David Cameron -+- Secret Societies -+- Sex with PIG -+- Prison or Knighthood ?

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Offline iamc2

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PIGS; and that is what these perverts are!

No limits and no boundaries to the perversion they engage in...Ti's Disgusting and a product of HELL!

"...old saying:" 'if ya dance with the devil: he leaves ya on the dance floor of fire..!'
"When the Truth was murdered:
Common Sense ran away..."

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The secrets of Dave's 'Chipping Snorton' set:
Drugs, parties and the gilded world of Cotswold elite he's oh-so at home with

    David Cameron at ease mingling with elite of Chipping Norton social scene
    Prime Minister said to let his hair down at events for Oxfordshire's wealthy
    Wife Sam also said to be at ease partying with high-fliers in the Cotswolds
    The 'Chipping Norton set ' includes Rebekah Brooks and Jeremy Clarkson


By Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott For The Daily Mail
Published: 23:00, 21 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243870/The-secrets-Dave-s-Chipping-Snorton-set-Drugs-parties-gilded-world-Cotswold-elite-s-oh-home-with.html


From a giant marquee in the grounds of a honeycomb-coloured Cotswold farm, thudding music reverberates into the night.

Blacked-out Range Rovers — the vehicle of choice for west Oxfordshire’s wealthy — are spread across a field like a row of small tanks, dwarfing the sleek limousines and the sports cars with personalised number plates.

Under the black sky, shadowy figures are pulling on cigarettes. These are the chauffeurs, who are bracing themselves for a long night in Sarsden, epicentre of the infamous Chipping Norton set — rich Londoners who have weekend homes in the Cotswolds.

Inside the marquee, more than 500 of the wealthiest and most powerful people in Britain are seeing in the New Year in style. The Moroccan-themed tent is festooned with floor cushions. Beautiful people lie draped over pouffes, sipping drinks by flickering lamp light.

The year is 2008. This is the annual New Year bash for ‘the set’, a party so exclusive and impenetrable by the paparazzi that the many well-known guests feel able to relax. Whatever happens in the marquee will stay in the marquee, because nobody in this gilded circle would risk ostracism by breaking the omerta that governs their social gatherings.

The guest list is tightly controlled by the stars of the set: TV host Jeremy Clarkson; former Blur bassist-turned-farmer Alex James and his wife Claire Neate; racehorse trainer Charlie Brooks and his glamorous sister Annabel; and the queen bee of them all: Rupert Murdoch’s protégée Rebekah Wade — now known by her married name Brooks.

Whenever anyone new is invited to one of these gatherings, their name requires the approval of all. Among the guests tonight is David Cameron, Leader of the Opposition, and his wife Samantha, who live a mile or two away in the hamlet of Dean.

Also there are Shadow Chancellor George Osborne and his wife Frances; Andy Coulson, former News of the World editor; BBC executive Alan Yentob and the director-general Mark Thompson.

By the time the PR Matthew Freud and his wife, Rupert Murdoch’s daughter Elisabeth, sweep in, the party is in full swing — loud, boozy and perhaps not entirely free of class-A drugs.

Whether fairly or unfairly, social gatherings among the upper echelons of society in these parts have acquired a reputation for featuring narcotics. So much so that some affectionately dub Chipping Norton ‘Chipping Snorton’.

As the clock approaches midnight, guests in varying condition troop out of the marquee to watch a spectacular firework display. Many seem euphoric, including Mrs Cameron. In the small hours of New Year’s Day, she drags on a cigarette and gives it her all on the dance floor.

Also present that night was a former newspaper executive, well used to scenes of excess, who recalled being shocked by the sheer concentration of power and money.

‘It was incredible to see all these people letting their hair down,’ he said. ‘But something felt wrong. There were just too many people in too many powerful positions too close to each other. I remember saying to the person I was with: “This will end in tears.” It wasn’t right.’

Emerging from the loos later that evening, the former newsman, a working-class boy made good, bumped into Cameron. ‘You’re not one of us, are you?’ the Leader of the Opposition quipped cheerfully.

The guest was left wondering if it was a reference to his politics, his social status — or both.

It is at such exclusive social occasions, in his constituency in Witney, that David Cameron can really be himself. In manor houses, converted barns, farmhouses and stately homes belonging to friends, the Prime Minister kicks off his shoes and lets his guard down. Details of these parties rarely leak. Members of the gilded circle generally have a strong interest in keeping their mouths shut about what they get up to behind closed doors.

Theirs is a world of helicopters, domestic staff, summers in St Tropez and fine food from Daylesford — the organic farm shop owned by Lady Carole Bamford, wife of billionaire industrialist and Cameron supporter Sir Anthony Bamford.

The Camerons dip in and out of this social scene, aware that too close an association with it might cause political damage.

At one late-night party, according to a member of the Chipping Norton set, Cameron became so inebriated that he lost his mobile phone.

‘He was wandering around drunk, asking if anyone had seen it. I couldn’t believe it,’ says the guest. When she feels as if she’s in safe company, Samantha herself can be extraordinarily indiscreet. At another private party, she regaled guests with a colourful account of how she and Cameron became so intoxicated on holiday in Morocco that they vomited.

One function they both attended was a Conservative Party fundraiser — held at the Georgian stately home of Cameron’s friend and neighbour Lord Chadlington.

According to one guest we spoke to: ‘There was a huge marquee full of ladies with big hair and even bigger jewellery. The entertainment for the evening was Dave in conversation with Jeremy Clarkson, who seemed to be smashed off his face. There was a lot of drink around. David was loving the whole laddishness of it. He was really playing up.

‘Clarkson’s opening line to Dave was: “Come on; let’s face it, no one in this tent could care less about comprehensive schools. What they want to know is why organic milk is so expensive at Daylesford?”

‘David tried to bluster his way out of it, but Clarkson just went on, saying things like: “Seriously, Dave, everyone sends their kids to private schools . . .”

Such incidents, of course, play directly into the hands of Cameron’s political opponents, who caricature him as an Old Etonian ‘toff’, most at ease among the super-wealthy and hopelessly privileged and out-of-touch.

It is a stereotype that Cameron painstakingly avoids reinforcing in public, though he appears to live up to it behind closed doors.

He was so anxious to avoid being seen in tails at the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, for instance, that he toyed with the idea of wearing a normal suit. And he initially baulked at sending a signed photograph to Eton for inclusion in its gallery of Old Etonian Prime Ministers. Undoubtedly, the private David Cameron feels at home with some of the very wealthy and louche characters of the Chipping Norton set. But that is only part of the picture.

Cameron’s life may be a tale of privilege, but his rise to the premiership is the result of some remarkable qualities — not least an unflinching self-belief, a well-balanced character and a rare political ability to attract many of those who wouldn’t normally vote Tory.

From the moment he presented himself as a prospective Tory candidate to the Witney Conservatives — he seemed a perfect fit.

They may not have dreamed he could become Prime Minister — but they warmed to the attractive, well-spoken Old Etonian who had impeccable Tory connections and told them exactly what they wanted to hear.

And if he seemed a little ‘square’ to some of the loucher members of the Chipping Norton social set, his power and his beautiful hippy-chick wife soon gave him an entrée.


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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243870/The-secrets-Dave-s-Chipping-Snorton-set-Drugs-parties-gilded-world-Cotswold-elite-s-oh-home-with.html






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Tally-ho Cameron and the hunt chum he helped
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243870/The-secrets-Dave-s-Chipping-Snorton-set-Drugs-parties-gilded-world-Cotswold-elite-s-oh-home-with.html

Journalists have long sought a picture of hunt supporter David Cameron riding to hounds, to no avail — prompting suspicions that someone with Cameron’s interests at heart may have paid to take any such images off the market.

But after extensive inquiries, we finally uncovered this photograph of the future PM preparing to set off for a day’s sport.

It was taken at the final gathering of the Heythrop Hunt before the ban came into effect, a few days after Christmas 2004. Cameron can be seen on a fine bay mount, looking a little nervous, as horses assemble in the square in Chipping Norton.

Every year, in the lull between Christmas and New Year, the Heythrop Hunt meets a few miles from Cameron’s constituency home. They assemble at Cornbury Park, a stately home which provides a spectacular backdrop for the horses and hounds. The estate belongs to friends of the Prime Minister, and many of his social set are involved in the annual meet.



Watching the hunt thunder off over the fields is an unforgettable sight, but Cameron dares not be there himself any more. Since becoming Prime Minister, he’s avoided being seen at hunts, let alone being photographed on horseback. Given the associations of equestrianism with class and privilege, he believes it’s too toxic.

Yet he’s an avid supporter of hunting, and does what he can to help hunts and huntsmen behind the scenes. He loves rural life and wants to protect its traditions: it is a world he grew up with and understands.

‘He can scratch a pig’s back so effectively that the creature sighs,’ said a journalist who saw him do this in the Cotswolds. Cameron told the same journalist that he could ‘castrate a ram with a pair of pliers’.

The last time he’s widely known to have gone hunting is in January 2003, when he went out with the Heythrop. Afterwards, he wrote a piece for the Guardian which implied it was his first time. (‘Nothing had prepared me for the sheer terror of a day’s hunting,’ and so on.)

It would be surprising if this were his first hunt. His old friend Bruce Anderson says Cameron used to joke that the ‘terrible thing about the Hunting Bill is that only two people are affected by it: Prince Charles and me’ — suggesting it was a regular hobby.

Guy Avis, his next-door neighbour in the Cotswolds, is honorary secretary of the Heythrop, and says Cameron has the use of a mount stabled at the nearby village of Ginge.

The hunting ban finally came into force in 2005. Far from dying out, however, the sport is booming, mostly in the form of trail hunting, in which hounds pursue an artificially laid scent.

Yet ‘accidents’ happen, when hounds ferret out real foxes that are pursued in the same way as they have been for hundreds of years. The Heythrop has been involved in a number of court cases relating to this.

While Cameron was Leader of the Opposition, his friend Julian Barnfield, a professional huntsman with the Heythrop, was charged with various offences of hunting a fox. The case was later dropped on a technicality.
Cameron, we discovered, intervened personally, writing to the Attorney General on Barnfield’s behalf in June 2008.

Later, Chris Edgell, a former detective constable involved in the case, tried to obtain a copy of the letter using the Freedom of Information Act, but his application was rejected.

Cameron’s constituency office also refused to provide Edgell with a copy of the correspondence — on the basis it followed ‘a private meeting between a constituent and his MP’. Did the police and Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) go easy on Barnfield after pressure from Cameron? It seems more than possible.

Edgell says: ‘I have learned from CPS and police sources that Cameron’s letter to the Attorney General was sent on to CPS headquarters, who sent it on to Thames Valley CPS, who then sent it to Gloucester CPS, who then sent it on to the Complex Case Unit at Bristol, where barrister Kerry Barker dealt with it.

‘I saw the letter. It said something like: “Is this really a productive use of police time?”


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243870/The-secrets-Dave-s-Chipping-Snorton-set-Drugs-parties-gilded-world-Cotswold-elite-s-oh-home-with.html




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Revealed: The PM's brother is 'family' to Rebekah Brooks (Murdock Minion)
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243870/The-secrets-Dave-s-Chipping-Snorton-set-Drugs-parties-gilded-world-Cotswold-elite-s-oh-home-with.html

Before Christmas last year, David Cameron accepted an invitation to a carol service that led to an awkward encounter. The host was his neighbour, property tycoon Tony Gallagher, who has a private chapel attached to his stately home near Chipping Norton.

In the flickering candlelight, Cameron may not immediately have noticed his one-time friend and confidante Rebekah Brooks, the former chief executive of News International — owners of The Times and the Sun — sitting quietly in one of the pews with her husband Charlie. Her trademark tumbling red hair was tucked under a hat.

Though neighbours, Cameron and Brooks had taken pains to avoid crossing paths in the three years since her arrest for alleged corruption and phone-hacking in July 2011. Now they were just a few feet apart — and their host ensured they couldn’t pretend otherwise.


Friendly: Mr Cameron and newspaper boss Rebekah Brooks (pictured) were once good friends as revealed during the Leveson Inquiry, which revealed how often they texted and emailed

Wrapping up the service, Gallagher offered an unusual benediction: ‘Let us give thanks that Rebekah and Charlie are with us this evening.’ He didn’t need to spell out where else the couple might have been — behind bars.

Neither Cameron nor Brooks knew how to react. Embarrassed, she turned and half smiled at him, shrugging and raising her palms heavenward.

The phone-hacking affair was the most serious crisis of Cameron’s leadership, culminating in the imprisonment of his former communications chief Andy Coulson and criminal charges against two of his close friends: the Brookses.

The decisions he made at the height of the furore triggered a year-long legal inquiry which turned former allies into enemies; exposed uncomfortable details of his dealings with the media; and was a hugely time-consuming distraction.

Not only did the affair raise serious questions over his judgement, but it was also a source of acute personal embarrassment, detonating a bomb under the Chipping Norton set. Naturally, attention focused on the shattering of his relationship with Brooks, but there was another player in the drama: Cameron’s older brother Alex.

Racehorse trainer Charlie Brooks had been at Eton with Alex Cameron, a successful QC, and the two men were exceptionally close. After the then Rebekah Wade met Brooks, marrying him in 2009, she was often at his farm just three miles from David Cameron’s home.

After that, it was natural all the couples would socialise — Alex and Sarah Cameron; David and Samantha Cameron; and Rebekah and Charlie Brooks.

But it was Cameron’s brother who remained steadfast when the phone-hacking scandal erupted. He refused to abandon his old friends.

At a risk of causing acute embarrassment for the Prime Minister, Alex and his wife continued seeing the couple throughout the long, drawn-out criminal proceedings against them. They treated Brooks and her husband as if nothing had changed — even going on holiday together during a break in the trial. The Brookses consider Alex ‘family’. The PM is not in the same bracket.

There can be no doubt, however, that Brooks was once close to David Cameron. Since the early days of his leadership, she had been generous with her contacts and advice. In the run-up to the 2010 election, Brooks had also thrown News International’s weight behind the Tory campaign.

Yet from the moment she and her husband were arrested, the Prime Minister deserted them, terrified of the political implications of being seen in their company. She expected and needed his support — or at least his silence. Instead, he threw her to the wolves, saying if he were in charge of News International, he would have accepted her resignation.

Cameron’s betrayal was devastating. Samantha tried to soften the blow by sending conciliatory messages through intermediaries in a shop in Chipping Norton — but for a long period, Brooks was deeply angry.

On top of that, Cameron set up the Leveson Inquiry to investigate the culture, practices and ethics of the Press. Having agreed to appear at it for questioning, he’d then undergone months of painstaking preparation.

Even so, when he took the stand in June 2012, embarrassing details came tumbling out. Not just his 26 meetings with News International executives in 15 months, at a time when the company was focused on taking full ownership of Sky (NI’s parent company News Corp owned 39 per cent), but his frequent exchanges of texts with Brooks.

Among those she’d sent him was a particularly toe-curling one, just before the party conference in 2009. It began by sympathising with the PM over an ‘issue with The Times’ — most likely a hostile article — and suggested she could placate him over ‘country supper soon’.

The message continued: ‘As always Sam was wonderful (and I thought it was OE’s [Old Etonians] that were charm personified!). I am so rooting for you tomorrow not just as a proud friend but because professionally we’re definitely in this together! Speech of your life? Yes, he Cam!’

Their relationship raised uncomfortable questions about News International’s support for the Tories — and whether the company expected something in return.

Lord Justice Leveson later concluded there was no evidence of a secret deal, but he was sharply critical of the ‘particular kind of lobbying out of the public eye’ between senior politicians and the Press.

Industry insiders claim the way Brooks used to talk privately about her relationship with Cameron fuelled suspicions she had him in her pocket. One source claims she brandished a text message from him over dinner to illustrate the closeness of their friendship. The other guests were colleagues from other newspaper groups, all of whom were campaigning against News Corp boss Rupert Murdoch’s bid to take over Sky.

One of the guests claims: ‘The text said something like: “Looking forward to supper at the weekend. Love David xx.” She then said words to the effect of: “I don’t know why you’re even bothering to run this campaign, because this is a done deal.” That was typical of Rebekah and the way she conducted the whole Sky thing. As chief executive, she had become chief lobbyist. Her job by that stage was entirely about lobbying.’

Brooks denies showing such a text.

On June 24, 2014, she and her husband were dramatically cleared by a jury at the Old Bailey. It marked the end of a three-year ordeal, during which they’d lost their reputations and some of their friends.

Today, Cameron and Brooks are back on speaking terms — but only just. There are no cosy suppers, no horse rides together, no intimate soirées with friends.

Although Samantha invited the couple to her birthday party at Chequers last year, they didn’t feel it would be right to accept. Torn apart by the phone-hacking saga and the divorce of several of its leading lights (Elisabeth Murdoch and Matthew Freud; Jeremy Clarkson and wife Frances), the Chipping Norton set last year came up with an ironic new name: ‘The Upset’.

Brooks has told friends that she understands why Cameron reacted as he did. She likes to relate a fable about a scorpion and a turtle she heard from Peter Mandelson.

‘The scorpion wants to cross a river, and asks the turtle for a ride. The turtle refuses, fearing he will be stung. The scorpion argues that stinging the turtle would not be in his interests, because they will both drown. So the turtle agrees to give him the ride.

‘Halfway across the river, the scorpion stings the turtle. However good his intentions, he is conditioned to do so. They both go down.’ Politicians and scorpions have much in common, she says.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243870/The-secrets-Dave-s-Chipping-Snorton-set-Drugs-parties-gilded-world-Cotswold-elite-s-oh-home-with.html#ixzz3mU53vBC3



Second Highest Rated Comment

DM readers don't you get it? All the posh boys (and girls) stick together to protect their wealth; many went to the same school, attended the same university and now work in positions of power and influence- they are "The Establishment" and are all chums together having lovely "country suppers". Other chums own and work high up in the rightwing press (DM, Times,The Sun) and their job is to feed the plebs (you) skewed, half hearted truths (and often lies) whilst not reporting on items of huge newsworthiness that do not fit into their agenda. Their aim? To ensure that you continue voting in the Tories so that they can continue dismantling your public services including selling off parts of the NHS to their other chums (1 in 5 of the cabinet have links to private health care companies) and giving huge tax breaks to their other chums in business. This is why the rich stay rich and you can never hope to have a truly fair crack of the whip. Wake up.






EvadingGrid

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'A stab in the back': Cameron uses a joke to take a swipe at Ashcroft over his explosive biography

    Prime Minister laughs off lurid allegations made in new book about his past
    Downing Street refused to comment on claims involving drugs and a pig
    But at a Tory fundraiser Cameron used a doctor's visit to make a joke


By Matt Chorley, Political Editor for MailOnline
Published: 15:55, 22 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3244873/A-little-prick-stab-Cameron-uses-joke-swipe-Ashcroft-explosive-biography.html#ixzz3mU6JJBMP

David Cameron has so far maintained a public silence on Lord Ashcroft's explosive biography, detailing the lurid allegations of drug-taking, lying and unsavoury activities with a dead pig.

But the Prime Minister used a well-crafted joke to take a swipe at the former Tory treasurer, likening the fall-out of the new book to a visit to the doctor with 'a little prick' and 'just a stab in the back'.

Lord Ashcroft's book lifts the lid on his dramatic falling out with the Prime Minister who he accuses of failing to honour a promise of a government job.

Downing Street has been stunned by the allegations from the book, Call Me Dave, during its serialisation in the Mail.

Lord Ashcroft makes allegations of drug taking and debauchery by a young Mr Cameron.

In the most shocking claim, the book reports a source who claims that during Mr Cameron’s initiation ceremony to a decadent Oxford dining society, known as the Piers Gaveston, he ‘put a private part of his anatomy’ into a dead pig’s mouth.

The source claims to have seen photographic evidence.

The allegation, dismissed by friends of the Prime Minister, made headlines around the world although no further evidence has emerged to confirm it.

Officially Number 10 said it would not 'dignify this book by offering comment'.

But now it has emerged that Mr Cameron used a joke at a fundraising dinner last night to launch a coded attack on Lord Ashcroft.

According to the BBC, Mr Cameron told the 300 guests at the Carlton Club that yesterday morning he had to go to hospital for treatment on a bad back.

He claimed the injury was the result of enthusiastic wood chopping at his constituency home at the weekend.

The doctor told the PM he would need an injection and asked him to lie on his front, adding: 'This will just be a little prick, just a stab in the back.'

Which Mr Cameron joked 'rather summed up my day'.



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3244873/A-little-prick-stab-Cameron-uses-joke-swipe-Ashcroft-explosive-biography.html


EvadingGrid

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White House officials reveal astonishment at David Cameron's "incompetence" over Syria:
Prime Minister's leadership is "torn apart" by senior military figures

    Decadence of Cameron's 'Chipping Snorton' set revealed in biography
    PM's brother holidayed with Rebekah Brooks during phone hacking trial
    Former defence minister says Navy has been 'stripped down to nothing'
    Ex-chairman says Libya is PM's 'Iraq’ and has become more dangerous


By James Slack, Home Affairs Editor for the Daily Mail
Published: 23:00, 21 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243902/PM-savaged-brass-Ashcroft-book-reveals-leading-general-Tory-grandee-U-S-accuse-ineptitude-Libya-Syria.html



David Cameron’s leadership record is torn apart today by a former defence chief, Tory grandees and White House officials.

On Day Two of Lord Ashcroft’s explosive biography, the Prime Minister is accused of ‘doing an Iraq’ in Libya and rank incompetence over Syria.

Astonishingly, General Sir David Richards, says he had to tell Mr Cameron that ‘being in the Combined Cadet Force at Eton’ did not qualify him to decide the tactics of complex military operations.

At times, the PM was at war with the chief of the defence staff, who disagreed with him strongly on strategy.

In a further blow to his credibility on foreign affairs, former defence minister Nicholas Soames says the Royal Navy has been ‘stripped down to nothing’.

And former Tory chairman Michael Ancram says Libya is Mr Cameron’s ‘Iraq’ – with the country now more dangerous than when the PM decided to topple Colonel Gaddafi.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243902/PM-savaged-brass-Ashcroft-book-reveals-leading-general-Tory-grandee-U-S-accuse-ineptitude-Libya-Syria.html#ixzz3mU8jgk16



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Revealed: The Prime Minister's brother is 'family' to Rebekah Brooks after refusing to abandon long-time friends in wake of phone-hacking scandal

    PM was once very good friends with newspaper chief Rebekah Brooks
    David Cameron and Ms Brooks stopped crossing paths after her arrest
    But PM's brother Alex, who knew Charlie Brooks at Eton, still saw couple
    Mr Cameron and Ms Brooks now speaking after she was cleared by a jury


By Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott For The Daily Mail
Published: 23:31, 21 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3243944/The-Prime-Minister-s-brother-family-Rebekah-Brooks-refusing-abandon-long-time-friends-wake-phone-hacking-scandal.html

worcesteradam

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Were Cameron's Oxford parties financed and doped up by the KGB?
Strange decisions and strange life choices

As David Cameron and an Eton schoolfriend sunbathed on a beach in the Crimea, they were approached by two older Russian men who spoke perfect English. After chatting, the Russians asked the 18-year-olds out to dinner — a feast of caviar and sturgeon accompanied by large quantities of vodka. This alone was odd: in 1985, few Soviet citizens could have afforded such luxuries. But young Cameron — travelling to the Soviet Union on his gap year — was uneasy about the turn the conversation took. Why did their hosts, who claimed to work in a local hotel, encourage them to criticise Mrs Thatcher and Britain?

Much later, in 2006, Cameron mentioned this peculiar encounter in Yalta when he appeared on BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs. The men who had met him and his friend Anthony Griffith, he speculated, had probably been KGB agents. But were they trying to recruit him? My co-author and I decided to investigate. The Kremlin dismissed Cameron’s suggestion, claiming the men were notorious homosexuals. But KGB veterans and intelligence experts told a different story. As soon as he’d applied for a visa, Cameron had almost certainly attracted attention from the authorities, not least because of his high-level family connections. The two Russians, we found, were not locals and most probably had come from the KGB headquarters in Moscow. So what did they hope to achieve?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3245547/LORD-ASHCROFT-Spy-said-Dave-asked-KGB-drugs-peculiar-meeting-two-men-beach-Crimea.html

Is Cameron fatally compromised?
Who was paying to have compromising debauched photographs taken, like the Osborne one above.

EvadingGrid

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Chillaxing on endless holidays. Watching low-brow TV box sets. But the question vexing colleagues... Does Cameron believe in anything?

    PM enjoys watching Midsomer Murders and Desperate Housewives
    He likes country weekends, tennis, snooker, cooking and gardening
    Conspicuous number of holidays have been feature of his leadership
    But he is insulted by suggestion that downtime makes him a slacker


By Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott For The Daily Mail
Published: 23:44, 22 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3245467/LORD-ASHCROFT-Chilling-endless-hols-Low-brow-box-sets-question-vexing-colleagues-Does-PM-believe-anything.html


What was the point of David Cameron? That was the question many were asking a year into the life of the Coalition. For all the talk of tackling the deficit and creating a ‘Big Society’, voters remained confused about his purpose.

Such was the uncertainty that Andrew Cooper, Cameron’s pollster, carried out a survey on what people thought ‘the ideal Government’ would aim to do. ‘People think we just don’t get it,’ he warned. ‘The public mood is turning against us.’

The old mantra — ‘we’re all in it together’ — a soundbite that used to poll positively, was becoming a source of scorn.



‘People just laugh when we use that phrase now,’ Cooper said. ‘Most people still don’t know what the Government is trying to do beyond making cuts. They don’t know what your vision is.’

Cameron himself seemed unclear. Asked on the Today programme whether he was still a ‘modern, compassionate Conservative’, he demurred.

‘I’m a common-sense Conservative,’ he replied uncertainly. It was so anodyne as to be meaningless.

Within the party, a feeling was emerging that, having got the top job, Cameron had achieved all he wanted.

‘Seventy-five per cent of him wanted to be PM, and 25 per cent of him wanted to change the world,’ sighs a Tory grandee. ‘With Thatcher and Brown, it was the other way round.’

Another source, who likes Cameron, nonetheless thinks he’s ‘in politics to be in politics’.

‘It’s a stimulating hobby for him. The phrase that Osborne uses, which I really dislike, is: “Oh look, it’s all a game.” He’s said that to me lots of times. I don’t think it is a game. It’s a serious endeavour for the future of the country.’

A former Cabinet minister says: ‘My admiration for Cameron as a tactician is almost boundless, but what’s the big picture? What’s the intention? I just don’t know what makes this man tick.

'It’s almost as if anything outside his family is just an exercise yard for his political skills. It’s as if it’s just a game of chess, and he just wants to come top.’

One strategist close to the leadership wonders what Cameron would have done if ‘fate hadn’t happened to hand him the task of dealing with the deficit’. ‘I don’t know, and I suspect he doesn’t either,’ he says.

A well-known think-tank type, who worked with Cameron when he first became leader, said: ‘There’s nothing there! He’s just a decent guy who’s on his back, floating. Not struggling. Not going anywhere.

‘You have to respect his talents — he’s good in public, good at the repartee; he’s got a good memory for detail. But there’s no guiding philosophy. You have to be able to build a philosophy. That’s why Blairism succeeded. That’s why Thatcherism succeeded. What is Cameronism? F*** all!

‘He’s like an MRI scanner who can see the tumours, but doesn’t know how to get them out. It’s really sad. It’s rare to find somebody who can grasp big narrative issues and problems as he does.

‘Yet he’s asleep at the wheel when he knows the road is dangerous.’

The impression that Cameron did not ‘stand for anything’ was fuelled by the pragmatism that enabled him to lead a coalition with a rival party in the first place.

Even behind closed doors, he rarely seemed exercised by any single issue. (A confidant says the most animated he ever saw him was ‘in his dislike for [Speaker] John Bercow’.)

The most damning assessment came from Michael Gove’s former special adviser Dominic Cummings, who publicly labelled him a ‘sphinx without a riddle’.

‘Cameron requires no psychological analysis,’ Cummings wrote. ‘He’s one of the most straightforward people one will meet in politics. Pundits have wasted millions of words on what they regard as his “mystery” but he is exactly what he seems . . .

‘He’s cleverer than most MPs and can hold his own in conversations with senior officials . . . Cameron is superficially suitable for the job in the way that “experts” often judge such things — basic chimp politics skills, height, glibness etc, so we can “shove him out to give a statement on X”. That’s it.’

As early as October 2010, critics had begun depicting Cameron as ‘the essay-crisis Prime Minister’ — like a student who leaves his work until the last minute.

By the middle of 2012, the phrase had acquired real traction.

As his old Oxford friend James Delingpole puts it: ‘Every time you think it’s all going to come crashing on top of him, he stays up all night on his Red Bull and Pro Plus, and dashes off something just good enough to persuade the world that the moment to send him down has not arrived quite just yet.’

At Westminster, a damning new phrase to describe his propensity to put his feet up began circulating: ‘chillaxing’ — a contraction of ‘chill-out’ and ‘relax’. ‘If there was an Olympic gold medal for “chillaxing” [Cameron] would win it,’ someone told his biographers Francis Elliott and James Hanning.

Friends weighed in, testifying to the PM’s fondness for country weekends, tennis, snooker, cooking, gardening and watching TV. He was even reported to have hosted karaoke nights at Chequers.

No 10 was furious with the allegation: it struck a nerve. Cameron is indeed fond of laying back and watching a DVD box set with a large glass of wine.

His cultural tastes are mainstream and low brow: TV shows with ‘murder, mystery and suspense’ (he named Trial And Retribution; Midsomer Murders; He Kills Coppers); American series such as The West Wing, Game Of Thrones and Desperate Housewives (which he ‘loved’); and, in the car, Virgin (now Absolute) Radio.

According to Samantha, he likes to watch ‘all three Godfather movies again and again and again’. And he annoys her with his endless channel flicking.

He went to see the crude Sacha Baron Cohen movie Borat and laughed throughout, and admitted he liked playing Fruit Ninja on his iPad.


Chillaxing on endless holidays. Watching low-brow TV box sets. But the question vexing colleagues... Does Cameron believe in anything?

    PM enjoys watching Midsomer Murders and Desperate Housewives
    He likes country weekends, tennis, snooker, cooking and gardening
    Conspicuous number of holidays have been feature of his leadership
    But he is insulted by suggestion that downtime makes him a slacker

By Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott For The Daily Mail

Published: 23:44, 22 September 2015 | Updated: 07:28, 23 September 2015

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What was the point of David Cameron? That was the question many were asking a year into the life of the Coalition. For all the talk of tackling the deficit and creating a ‘Big Society’, voters remained confused about his purpose.

Such was the uncertainty that Andrew Cooper, Cameron’s pollster, carried out a survey on what people thought ‘the ideal Government’ would aim to do. ‘People think we just don’t get it,’ he warned. ‘The public mood is turning against us.’

The old mantra — ‘we’re all in it together’ — a soundbite that used to poll positively, was becoming a source of scorn.
Sitting back: Within the Conservative party, a feeling was emerging that, having got the top job, David Cameron (pictured on the beach in Harlyn Bay, Cornwall, during a holiday in July 2008) had achieved all he wanted
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Sitting back: Within the Conservative party, a feeling was emerging that, having got the top job, David Cameron (pictured on the beach in Harlyn Bay, Cornwall, during a holiday in July 2008) had achieved all he wanted

‘People just laugh when we use that phrase now,’ Cooper said. ‘Most people still don’t know what the Government is trying to do beyond making cuts. They don’t know what your vision is.’

Cameron himself seemed unclear. Asked on the Today programme whether he was still a ‘modern, compassionate Conservative’, he demurred.

‘I’m a common-sense Conservative,’ he replied uncertainly. It was so anodyne as to be meaningless.
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Within the party, a feeling was emerging that, having got the top job, Cameron had achieved all he wanted.

‘Seventy-five per cent of him wanted to be PM, and 25 per cent of him wanted to change the world,’ sighs a Tory grandee. ‘With Thatcher and Brown, it was the other way round.’

Another source, who likes Cameron, nonetheless thinks he’s ‘in politics to be in politics’.
Leisure habits: According to his wife Samantha, Mr Cameron (pictured in Cornwall in 2008) likes to watch ‘all three Godfather movies again and again and again’ - and he annoys her with his endless channel flicking
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Leisure habits: According to his wife Samantha, Mr Cameron (pictured in Cornwall in 2008) likes to watch ‘all three Godfather movies again and again and again’ - and he annoys her with his endless channel flicking

‘It’s a stimulating hobby for him. The phrase that Osborne uses, which I really dislike, is: “Oh look, it’s all a game.” He’s said that to me lots of times. I don’t think it is a game. It’s a serious endeavour for the future of the country.’
FEARS HIS DAD WOULD WIN DERBY
Mountain Pride, which had a real prospect of winning the 2008 Derby

Mountain Pride, which had a real prospect of winning the 2008 Derby

For Cameron’s father Ian, the Sport of Kings was a lifelong passion.

His career as a race-horse owner spanned five decades and, long before his son started dating Samantha, he co-owned a horse with her father Reggie Sheffield.

David Cameron has always loved racing and was part of a betting syndicate at Eton.

Much later, as leader of the Opposition, he once broke off from filming an expensive party political broadcast in order to watch the Grand National.

However, he was well aware that it might not go down well with the public to know that his family owned race horses. Indeed, in 2008, he was terrified it would make headlines.

That year, his father had a share in a horse named Mountain Pride (pictured above), which had a real prospect of winning the Derby. According to his old friend Bruce Anderson, Cameron was terrified that it would.

‘David was thinking: “What a nightmare! Imagine the public reaction!” He said it would have been a huge embarrassment . . . toff, toff, toff.’

Fortunately for the Tory leader, the horse didn’t live up to expectations.

A former Cabinet minister says: ‘My admiration for Cameron as a tactician is almost boundless, but what’s the big picture? What’s the intention? I just don’t know what makes this man tick.

'It’s almost as if anything outside his family is just an exercise yard for his political skills. It’s as if it’s just a game of chess, and he just wants to come top.’

One strategist close to the leadership wonders what Cameron would have done if ‘fate hadn’t happened to hand him the task of dealing with the deficit’. ‘I don’t know, and I suspect he doesn’t either,’ he says.

A well-known think-tank type, who worked with Cameron when he first became leader, said: ‘There’s nothing there! He’s just a decent guy who’s on his back, floating. Not struggling. Not going anywhere.

‘You have to respect his talents — he’s good in public, good at the repartee; he’s got a good memory for detail. But there’s no guiding philosophy. You have to be able to build a philosophy. That’s why Blairism succeeded. That’s why Thatcherism succeeded. What is Cameronism? F*** all!

‘He’s like an MRI scanner who can see the tumours, but doesn’t know how to get them out. It’s really sad. It’s rare to find somebody who can grasp big narrative issues and problems as he does.

‘Yet he’s asleep at the wheel when he knows the road is dangerous.’

The impression that Cameron did not ‘stand for anything’ was fuelled by the pragmatism that enabled him to lead a coalition with a rival party in the first place.

Even behind closed doors, he rarely seemed exercised by any single issue. (A confidant says the most animated he ever saw him was ‘in his dislike for [Speaker] John Bercow’.)

The most damning assessment came from Michael Gove’s former special adviser Dominic Cummings, who publicly labelled him a ‘sphinx without a riddle’.

‘Cameron requires no psychological analysis,’ Cummings wrote. ‘He’s one of the most straightforward people one will meet in politics. Pundits have wasted millions of words on what they regard as his “mystery” but he is exactly what he seems . . .
Criticism: The most damning assessment of Mr Cameron came from Dominic Cummings (right), former special adviser to Michael Gove (left) who publicly labelled him a ‘sphinx without a riddle'
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Criticism: The most damning assessment of Mr Cameron came from Dominic Cummings (right), former special adviser to Michael Gove (left) who publicly labelled him a ‘sphinx without a riddle'

‘He’s cleverer than most MPs and can hold his own in conversations with senior officials . . . Cameron is superficially suitable for the job in the way that “experts” often judge such things — basic chimp politics skills, height, glibness etc, so we can “shove him out to give a statement on X”. That’s it.’

As early as October 2010, critics had begun depicting Cameron as ‘the essay-crisis Prime Minister’ — like a student who leaves his work until the last minute.
Old Oxford friend: James Delingpole said the PM can 'dash off something just good enough to persuade the world that the moment to send him down has not arrived quite just yet'
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Old Oxford friend: James Delingpole said the PM can 'dash off something just good enough to persuade the world that the moment to send him down has not arrived quite just yet'

By the middle of 2012, the phrase had acquired real traction.

As his old Oxford friend James Delingpole puts it: ‘Every time you think it’s all going to come crashing on top of him, he stays up all night on his Red Bull and Pro Plus, and dashes off something just good enough to persuade the world that the moment to send him down has not arrived quite just yet.’

At Westminster, a damning new phrase to describe his propensity to put his feet up began circulating: ‘chillaxing’ — a contraction of ‘chill-out’ and ‘relax’. ‘If there was an Olympic gold medal for “chillaxing” [Cameron] would win it,’ someone told his biographers Francis Elliott and James Hanning.

Friends weighed in, testifying to the PM’s fondness for country weekends, tennis, snooker, cooking, gardening and watching TV. He was even reported to have hosted karaoke nights at Chequers.

No 10 was furious with the allegation: it struck a nerve. Cameron is indeed fond of laying back and watching a DVD box set with a large glass of wine.

His cultural tastes are mainstream and low brow: TV shows with ‘murder, mystery and suspense’ (he named Trial And Retribution; Midsomer Murders; He Kills Coppers); American series such as The West Wing, Game Of Thrones and Desperate Housewives (which he ‘loved’); and, in the car, Virgin (now Absolute) Radio.

According to Samantha, he likes to watch ‘all three Godfather movies again and again and again’. And he annoys her with his endless channel flicking.

He went to see the crude Sacha Baron Cohen movie Borat and laughed throughout, and admitted he liked playing Fruit Ninja on his iPad.
Cultural tastes: Mr Cameron enjoys watching American TV series such as The West Wing, Game Of Thrones and Desperate Housewives (above) - which he 'loved' - and listening to Virgin (now Absolute) Radio in the car
+8

Cultural tastes: Mr Cameron enjoys watching American TV series such as The West Wing, Game Of Thrones and Desperate Housewives (above) - which he 'loved' - and listening to Virgin (now Absolute) Radio in the car

He has made much of going on midweek ‘date nights’ with Samantha. A friend says he takes his music ‘very seriously’ and has more than The results were encouraging — most voters believed he worked hard enough — yet the term refused to go away.

Part of the problem was his conspicuous number of holidays, a feature of his leadership.

Again and again, he would be holidaying when some crisis or other struck. By August 2014, when ISIS was rampaging across Iraq and a British terror suspect beheaded a U.S. journalist, Cameron had clocked up 14 breaks in just over three years, in Granada, Ibiza, Tuscany, Mallorca, Ibiza, the Algarve, Jura, Lanzarote and Portugal, and taking no fewer than five trips to Cornwall.

‘At the moment, it seems like the only way to ask him a question is to hire a Cornish ice-cream van and set up on the beach,’ one MP lamented.

Yet he has always been honest about his taste for downtime.

He told GQ Editor Dylan Jones in 2007 that it was one of ‘Sam’s rules’ that ‘we have plenty of time together, plenty of time with the children’.

‘I think you need to do that in a high-pressure job . . . If you work so hard that you get completely fried in the head, and totally ragged, you start making bad decisions and bad judgments,’ he has said. ‘So holidays are very important to me, to relax a bit, and then get the batteries charged up for what lies ahead.’

But his attitude frustrates some colleagues. One who travelled with him regularly was struck by his reluctance to let his workload get in the way.

‘We were staying in the middle of nowhere in a crappy B&B, with a help-yourself booze cupboard, and he said: “I’ve got lots of papers to do. Let’s have a chill.” He’d have all these papers and yet he’d say: “Let’s have another one.” He always used to talk about nights off and I just thought he was a bit lazy.


Yet he was insulted by the suggestion that any of this made him a slacker. Such was the concern in No 10 that Andrew Cooper carried out private polling to see whether the ‘chillax’ label was sticking.

‘I felt bad for the women in the office. There was all this talk about how he had to get home for family time, but the women in the office weren’t going home for family time.

‘I thought it was really naughty. It was a disingenuous way of saying: “I’m actually bunking off home.” ’ The same aide was surprised and irritated when Cameron ‘whipped out a novel’ en route to a public engagement.

‘We’d gone to Gloucester — there were about six or seven of us — and he sat among everyone reading it,’ he recalls. ‘Everyone sat there in deferential silence, but I remember thinking: “I’m really sorry, but the spin doctor in me thinks you should be reading some papers and looking like you’ve got work to do.”

‘Sitting with seven staff and reading a novel? I found that quite irritating.’

Another former aide has never forgotten his willingness to deliver a keynote speech he knew was not up to scratch.

‘His fingernails are not bitten down,’ he sighs. ‘I remember him going to bed the night before one party conference speech and saying: “It’s not that good, but it will do.” ’

There is something disquieting about Cameron’s willingness to settle for second best. Literally and figuratively, he sleeps easily, whatever is going on in the world. (‘Pillow, head, bang,’ is how Bruce Anderson describes his ability to drop off.)

Yet he is supremely capable in carrying out the job of Prime Minister as he understands it. Unlike Gordon Brown (once described as an ‘insomniac obsessive’), he sees no reason to kill himself in the process.



Extracted from Call Me Dave: The Unauthorised Biography Of David Cameron, by Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott, published by Biteback Publishing on October 12 at £20. © Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott 2015. To order a copy, call 0808 272 0808 or visit mailbookshop.co.uk
Read more:




Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3245467/LORD-ASHCROFT-Chilling-endless-hols-Low-brow-box-sets-question-vexing-colleagues-Does-PM-believe-anything.html


EvadingGrid

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Were Cameron's Oxford parties financed and doped up by the KGB?
Strange decisions and strange life choices

As David Cameron and an Eton schoolfriend sunbathed on a beach in the Crimea, they were approached by two older Russian men who spoke perfect English. After chatting, the Russians asked the 18-year-olds out to dinner — a feast of caviar and sturgeon accompanied by large quantities of vodka. This alone was odd: in 1985, few Soviet citizens could have afforded such luxuries. But young Cameron — travelling to the Soviet Union on his gap year — was uneasy about the turn the conversation took. Why did their hosts, who claimed to work in a local hotel, encourage them to criticise Mrs Thatcher and Britain?

Much later, in 2006, Cameron mentioned this peculiar encounter in Yalta when he appeared on BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs. The men who had met him and his friend Anthony Griffith, he speculated, had probably been KGB agents. But were they trying to recruit him? My co-author and I decided to investigate. The Kremlin dismissed Cameron’s suggestion, claiming the men were notorious homosexuals. But KGB veterans and intelligence experts told a different story. As soon as he’d applied for a visa, Cameron had almost certainly attracted attention from the authorities, not least because of his high-level family connections. The two Russians, we found, were not locals and most probably had come from the KGB headquarters in Moscow. So what did they hope to achieve?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3245547/LORD-ASHCROFT-Spy-said-Dave-asked-KGB-drugs-peculiar-meeting-two-men-beach-Crimea.html

Is Cameron fatally compromised?
Who was paying to have compromising debauched photographs taken, like the Osborne one above.


Its all pretty standard.

This sort of HoneyTrap was constantly used throughout the Cold War, the thing to remember is 99% of the time these ploys failed.

I know, this from First Hand Accounts from reliable sources . . . can't day much more really.


It is entertaining, but I can not honestly think that Cameron fell for it. Sure he would have played along for a while for the FreeBees, that is what nearly everyone did back then. But next to nobody actually fell for these ploys.

EvadingGrid

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Dave: I was born with TWO silver spoons in my mouth. Parents at his prep school included: 8 Honourables, 4 Sirs, 2 Princesses, 2 Marchionesses, 1 Viscount, 1 Earl, 1 Lord... and Her Majesty The Queen!

    David Cameron enjoyed lavish birthdays - a far cry from usual kids' parties
    Aged 11, he flew on Concorde over U.S. states and enjoyed helicopter ride
    He went on all-expenses-paid trip for grandson of oil billionaire's birthday
    Also enjoyed sophisticated teenage years dining in Soho and Florence
    Parents of pupils at Heatherdown included Queen, Princesses and Earls

By Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott For The Daily Mail
Published: 23:02, 22 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3245386/Dave-born-TWO-silver-spoons-mouth-Parents-prep-school-included-8-Honourables-4-Sirs-2-Princesses-2-Marchionesses-1-Viscount-1-Earl-1-Lord-Majesty-Queen.html


For David Cameron’s classmates at prep school, birthdays were sometimes marked with considerably more than a cake, a hired conjurer and a party bag containing sweets and a novelty pencil.

At the age of 11, the future Prime Minister was treated to a celebration that must rank as one of the most lavish childhood parties in recent history.

It kicked off with a flight on Concorde, spanned several American states and included a helicopter flight. While a pupil at an exclusive prep school called Heatherdown, he was one of four boys to be invited on the all-expenses-paid jaunt to celebrate the birthday of his classmate, Peter — grandson of oil billionaire John Paul Getty.

Accompanying them was an 18-year-old teacher called Rhidian Llewellyn, who has never forgotten the excesses of Getty’s birthday celebrations.

Aboard Concorde, the boys tucked into caviar, salmon and beef bordelaise. And when Llewellyn turned round to check his charges were behaving, he was met with the sight of Cameron cheerily raising a glass of Dom Pérignon ’69 and exclaiming: ‘Good health, sir!’

The boys spent four days in Washington DC, sightseeing by air-conditioned convertible and dining in fine restaurants, before flying on to New York, where they explored the Empire State Building and World Trade Centre.

Llewellyn says: ‘I had to vaguely try to control this group of five ten and 11-year-old boys. Fortunately, the Getty boy had a French nanny, so between us we just about coped.’

After New York, the boys went to Disney World in Florida and the Kennedy Space Centre, before heading to Las Vegas, where they hung around the hotel swimming pool and played the slot machines.

The ‘birthday’ concluded with three days at the Grand Canyon and a trip to Hollywood, followed by a week of relaxation at the Getty family home, which overlooked San Francisco’s Golden Gate.

While he was at Heatherdown, the parents of the pupils included eight Honourables, four Sirs, two Majors, two Princesses, two Marchionesses, one Viscount, one Brigadier, one Commodore, one Earl, one Lord . . . and the Queen.

At aged nine, Cameron played Harold Rabbit in a school production of The Wind In The Willows, opposite Prince Edward, who was Mole. Watching in the audience was Her Majesty.

By his own admission, David Cameron had an extremely comfortable start in life. A Cabinet colleague once teased that he was born with a silver spoon in his mouth — and Cameron replied: ‘No, I was born with two.’

His parents’ millions were both inherited and self-made. Though the Camerons are not blue bloods, there are titles and big houses in the background. 

Home was a rectory in Peasemore, a village near Newbury, Berkshire. It is a Grade II-listed building with a tennis court, swimming pool and extensive grounds. There is also an elaborate pagoda, built by Cameron’s father, which his friends called ‘Ian’s erection’.

His upbringing was quintessentially English. One childhood friend, who spent many happy summers lounging by the pool with him and his three siblings, loved the old-fashioned wholesomeness of it all.

‘To me it was like a fairy tale; like living in an Enid Blyton book. His mother would come out to the pool with jugs of homemade lemonade. It was just idyllic.’

Another playmate says: ‘He is a real, proper Englishman, who’d love to defend what he sees as the real England — but his real England is different to almost everyone else’s.’

To some of Cameron’s childhood friends, his parents Ian and Mary seemed kind but a little remote. They recall the children greeting their father rather formally when he came home from work.

‘His mother Mary was quite frightening to me because she was so grand and proper,’ says one. ‘She was quite abrupt with children. They were all close, but I never saw any signs of affection — hugging and kissing and that kind of stuff.’

There was, of course, a nanny: Gwen Hoare, now 94, who still lives in the village. Her brother Bert says she has worked for several generations of the family — ‘She brought up the Camerons,’ he adds simply.

David Cameron was close to both parents but worshipped his father, a stockbroker, who had been born with deformed legs. By all accounts, Ian was an extrovert who never let his disability hold him back.

As well as helping to weed the churchyard and serving on the parish council, he was very successful. Ironically, given the political sensitivities surrounding tax avoidance today, his area of expertise was offshore investment funds.

He set three rules for his children: that they should realise nothing in life is ever completely fair; that they shouldn’t marry until they were at least 26; and that they should never become chartered accountants.

Mary sat as a magistrate in Newbury, where she developed a reputation for being tough. ‘I used to come home, to almost warn the children about the perils of doing the wrong thing, and [David] learned quite a lot from that,’ she once said, adding that she ‘wasn’t always successful’.

Tory MP Nicholas Soames, a family friend, describes the Camerons as ‘very, very good people’, with a strong sense of civic duty. ‘They really do their whack, always did. Everyone who knows [David’s] mother loves her,’ he says.

Before he turned eight, Cameron was shipped off to boarding school near Ascot. The school, set in a 30-acre estate, had some arcane rituals. After breakfast, pupils had to troop off to the loos, where they were made to recite Latin verbs and then tick their names off on a list pinned to each cubicle door.

There was still corporal punishment: Cameron was apparently beaten a couple of times with a hairbrush — once for stealing strawberries from the garden of the headmaster’s wife. And, at weekends, Heatherdown boys, clad in green boiler suits, were allowed to roam the grounds, shooting air rifles.

As the younger sibling of an older pupil, the future Prime Minister was known as ‘Cameron Minor’, shortened to ‘Cameron Mi’; while his brother Alex — remembered by former teachers as the more extrovert and popular of the two — was known as ‘Cameron Ma’.

According to former teacher Christopher Bromley-Martin, Cameron Mi was ‘tidy’ and ‘a sort of miniature example of what he is now — he hasn’t changed in appearance at all, except in an obvious sort of way.’

He did well academically, despite never being regarded as bright enough to sit the ‘murderous’ scholarship exam for Eton. But he did get into the school in 1979.

The education he received there, and the connections he made, were instrumental in his ascent and have coloured his political career. The friends he made at Eton have provided him with a remarkably stable and loyal social base.

Throughout the school, there was intense pressure to perform. It was ruthlessly academic, though Cameron was never one of the high-fliers. One boy, who followed him to Oxford, says: ‘I was amazed when people would come up to me and say: “You went to Eton, so you must know David. He’s really clever.”

‘I thought . . . what?! He clearly absolutely shone at Oxford, but I think most people at school with him would have been surprised that he was academically top notch.’

Although Cameron coasted through much of his time at Eton, he suddenly started studying hard in the sixth form. The late Michael Kidson, Cameron’s sixth form history teacher, used to say in later life that his success at A-level was ‘among the most inexplicable events in modern history’.

As a teenager, Cameron was remarkably sophisticated. During one three-day break, he told friends, he’d flown to Florence to immerse himself in art. He also dined so often at the Etoile restaurant in Soho he could recite the menu by heart.

It is a testament to Cameron that few Old Etonians have anything seriously disobliging to say about him. Some thought him a little arrogant and charmless, but his worst social offence seems to have been to stick to a small clique — a habit that remains.

One former classmate said: ‘He didn’t make friends easily and seemed to cling on to very close friends. Looking back, I sort of read that as maybe he was slightly insecure, possibly even a bit shy.’

James Deen, who was in all the same classes as Cameron, says: ‘He was a very nice person at the periphery of a group of quite naughty boys.’

William Buckland, who shared history classes with him says: ‘By Eton standards . . . [David] was “good second-rate” in terms of talent.’

When, at the tender age of 14, he told friends he would one day be Prime Minister, they did not take it seriously. By his mid-20s, when he was flying high at Tory Central Office, it was becoming very clear that they had underestimated him.




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Bamboozled by Boris the mischief maker: Explosive biography tells how London mayor secured an extra £93MILLION of public money from Cameron and Osborne after threat to overshadow Tory conference

    Day Three of our serialisation of Lord Ashcroft's biography Call Me Dave
    Ashcroft says Boris was Cameron's last Tory candidate choice for Mayor
    Cameron was so desperate for alternative that he approached Greg Dyke
    Boris was given millions to help boost his political career following threat


By James Slack, Home Affairs Editor for the Daily Mail
Published: 23:01, 22 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3245375/Bamboozled-Boris-mischief-maker-PM-Osborne-silenced-mayor-93million-public-money-threatened-overshadow-Tory-conference.html


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How Cameron pledged loyalty to all THREE contenders to succeed Mrs T... but she thought he was so shallow - and old boss Major wouldn't back him

    David Cameron pledged loyalty to three contenders after Margaret Thatcher
    He offered his support to John Major, Michael Heseltine and Douglas Hurd
    After Major won, 24-year-old Cameron invited to help prepare him for PMQs
    Since Cameron became PM, Major has often been unhelpful towards him


By Michael Ashcroft and Isabel Oakeshott For The Daily Mail
Published: 23:38, 22 September 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3245427/How-Cameron-pledged-loyalty-THREE-contenders-succeed-Mrs-T-thought-shallow-old-boss-Major-wouldn-t-him.html


worcesteradam

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It is entertaining, but I can not honestly think that Cameron fell for it. Sure he would have played along for a while for the FreeBees, that is what nearly everyone did back then. But next to nobody actually fell for these ploys.
I think its a limited hangout.
The story has a happy ending, the Russians misjudged him and let him go, but only 90% of readers will be stupid enough to believe that without the proof and Im not one of those.

EvadingGrid

  • Guest
I think its a limited hangout.
The story has a happy ending, the Russians misjudged him and let him go, but only 90% of readers will be stupid enough to believe that without the proof and Im not one of those.

Am I reading this right ?
Do you think Cameron is an FSB asset ?

worcesteradam

  • Guest
Certainly possible from the available evidence.
And that they obtained compromising photographs of him, also possible.
That they were involved in his strange Oxford societies is almost seeming likely.

EvadingGrid

  • Guest
Certainly possible from the available evidence.
And that they obtained compromising photographs of him, also possible.
That they were involved in his strange Oxford societies is almost seeming likely.

Now the Oxford Secret Societies is a different thing all together.

Its my opinion, and I am not alone, that the entire purpose of these initiation rites is to get blackmail material.
To force the candidate to cross a line that can never be undone.

But that is nothing to do with the FSB.

worcesteradam

  • Guest
Why not?

EvadingGrid

  • Guest
Why not?

The FSB are not evil enough to get invited into an Oxford Secret Society  ::)

worcesteradam

  • Guest
Although of course, the Cambridge Apostles was a KGB spy ring.

Camerons Godfather has Cuban ties, critiqued Apartheid:
"After leaving Eton in 1984, Cameron started a nine-month gap year. He worked as a researcher for his godfather Tim Rathbone, then Conservative MP for Lewes. In his three months, he attended debates in the House of Commons. Through his father, he was then employed for a further three months in Hong Kong by Jardine Matheson as a 'ship jumper', an administrative post. Returning from Hong Kong, Cameron visited the then Soviet Union."

In 1960, Rathbone married Margarita Sanchez y Sanchez, a Cuban, with whom he had three children: John-Paul, Michael and Cristina. Rathbone was also a staunch critic of apartheid: On a visit to Rhodesia, he proposed ousting Ian Smith and holding transitional elections for a majority black government. In 1986, he invited Oliver Tambo, a prominent member of the South African opposition to address Conservative MPs.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Rathbone

Cameron also has ties to Lord Lamont, a mysterious man with unexplained Russian connections
In 1992 Cameron was rewarded with a promotion to Special Adviser to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Norman Lamont. Cameron was working for Lamont at the time of Black Wednesday, when pressure from currency speculators forced the Pound sterling out of the European Exchange Rate Mechanism.

This is the event where international man of mystery George Soros made all his money. If it were true for example that Soros represented say Rothschild, then Rothschild linked Cameron, Lamont and Soros were on both sides of the affair during this crisis.

Lamont was appointed a Member of the Advisory Board of Bill Browder's Hermitage Global Fund, when it was launched in April 2007. https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/norman_lamont_hermitage_magnitsk

EvadingGrid

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It would surprise me if he did not work for the  Rothschild's.


Online TahoeBlue

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Interesting collection of characters ...

http://fallingmasonry.info/masonic-lords.html
Michael Heseltine Lord Heseltine (Conservative); Former Secretary of State for Defence Bilderberg attendee

http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/uk-news/headlines-march-18-2013-cross-1754953
Morning news headlines for March 18, 2013

David Cameron, Jimmy Savile, George Osborne and Lord Heseltine
...

MPs urge sex abuse courts

VULNERABLE sexual abuse witnesses should be allowed to give evidence in new specialist courts featuring uniquely-trained judges in the wake of the Rochdale and Jimmy Savile scandals, MPs will argue today
.

The court sittings, modelled on those introduced for domestic violence cases, would also ensure a specially-trained court usher is assigned to at-risk witnesses and facilities such as screens to protect them from the accused are provided.

Conservative MP Nicola Blackwood and Labour MP Ann Coffey are calling for specialist courts in two proposed amendments to the forthcoming Crime and Courts Bill, which is being debated in Parliament today.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

EvadingGrid

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Question

U-Turn on the Referendum on Europe ?

If Cameron gets hounded out of 10, Downing Street and Office, will that provide an excuse for an almighty U-Turn on the Referendum on Membership of the European Union ?

Is Bilderberg Angry with David Cameron for allowing the Referendum on EU Membership to take place, and is that why he is being hounded out of office ?

worcesteradam

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Im afraid there are further developments:

The row over Michael Ashcroft’s book about David Cameron took a bizarre turn last night after it emerged that the sex of a Russian spy who allegedly met the Prime Minister in his student days was changed in an account by the peer.
Ashcroft claimed last week to have uncovered a previously unnoticed Russian press report that showed a KGB agent who met the young Cameron in 1985 was a ‘slim girl’ called Valery.

In fact the report, a full copy of which has been obtained by The Mail on Sunday, makes it crystal clear the agent was a ‘slim’ man called Valery. The word ‘girl’ has been mysteriously inserted in Ashcroft’s account. Ashcroft’s account is based on a 2011 report in the obscure Argumenti Nedeli, a pro-Kremlin journal. It has made a series of wild, unsubstantiated claims about Cameron – and said that he is gay.

This newspaper commissioned an expert to translate the article used by Ashcroft to bolster a central claim in his book – Cameron’s alleged drug habits. As stated by Ashcroft last week, the weekly newspaper claimed that the 18-year-old Cameron asked the KGB to obtain drugs for him. However, Ashcroft did not repeat another extraordinary claim that Argumenti Nedeli went on to make about ‘homosexual’ Cameron. The journal used his supposed interest in ‘slim male spy Valery’ to call him a ‘perverted English aristocrat’.

It published further wild claims about Cameron earlier this month. In a dramatic change to its earlier account, it claimed Cameron was on a trial spying mission minded by a ‘professional’ MI6 agent on his teenage trip to the Soviet Union, but may have been recruited by the KGB. It also suggested he could still be working for the Russians from Number 10 by using the referendum on Britain’s membership to wreck the EU.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3250425/Why-did-change-spy-s-sex-books-Ashcroft-biography-row-takes-bizarre-turn-emerges-peer-changed-gender-KGB-agent-met-Cameron-student-days.html

Im not sure what to make of this except clearly there is more to learn.

Pirate

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Re: David Cameron -+- Secret Societies -+- Sex with PIG -+- Assassination ?
« Reply #64 on: October 19, 2015, 08:24:26 PM »
Lord Ashcroft in 18-day fight for life in intensive care after septic shock, liver and kidney failure - leaving him too ill to attend launch of his tell-all Cameron biography

    Peer, 69, missed launch of his biography of PM in Westminster last night
    He's been recovering in hospital in America and is now 'out of danger'
    Call Me Dave revealed his fury at David Cameron not giving him top job

By Mark Duell for MailOnline
Published: 19:51, 19 October 2015
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3279780/Lord-Ashcroft-intensive-care-18-days-suffering-renal-failure-septic-shock-liver-kidney-failure.htm

Pirate

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wow

wot a coincidence ?

worcesteradam

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Yes it is a bit.

Some have suggested in the past that Ashcroft might be a money launderer.