NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower

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Online TahoeBlue

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #560 on: June 02, 2015, 01:15:17 PM »
Your Amazon packages are probably RFID ...

http://www.phaseivengr.com/wireless-technologies/wireless-technologies-overview/about-wireless-rfid-sensors/about-ultra-long-range-uhf-rfid-sensors/
https://youtu.be/J3nwqbWRsr0?list=SP02E0DD143A7874F2
https://youtu.be/EpCm08ku8HE?list=SP02E0DD143A7874F2

http://www.codesource.com/cat_name/rfid_shipping_labels.aspx
RFID Shipping Labels

If you ship products to the DoD, you are probably required to apply encoded RFID tags to shipments and convey shipment data to the government system. CodeSource can meet your RFID requirements. All of our RFID labels meet Mil-Spec 129P and are guaranteed to exceed DFARS 252.211-7006 requirements. All of our labels are thermally printed on a synthetic material that is chemical resistant, water proof and can be applied to -15° F. Our RFID labels contain tags that are pre-programmed Gen 2 DoD RFID labels with extended read range.
 
 
http://www.barcodegiant.com/datamax-o-neil/part-h420924-ad222-fl.htm?aw&adtype=pla&kpid=51821&gclid=CN7MgLLB8cUCFZCEaQod0XwAmg
Datamax-O'Neil RFID Tag

RFID Labels (4 x 2, TT, 10 Rolls, 96BIT AD222 INLY CL1 GEN2)


http://www.iautomate.com/products/rx211-long-range-rfid-wiegand-reader-for-gate-control-card-access.html?page_context=category&faceted_search=0
RX211 Long Range RFID Wiegand Reader for Gate Control & Card Access Product Description and Specifications


The RX211 works in conjunction with the Keri PXL-500W, Rosslare AC-215 or any other 26 bit or 32 bit wiegand Card Access Control Panel. The RX211 Long Range RFID Vehicle ID Readers are specifically designed for hands-free vehicle identification in fleet management, parking gates, airports, gate control in gated communities or parking facilities, card access, access control, and asset management applications. The RX211 Long Range RFID Vehicle ID Readers communicate with our T Series RFID Tags to capture the presence, identification and location of vehicles, assets, people and alarm triggered events. They provide long range coverage for dynamic vehicle ID location, inventory management, and real-time personnel mustering.
...
Tag read range from 1 foot up to 300 feet or more (with optional external antennas)

| - - - -

roving wiretap ....

https://www.techdirt.com/blog/wireless/articles/20131112/10434625217/cell-phone-manufacturers-offer-carefully-worded-denials-to-question-whether-nsa-can-track-powered-down-cell-phones.shtml
Cell Phone Manufacturers Offer Carefully Worded Denials To Question Of Whether NSA Can Track Powered-Down Cell Phones
...
On the plus side, the responding manufacturers seem to be interested in ensuring a powered down phone is actually powered down, rather than just put into a "standby" or "hibernation" mode that could potentially lead to exploitation. But the implicit statement these carefully worded denials make is that anything's possible. Not being directly "aware" of something isn't the same thing as a denial.

 Even if the odds seem very low that the NSA can track a powered down cell phone, the last few months of leaks have shown the agency has some very surprising capabilities -- some of which even stunned engineers working for the companies it surreptitiously slurped data from.

 Not only that, but there's historical evidence via court cases that shows the FBI has used others' phones as eavesdropping devices by remotely activating them and using the mic to record conversations. As was noted by c|net back in 2006, whatever the FBI utilized apparently worked even when phones were shut off.
The surveillance technique came to light in an opinion published this week by U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan. He ruled that the "roving bug" was legal because federal wiretapping law is broad enough to permit eavesdropping even of conversations that take place near a suspect's cell phone.

Kaplan's opinion said that the eavesdropping technique "functioned whether the phone was powered on or off." Some handsets can't be fully powered down without removing the battery; for instance, some Nokia models will wake up when turned off if an alarm is set.

While the Genovese crime family prosecution appears to be the first time a remote-eavesdropping mechanism has been used in a criminal case, the technique has been discussed in security circles for years.

Short of pulling out the battery (notably not an option in some phones), there seems to be little anyone can do to prevent the device from being tracked and/or used as a listening device. The responding companies listed above have somewhat hedged their answers to the researcher's questions, most likely not out of any deference to government intelligence agencies, but rather to prevent looking ignorant later if (or when) subsequent leaks make these tactics public knowledge.

 Any powered up cell phone performs a lot of legwork for intelligence agencies, supplying a steady stream of location and communications data. If nothing else, the leaks have proven the NSA (and to a slightly lesser extent, the FBI) has an unquenchable thirst for data. If such exploits exist (and they seem to), it would be ridiculous to believe they aren't being used to their fullest extent.
///
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #561 on: June 02, 2015, 03:10:35 PM »
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/jun/02/rand-paul-house-allies-surveillance-usa-freedom-act
Rand Paul allies plan new surveillance reforms to follow USA Freedom Act
Representative Thomas Massie has authored an amendment to block the NSA from undermining encryption and stop other agencies collecting US data in bulk

Spencer Ackerman in New York
Tuesday 2 June 2015 12.25 EDT 

Several of Rand Paul’s allies in the US House of Representatives are seeking to capitalize on the momentum of surveillance reform as the USA

Freedom Act continues through the Senate by attempting to stop the National Security Agency from undermining encryption and banning other law enforcement agencies from collecting US data in bulk.

Thomas Massie, a libertarian-minded Kentucky Republican, has authored an amendment to a forthcoming appropriations bill that blocks any funding for the National Institute of Science and Technology to “coordinate or consult” with the NSA or the Central Intelligence Agency “for the purpose of establishing cryptographic or computer standards that permit the warrantless electronic surveillance” by the spy agencies. He is joined in the effort by Democrat Zoe Lofgren of California.


Massie and Lofgren will place the amendment on the bill funding the Justice Department as early as Tuesday. Their move is part of the first wave of follow-up measures by privacy advocates to supplement the USA Freedom Act, a bill already passed by the House which, although it would limit some NSA powers, many civil libertarians consider insufficient.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #562 on: June 02, 2015, 05:07:10 PM »
Exiled US whistleblower Edward Snowden is holding a live Q&A online organized by Amnesty International UK

http://rt.com/news/264409-snowden-answers-questions-spying/


Published time: June 02, 2015 19:09 Get short URL

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #563 on: June 02, 2015, 08:03:40 PM »
http://news.yahoo.com/either-way-no-more-nsa-collection-us-phone-071840768--politics.html

  We knew these rat bastards would go against the American people.  It's not our country anymore.  Nice try Senator Paul.

Congress sends NSA phone-records bill to president

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress approved sweeping changes Tuesday to surveillance laws enacted after the Sept. 11 attacks, eliminating the National Security Agency's disputed bulk phone-records collection program and replacing it with a more restrictive measure to keep the records in phone companies' hands.

Two days after Congress let the phone-records and several other anti-terror programs expire, the Senate's 67-32 vote sent the legislation to President Barack Obama, who said he would sign it promptly.

"This legislation will strengthen civil liberty safeguards and provide greater public confidence in these programs," Obama said in a statement. The bill signing could happen late Tuesday or early Wednesday, but officials said it could take at least several days to restart the collection.

The legislation will revive most of the programs the Senate had allowed to lapse in a dizzying collision of presidential politics and national security policy. But the authorization will undergo major changes, the legacy of agency contractor Edward Snowden's explosive revelations two years ago about domestic spying by the government.

In an unusual shifting of alliances, the legislation passed with the support of Obama and House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, but over the strong opposition of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. McConnell failed to persuade the Senate to extend the current law unchanged, and came up short in a last-ditch effort Tuesday to amend the House version, as nearly a dozen of his own Republicans abandoned him in a series of votes.

"This is a step in the wrong direction," a frustrated McConnell said on the Senate floor ahead of the Senate's final vote to approve the House version, dubbed the USA Freedom Act. He said the legislation "does not enhance the privacy protections of American citizens. And it surely undermines American security by taking one more tool form our warfighters at exactly the wrong time."


The legislation remakes the most controversial aspect of the USA Patriot Act — the once-secret bulk collection program that allows the National Security Agency to sweep up Americans' phone records and comb through them for ties to international terrorists. Over six months the NSA would lose the power to collect and store those records, but the government still could gain court orders to obtain data connected to specific numbers from the phone companies, which typically store them for 18 months.

It would also continue other post-9/11 surveillance provisions that lapsed Sunday night, and which are considered more effective than the phone-data collection program. These include the FBI's authority to gather business records in terrorism and espionage investigations and to more easily eavesdrop on suspects who are discarding cellphones to avoid surveillance.

In order to restart collection of phone records, the Justice Department will need to obtain a new order from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

"This legislation is critical to keeping Americans safe from terrorism and protecting their civil liberties," Boehner said. "I applaud the Senate for renewing our nation's foreign intelligence capabilities, and I'm pleased this measure will now head to the president's desk for his signature."

The outcome capped a dramatic series of events on Capitol Hill that saw a presidential candidate, GOP Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky, defy fellow Republicans and singlehandedly force the existing law to lapse Sunday at midnight, leading to dire warnings of threats to America.

NSA Surveillance Bill Clears Hurdle in US SenatePlay videoNSA Surveillance Bill Clears Hurdle in US Senate
The suspense continued Tuesday as McConnell tried to get the Senate to go along with three amendments he said would make the House bill more palatable. But House leaders warned that if presented with the changes the House might not be able to approve them. The Senate denied McConnell's attempts, an embarrassment for the leader six months after Republicans retook Senate control.

The changes sought by McConnell included lengthening the phase-out period of the bulk records program from six months to a year, requiring the director of national intelligence to certify that the NSA can effectively search records held by the phone companies and making phone companies notify the government if they change their policy on how long they hold the records. Most controversially, McConnell would have weakened the power of a new panel of outside experts created to advise the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court.

The final vote divided Senate Republicans, with 23 voting "yes" and 30 voting "no," and senators seeking re-election in 2016 split on the issue.

Among GOP presidential candidates, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas was the only "yes" vote, while Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida joined Paul in opposing the bill. Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who announced for president Monday, was absent. Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who is running on the Democratic side, also voted no.

Civil liberties groups have been mixed on the legislation, but the ACLU applauded the vote, with Deputy Legal Director Jameel Jaffer calling it "a milestone."

Snowden, now in Russia and reviled by lawmakers of both parties, addressed the vote via video link during an event hosted by Amnesty International. He said the legislation was historic because Americans are questioning long-held assumptions that intelligence officials always act in their best interest.

"For the first time in recent history, we found that despite the claims of government, the public made the final decision and that is a radical change we should seize on, we should value and we should push forward," he said.

___




I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #564 on: June 25, 2015, 10:54:33 AM »
Now we have the NSA France spying info from WikiLeaks ,...

http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/24/europe/france-wikileaks-nsa-spying-claims/
France summons U.S. ambassador after reports U.S. spied on presidents
By Laura Smith-Spark and Jethro Mullen, CNN
Updated 11:17 AM ET, Wed June 24, 2015

(CNN)—France has summoned the U.S. ambassador for a meeting Wednesday in the wake of reports that the United States spied on French President François Hollande and his two predecessors -- despite France being a close ally.


WikiLeaks has published what it said were U.S. National Security Agency reports about secret communications of the last three French presidents between 2006 and 2012.

France won't tolerate "any action jeopardizing its security and the protection of its interests," the country's Defense Council said in a statement Wednesday. But it suggested it was already well aware of the spying allegations.

"These unacceptable facts already resulted in clarifications between France and the United States" in 2013 and 2014, the Defense Council said
...

Assange: 'Hostile surveillance'

French newspaper Libération and online outlet Mediapart cited five NSA reports published by WikiLeaks on Tuesday and purportedly pulled from intercepted communications of former Presidents Jacques Chirac and Nicolas Sarkozy as well as Hollande and other French figures.

According to a WikiLeaks news release, the cache of "top secret" documents includes "intelligence summaries of conversations between French government officials concerning some of the most pressing issues facing France and the international community."

These include "the global financial crisis, the Greek debt crisis, the leadership and future of the European Union, the relationship between the Hollande administration and the German government of Angela Merkel, French efforts to determine the make-up of the executive staff of the United Nations, French involvement in the conflict in Palestine and a dispute between the French and US governments over US spying on France."

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said the French people "have a right to know that their elected government is subject to hostile surveillance from a supposed ally."

WikiLeaks is proud of its work with Libération and Mediapart to bring the story to light, Assange said, adding that "French readers can expect more timely and important revelations in the near future."
...

'Oldest ally'


France is a longstanding ally of the United States and, as a fellow permanent member of the U.N. Security Council and NATO, a key partner in international diplomacy. U.S. President Barack Obama earlier this year referred to France as "America's oldest ally."

But these are not the first reports alleging U.S. espionage against its friends.

In 2013, Le Monde reported that the NSA had monitored phone calls made in France, citing documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden to WikiLeaks. That surveillance was conducted on French citizens and carried out on a "massive scale," as reported by Le Monde.

Those particular phone intercepts took place from December 10, 2012, to January 8, 2013, Le Monde said. An NSA graph showed an average of 3 million data intercepts a day.

Also in 2013, CNN reported on allegations of NSA surveillance of other world leaders, including Merkel and the presidents of Brazil and Mexico.

| - - - -

Earlier:

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/24/nsa-surveillance-world-leaders-calls

NSA monitored calls of 35 world leaders after US official handed over contacts
Friday 25 October 2013 02.50 EDT 
• Agency given more than 200 numbers by government official
• NSA encourages departments to share their 'Rolodexes'
• Surveillance produced 'little intelligence', memo acknowledges
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #565 on: June 25, 2015, 03:26:07 PM »
Back in the beginning there was an encryption email software called Private Idaho ... using PGP (Pretty Good Privacy)
Then there was a song and a movie ..


http://web.textfiles.com/computers/pidaho.txt
Private Idaho version 2.5b4 (beta) 9/20/95 - Freeware
copyright (c)1995, Joel McNamara (joelm@eskimo.com)

What it does
------------
Private Idaho makes private e-mail easier.  It simplifies using
PGP and various anonymous remailers.  You can send e-mail messages
with it (if you have access to a SMTP mail server) or you can use
it in conjunction with many Windows e-mail applications.

PGP is fairly well known.  Remailers are getting increased exposure,
but are still not widely used.  If you use PGP, they are worth
knowing and learning about.  For a good introduction, refer to


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXmnmvDl-ao
B'52 - Private Idaho - HQ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_Idaho
"Private Idaho" is a single released by The B-52's from their album Wild Planet.
Gus Van Sant used the song title for his movie My Own Private Idaho
.

Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoo
 You're living in your own Private Idaho
 Living in your own Private Idaho
 Underground like a wild potato.
 Don't go on the patio.
 Beware of the pool,
 blue bottomless pool.
 It leads you straight
 right through the gate
 that opens on the pool.
 You're living in your own Private Idaho.
 You're living in your own Private Idaho.

 Keep off the path, beware the gate,
 watch out for signs that say "hidden driveways".
 Don't let the chlorine in your eyes
 blind you to the awful surprise
 that's waitin' for you at
 the bottom of the bottomless blue blue blue pool.

 You're livin in your own Private Idaho. Idaho.
 You're out of control, the rivers that roll,
 you fell into the water and down to Idaho.
 Get out of that state,
 get out of that state you're in.
 You better beware.

 You're living in your own Private Idaho.
 You're living in your own Private Idaho.

 Keep off the patio,
 keep off the path.
 The lawn may be green
 but you better not be seen
 walkin' through the gate that leads you down,
 down to a pool fraught with danger
 is a pool full of strangers.


 You're living in your own Private Idaho,
 where do I go from here to a better state than this.
 Well, don't be blind to the big surprise
 swimming round and round like the deadly hand
 of a radium clock, at the bottom, of the pool.

 I-I-I-daho
 I-I-I-daho
 Woah oh oh woah oh oh woah oh oh
 Ah ah ah ah ah ah ah ah
 Get out of that state
 Get out of that state
 You're living in your own Private Idaho,
 livin in your own Private.... Idaho
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline chris jones

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #566 on: June 30, 2015, 04:28:11 PM »
REUTERS:

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. court has ruled that the eavesdropping National Security Agency can temporarily resume its bulk collection of Americans' telephone records, according to documents made public on Tuesday.
   THE LAND OF THE FREE?

                 

Offline Effie Trinket

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #567 on: June 30, 2015, 04:49:53 PM »
REUTERS:

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A U.S. court has ruled that the eavesdropping National Security Agency can temporarily resume its bulk collection of Americans' telephone records, according to documents made public on Tuesday.
   THE LAND OF THE FREE?

               
And people will only remember the fake victory, and not pay any attention to this.  NSA probably blackmailed the court.  "Rule NSA spying legal unless you want us to release video of you f*cking goats."

Also, LOL @ "temporarily", as if something is going to happen to actually stop them.  NSA is mentioned only to attract your focus on.  There's innumerable other corporations spying on you that don't even pretend to be part of the govt., therefore no court ruling could even have any effect on them anyways.   Snowden's firm, Google, et.al.  Dumbasses think the police state revolves around the NSA.  Try hundreds of corporations, think tanks, and universities that represent the global police state controllers/architects.

Offline windyacres

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #568 on: July 01, 2015, 02:24:27 AM »
I think the word ISIS on the telephone has been added
to their words they monitor phone conversations for. 
Be Prepared

Offline chris jones

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #569 on: July 01, 2015, 04:31:09 PM »
The priority for the neocons was getting the goods on high uppers, politicians being at the top of the list. Either they comply or are exposed in short blackmail.
 J Edgar Hoover (Czar) had his files on every pol  USA , they were scared sh**tless of this mucker.
That's but one side of the coin, the other is what they are capeable of doing if a POL steps up as did JFK,RFK & MLK ( public figure).
 The elites Omerta.

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #570 on: July 02, 2015, 09:23:11 PM »
Secret Core Text from Trade In Services Agreement Negotiations Leaked https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYLS-WSkA0E

Jul 1, 2015 DAHBOO777

WikiLeaks Exclusive: Secret core text from Trade in Services Agreement negotiations http://www.thesaturdaypaper.com.au/news/politics/2015/07/01/wikileaks-exclusive-secret-core-text-trade-services-agreement-negotiations

The leaked TiSA core text reveals the sweeping ambition of the agreement to liberalise trade in all services – banking, financial, e-commerce, professional consulting, transport, health and other human services – with implications for all levels of government defined as including “central, regional or local governments and authorities”.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #571 on: August 05, 2015, 07:07:46 PM »
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2015/aug/05/homan-square-chicago-thousands-detained
Chicago police detained thousands of black Americans at interrogation facility

Special report: Guardian lawsuit reveals overwhelming racial disparity at Homan Square, where detainees are still held for minor crimes with little access to the outside word, despite police denials that site is an anomaly
Spencer Ackerman and Zach Stafford in Chicago
Wednesday 5 August 2015 12.56 EDT

At least 3,500 Americans have been detained inside a Chicago police warehouse described by some of its arrestees as a secretive interrogation facility, newly uncovered records reveal.

Of the thousands held in the facility known as Homan Square over a decade, 82% were black. Only three received documented visits from an attorney, according to a cache of documents obtained when the Guardian sued the police.

Despite repeated denials from the Chicago police department that the warehouse is a secretive, off-the-books anomaly, the Homan Square files begin to show how the city’s most vulnerable people get lost in its criminal justice system.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline windyacres

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #572 on: February 21, 2016, 05:45:05 AM »
Cryptome’s searing critique of Snowden Inc. 

February 13, 2016
by Tim Shorrock   

The current corporate media business model of celebrity as an income producer and celebrity as a sensationalizing, titillating device for increasing the value of content is something we stay away from. It’s deeply cynical to sensationalize this trusted transaction, when someone come to you with a document and puts it forward to you.

— Deborah Natsios, Cryptome
Screenshot 2016-02-13 11.32.08

Credit: Natsios-Young.org

This week, John Young and Deborah Natsios, the founders of Cryptome, one of the world’s oldest and best-known repositories of leaked intelligence documents, quietly posted a URL to an interview they conducted on February 6 during a conference in Berlin, Germany.

Young and Natsios are introduced, correctly, as “renowned figures within a larger community people interested in keeping governments and institutions accountable, and using documents to do that.” But they also offer deep insights into the media and how it has handled revelations about U.S. intelligence and the National Security Agency. And their remarks, such as the quote above, clearly catch their host by surprise.

In the 18th minute, they issue a scathing rebuke of “celebrity” journalism as practiced, in their opinion, by The Intercept, the publication owned by Pierre Omidyar’s First Look Media. The interview is worth hearing in its entirety, and I urge anyone who’s had questions and concerns about Edward Snowden and his relationship to The Intercept’s founding editors, Glenn Greenwald, Jeremy Scahill and Laura Poitras, to listen to it and carefully consider their arguments.

Why? Because Cryptome raises serious questions that nobody else on the left or in the media want to talk about, including how Omidar has created a business from Snowden’s cache; what exactly Snowden may have been doing while he was working for the CIA prior to his time at NSA (and what else he may have been doing at NSA itself); and why Snowden and The Intercept continue to proselytize for Tor, the anonymization tool, despite its massive funding from the U.S. government, the Pentagon and the national security state.

One of the most amazing moments comes when the host, Pit Shultz, grows nervous about how his questions are being answered. It’s a sad insight into how the libertarian left responds to any criticism of its heroes and the arrogance and vitriol that’s been thrown to people who’ve raised questions about Snowden, Tor or Omidyar’s operations. To his credit, Shultz soldiers on – but only after Natsios assures him that “robust debate” is crucial to democracy.

Cryptome’s critique, as expressed in the interview, is not new. Ever since Greenwald first wrote about Snowden’s documents in The Guardian in 2013, the organization has been keeping careful track of the glacial pace of the documents’ release and The Intercept’s almost-total control over the cache. Their latest tally, posted this week, is 6,318 pages of what The Guardian first reported as 58,000 files.

From the start, Young and Natsios made it clear that they strongly disapprove of the fact that this cache has not been made widely available to the public and posted for all to see – as they have done with the tens of thousands of intelligence files they have released since the late 1990s (and as Daniel Ellsberg did with the Pentagon Papers). Take a look at how Gawker, a publication very friendly to The Intercept, reported on Cryptome in June 2013:

    When the Guardian and Washington Post published their blockbuster NSA reports based on Ed Snowden’s leaks, journalists lined up conga-style to congratulate them on the scoops. Not Cryptome. Instead, the secret-killing site blasted the Guardian and Post for only publishing 4 of the 41 slides that Snowden gave them about PRISM, the NSA’s system for spying on the internet.

    “Mr. Snowden, please send your 41 PRISM slides and other information to less easily cowed and overly coddled commercial outlets than Washington Post and Guardian,” Cryptome wrote in a June 10th dispatch titled “Snowden Censored by Craven Media.”

    To longtime followers of Cryptome, this response was unsurprising. Before Wikileaks, before Ed Snowden, there was Cryptome. Manhattan-based architects John Young and Deborah Natsios founded Cryptome.org in 1996 as a repository for documents no one else would publish, including lists of CIA assets, in-depth technical schematics of sensitive national security installations, and copyrighted material. As leaking has created a vibrant media ecosystem in recent years, complete with favored outlets, journalists and sources, Cryptome has positioned itself as its curmudgeonly ombudsman, quietly but blisteringly cutting down the hype and blather it sees in its competitors while advocating a form of radical transparency as straightforward as Cryptome.org’s bare-bones website.

Until now, however, I’ve never seen an analysis like this. What follows is my transcript of key parts of the interview.

Shultz, the host, begins with a discussion with Natsios, who grew up “in a CIA family,” about her art, and then focuses on Cryptome’s roots in the Cold War and its founding in 1996 (Young was also active, with Wikileak’s Julian Assange, in the “cypherpunk” movement in the early 1990s). Throughout their organization’s existence, Young explains, “we did not seek celebrity. We thought we should do public service quietly and non-ostentatiously. We don’t like high-profile activity because we think it disrupts the process.”

This is already a huge contrast to the approach taken by the The Intercept’s founders. But what follows is stunning. After Natsios makes her statement about “celebrity as an income producer,” Young opens up, first taking on the ACLU.

Young: Let me name some names. ACLU, one of the most corrupt organizations in New York City and around the world. We detest how they’re handling Snowden. They’re using him for funding purposes. Meanwhile, they’re turning down more needy people because they’re not good for fund-raising. Look at what these folks are paid. Phenomenal salaries are being paid. Phenomenal salaries are being paid to The Intercept. These are your corrupt organizations to get these kinds of salaries out there while others who provide the information are either going to jail or getting nothing. I think that’s the pattern that’s going on now under the national security realm. Now I should say the National Security Archives and the Federation of American Scientists do not do that. But some of these newcomers to the national security field are. ACLU is an old organization. But we know people who’ve left ACLU over this issue, because they’ve become money-driven and not public service driven. And they refuse to have anything to do with ACLU. And that’s a tragedy because it once had a wonderful history. Now the question is, who else is on the list? There are others who are smelling the coffee of money-making…

The interview then turns to non-profit journalism, as practiced by First Look.

Natsios: As you know, the neo-liberal model now includes the non-profit world. But the non-profit world is now in a group-think in terms of its operational practices…

Young: You know, you get a lucrative tax write-off to set up a non-profit journalism organization because it’s considered a hardship industry. Isn’t that absurd? But it turns out Omidyar saved a lot of money setting up First Look because he gets a tax write-off for a hardship industry as though there some farmer out there somewhere. So when you see [Amazon owner Jeff] Bezos and other people investing, it’s for a tax write-off. And so a number of non-profits in the media world say, “Oh, the decline of investigative journalism” or blah blah blah. Well, it turns out that’s a result of heavy lobbying to be declared a hardship industry. Bingo!

The next section (not transcribed here) focuses on Tor, the “anonymity tool” promoted heavily by Snowden, Poitras and Greenwald and financed by the U.S. government, primarily through the Pentagon, as well as Omidyar himself – a topic I’ll focus on in a later posting. The discussion appears to disturb the interviewer.

Shultz: We are loyal here to this community. But some inner criticism can be seen as constructive. These questions are important. I suppose you can say whatever you say. We have free speech here.

Natsios: You said that very tentatively and cautiously. You should say that robustly, that robust dissent within any organization is crucial in a democratic context. Don’t apologize for it.

After that exchange, the conversation pivots to a discussion about Snowden’s role as a spy. Young mentions Snowden’s experience before NSA in Hawaii as a counter-intelligence operative for the CIA.

Shultz: [At the conference there was mention of] Snowden as a hero for civil rights. But it was not mentioned he was a spy. How can you trust a spy?

Young: You cannot. You cannot trust anyone with a security clearance…They have to lie to you. It’s not a glorious role, it’s a dirty role.

Young then returns to The Intercept’s relationship with Snowden. He mentions two journalists who came way before Greenwald & Co. and early on exposed the operations of the NSA overseas, Duncan Campbell and Nicky Hager.

Young: I don’t know why Snowden didn’t go to them instead of those assholes he went to. That’s a story that hasn’t been told. Why did he go to these technologically illiterate people to reveal this stuff to? Someone sold him a bill of goods. We don’t know who fed him into this group.

Shultz: So you’re critical about him spoon-feeding the mass media?

Natsios: It’s a second secret regime that’s been imposed by the media proxies. The assumption is there should be a media pathway to the public. Well, that could be a fallacy…If we’re to believes Snowden’s current media proxies and his testimony through them, he’s been extremely cautious and controlling about his release. He wants to have his cake and eat it too. He’s been extremely particular about what he wants to let go evidently and what he keeps in reserve. That’s his choice. But these are taxpayer-paid documents belonging in the public domain. What authority does he have to open the spigot where he is now controlling in a fairly doctrinaire and authoritarian way what happens to this trove, this cache?…

Young: Snowden says he gave them to the public; no, he didn’t. He gave them to a bunch of self-interested journalists who decided to run a certain story with it, i.e., to explain it to people. And their f**king explainers really have a problem.

Natsios: It’s a serious conflict of interest. They’ve written themselves into the story as heroes, co-heroes of the story. It’s a conflict of interest. They’re not at a distance from their source. They’ve embedded themselves in the narrative, and therefore all decisions are highly suspect because they benefit from the outcome of the narrative in every sense.

Young: They should go to people who can read the documents, not report on them. Reporting is not honesty. It is headline grabbing. It is hyper ventilation. And they call it reporting, when in fact it’s highly selective. This is criminal behavior. [Note: in that context, it’s rather amazing to see this tweet from Snowden himself chastising a Washington journalist for being directed in his reporting by a White House official – exactly what Snowden did with his stenographers].

To get its full flavor, I again urge readers to listen to the interview in its entirety. After I heard it, I passed part of this transcript by Bill Binney, the legendary NSA analyst who once was the Technical Director of NSA’s Operations Directorate. He is reknowned for blowing the whistle on corporate corruption and illegal surveillance at the NSA, a story I documented in The Nation in 2013 (prior to Snowden’s appearance on the scene, I might add).

Binney, always the humorist, reminded me of a notorious statement made by Sam Visner, a senior NSA official, to a group of contractors a day after the 9/11 attacks: “We can milk this thing all the way to 2015.” Here’s Binney’s email to me about the arguments from Young and Natsios: “As Sam said, ‘we can milk this cow for 15 years.’ It’s just business.”

Cryptome puts it this way: “At Snowden current rate it will take 20-620 years to free all documents.” That’s really milking it. So, yes, “money doesn’t talk, it swears.”

For a full bibliography of Young and Natsios, click here.

Link to the article -

http://timshorrock.com/?p=2354

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Offline windyacres

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #573 on: April 09, 2016, 03:26:39 AM »
Edward Snowden calls on British people to rise up and demand
 David Cameron quit as Prime Minister



   
UK Mirror
April 8, 2016

Edward Snowden has called on the British people to rise up and demand that David Cameron resign.

The fugitive whistleblower urged voters to attend a protest outside Downing Street to force the Prime Minister from office.

In a series of tweets, Mr Snowden , said the next 24 hours “could change Britain.”

He suggested the outrage at Mr Cameron’s admission that he trousered thousands in profits from his father’s offshore fund could spark the same kind of protests that yesterday forced Icelandic PM Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson to quit.

An estimated 10% of Icelandic voters took to the streets on Tuesday night, furious at the revelation that Mr Gunnlaugsson had hidden millions in an offshore fund.


Read more -

http://www.prisonplanet.com/edward-snowden-calls-on-british-people-to-rise-up-and-demand-david-cameron-quit-as-prime-minister.html

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #574 on: May 05, 2016, 04:29:09 AM »
A Whistleblower Manifesto by Edward Snowden 


Michael Krieger
May 3, 2016


In the beginning of a change, the patriot is a scarce man, and brave, and hated and scorned. When his cause succeeds, the timid join him, for then it costs nothing to be a patriot.
The only rational patriotism, is loyalty to the nation all the time, loyalty to the government when it deserves it.
– Quotes by Mark Twain


Every time I hear from Edward Snowden I’m immediately reminded of how thoughtful, courageous and patriotic he is, and how fortunate we are that he followed his conscience and spilled the beans on a multitude of unaccountable and unconstitutional actions routinely committed by America’s deep state government.

Earlier today, The Intercept posted a piece written by Edward Snowden pulled from the recently published book Inside the Assassination Complex. It’s a short piece, but extremely powerful and to the point. I saw it as a whistleblower’s manifesto in which Mr. Snowden explains why he felt he had no other choice but to come forward, and why others in similar positions should consider doing the same should they find themselves in a position to defend the U.S. Constitution and inform the general public. We all know that the deep state will never voluntarily work to protect “we the people,” as such, leaking on behalf of the public interest is now a matter of national survival.

So without further ado, here are excerpts from Snowden’s latest piece, Whistleblowing is Not Just Leaking — It’s an Act of Political Resistance:

I’ve been waiting 40 years for someone like you.” Those were the first words Daniel Ellsberg spoke to me when we met last year. Dan and I felt an immediate kinship; we both knew what it meant to risk so much — and to be irrevocably changed — by revealing secret truths.

One of the challenges of being a whistleblower is living with the knowledge that people continue to sit, just as you did, at those desks, in that unit, throughout the agency, who see what you saw and comply in silence, without resistance or complaint. They learn to live not just with untruths but with unnecessary untruths, dangerous untruths, corrosive untruths. It is a double tragedy: What begins as a survival strategy ends with the compromise of the human being it sought to preserve and the diminishing of the democracy meant to justify the sacrifice.

A single act of whistleblowing doesn’t change the reality that there are significant portions of the government that operate below the waterline, beneath the visibility of the public. Those secret activities will continue, despite reforms. But those who perform these actions now have to live with the fear that if they engage in activities contrary to the spirit of society — if even a single citizen is catalyzed to halt the machinery of that injustice — they might still be held to account. The thread by which good governance hangs is this equality before the law, for the only fear of the man who turns the gears is that he may find himself upon them.

Hope lies beyond, when we move from extraordinary acts of revelation to a collective culture of accountability within the intelligence community. Here we will have taken a meaningful step toward solving a problem that has existed for as long as our government.

Not all leaks are alike, nor are their makers. Gen. David Petraeus, for instance, provided his illicit lover and favorable biographer information so secret it defied classification, including the names of covert operatives and the president’s private thoughts on matters of strategic concern. Petraeus was not charged with a felony, as the Justice Department had initially recommended, but was instead permitted to plead guilty to a misdemeanor. Had an enlisted soldier of modest rank pulled out a stack of highly classified notebooks and handed them to his girlfriend to secure so much as a smile, he’d be looking at many decades in prison, not a pile of character references from a Who’s Who of the Deep State.

In the above paragraph, Snowden highlights the most corrosive aspect of modern American society, the institutionalization of a barbaric and un-American two-tierd justice system. For more on the Petraeus angle referenced, see: Some Leaks Are More Equal Than Others – Hypocritical D.C. Insiders Line up to Defend General Petraeus from Prosecution.

Now back to Snowden.

This dynamic can be seen quite clearly in the al Qaeda “conference call of doom” story, in which intelligence officials, likely seeking to inflate the threat of terrorism and deflect criticism of mass surveillance, revealed to a neoconservative website extraordinarily detailed accounts of specific communications they had intercepted, including locations of the participating parties and the precise contents of the discussions.

 If the officials’ claims were to be believed, they irrevocably burned an extraordinary means of learning the precise plans and intentions of terrorist leadership for the sake of a short-lived political advantage in a news cycle. Not a single person seems to have been so much as disciplined as a result of the story that cost us the ability to listen to the alleged al Qaeda hotline.

If harmfulness and authorization make no difference, what explains the distinction between the permissible and the impermissible disclosure?

The answer is control. A leak is acceptable if it’s not seen as a threat, as a challenge to the prerogatives of the institution. But if all of the disparate components of the institution — not just its head but its hands and feet, every part of its body — must be assumed to have the same power to discuss matters of concern, that is an existential threat to the modern political monopoly of information control, particularly if we’re talking about disclosures of serious wrongdoing, fraudulent activity, unlawful activities. If you can’t guarantee that you alone can exploit the flow of controlled information, then the aggregation of all the world’s unmentionables — including your own — begins to look more like a liability than an asset.

At the other end of the spectrum is Manning, a junior enlisted soldier, who was much nearer to the bottom of the hierarchy. I was midway in the professional career path. I sat down at the table with the chief information officer of the CIA, and I was briefing him and his chief technology officer when they were publicly making statements like “We try to collect everything and hang on to it forever,” and everybody still thought that was a cute business slogan. Meanwhile I was designing the systems they would use to do precisely that. I wasn’t briefing the policy side, the secretary of defense, but I was briefing the operations side, the National Security Agency’s director of technology. Official wrongdoing can catalyze all levels of insiders to reveal information, even at great risk to themselves, so long as they can be convinced that it is necessary to do so.

Reaching those individuals, helping them realize that their first allegiance as a public servant is to the public rather than to the government, is the challenge. That’s a significant shift in cultural thinking for a government worker today.

At the heart of this evolution is that whistleblowing is a radicalizing event — and by “radical” I don’t mean “extreme”; I mean it in the traditional sense of radix, the root of the issue. At some point you recognize that you can’t just move a few letters around on a page and hope for the best. You can’t simply report this problem to your supervisor, as I tried to do, because inevitably supervisors get nervous. They think about the structural risk to their career. They’re concerned about rocking the boat and “getting a reputation.” The incentives aren’t there to produce meaningful reform. Fundamentally, in an open society, change has to flow from the bottom to the top.

And when you’re confronted with evidence — not in an edge case, not in a peculiarity, but as a core consequence of the program — that the government is subverting the Constitution and violating the ideals you so fervently believe in, you have to make a decision. When you see that the program or policy is inconsistent with the oaths and obligations that you’ve sworn to your society and yourself, then that oath and that obligation cannot be reconciled with the program. To which do you owe a greater loyalty?

As a result we have arrived at this unmatched capability, unrestrained by policy. We have become reliant upon what was intended to be the limitation of last resort: the courts. Judges, realizing that their decisions are suddenly charged with much greater political importance and impact than was originally intended, have gone to great lengths in the post-9/11 period to avoid reviewing the laws or the operations of the executive in the national security context and setting restrictive precedents that, even if entirely proper, would impose limits on government for decades or more.

That means the most powerful institution that humanity has ever witnessed has also become the least restrained. Yet that same institution was never designed to operate in such a manner, having instead been explicitly founded on the principle of checks and balances. Our founding impulse was to say, “Though we are mighty, we are voluntarily restrained.”

For more on the judicial system as the “limitation of last resort,” see: Can You Say ‘Rubber Stamp?’ FBI and NSA Requests Never Denied by Secret Court.
When you first go on duty at CIA headquarters, you raise your hand and swear an oath — not to government, not to the agency, not to secrecy. You swear an oath to the Constitution. So there’s this friction, this emerging contest between the obligations and values that the government asks you to uphold, and the actual activities that you’re asked to participate in.

By preying on the modern necessity to stay connected, governments can reduce our dignity to something like that of tagged animals, the primary difference being that we paid for the tags and they’re in our pockets. It sounds like fantasist paranoia, but on the technical level it’s so trivial to implement that I cannot imagine a future in which it won’t be attempted. It will be limited to the war zones at first, in accordance with our customs, but surveillance technology has a tendency to follow us home.

Unrestrained power may be many things, but it’s not American. It is in this sense that the act of whistleblowing increasingly has become an act of political resistance. The whistleblower raises the alarm and lifts the lamp, inheriting the legacy of a line of Americans that begins with Paul Revere.

The individuals who make these disclosures feel so strongly about what they have seen that they’re willing to risk their lives and their freedom. They know that we, the people, are ultimately the strongest and most reliable check on the power of government. The insiders at the highest levels of government have extraordinary capability, extraordinary resources, tremendous access to influence, and a monopoly on violence, but in the final calculus there is but one figure that matters: the individual citizen.

And there are more of us than there are of them.

Amen and perfectly said. We can only hope a handful of government employees and contractors with a conscience and a real dedication to the U.S. Constitution will read this and act accordingly.


http://libertyblitzkrieg.com/2016/05/03/a-whistleblower-manifesto-by-edward-snowden/

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Re: NSA Data Mining - Prism Prison - Verizon - Snowden Whistleblower
« Reply #576 on: March 19, 2017, 07:38:22 PM »



... good background on US/BRIT spying consortium,
ala GCHQ wiretapping Trump, etc
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."