Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis

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Offline Satyagraha

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Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« on: December 02, 2016, 09:58:47 AM »
Trump picks retired Marine Gen. James Mattis for secretary of defense

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/trump-has-chosen-retired-marine-gen-james-mattis-for-secretary-of-defense/2016/12/01/6c6b3b74-aff9-11e6-be1c-8cec35b1ad25_story.html

By Dan Lamothe December 1 at 8:45 PM
President-elect Donald Trump said Thursday he has chosen retired Marine Gen. James N. Mattis, who has said that responding to “political Islam” is the major security issue facing the United States, to be secretary of defense.

“We are going to appoint Mad Dog Mattis as our secretary of defense,” Trump told a rally in Cincinnati, the first stop on a post-election “thank-you tour.”

Trump joked that the media and audience should keep the news to themselves. “We are going to be announcing him Monday of next week,” Trump said. “Keep it inside the room.”

Mattis, who retired as chief of U.S. Central Command in 2013, has often said that Washington lacks an overall strategy in the Middle East, opting to instead handle issues in an ineffective one-by-one manner.

“Is political Islam in the best interest of the United States?” Mattis said at the Heritage Foundation in 2015, speaking about the separate challenges of the Islamic State and Iranian-backed terrorism. “I suggest the answer is no, but we need to have the discussion. If we won’t even ask the question, how do we even recognize which is our side in a fight?” ...

(More at source link)
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2016, 12:18:12 PM »
THE TRUTH ABOUT ‘MAD DOG’ MATTIS, TRUMP’S DEFENSE SECRETARY PICK
Gen. Mattis a modern-day tactician
http://www.infowars.com/general-mattis-letter-on-duty-of-leaders-to-read-and-study/
Dan Lyman | Infowars.com - DECEMBER 2, 2016

Donald Trump will nominate General James ‘Mad Dog’ Mattis to be his Secretary of Defense, which has prompted an increased interest in the General’s history, philosophy, and accomplishments.
An email from Mattis to a colleague from 2003 has surfaced, thanks to the work of military historian, Jill R. Russell, who published the correspondence with permission, in its original form, to the blog Strife.
Mattis stressed the importance of military leaders reading extensively and regularly, and studying from the experiences of others, in order to develop a knowledge base deep enough to preserve lives in the field...

(see more at link)

-----------------------------

The headline "The Truth about "Mad Dog" Mattis" is misleading - this is a link to an article that includes a letter from Mattis about how he reads books about military strategy. I think he would enjoy being likened to General Patton, an avid reader, who was famous for reading and using Rommel's papers to inform his own strategy.

In the letter he's written (reproduced in the article at the link), he states,

--------------------------------

"Ultimately, a real understanding of history means that
we face NOTHING new under the sun.
For all the “4th Generation of War” intellectuals running around today
saying that the nature of war has fundamentally changed,
the tactics are wholly new, etc, I must respectfully say… “Not really”..."


-----------------------------

Well, I think tactics can be debated - we have drones, nukes, 24/7 surveillance of anyone on the planet, network-centric warfare, the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA). Should we have called it the Same-Old-Military Affairs? No... I think the tactics are fundamentally different.

The "Truth" is not in that article. That article should be called "Mattis Reads Books"... we need to discover the "Truth" on our own.

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Effie Trinket

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2016, 12:30:23 PM »
http://www.iraq-war.ru/article/197132
http://www.clayandiron.com/news.jhtml?method=view&news.id=1945

May 14, 2009

Pentagon Preparing For War With The Enemy: Russia
by Rick Rozoff

Global Research, May 14, 2009

"Today the situation is much more serious than before August 2008....A possible recurrence of war will not be limited to the Caucasus.

"The new President of the United States did not bring about any crucial changes in relation to Georgia, but having a dominant role in NATO he still insists on Georgia's soonest joining of the Alliance. If it happens, the world would face a more serious threat than the crises of the Cold War.

"Under the new realities, Georgia's war against South Ossetia may easily turn into NATO's war against Russia. This would be a third world war." (Irina Kadzhaev, South Ossetia political scientist, South Ossetia Information Agency, April 2009

On May 12 James Mattis, NATO's Supreme Allied Commander Transformation ACT and commander of the U.S. Joint Forces Command, spoke at a three-day symposium called Joint Warfighting 09 in Norfolk, Virginia, where NATO's Allied Command Transformation is based, and stated: "I come with a sense of urgency. The enemy is meeting like this as well."

A local newspaper summarized his speech:

"Mattis outlined a future in which wars will not have clearly defined beginnings and ends. What is needed, he said, is a grand strategy, a political framework that can guide military planning."

He failed, for what passes for diplomatic reasons no doubt, to identify who "the enemy" is, but a series of recent developments, or rather an intensification of ongoing ones, indicate which nation it is.


Last week the head of the U.S. Strategic Command, Gen. Kevin Chilton, told reporters during a Defense Writers Group breakfast on May 7 "that the White House retains the option to respond with physical force - potentially even using nuclear weapons - if a foreign entity conducts a disabling cyber attack against U.S. computer networks...."

An account of his talk added "the general insisted that all strike options, including nuclear, would remain available to the commander in chief in defending the nation from cyber strikes."

Chilton "said he could not rule out the possibility of a military salvo against a nation like China, even though Beijing has nuclear arms," though the likely first target of alleged retaliation against equally alleged cyber attacks would be another nation already identified by US military officials as such: Russia.

In late April and early May of 2007 the government of Estonia, which was inducted into NATO in 2004 and whose president was and remains Toomas Hendrik Ilves, born in Sweden and raised in the United States (where he worked for Radio Free Europe), reported attacks on websites in the country which were blamed on Russia.

Over two years later no evidence has been presented to substantiate the claim that Russian hackers, much less the government itself, were behind the attacks, though it remains an article of faith among US and other Western officials and media that they were.

The response from American authorities in the first place was so sudden and severe, even before investigations were conducted, as to strongly suggest that if the attacks hadn't been staged they would need to be invented.


Right afterward Secretary of the Air Force Michael W. Wynne stated, "Russia, our Cold War nemesis, seems to have been the first to engage in cyber warfare."


The US Air Force news source from which the above is quoted added that the events in Estonia days earlier "did start a series of debates within NATO and the EU about the definition of clear military action and it may be the first test of the applicability of Article V of the NATO charter regarding collective self-defense in the non-kinetic realm."

NATO's Article 5 is a collective military defense provision, in fact a war clause, one which first and to date for the only time has been used to support the protracted and escalating war in Afghanistan.

References to it, then, are not to be taken lightly.

On a visit to Estonia last November Pentagon chief Robert Gates met with the country's prime minister, Andrus Ansip, and "discussed Russian behavior and new cooperation on cyber security...."

It was reported that "Ansip said NATO will operate under the principle of Article 5 of the alliance’s treaty, which states that an attack on one ally is treated as an attack on all," and "We are convinced that Estonia, as a member of NATO, will be very well defended.”

That the repeated mention of NATO's Article 5 continued a year and a half after the alleged cyber attacks when none had occurred in the interim is revealing.

At the beginning of this month the Pentagon announced that it was launching what it called a "digital warfare force for the future," at Fort Meade in Maryland under the control of the U.S. Strategic Command, whose chief, Gen. Kevin Chilton, was quoted earlier as threatening the use of force up to and including nuclear weapons.

The initiative was characterized in a news report as follows:

"Lt. Gen. Keith Alexander, also the Pentagon's leading cyber warfare commander, said the U.S. is determined to lead the global effort to use computer technology to deter or defeat enemies...."

The Pentagon is a synecdoche for the Department of Defense and everything related to its activities is cloaked in the same euphemism, so when pressed the US will insist its new cyber warfare project is intended for defensive purposes only
. Any nation which and people who have been on the receiving end of US Defense Department actions know better. The new US cyber warfare command, its rationale based on a supposed Russian threat emanating from a non-military incident in the Baltics over two years ago, will be used to cripple the computer systems of any nation targeted for direct military assault, thus rendering them defenseless, and will be particularly effective for space-based and Star Wars (missile shield, interceptor missiles) first strike plans.

On the same day the report of General Alexander's pledge to "defeat enemies" appeared another news item reported that "A quasi-classified satellite that will serve as an engineering trailblazer for ballistic missile tracking technologies flew into space Tuesday May 12."

It was a Space Tracking and Surveillance System Advanced Technology Risk Reduction (STSS-ATRR) satellite, which "is part of a space-based system for the Missile Defense Agency.

"Sensors aboard the STSS-ATRR satellite and on the ground will communicate with other systems to defend against incoming ballistic missiles."[/b]

A few days earlier the California-based manufacturer Ducommun in a news report titled Ducommun Incorporated Announces Delivery of Nanosatellites to U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command announced that "its Miltec Corporation subsidiary delivered flight-ready nanosatellites to the U.S. Army pace and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command (USASMDC/ARSTRAT) in Huntsville, Alabama on April 28, 2009."

The delivery was "the completion of the first U.S. Army satellite development program since the Courier 1B communications satellite in 1960."

Military satellites used for neutralizing the potential of a rival nation not so much to launch a first strike but to respond to one blur the distinction between so-called Son of Star Wars missile shield projects and full-fledged militarization of space.

A recent Russian commentary saw it in just that manner:

"Withdrawal from the 1972 ABM Treaty signified a switch to the testing and deployment of a global missile defense system, with a view to fully removing the deterrent potential of China, and partially that of Russia.

"Washington is still trying to eliminate international legal restrictions on the formation of a system, which would theoretically make it invulnerable towards an act of retaliation, and even a launch-under-attack strike."

Added to which is another "quasi-classified" subterfuge related to a prospective resumption of Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START) talks between the US And Russia.

American Assistant Secretary of State Rose Gottemoeller stated this week "that the US is not prepared to cut warheads removed from delivery means and kept in storage."

So in addition to US plans to deploy ground-, sea-, air- and space-based anti-missile systems primarily around and against Russia (Poland, the Czech Republic, Norway, Britain, Japan and Alaska to date), the Pentagon will hold in reserve nuclear warheads for activation without a monitoring mechanism provided to Russian inspectors and arms reduction negotiators.

On May 6 Euronews conducted an interview with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov, who warned, "The way it the US anti-ballistic missile shield is designed has nothing to do with Iran's nuclear program. It is aimed at Russian strategic forces, deployed in the European part of the Russian Federation."

To add to the concerns of Russia and other nations, On April 30 the US established a Navy Air and Missile Defense Command (NAMDC) at the Naval Support Facility at Dahlgren, Virginia.


"NAMDC is the lead organization for Navy, joint and combined Integrated Air and Missile Defense (IAMD). NAMDC serves as the single warfare center of excellence to synchronize and integrate Navy efforts across the full spectrum of air and missile defense to include air defense, cruise missile defense and ballistic missile defense."

The past two weeks has been a fertile period for stories in this vein and, to bring attention nearer the Earth, the US-based Strategy Page reported from a Russian source that "The United States has bought two Su-27 fighter jets from Ukraine" to "be used to train American military pilots, who may face opponents in them" and that the "US military will use them to test its radar and electronic warfare equipment."

This was at the very moment that the US client in Ukraine, President Viktor Yushchenko, his national poll ratings plummeting to near 1%, signed a directive to prepare for full NATO membership and a few days after a US military delegation visited the country to inspect a tank unit and to plan "reforming the system of combat training...."

In terms of US training for warfare against the Russian Air Force, the Ukrainian development is only the latest in a number of such activities.

Immediately following the nation becoming a full member of NATO, the US 81st Fighter Squadron flew to Constanta, Romania (in which nation the Pentagon has acquired four new bases since) to engage in combat training against Russian MiG-21s.

According to one US pilot present, “It was pretty neat - you’re sitting in a MiG-21 that will be airborne with a MiG-21 pilot within days. This was an arm of the Soviet Union. These pilots were flying before the Soviet Union fell. They have quite a bit of perspective.”

In July of the next year the US 492nd Fighter Squadron was deployed to the Graf Ignatievo Air Base in neighoring Bulgaria to insure the opportunity for "Air Forces from multiple nations to learn about each other’s aircraft tactics and capabilities.

"The pilots of the F-15E Strike Eagles and the MIG-29s and MIG-21s are sharing knowledge of aircraft and tactics as the exercise wraps up its first week of training."

A US Air Force colonel was quoted as saying, “Only two of the 38 aircrew members have had a chance to fly against MIGs. By the time the exercise is over, everyone will have had a chance to either fly in a MIG or fly against one.”

A month afterward the US Air Force 22nd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron arrived in Romania for the Viper Lance exercises which "marked the first time U.S. F-16 pilots have trained in Romania" and "where "MiG-21 and F-16 pilots flew integrated formations to conduct basic fighter maneuvers, dissimilar air combat training and air-to-ground strike missions...."

This time the quote is from an F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot:

"My flight in the backseat of a Lancer MiG-21 is a good opportunity to look at different aircraft and it's a real privilege and an honor. I want to see what they see from their cockpit, and view a new angle of understanding against our adversaries."

Two weeks ago a US Air Force fighter squadron flew to the Bezmer Air Base in Bulgaria where an American airman said, "This is the first time a USAFE United States Air Forces in Europe fighter squadron has deployed to this location....The most rewarding part of this experience is knowing that I am helping the pilots train for war."

To prepare the US for air combat against the full range of Russian military aircraft, India was invited to the annual Red Flag air combat exercises in Alaska in 2007, war games "meant to train pilots from the US, NATO and other allied countries for real combat situations.


"This includes the use of 'enemy' hardware and live ammunition for bombing exercises."

India provided six Sukhoi SU-30MKI fighters which were "particularly interesting to the exercise as they are Russian-made, thus
traditionally considered 'hostile.'"

May 1st, on the occasion of the Czech Republic taking over the six-month NATO air patrol rotation in the Baltic skies over Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania - five minutes flight from Russia's second largest city of St. Petersburg - a Czech official boasted "The area we are protecting is about three times larger than that of the Czech Republic. This is a NATO outpost."

Lithuanian Air Force Commander Arturas Leita announced that "the Baltic countries would probably ask for the prolongation of the air force mission within NATO until 2018."

From June 8-16 Sweden will host a NATO drill, Loyal Arrow, described as "biggest air force drill ever in the Finnish-Swedish Bothnian Bay," 24, also not far from St. Petersburg, with a British aircraft carrier and more than 50 fighter jets participating.

That exercise will begin exactly a week after the US-led NATO Cooperative Lancer 09 war games end in Georgia on Russia's southern flank.


In speaking of the dangers of the last-named but with equal application to all that has preceded it, the South Ossetian Ministry for Press and Mass Media website recently quoted political scientist Irina Kadzhaev as warning:

"Today the situation is much more serious than before August 2008. The then threat endangered only South Ossetia and Abkhazia, but after Russia's recognition of these states' independence and the conclusion of agreements envisaging the presence of Russian armed forces on their territories, a possible recurrence of war will not be limited to the Caucasus.

"The new President of the United States did not bring about any crucial changes in relation to Georgia, but having a dominant role in NATO he still insists on Georgia's soonest joining of the Alliance. If it happens, the world would face a more serious threat than the crises of the Cold War.

"Under the new realities, Georgia's war against South Ossetia may easily turn into NATO's war against Russia. This would be a third world war.

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=13614
http://defensesystems.com/articles/2009/05/12/mattis-c4isr-needs-to-empower-small-units.aspx


Criminal NWO enemy traitor
terrorist Gen. James Mattis



Mattis: C4ISR needs to empower small units

    * By Sean Gallagher
    * May 12, 2009

DOD will institutionalize lessons learned in irregular warfare

The evolving nature of threats to the United States and its allies will require more flexible forces and the delivery of command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities down to a much lower level than before.

Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis, commander of the U.S. Joint Forces Command, expressed that vision in his keynote address today at the Joint Warfighting Conference in Virginia Beach, Va., co-sponsored by AFCEA International and the U.S. Naval Institute.

“The bottom line is that we will not face wars with clearly defined beginnings or clearly defined ends,” Mattis said. “We’re going to have to protect our people from manifold threats. It’s up to us to orchestrate a great rethinking of how to defend” them.

Mattis said the Defense Department will institutionalize the advancements made in irregular warfare operations without impairing its ability to fight more conventional conflicts. DOD must find ways “to maintain our strategic superiority while building a force that can fight irregular threats,” he added.

“The irregular threat is large, but interstate warfare is still a possibility,” he said. “It’s not an either/or. We cannot bifurcate the enemy threat.”

“No fire team on the ground should not be able to pull down joint intelligence and joint fires,” he said. In the emerging model for joint operations, junior noncommissioned and commissioned officers would have access to information and the authority to call for support from other combatants in ways that previously might have only been available to larger units.

That requirement is part of the need Mattis spoke of for a military force that can break down into small teams for operations among a population or for irregular warfare, and then come back together for larger operations.

In addition to empowering small units, Mattis said, DOD must continue to improve its ability to work with allies and coalition partners. “We must have a coalition-friendly command and control and approach to operations,” he said.

He outlined the roles joint forces will face: combat; security operations; engagement with other nations, including civil affairs operations; and reconstruction. “We can’t just go blow it all up and walk away,” he said.


Mattis also said joint forces must know how to operate in the absence of technological tools. “Our communications links are going to be cut more often than not. We must assume that they are going to go down.”

The nature of the conflicts in Iraq created a generation of DOD leaders who never had to worry about such challenges because of the enemy’s lack of signals intelligence and the United States’ information dominance on the battlefield, he said. The military cannot afford to assume that it will have that kind of dominance in the future, he added.

Online egypt

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2016, 01:30:19 PM »


Hey, this was supposed to stay in the room!   ;D

love, e

Offline Effie Trinket

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2016, 03:30:52 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkXtWwNDSdA

James Mattis: 'It's fun to shoot people'
http://voices.washingtonpost.com/federal-eye/2010/07/james_mattis_its_fun_to_shoot.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkXtWwNDSdA&feature=player_embedded

President Obama's pick to lead military operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan and the Middle East is an experienced ground combat commander, but also earned a stern rebuke in 2005 for controversial comments about combat operations.

Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis, then a lieutenant general, told a crowd in San Diego that it was "fun to shoot some people" and said that some Afghans deserved to die.

"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years, because they didn't wear a veil," Mattis said. "You know guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a hell of a lot of fun to shoot 'em." (Watch Mattis's comments in the video above.)

Then-Marine Corps Commandant Michael W. Hagee told Mattis to choose his words "more carefully," but also praised him as "one of the country's bravest and most experienced military leaders."

"While I understand that some people may take issue with the comments made by him, I also know he intended to reflect the unfortunate and harsh realities of war," Hagee said. "Mattis often speaks with a great deal of candor. I have counseled him concerning his remarks, and he agrees he should have chosen his words more carefully."

Military ethicists warned that Mattis's comments had the potential to cause violent events committed either by U.S. military service members or against American troops.

On Thursday Defense Secretary Robert Gates told reporters that appropriate action was taken against Mattis in 2005.

"Obviously in the wake of the Rolling Stone interview [with Gen. Stanley McChrystal], we discussed this kind of thing," Gates said. "And I have every confidence that -- that General Mattis will be -- will respond to questions and speak publicly about the matters for which he is responsible in an entirely appropriate way."

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2016, 03:54:14 PM »
The links you posted are great to give us a perspective (remind us) of the new warfare machine. To the extent that they put the lie to Mattis' own words about the fundamentally unchanged tactics of war, it's useful background. I think this guy is a complete war monger, who takes pleasure in killing people (as he so stated).

"Actually it's a lot of fun to fight em.
You know, it's a hell of a hoot.
It's fun to shoot some people."

Gen. James Mattis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=565oSIDAtRE


Now that he's going to be Sec. of Defense; we need to track what's going on with him, and how his actions will/will not align with the stated goals of the president.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Effie Trinket

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2016, 04:01:32 PM »
INFOWARS 2016 VS. INFOWARS IN 2010:

December 2, 2016
Quote
http://www.infowars.com/general-mattis-letter-on-duty-of-leaders-to-read-and-study/

The Truth About ‘Mad Dog’ Mattis, Trump’s Defense Secretary Pick
Gen. Mattis a modern-day tactician
Dan Lyman | Infowars.com - December 2, 2016

Donald Trump will nominate General James ‘Mad Dog’ Mattis to be his Secretary of Defense, which has prompted an increased interest in the general’s history, philosophy, and accomplishments.

An email from Mattis to a colleague from 2003 has surfaced, thanks to the work of military historian, Jill R. Russell, who published the correspondence with permission, in its original form, to the blog Strife.

Mattis stressed the importance of military leaders reading extensively and regularly, and studying from the experiences of others, in order to develop a knowledge base deep enough to preserve lives in the field.

The letter was shared virally via email, as it was written long before social media was in popular use.

Russel notes in her article, “Much is written and [believed to be] known about the General as a warrior. Less is known about him as a true student of his profession. I would submit that it is quite impossible to correctly understand the former without a proper interrogation of the latter.”

“Furthermore, there is his consideration of the views of others – as in the breadth of his reading or response to my comments – suggesting that he had not fallen prey to the hubris of the powerful, which is to believe they have all of the answers,” she adds. “Good leaders don’t only hear ‘yes’ from the people around them. Thus, the insight these words give to his thinking and interests is invaluable.”

Mattis’ letter reads as follows –

“…The problem with being too busy to read is that you learn by experience (or by your men’s experience), i.e. the hard way. By reading, you learn through others’ experiences, generally a better way to do business, especially in our line of work where the consequences of incompetence are so final for young men.

Thanks to my reading, I have never been caught flat-footed by any situation, never at a loss for how any problem has been addressed (successfully or unsuccessfully) before. It doesn’t give me all the answers, but it lights what is often a dark path ahead.

With TF 58, I had w/ me Slim’s book, books about the Russian and British experiences in AFG, and a couple others. Going into Iraq, “The Siege” (about the Brits’ defeat at Al Kut in WW I) was req’d reading for field grade officers. I also had Slim’s book; reviewed T.E. Lawrence’s “Seven Pillars of Wisdom”; a good book about the life of Gertrude Bell (the Brit archaeologist who virtually founded the modern Iraq state in the aftermath of WW I and the fall of the Ottoman empire); and “From Beirut to Jerusalem”. I also went deeply into Liddell Hart’s book on Sherman, and Fuller’s book on Alexander the Great got a lot of my attention (although I never imagined that my HQ would end up only 500 meters from where he lay in state in Babylon).

Ultimately, a real understanding of history means that we face NOTHING new under the sun. For all the “4th Generation of War” intellectuals running around today saying that the nature of war has fundamentally changed, the tactics are wholly new, etc, I must respectfully say… “Not really”: Alex the Great would not be in the least bit perplexed by the enemy that we face right now in Iraq, and our leaders going into this fight do their troops a disservice by not studying (studying, vice just reading) the men who have gone before us.

We have been fighting on this planet for 5000 years and we should take advantage of their experience. “Winging it” and filling body bags as we sort out what works reminds us of the moral dictates and the cost of incompetence in our profession. As commanders and staff officers, we are coaches and sentries for our units: how can we coach anything if we don’t know a hell of a lot more than just the TTPs? What happens when you’re on a dynamic battlefield and things are changing faster than higher HQ can stay abreast? Do you not adapt because you cannot conceptualize faster than the enemy’s adaptation? (Darwin has a pretty good theory about the outcome for those who cannot adapt to changing circumstance — in the information age things can change rather abruptly and at warp speed, especially the moral high ground which our regimented thinkers cede far too quickly in our recent fights.) And how can you be a sentinel and not have your unit caught flat-footed if you don’t know what the warning signs are — that your unit’s preps are not sufficient for the specifics of a tasking that you have not anticipated?

Perhaps if you are in support functions waiting on the warfighters to spell out the specifics of what you are to do, you can avoid the consequences of not reading. Those who must adapt to overcoming an independent enemy’s will are not allowed that luxury.

This is not new to the USMC approach to warfighting — Going into Kuwait 12 years ago, I read (and reread) Rommel’s Papers (remember “Kampstaffel”?), Montgomery’s book (“Eyes Officers”…), “Grant Takes Command” (need for commanders to get along, “commanders’ relationships” being more important than “command relationships”), and some others. As a result, the enemy has paid when I had the opportunity to go against them, and I believe that many of my young guys lived because I didn’t waste their lives because I didn’t have the vision in my mind of how to destroy the enemy at least cost to our guys and to the innocents on the battlefields.

Hope this answers your question…. I will cc my ADC in the event he can add to this. He is the only officer I know who has read more than I.

Semper Fi, Mattis”
INFOWARS IN 2010:
Obama Selects General Who Likes Killing Muslims to Centcom
http://www.infowars.com/obama-selects-general-who-likes-killing-muslims-to-centcom/
Kurt Nimmo Infowars.com July 8, 2010

Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis has been selected to replace the globalist Gen. David Petraeus who was selected to replace Gen. Stanley McCrystal who made the mistake of dissing the anointed one, Barry Obama. Mattis will fill the post of CentCom commander previously occupied by Petraeus.   
   
Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis: “It’s fun to shoot some people… You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn’t wear a veil… So it’s a hell of a lot of fun to shoot them.”

Gen. Mattis has the same habit of speaking his mind as McCrystal. Eric Garris writes today that Mattis was quoted back in 2005 as saying he finds pleasure in shooting and killing people in Afghanistan. “Actually it’s quite fun to fight them, you know. It’s a hell of a hoot,” Mattis said, prompting laughter from some military members in the audience, CNN reported on February 4, 2005. “It’s fun to shoot some people. I’ll be right up there with you. I like brawling.” Mattis, who commanded Marine expeditions in Afghanistan and Iraq, made the comments during a panel discussion in San Diego, California.

“You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn’t wear a veil,” Mattis said. “You know, guys like that ain’t got no manhood left anyway. So it’s a hell of a lot of fun to shoot them.”

Mattis was talking about the Taliban, an ultra-fanatical Wahhabi sect installed by the CIA and Pakistan’s ISI and funded by their Wahhabist brethren in Saudi Arabia. The Taliban “came from madrassas set up by the Pakistani government along the border and funded by the U.S., Britain, and the Saudis, where they had received theological indoctrination and military training,” writes Phil Gasper, a professor of Philosophy at Notre Dame de Namur University. “The Taliban’s brand of extreme Islam had no historical roots in Afghanistan.” It was planted there by the U.S., Pakistan, Britain, and Saudi Arabia.

Mattis led the attack on Fallujah, Iraq, in 2004. The attack violated Article 6(b) of the 1945 Nuremberg Charter that describes the “wanton destruction of cities, towns or villages” as a war crime.

“Preliminary estimates as of December of 2004 revealed that at least 6,000 Iraqi citizens in Fallujah had been killed, and one-third of the city had been destroyed,” Peter Phillips and Project Censored reported in 2006. “Countless violations of international law and crimes against humanity occurred in Fallujah during the November massacre,” including the mass slaughter of Iraqis and the use of illegal weapons such as cluster bombs, napalm, uranium munitions and chemical weapons. “According to Iraqis inside the city, at least 60 percent of Fallujah went on to be totally destroyed in the siege, and eight months after the siege entire districts of the city remained without electricity or water. Israeli style checkpoints were set up in the city, prohibiting anyone from entering who did not live inside the city. Of course non-embedded media were not allowed in the city,” writes Phillips.

“The last three times that that general has been in combat, when he was leading Marines in Afghanistan and the two times that he led his division in Iraq, his actions and those of his troops clearly show that he understands the value of proper leadership and the value of human life,” said Marine Gen. Peter Pace, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, after Mattis made his comments about the joy he experiences after killing religious zealots installed by the CIA who slap their women around, a practice likely gleaned from instructional books issued by USAID (an “aid” organization that works closely with the CIA). Pace issued his praise after 6,000 Iraqi citizens were massacred in Fallujah.

“The post General Mattis is taking is a critical one at a critical time,” said Bush era retread Robert Gates after Mattis was selected. He described Gen Mattis as one of the military’s “outstanding combat leaders and strategic thinkers” and added that the “general’s insight” should be used in the future, presumably in Afghanistan, according to the BBC.

Friday, July 09, 2010
04:14 Mecca time, 01:14 GMT
 http://english.aljazeera.net/news/americas/2010/07/201078233717799692.html 
News Americas
 
 
'Brawler' general to lead Centcom 

 
Mattis was reprimanded for saying in 2005 that 'it's fun to shoot some people' [EPA]


-A US general once criticised for saying it was "fun to shoot some people" has been picked by the Pentagon to replace General David Petraeus as head of the military command overseeing the US wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

General James Mattis, who currently heads the US Joint Forces Command in the US state of Virginia, and who previously led troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, was selected to lead US Central Command, or Centcom, which oversees operations in 20 countries stretching from Egypt across the Middle East and into South and Central Asia.

Robert Gates, the defence secretary, praised Mattis as "one of the military's most innovative and iconoclastic thinkers" as he announced his recommendation for the post on Thursday.

Barack Obama, the US president, must formalise the nomination before it goes to congress for approval.

Mattis was reprimanded by the Marine Corps for telling a San Diego, California conference in 2005 that "it's fun to shoot some people".

"I'll be right up front with you, I like brawling," he had said during a panel discussion.

"You go into Afghanistan, you got guys who slap women around for five years because they didn't wear a veil," Mattis said. "You know, guys like that ain't got no manhood left anyway. So it's a hell of a lot of fun to shoot them."

On Thursday, Gates dismissed concerns about the comments, saying appropriate action had been taken at the time - Mattis was reprimanded and told to choose his words more carefully – and the four-star general had learnt his lesson.

'Lesson learnt'

"I think that the subsequent five years have demonstrated that the lesson was learnt, Gates said.

In video :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkXtWwNDSdA&feature=player_embedded

Al Jazeera's Patty Culhane reports on the controversial choice for Centcom head


Retired Brigadier-General Mark Kimmitt, who has held a number of posts in the US government and military, echoed Gates' remarks.

Pointing out that Mattis' one-off comment was made five years ago, he told Al Jazeera that the general had since proven himself as a statesman, including by working with 27 nations in a Nato command position.

From 2007 to 2009, Mattis served as Nato's supreme allied commander for transformation as he also led the US Joint Forces Command which "focuses on supporting current operations while shaping US forces for the future", according to its website.

Mattis had "the right experience for the job" and was the "right man for the job", Kimmitt said.

Mattis, who had been due to retire, was picked for the Centcom post after a shakeup following inappropriate comments made by General Stanley McChrystal, which led to his June 23 sacking as the US and Nato commander in Afghanistan.

General David Petraeus vacated his post as Centcom chief and agreed to assume command of the Afghan war after McChrystal and his aides were quoted making dismissive remarks about senior Obama administration officials in a Rolling Stone magazine article.

"Obviously in the wake of the Rolling Stone interview, we discussed this kind of thing," Gates said on Thursday. "And I have every confidence that General Mattis will respond to questions and speak publicly about the matters for which he is responsible in an entirely appropriate way."


Offline John_Back_From_The_Club_O

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2016, 04:02:50 PM »
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Great, Great Post BTW ET!
----------------------------------------

The Asymmetric Warfare Group (Military Intel White Paper)
http://www.awg.army.mil/SiteWideContent/Docs/AWG_CommandBrief_PublicWebsite.pdf

SEE: AWG Network Graphic
The Crowd Shouted... “Give us Barabbas!” ... and People, The NWO Gave Him To You.
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Offline Effie Trinket

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2016, 04:27:35 PM »

Well, I think tactics can be debated - we have drones, nukes, 24/7 surveillance of anyone on the planet, network-centric warfare, the Revolution in Military Affairs (RMA). Should we have called it the Same-Old-Military Affairs? No... I think the tactics are fundamentally different.

The "Truth" is not in that article. That article should be called "Mattis Reads Books"... we need to discover the "Truth" on our own.
http://www.larouchepub.com/eiw/public/2008/2008_30-39/2008_30-39/2008-38/pdf/43-44_3537.pdf

http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=4092356

Marshall, Mattis To Lead QDR 'Red Team'
By JOHN T. BENNETT
Published: 15 May 2009 11:44

U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates announced this week he has tapped two prominent defense thinkers to head the team that will challenge the conclusions of the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR).

The secretary told lawmakers this week that Andrew Marshall, the longtime director of the Pentagon's Office of Net Assessment, and Marine Corps Gen. James Mattis, U.S. Joint Forces Command chief, will lead what he calls his "QDR red team."

"I think Jim Mattis is one of the most creative and thoughtful military minds anywhere, and I think the combination of Andy Marshall and Jim Mattis, basically, red teaming ... both the scenarios and the QDR itself [will ensure] we're not the prisoners of a bureaucratic group-think of people who have done this work forever," Gates told the House Armed Services Committee on May 13.

Marshall has headed Net Assessment, often called the Pentagon's in-house think tank, since its creation in 1973. He was appointed by President Richard Nixon. Marshall also led the red team, which will play devil's advocate during the Pentagon's strategic review, during the 2006 QDR process.

What is a red team?  Do an advanced search for "red team" on this forum (select search in topic subjects only).

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2016, 04:55:30 PM »
http://www.larouchepub.com/eiw/public/2008/2008_30-39/2008_30-39/2008-38/pdf/43-44_3537.pdf


In this paper, it looks like Mattis is objecting to the EBO (Effects-based operations) component of the Revolution in Military Affairs. This is the behavior prediction piece; anticipating peoples reactions based on a database of information that will attempt to predict their movements (big data again). This was written back in 2008, so perhaps they've done a better job with the EBO stuff by 2017, when he assumes the Sec of Def position.

From the pdf:

Quote
Among the conclusions that the Army, the Marine Corps, and other observers
have come to, Mattis writes, are the following:
• EBO assumes a level of unachievable predictability;
• It cannot correctly anticipate reactions of complex
systems;
• It discounts the human dimension of war (such as
passion, imagination, willpower and unpredictability), among others.
The Israeli experience is central to these conclusions, but so also are the outcomes of the 1991 Gulf
War, the 1999 Yugoslavia War, and the “Shock and Awe” phase of the invasion of Iraq, in 2003.
The dependence of all of these operations on air-delivered precision-guided ordnance,
“underscore the fact that effectsbased operations tend to be ineffective when used exclusive of ground maneuver operations,” Mattis writes. Mattis concludes that these principles are “fundamentally flawed and must be removed from our lexicon, training, and operations.

EBO thinking, as the Israelis found, is an intellectual ‘Maginot Line’ around which the enemy maneuvered.”



Mattis doesn't see any war scenario where boots on the ground won't be needed.
Well, at least that's consistent with Alexander the Great. ;)

For more info on EFO, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Effects-based_operations
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline pac522

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2016, 05:04:46 PM »
Two words I could of done without seeing on this page is Anti_Illuminati and C4ISR. Thank you Effie for digging that up.

Mattis thinks we should be working with our ally Saudi Arabia and their intelligence service. Anyone else agree with that?
This country did not achieve greatness with the mindset of "safety first" but rather "live free or die".

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The problem is the virus called the Illuminati.  ~EvadingGrid

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Offline John_Back_From_The_Club_O

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2016, 11:47:42 AM »
Republican Jewish Coalition Backs ‘Mad Dog’ 'neocon on riods' Mattis
http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/02/republican-jewish-coalition-backs-mad-dog-mattis/

Big surprise there.  ::)
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Offline chris jones

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2016, 08:16:14 PM »
Turak: General Mattis is right on torture - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
www.jsonline.com/story/opinion/contributors/...general-mattis...torture/94518812/
28  nov 2016 - We should listen to combat veterans on this issue: They understand it.

Seems the mad dog talked trump out of the torture angle. Well John and all others what is your take on this.

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Trump pick for Secretary of Defense: Gen. James Mattis
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2016, 12:57:00 PM »
WTfreak?

EXXON Chief Expected to Be Named Secretary of State...

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5