Rape,Halliburton,KBR,Dick Cheney,Record Profits,and the US State Department

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Offline Dig

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Former Halliburton subsidiary KBR's 4th quarter profits up 65%
http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Former_Halliburton_subsidiary_KBRs_4th_quarter_0226.html
Associated Press
Published: Tuesday February 26, 2008


HOUSTON (AP) -- Former Halliburton subsidiary KBR Inc. said Tuesday fourth-quarter profit rose 65 percent, lifted by contributions from natural-gas projects, work in Iraq and a tax benefit related to a 2006 asset sale.

The Houston-based military contractor and engineering and construction firm said profit for the October-December period was $71 million, or 42 cents a share, up from $43 million, or 28 cents a share, in the prior-year period.

The most-recent quarter included income from discontinued operations of $23 million, or 14 cents a share, due to tax benefits from the 2006 sale of its production services group.

The prior-year period included a loss from discontinued operations of $2 million, or 1 cent a share.

Wall Street expected KBR to earn 32 cents in the quarter, excluding one-time items.

Shares fell 45 cents to $33.60 at the open of trade.

Revenue for the final three months of 2007 amounted to $2.4 billion, topping the Wall Street forecast of $2.27 billion. Revenue in the year-ago quarter was $2.3 billion.

The company, which split from Halliburton last spring, said income from continuing operations amounted to $48 million, or 28 cents a share, versus comparable income of $45 million, or 30 cents a share, a year ago.

KBR said operating income in the fourth quarter of 2007 was partially offset by $22 million in charges from potentially disallowable costs incurred under U.S. government contracts in the Middle East in 2003.

Bill Utt, KBR's chairman and chief executive, called 2007 a record year for profits.

"We continued to execute well on our current projects, ramped up work on several of our new awards and delivered solid operating results," Utt said.

KBR is probably best known for providing food and shelter to U.S. troops in Iraq, thought Utt has said the company is likely to continue to do less work in Iraq as troop levels decrease.

Last month, the Army said it would revisit its decision to award three $5 billion contracts to KBR, DynCorp International Inc. and Fluor Corp. for services in Iraq.

The bundled contracts, which could be worth up to $150 billion if extended on a yearly basis over a 10-year span, have been on hold since July, after two private companies filed separate protests with the Government Accountability Office questioning the award. The Army has said it's reevaluating new bids from the companies but has not specified when it would make an announcement.

For now, KBR continues to work under a previous, multibillion-dollar government contract.

Congressional Democrats and others have often criticized KBR's war-generated profits because of its former association with Halliburton, which once was led by Vice President Dick Cheney. Halliburton is now focused solely on its lucrative oilfield services businesses.

KBR also is changing its focus a bit, striving to get back to its roots and land more industrial construction and other projects that contributed heavily to its bottom line 20 years ago.

KBR has announced several new contracts in the past year, both in the U.S. and overseas. They include a pact to manage construction of a chemicals and plastics production complex in Ras Tanura, Saudi Arabia - a plant that's expected to be among the world's largest petrochemical facilities.

It also will provide engineering services for an ammonia plant in Venezuela.

In the most-recent quarter, KBR said income at its government and infrastructure arm fell 40 percent from a year ago to $53 million, hurt by the $22 million in charges linked to the Middle East contract.

Its upstream arm had net income of $64 million, down from $67 million in the fourth quarter of 2006, though the company touted positive contributions from several ongoing projects in which KBR helps clients turn natural gas into commercial products.

Income at its services division rose to $23 million from $18 million a year ago.

For all of 2007, KBR said net income was $302 million, or $1.79 a share, up markedly from $168 million, or $1.20 a share, in 2006. Revenue was down slightly to $8.7 billion from $8.8 billion in 2006.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Bush Administration Misses Deadline To Respond To KBR Rape Questions
http://thinkprogress.org/2008/01/03/state-rice-kbr-rape/


Last month, ABC News reported that a former Halliburton/KBR employee, Jamie Leigh Jones, had been gang-raped by her co-workers while working in Baghdad. She was then left by the company in a “shipping container for at least 24 hours without food or water.”

Shortly after the news broke, Sen. Bill Nelson (D-FL) wrote to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice “requesting details on how many Americans in Iraq had reported being sexually assaulted or abused, how they were investigated, and if any had been recommended for prosecution.” He gave the State Department a deadline of Dec. 21 to respond. Yet according to Nelson’s office, the senator has not yet received any response:

He has not received a reply, a spokesman confirmed. … Nor has Nelson received replies from Secretary of Defense Robert Gates or Attorney General Michael Mukasey, to whom he also wrote asking for information and assistance, according to the lawmaker’s spokesman. […]

Asked about missing that deadline, a State Department spokesman told ABC News, “If the senator has asked questions, I’m quite sure we will provide answers. But it’s not something I could discuss with you.”

Former Halliburton/KBR employees have described an atmosphere of “rampant sexual harassment.” Rep. Ted Poe (R-TX) has also confirmed that his office has heard from multiple other women who were victims of sexual assault while working for KBR in Iraq.

The refusal of the Bush administration to respond to Nelson’s request mirrors its foot-dragging on Jones’s case over the past two years. Despite Poe’s involvement in the case, the Justice Department has refused to bring criminal charges against anyone, and it appears that no “federal agency [is] investigating the case.”

Last month, the Justice Department also refused to send a representative to answer questions on the case before the House Judiciary Committee. “This is an absolute disgrace,” remarked chairman John Conyers (D-MI).

Filed under: Iraq, Ethics

Posted by Amanda January 3, 2008 11:15
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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U.S. women reporting rapes in Iraq remain in limbo
http://www.iht.com/articles/2008/02/13/america/abuse.php
By James Risen
Published: February 13, 2008


WASHINGTON: Mary Kineston, an Ohio mother who went to Iraq to drive trucks, thought she had endured the worst when her supply convoy was ambushed in April 2004. After car bombs exploded and insurgents began firing on the road between Baghdad and Balad, she and other military contractors were saved only when army Black Hawk helicopters arrived.

But not long after the ambush, Kineston said, she was sexually assaulted by another driver, who remained on the job, at least temporarily, even after she reported the incident to KBR, the military contractor that employed the drivers. Later, she said she was groped by a second KBR worker. After complaining to the company about the threats and harassment endured by female employees in Iraq, she was fired.

"I felt safer on the convoys with the army than I ever did working for KBR," said Kineston, who won a modest arbitration award against KBR after returning to Ohio. "At least if you got in trouble on a convoy, you could radio the army, and they would come and help you out. But when I complained to KBR, they didn't do anything. I still have nightmares. They changed my life forever, and they got away with it."

Kineston is one of a growing number of American women who have reported that they were sexually assaulted by co-workers while employed as contractors in Iraq, but find themselves in legal limbo, unable to seek justice or even significant compensation.

With thousands of women filling jobs as contractors in the Iraq war zone, the problem of rapes and sexual assaults has increased, along with other forms of crime among contractors. Comprehensive statistics on sexual assaults among contractors are unavailable, however, because no one in the government or contracting industry is tracking them.
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Many of the same legal and logistic obstacles that have impeded other types of investigations involving contractors in Iraq - like shootings involving security guards for Blackwater Worldwide - have made it difficult for the U.S. government to pursue charges of sexual offenses against contractors in Iraq. The military justice system does not apply to them, and the reach of other U.S. laws on contractors working in foreign war zones remains unclear five years after the invasion of Iraq.

Meanwhile, KBR and other contractors have required Iraq-bound employees to sign documents agreeing to take personnel disputes to private arbitration, rather than sue the companies in American courts. The companies have repeatedly challenged arbitration claims of sexual assault or harassment brought by female employees who served in Iraq, raising fears among some women about going public with their claims. Several women who say they were sexually assaulted or raped in Iraq said they had suffered largely in silence for years.

That silence was broken in December, when Jamie Leigh Jones, a 23-year-old former employee of KBR, testified at a congressional hearing that she had been gang-raped in 2005 by co-workers in Iraq. Since her testimony, other women have begun to step forward.

Jones and her attorneys said that 38 women who worked as contractors in Iraq, Kuwait and other countries have contacted her since she testified to discuss their own experiences. Now, congressional leaders are seeking answers from the Pentagon, the State Department and other agencies to try to determine the scope of the threats facing women contractors.

Court documents, interviews with women who were victims, their lawyers and other professionals, along with the limited data made available by the Bush administration, suggest that the assaults on Kineston and Jones are not isolated incidents.

The U.S. Army's Criminal Investigation Command has reported that it investigated 124 cases of sexual assault in Iraq over the past three years. Those figures, provided to Senator Bill Nelson, the Florida Democrat who has taken the lead in the Senate on the issue, include cases involving both contractors and military personnel but do not include cases involving contractors or soldiers investigated by other branches of the military.

The Diplomatic Security Service at the State Department has separately reported that it has investigated four cases of rape or sexual assault involving female contractors, including Jones's case. But the Pentagon has failed to respond to a request from Nelson for more comprehensive data, like the number of rape examinations done by military doctors in Iraq on behalf of female contractors.

What is more, the Bush administration has not offered to develop a coordinated response to the problem, aides to Nelson and other experts said.

A KBR spokeswoman, Heather Browne, said the company was intent on protecting female workers in Iraq. "KBR's commitment to the safety and security of all employees is unwavering," she said in a written statement. "One instance of sexual harassment or assault is too many and unacceptable."

When America went to war in Iraq, no one anticipated that crimes by and among civilian contractors would become such a major issue for the United States. Yet the administration's decision to rely so heavily on outside contractors - there are reportedly at least 180,000 contractors in Iraq, significantly outnumbering U.S. military personnel - made it inevitable that contractor crime would emerge as an unresolved problem as the war dragged on.

KBR, by far the largest military contractor in Iraq, says that it now has 2,383 women working in Iraq, out of a total work force there of 54,170. With a ratio of more than 20 male workers for every female in a dangerous war zone thousands of miles from home, where laws and law enforcement are at best uncertain, sex crimes would seem almost inevitable.

A shooting in Baghdad in September involving Blackwater guards that left 17 Iraqis dead highlighted the fact that the laws governing contractors remained unclear. In cases involving sexual assault, for example, soldiers and other military personnel can be prosecuted under the military justice system, but that system does not apply to contractors.

Instead, a little-used law, the Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act, seems to be the closest law that could apply to contractors charged with rape, but its legal reach has been under wide debate since the Blackwater shootings.

Paul Brand, a Chicago psychologist who counsels contractors who have served in Iraq, said the harassment of female workers by male colleagues was common. "The extent of the harassment varies greatly from contractor to contractor, depending on how diligently they screen job candidates and management's willingness to encourage women to report problems," he said. "In many instances, very little or nothing is done."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Headlined on 2/26/08:
Sex, Halliburton, and the State Department
http://www.opednews.com/articles/opedne_david_sw_080226_sex_2c_halliburton_2c_an.htm
by David Swanson     Page 1 of 1 page(s)


On Wednesday, February 27th, from 8 to 9 p.m. ET I'll be interviewing live another female Halliburton employee who was subjected to an environment of constant sexual harassment in Iraq. Tracy Barker was sexually assaulted by Halliburton employees and - in one instance - by a U.S. State Department employee in Basra, Iraq. The State Department employee has confessed to part of what Barker alleges, but remains at the State Department, and has never been charged with any crime. You can listen to the live interview and call in with your questions on Wednesday at http://www.thepeoplespeakradio.net

At the same link, you'll find the audio file of a recent interview I conducted with Jamie Leigh Jones, a victim of gang rape by employees of the Halliburton corporation in Iraq. Jones has become the best known of what appears to be a lengthy list of Halliburton employees subjected to sexual assault. U.S. contractors in Iraq cannot be prosecuted under Iraqi law and simply are not prosecuted under U.S. law.
 

An ABC News 20/20 report last December focused largely on Jones' story, and Jones also testified before Congress that month. But if you watch the 20/20 report through to the end you'll see a second story as well, that of Tracy Barker: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ez9fFRuJB-4


Barker has brought charges against Halliburton/KBR claiming that she was sexually assaulted, harassed, and falsely imprisoned while working at Camp Hope in Basra, Iraq. Barker is a military wife and mother of 3 who worked for Halliburton's KBR subsidiary as an administrative assistant in Iraq while her husband served in the U.S. military. According to ABC News, Barker claims that State Department employee Ali Mokhtare attempted to rape her: http://abcnews.go.com/Blotter/Story?id=3998439

"Mokhtare denied that he had attempted to rape her, but admitted that he had gone too far with Tracy, and signed a statement to that effect, which ABC News has obtained. In the document, Mokhtare states he 'admitted that he pulled her vest and shirt' and that he asked Barker, 'What do you have behind there?' He also says that he 'made a mistake and it was stupid,' according to the document. Despite his admission, Mokhtare, a U.S. citizen, still works at the State Department today....

"Mokhtare was a diplomatic official in Basra who first came to Iraq as a Farsi translator interviewing detainees. The U.S. Diplomatic Security Service investigated the allegations against Mokhtare and presented the case to the Justice Department for prosecution, but 'the case was declined for prosecution' states the document. Furthermore, investigators requested that the State Department suspend Mokhtare's security clearance, but according to a handwritten note at the bottom of the document, that request was denied."

Following the incident, Barker says, Halliburton confined her to a living container where she was constantly watched, including when she used the bathroom. Food was brought to her as if she was a prisoner, and she was denied medical attention and any outside communications. Barker says she was forced several days later to wear the same clothing she'd worn the night of the assault (ordinary pants and a long-sleeved shirt) and paraded through a crowded dining area apparently to humiliate her. This was part of the official investigation, aimed at determining whether she was sexually provocative. At this point she was still be refused medical attention.

Eventually, Barker says, she was able to use a cellphone belonging to National Guardsman Kevin Rodgers. Barker’s husband, 1st Sergeant Galen Barker, says that his wife contacted him through Rodgers. He then tried unsuccessfully to get to Kuwait so that he could rescue his wife from Iraq. Barker continued to be held against her will by Halliburton, and the State Department continued to stall her release. She was eventually rescued by Dr. David Pakkal of the State Department who took her to Kuwait.

When she returned home, Barker spoke out about what she had been through and began pursuing justice through U.S. courts. She says she was the first victim to do so. Several months after returning home, in July of 2005, Barker started receiving phone calls from other Halliburton employees who also alleged sexual harassment and rape while in Iraq. Barker learned that a State Department investigator and a Halliburton employee had given her home phone number out to gang rape victims because they thought Barker could help them.

Barker says the State Department offered her $3,500 in cash to drop certain charges, but she refused.

Halliburton has requested private arbitration instead of facing a civil suit and claims that this is required by Barker's employment contract. A judge ruled this month in favor of arbitration, arguing that sexual harassment, including assault, is a reality in today's workplace. Barker's attorney Stewart Hoffer is in the process of appealing this order.

Barker was invited to testify before Congress on December 19, 2007, by Congressman Bob Etheridge. Barker’s newborn twins were fighting for their lives, but Barker made the trip to Washington, only to be denied the opportunity to testify. Barker was permitted only to submit to the House Judiciary Committee a statement from Letty Surman, Barker's human resources manager at Halliburton/KBR and an eyewitness to some of her ordeals. Surman's affidavit detailed Barker’s workplace experience and described the men who assaulted Barker.

Barker has created the Tracy K. Barker Foundation to help other women who have also been victimized while working overseas.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: Rape, Halliburton, KBR, Record Profits, and the State Department
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2008, 01:53:34 AM »
February 13, 2008
http://www.msmagazine.com/news/uswirestory.asp?ID=10817
Alleged KBR Rape Victim Testifies at Another House Hearing

Jamie Leigh Jones, a former KBR employee, testified again on Tuesday at a Congressional hearing that she was drugged and gang-raped by a group of her co-workers in the Green Zone KBR camp in Iraq in 2005. She also asked lawmakers to address the difficulties victims of such crimes face in suing their employers when the crimes occur abroad.

The issue received national attention last year and Jones testified in a Congressional hearing on the issue last December. Since then, more women have spoken out. Women are now reporting being sexually assaulted by co-workers while working with contractors in Iraq, but they are not receiving real compensation or justice.

Mary Beth Kineston, an American truck driver for KRB, says she was sexually assaulted by a fellow driver, who continued to work for KRB even after she made a complaint. Subsequently, she was groped by another KRB worker and was fired when she attempted to place a second complaint.

Five years after the United States invasion on Iraq, the U.S. has still not created laws to protect Americans working under American contractors in foreign countries. The lack of legal protection makes it difficult for women to defend themselves through the legal system, leaving them in kind of "legal limbo," according to the New York Times.

Jones said on Tuesday, "Victims of crime perpetrated by employees of taxpayer-funded government contracts in Iraq deserve the same standard of treatment and protection governed by the same laws whether they are working in the U.S. or abroad."

Media Resources: New York Times 2/13/08; Feminist Daily Newswire 12/20/07, 1/15/08; ABC News 12/10/07
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: Rape, Halliburton, KBR, Record Profits, and the State Department
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2008, 01:54:18 AM »
Gang-Rape Victim Says She And Others Silenced by Halliburton
Jones Says They Are Forced To Argue Their Sexual Assault Cases in Secretive Arbitration
By MADDY SAUER
http://www.abcnews.go.com/print?id=4278133
Feb. 12, 2008—



A Houston, Texas woman, who says she was gang-raped by her co-workers at a Halliburton/KBR camp in Baghdad, says 38 women have come forward through her foundation to report their own tragic stories to her, but that many cannot speak publicly due to arbitration agreements in their employment contracts.

Jamie Leigh Jones is testifying on Capitol Hill this afternoon. She says she and other women are being forced to argue their cases of sexual harassment, assault and rape before secretive arbitration panels rather than in open court before a judge and jury.

Jones returned from Iraq following her rape in 2005. She was the subject of an exclusive ABC News report in December which led to congressional hearings.

After months of waiting for criminal charges to be filed, Jones decided to file suit against Halliburton and KBR.

KBR has moved for Jones' claim to be heard in private arbitration, instead of a public courtroom, as provided under the terms of her original employment contract.

Halliburton, which has since divested itself of KBR, says it is improperly named in the suit and referred calls to KBR.

In arbitration, there is no public record or transcript of the proceedings, meaning that Jones' claims would not be heard before a judge and jury. Rather, a private arbitrator hired by the corporation would decide Jones' case.

In fact, Tracy Barker, who says she was sexually harassed and sexually assaulted while working for Halliburton/KBR in Iraq, also recently tried to file suit against the companies. She was forced into arbitration last month.

Jones will tell Congress today that she was not aware that when she signed her employment contract, she was effectively signing away her right to bring a lawsuit.

"When I decided to pursue a civil suit, I was informed that within my 13-page employment contract that had an additional five pages attached, [there was] included an arbitration clause," Jones says in her prepared statement to the committee.

Jones didn't know much about arbitration when she signed the contract and was shocked to learn what she had done.

"I learned that I had signed away my right to a trial by jury," she said.

Congressman Ted Poe, R-Texas, who has been involved in the Jones case since the beginning, will also appear at today's hearing. He disagrees with the arbitration solution.

"Air things out in a public forum of a courtroom," said Rep. Poe in an earlier interview with ABC News. "That's why we have courts in the United States."

More than two years since her attack, no criminal charges have been brought in the matter, and legal experts say that it is highly unlikely that Jones' alleged assailants will ever face a judge and jury.

Jones says that the arbitration clauses are letting her rapists and other criminals off the legal hook.

"The forced arbitration clause in Army contractor's contracts prove to protect the criminals of violent crimes, rather than enforce they be held accountable by a judge and jury," Jones says in her remarks. "My goal is to ensure all American civilians who become victims of violent crimes while abroad have the right to justice before a judge and jury."

KBR said in a statement to ABCNews.com, "Arbitration is the last step of KBR's Dispute Resolution Program. The vast majority of employment disputes at KBR, approximately 96 percent, are resolved through this program without resort to arbitration. KBR remains committed to ensuring the arbitration process is fair to all employees."

Since the attacks, Jones has started a nonprofit foundation called the Jamie Leigh Foundation, which is dedicated to helping victims who were raped or sexually assaulted overseas while working for government contractors or other corporations.

"I want other women to know that it's not their fault," said Jones. "They can go against corporations that have treated them this way." Jones said that any proceeds from the civil suit will go to her foundation.


"There needs to be a voice out there that really pushed for change," she said. "I'd like to be that voice."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Rape in the U.S. military
How a fraternal culture and a habit of blaming the victim leave sexual violence unexamined and unpunished.
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/la-oew-marshall30jan30,0,510658.story
By Lucinda Marshall
January 30, 2008

Anne K. Ream's recent Op-Ed sheds much needed light on how the U.S. military continues to trivialize rape and sexual assault committed by members of the armed forces. Writing about whether a man who is convicted of rape in a civilian court should still be entitled to a traditional military funeral, Ream points out that although barring full honor burials in such a situation is largely a symbolic act, "the military policy of allowing honors burials for veterans convicted of rape sends a chilling message to victims: Even the most heinous sexual violence does not trump prior military service."

The case Ream refers to is not an isolated incident of fraternal militarism being used to excuse sexual violence. In a recent court case in Lebanon, Penn., an Army Reserve sergeant was convicted of indecent assault after rape charges were dropped when fellow soldiers who were present at the incident refused to cooperate with police. Responding to the verdict, the defendant's attorney said she thought he should have been cleared of all charges. "After all, he did serve his country."

Unfortunately, this mind-set is consistent with the Pentagon's very poor record of prosecuting sexual assault and rape within the ranks while at the same time disregarding and further victimizing those who report these heinous crimes. To put these cases in perspective, there were 2,947 reports of sexual assaults in the military in 2006, an increase in reports of 24% over 2005. However, very few of these cases tend to be prosecuted. A Pentagon report [PDF] in March 2007 found that more than half of the investigations dating back to 2004 resulted in no action. When action was taken, only one third of the cases resulted in courts-martial.

Indeed, in many cases, the military seems more intent on intimidating and harassing the victims than investigating and prosecuting the charges. In 2004, after Lt. Jennifer Dyer reported being raped by a fellow officer at Camp Shelby, Miss., she said she was held in seclusion for three days, read her Miranda rights and threatened with criminal prosecution for filing a false report. After finally being given two weeks leave, she was threatened with prosecution for being AWOL when she would not report for duty to the same location where the man she had accused — who was later acquitted on assault charges — was still posted.

Lance Cpl. Sally Griffiths was also accused of lying after she reported being raped by a fellow Marine while stationed in Okinawa, Japan. It wasn't until she got access to her case file and found a statement by the Marine that confirmed her story that she was able to obtain the discharge she sought. The Marine she accused was never prosecuted. He continued to serve in the military and was promoted several times.

After Army Spc. Suzanne Swift went AWOL instead of staying in the same unit as the soldiers who she accused of sexually harassing her, the Army court-martialed her when she refused a deal that would have forced her to remain in the military and sign a statement saying she had not been raped.

More recently, there have been the well-publicized cases of Lance Cpl. Maria Lauterbach, who was murdered after accusing another Marine of rape, and Jamie Leigh Jones, who says that she was gang-raped while working for Halliburton/KBR in Iraq. Jones claims that after she reported her rape, the company put her in a shipping container and warned her that she would lose her job if she left Iraq for medical treatment. The rape kit collected by military medical personnel was lost after it was turned over to Halliburton/KBR. The Pentagon has refused to investigate or to testify before Congress.

In allowing convicted rapists to be buried with full honors, the military continues to perpetuate the culture of impunity that allows soldiers to commit sexual violence with little worry of being brought to justice. As Ream concludes, it is sadly ironic that even though rape and sexual violence are now considered war crimes, our own military persists in practices that perpetuate those crimes. Unfortunately, this is merely one more example of the misogyny implicit in military culture. Women's bodies and lives have always been considered the spoils of war. The military's continuing disregard and disrespect for the safety of women's lives even within their own ranks, and in disregard of international law, should give us pause to wonder just whose freedom we are protecting.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Alleged rape victim says contract stifling
http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Top_News/2008/02/12/alleged_rape_victim_says_contract_stifling/6133/
Published: Feb. 12, 2008 at 8:21 PM

WASHINGTON, Feb. 12 (UPI) -- A Texas woman claiming Halliburton/KBR co-workers gang-raped her in Iraq says she and other women are prohibited by contract from talking about their cases.

Jamie Leigh Jones, in remarks prepared for testimony Tuesday before the House Judiciary Committee, said she and 38 women were forced to argue their claims of sexual harassment, assault and rape before private arbitration panels rather than in open court, ABC News reported.

Jones, of Houston, returned from Iraq in 2005. After months of waiting for criminal charges to be filed, Jones sued Halliburton and KBR. KBR moved to have the claim heard in arbitration as Jones' contract provided.

Jones said she didn't know when she signed her employment contract she was ceding her right to sue.

"When I decided to pursue a civil suit, I was informed that within my 13-page employment contract that had an additional five pages attached, (there was) included an arbitration clause," Jones said in her prepared statement. "I learned that I had signed away my right to a trial by jury."

Jones founded the nonprofit Jamie Leigh Foundation, which helps victims of sexual crime overseas while working for government contractors or other corporations.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Avoiding the 'inevitable' Preventing rape requires truly addressing the ways in which societies systematically devalue women
[For the record, this is a crime and should be punished as a crime ASAP to the full extent of the law!  Did Pat Tillman get more justice because he is male?  I mean this is a bit preposterous but shows that they are just trying anything to avoid the obvious...THE WAR IS TOTALLY ILLEGAL AND WE NEED TO GET OUT ASAP!  IT IS A HELL HOLE WHERE RAPE, MURDER, FRAUD, AND CORRUPTION ARE THE DEFAULT!]
http://commentisfree.guardian.co.uk/anna_sussman/2008/02/avoiding_the_inevitable.html
Anna Sussman February 15, 2008 4:30 PM

The recent decision by the House of Lords allowing rape survivors to sue their rapists for compensation, regardless of how old the claim is, should be welcomed. But since the conviction rate in the United Kingdom is less than 6%, the ruling provides little relief for the 94 out of 100 women whose perpetrators walk free.

This Saturday, at the Trinity United Reformed Church in Camden, rape survivors will testify in an unofficial public trial about their experiences of sexual and domestic violence, their efforts to protect themselves, and the reactions of local authorities. Some will wear scarves and dark glasses for anonymity; others will face the crowd head-on. Hosted by the organisation Women Against Rape (WAR), it aims to give survivors of sexual violence a chance to air their grievances and taste justice, albeit in an informal arena. Although far smaller in scale, it has a historical precedent in the 2000 Women's International War Crimes Tribunal on Japan's Military Sexual Slavery (pdf).

Prosecutors and police in the UK have also recently proposed to allow rape survivors to use text messages and phone calls to lead rapists into incriminating themselves. And while this strategy, already used in the US and Canada, may help, it is hopelessly reactive.

But a lame reaction is better than no reaction, such as that of the United States' department of justice (DoJ) to allegations of gang rape of an employee of KBR, the largest private military contractor operating in Iraq, by her colleagues in 2005. After its crime victims office ruled out an investigation, claiming it did not have jurisdiction, the DoJ took callousness to new heights when it refused to send a single lawyer for questioning to the December 2007 congressional hearing where Jamie Leigh Jones testified.

With Hillary Clinton banging on their door, the state department and the US army's criminal investigation command have begun to dribble out some figures on their investigations of sexual assault cases in Iraq, but there are no comprehensive statistics on what appears to be a frighteningly common phenomenon. Anyway, rape is just, you know, part of the job.

Where would someone get that idea? Writing in the International Herald Tribune on Wednesday, reporter James Risen states that: "With a ratio of more than 20 male workers for every female in a dangerous war zone thousands of miles from home, where laws and law enforcement are at best uncertain, sex crimes would seem almost inevitable." Inevitable? So sexual assault is like a Christmas bonus for female KBR employees working in Iraq? In taking a job there, are they simply begging for it?

In the three months since her testimony, Jones and her lawyers have been contacted by 38 women with similar stories. Luckily for Jones, the lurid and scarcely believable details of her case - she was drugged, raped vaginally and anally, locked in a shipping container for 24 hours, and only able to escape when the soft-hearted armed security guard standing outside her container lent her his cellphone and she reached her family - caught the public's attention, and a federal grand jury in Florida has finally begun a criminal investigation into her case.

In all of these situations, justice delayed is more than justice denied. Convictions and compensation, while worth pursuing, always come a day late and a dollar short. Preventing rape - the real solution - requires truly addressing the ways in which societies systematically devalue women, to the point where rape becomes "inevitable".
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Halliburton, Rape and the Failure of Justice
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/cristobal-joshua-alex/halliburton-rape-and-the_b_86218.html
Posted February 12, 2008 | 11:16 AM (EST)
 

Something odd happened in Texas just a few days ago. Tracy Barker, a former Halliburton employee who was sexually assaulted by her co-workers, had her case against Halliburton thrown out by a Bush-appointed federal judge. So why is this odd?

Well, actually, it may seem odd, but it's no longer unusual. The courts--designed to protect the minority from the majority, and often the last resort for people to vindicate their rights--are closing their doors to millions of Americans and sending some of them to secret arbitrations. In about 94% of the arbitrations involving what happened on the job, the employers win, and the employee is forced to pay the arbitrator just to hear their claims, as well the employer's legal expenses. Oh, and I forgot to mention that the arbitrator is chosen by the employer. Sound just?

As first reported by ABC News, Tracy Barker arrived in Baghdad in September 2004 to begin work for KBR, then a subsidiary of Halliburton. Not long after she arrived, Tracy's coworkers and supervisors made sexually abusive comments, berating and belittling her, and threatening her with physical harm. When she reported the abuse to Halliburton, Tracy was retaliated against.

In June of 2005, after intimidating her with stories about women who had been raped and left to die, Ali Mokhtare, a state department employee who worked closely with the Halliburton employees, attempted to rape Tracy. She was able to escape his attack, but not before Mokhtare had sexually assaulted her. Tracy reported the incident to her direct supervisor, who responded by offering to protect her in exchange for sexual favors. He persisted in his advances, and one evening, he entered her living quarters on a false pretense and sexually assaulted her.

Tracy Barker is not alone in having suffered sexual violence at the hands of her coworkers at Halliburton. The story of Jamie Leigh Jones, now widely known, parallels Tracy Barker's story. Before Jones left for Iraq, she was told that she would be living in a trailer with one other woman, but when she arrived in Baghdad, she discovered that she was stationed in a predominantly male barracks, where she reports that she never saw another woman. Like Tracy Barker, she was the object of belittling remarks and sexual advances from the men in her barracks, but when she requested to be moved to the living quarters that were promised her, her request was denied. On her fourth day in Iraq, Jamie Leigh Jones was drugged and gang-raped by five to six men.

Over two and a half years have passed since Tracy Barker and Jamie Leigh Jones were assaulted. Ali Mokhtare, who admitted to having assaulted Tracy Barker, is still working for the state department and has faced no disciplinary action. The men who raped Jamie Leigh Jones have not been brought to justice, and neither has Halliburton.

Because Tracy and Jamie signed an employment contract requiring binding mandatory arbitration, they may never have their rights vindicated in open court. The clause at issue in Halliburton's employment contract has prevented both Barker and Jones from suing for discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 in a civil court.

According to Tort Deform, the problem with mandatory arbitration extends far and wide:

"Most Americans do not know it, but, on a regular basis, they inadvertently sign away their right to go to a public court and have a trial by jury. Often found nestled in a small section of a contract for things like a credit card or a form for a patient about to undergo surgery, arbitration agreements have a large impact on a person's ability to exercise his or her legal rights."

Judge Gray Miller, the judge who threw out Tracy's case, recognized, without irony that "sadly, sexual harassment, up to and including sexual assault, is a reality in today's workplace." Yet, he determined that she had agreed to arbitration when she signed her employment contract and, because of recent decisions by the Supreme Court and the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, that he had to uphold the arbitration clause rather than letting the case go forward in court. He placed the burden on Congress to address the problem, stating "The Supreme Court has held that statutory claims may be arbitrable as long as Congress has expressed no intent to the contrary."

Judge Miller was right about one thing. Congress will need to step in and fix this mess, because the courthouse doors are closing fast. There are some in D.C. who are starting to take notice. Two pieces of legislation, the Arbitration Fairness Act and the Civil Rights Act of 2008 would return many of the protections that Tracy, Jamie and the rest of us never should have lost.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Amd304912

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US: Energy Dept. Audit Finds Overcharges On Contracts Alleged 'Padding' By KBR Affiliate

by Dana Hedgpeth, Washington Post
October 30th, 2007

The Los Alamos National Laboratory paid millions of dollars in questionable charges to a contractor affiliated with KBR, according to a recent audit by the Energy Department's inspector general.

In three-quarters of the "work order tasks" analyzed from the last two years, the inspector general found cost overruns of 20 percent or more. The inspector general examined 94,561 cases.

KBR was formerly known as Kellogg, Brown and Root.

In several cases, the contractor -- KSL Services Joint Venture, which was formed by KBR, Shaw Infrastructure and Los Alamos Technical Associates -- put estimates of 1 cent into a computerized payment system as a "place holder," according to a report by Gregory H. Friedman, the Energy Department's inspector general. For example, one work order actually totaled $101,978.08.

Eight of 10 managers at the Los Alamos lab whom auditors talked to said "estimates are overrun a fair amount of the time" or "estimates are overrun consistently," the report said.

KBR spokeswoman Heather Browne disagreed with the findings. She said that before the report came out, "KSL Services worked with LANL to implement new processes and procedures designed to address many of the issues raised in the report."

KSL was awarded a contract in February 2003 valued at nearly $800 million over five years, under which it provides mechanical and site-support services such as repairing doors, fixing plumbing and maintaining landscaping.

The University of California and Bechtel have a $2 billion contract with the Energy Department to run the laboratory. The facility recently has experienced several security lapses, lost computer drives and contracting problems. KSL operates under a subcontract to the lab.

The inspector general's report also found substantial problems with KSL overcharging for labor and materials.

In one case, $10,191 was paid for more than twice the amount of electrical wire that a job needed. In another instance, a nuclear safety engineer charged $4,900 on a job, triple the expected cost. In working on patching cracks on a loading dock, a foreman charged three hours to the work order -- more than four months before the job being done. And one KSL employee charged eight hours for re-gluing carpet tiles, a job that only took him 15 minutes to finish, according to the report.

Another $9,780 was paid for work to upgrade fire alarms that was never done. Lab officials told auditors that charges for labor and material were "questionable, inappropriate, excessive, or unsupported based on their knowledge of the work performed," the inspector general said.

Auditors were told of inappropriate timekeeping charges, work orders being submitted by people who did not work on them, unapproved overtime charges and other unexplained charges.

An official at the lab said that "when KSL workers have no work to do, they are being subsidized, and work order 'padding' is common," the report said.

The lab's computerized billing system, called PassPort, had a category called "Other Costs" that allowed KSL to recover up to $20,000 a year in unanticipated costs. But the costs reached $41 million last year and were already over $14 million by the end of May 2007, according to the inspector general's report, and it was unclear what the lab had paid for.

The lab is also conducting an internal audit of the KSL contract.
http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=14779
faith basers make me as sick as free basers Surah 75 سورة القيامة - محمد [ http://powerofthadolla.freeforums.org/ ] An Almond for a Parrot
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Offline Amd304912

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US: Rice Says ‘Hole’ in U.S. Law Shields Contractors in Iraq


by John M. Broder, NY Times
October 26th, 2007

Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice conceded on Thursday that there was a “hole” in United States law that had allowed Blackwater USA employees and other armed contractors in Iraq to escape legal jeopardy for crimes possibly committed there.

In an appearance before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Ms. Rice said the administration would support new laws that would apply to contractors but expressed reservations about proposals to bring contractors under the military justice system.

She deferred a number of other questions about problems with the supervision of the thousands of private security guards in Iraq, saying she planned to meet with Robert M. Gates, the secretary of defense, to try to come up with new rules to avoid episodes like the shooting by Blackwater gunmen on Sept. 16 that Iraqi investigators have said left 17 Iraqis dead. “Obviously we need a better coordinated policy for all of them,” she said.

Blackwater, meanwhile, under continuing siege in the courts, the news media and Congress, stepped up its public relations efforts this week with a mass e-mail message to its employees, suppliers, fellow security contractors and political allies, asking them to flood Congress with messages of support.

The e-mail message noted that the Blackwater “family” was working vigorously to defend American interests. “In this tumultuous political climate,” Blackwater “has taken center stage, our services and ethics aggressively challenged with misinformation and fabrications,” the message said. “While we can’t ask that each supporter do everything, Blackwater asks that everyone does something. Contact your lawmakers and tell them to stand by the truth.”

It then suggests some talking points: Blackwater is saving taxpayers millions of dollars by providing temporary workers to take the place of full-time government or military employees; 30 Blackwater guards have been killed in Iraq and Afghanistan but none of the American officials they guard have been killed or seriously wounded; and Blackwater’s work force is mainly military veterans and “mature law enforcement personnel.”

“Expanding our communications effort starts with you,” said the Blackwater message, which was sent by Constant Contact, an e-mail marketing firm. “Pass the word — pass the truth.”

Blackwater’s spokeswoman, Anne Tyrrell, did not respond to requests for comment.

In response to questions, Ms. Rice acknowledged that there was rampant corruption in the Iraqi government, but said that the State Department was working to fix the problem. “There’s a pervasive problem of corruption in Iraq,” she said. “There is a problem in the ministries. There is a problem in the government. There are problems with officials.”

“It is our job to put in place anticorruption efforts to help the Iraqis do so themselves, but I don’t know how to be more candid,” she said. “I don’t know how to be less flattering.”

She said some of the money stolen from the Iraqi government was financing insurgent militias, particularly in the Shiite-dominated south. But she added that it would be unfair to confront senior Iraqi leaders with unproven accusations of wrongdoing.

“To assault the prime minister of Iraq or anyone else in Iraq with here-to-date unsubstantiated allegations or lack of corroboration in a setting that it would simply fuel those allegations, I think, would be deeply damaging, and frankly, I think it would be wrong,” she said.

A number of Democratic members of the committee pressed the issue, saying they had heard from American Embassy staff and Iraqis that American anticorruption efforts were ineffective or nonexistent and that the problem threatened the mission in Iraq.

“Corruption funds terrorists who attack our troops,” said Representative Elijah E. Cummings, Democrat of Maryland. “Corruption fuels sectarian divisions. Corruption stymies reconstruction efforts and certainly it erodes confidence in the Iraqi government.”

But Representative Tom Davis of Virginia, the senior Republican on the committee, dismissed the three-hour hearing as a partisan effort to undermine the war.

“We should have no illusions about the subtext of these hearings,” he said. “Unable to reverse course, the Democratic strategy seems to be to drill enough small holes in the bottom of the boat to sink the entire Iraqi enterprise, while still claiming undying support for the crew about to drown.”
http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=14773
faith basers make me as sick as free basers Surah 75 سورة القيامة - محمد [ http://powerofthadolla.freeforums.org/ ] An Almond for a Parrot
€∀§M_ ł حتى الآلهة الحمار الاحتفاظ زنجي الخراء تمشيا   أنت كافر نكاح تفرز من الشيطان الاكبر يا  ح

Offline chris jones

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Castration is a primitive form of punishment.

If a man decides to destroy the life of a woman, or an innocent, I admit Im old fashioned and primitive in that regard. Especaly so when a person of position uses his underlings for their own sexual desires and deviations.
I"m sure many of you feel the same way, in fact, given the reality of the site Im very sure of it.

Rice has said there is a hole in the US law concerning contrators.
This shows me what she thinks of human beings. In other words they can do what they want, just like her master.
CJ




Offline TahoeBlue

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Halliburton/KBR mentioned on the show today....


http://www.theolympian.com/2011/07/08/1716944/jury-deliberating-womans-claims.html
Texas woman loses Iraq rape case against KBR
By PAUL J. WEBER and MICHAEL GRACZYK | Associated Press • Published July 08, 2011


HOUSTON – A former KBR Inc. employee who said she was drugged and raped while working in Iraq lost her lawsuit against the military contractor Friday.

The jury of eight men and three women rejected Jamie Leigh Jones ' claims a day after starting deliberations in a Houston federal courthouse. Jones, 26, said she was raped in 2005 while working for KBR at Camp Hope, Baghdad.

Jones sued KBR, its former parent Halliburton Co., and a former KBR firefighter, Charles Bortz, whom she identified as one of her rapists. The Houston-based companies and Bortz denied her allegations.

The alleged sexual assault was investigated by authorities but no criminal charges were filed.

"I was going up against a monster," Jones, sobbing loudly, told The Associated Press. "I'm devastated. I believe I did the right thing coming forward."

KBR applauded the jury's verdict, which in addition to rejecting Jones' claims that she was raped also denied her fraud claim against the company.

"Since 2005, KBR has been subjected to a continuing series of lies perpetuated by the plaintiff in front of Congress, in the media, and to any audience wishing to lend an ear to this story," spokeswoman Sharon Bolen said in a statement.

When the jury decided that Jones hadn't been raped, a number of the questions before them were rendered moot, including accusations against Halliburton, said KBR attorney Daniel Hedges.

Jones said the civil trial wasn't a fair fight. She said she felt she lost because the jury wasn't allowed to hear details of her attacker's past but were allowed to hear hers. Bortz said the sex was consensual.

Jones said she believed her bruises and the description of the rape would have swayed jurors.

"I just thought that the physical evidence would help. I guess the fact that my entire life was on display and (his) wasn't" made a difference, Jones said.

Her attorney had asked jurors to award her as much as 5 percent of KBR's net worth in actual or punitive damages. That would be more than $114 million, the Houston Chronicle reported.

Attorney Ron Estefan, in his closing arguments, accused KBR of neglecting to enforce its policies against sexual harassment for years by its contract workers in Iraq. The neglect facilitated Jones' rape, he said.

Lawyers for Bortz and the companies argued that Jones concocted her story out of fear of gossip among co-workers at the camp.
...
Read more: http://www.theolympian.com/2011/07/08/1716944/jury-deliberating-womans-claims.html#ixzz1SaHvC83o
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline ghost hacked

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http://www.amazon.ca/Halliburtons-Army-Well-Connected-Company-Revolutionized/dp/1568583923

I had read this book recently. Shows most of what is talked about here, human rights abuse, human trafficking, and a whole whack of other shady shit ..  really worth the read.
'We play the game with the bravery of being out of range.' - Roger Waters

Offline Catalina

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This will make you sick!

Woman Gang-Raped by 7 Halliburton Employees "Signed Away" Her Right to Sue? How Justice Has Become the Privilege of Corporations

http://www.alternet.org/reproductivejustice/151452/woman_gang-raped_by_7_halliburton_employees_%22signed_away%22_her_right_to_sue_how_justice_has_become_the_privilege_of_corporations/
Spare no cost for truth's sake, neither depart from it for any gain. -Proverbs 23:23

Bestow not the gifts that God has given you to get worldly riches. -Proverbs 23:4