THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE

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Online Jackson Holly

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THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« on: August 23, 2015, 08:34:14 AM »

… about the glorification of the
violent, misogynistic, anti-European,
sex-obsessed, "hip-hop" sub-culture
that has taken over American society.



Straight Outta Excuses: Rap Culture
Blames Police for Black-on-Black Violence

Aug. 22, 2015   Mary Ramirez

  http://www.theblaze.com/contributions/straight-outta-excuses-rap-culture-blames-police-for-black-on-black-violence/
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2015, 09:16:50 AM »


… straight outta hell?

Rap Game Christopher Columbus
A look at pop’s colonization of hip-hop.
Justin Charity  DEC 12, 2014

"
Hip-hop is black art. Yes, sure, there’s Rick Rubin, there’s the Beastie Boys, there’s 3rd Bass and The Cactus Album, there’s Lyor Cohen, there’s Eminem—as with any artform that’s ever sought to flourish commercially, hip-hop’s got white pioneers, engineers, and experts aplenty. Yet from inception to present day, rap is an artform that’s primarily fluent in black culture, marginalized perspectives, the accents and vernacular of the oppressed. Still, it’s an irrepressible fact of modern commerce that white kids, insufferable or not, are helping Pusha T, Bun B, and Juicy J pay various car notes.

~~~~~~~

"

Within the past year, under circumstances that I’ll be so kind as not to disclose, Dr. Naison found himself in Vegas, in lively nightclub company, face-to-face with a stripper pole installed for patron use, DIY. “The whole scene was mostly middle class men and women,” Dr. Naison recalls. “As many women as men, letting go their inhibitions in the most astonishing way, some of which I can’t even talk about, to this music, which was all eroticized, rather boring hip-hop filled with ghetto-centric eroticism and artists varying in race, nationality, and gender.”

http://www.complex.com/music/2014/12/cultural-appropriation-in-music-hip-hop-and-pop
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Online Al Bundy

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2015, 09:40:01 AM »
Jackson, maybe you just do not like rap music ?  ;D

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2015, 09:42:05 AM »



The 21st Century Hip-Hop Minstrel Show:
Are We Continuing the Blackface Tradition?

by Raphael Heaggans

"
Rap music empowered people during its heyday. However, some elements within hip-hop music date back to slavery. The formation of baggy pants, gangs, glorification of prisons, objectification of women, pimping, celebration of the ghetto, and odes to marijuana have become consistent themes within hip hop that aides in psychologically affecting youths' perceptions about Black life around the world.

These stereotypic images of Blacks were perpetuated in the minstrel show by Whites-in blackface in the 1800s-as a means of entertaining other Whites. Today, some Black male hip hop artists perpetuate such false stereotypic portrayals of Black life for the entertainment of a mostly-suburbanite audience.

These portrayals perpetuate the legacy of slavery while the Black male hip-hop artist is making pennies compared to the big bucks the recording and distribution companies are earning off the backs of any willing Black male hip-hop artist who will degrade himself and his race in great stereotypic proportions. This stance goes against what our Black, White, gay, and Jewish ancestors fought against during slavery and the Civil Rights Movement.


http://www.amazon.com/21st-Century-Hip-Hop-Minstrel-Show/dp/1934269514
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2015, 09:52:40 AM »
Jackson, maybe you just do not like rap music ?  ;D


I moved to a diffent village where hip hop rap is prevalent. Theft is said to be a problem here as well as meth use. Previous town the favored music was country and old school rock and roll. That town had much less problems with theft etc.
I don't like the gangsta culture one bit.

EvadingGrid

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2015, 09:54:41 AM »
There is some stuff on how they used Rap Music as a weapon against people.
There is also stuff about Rap Music and the Illuminati.

Hopefully some body will post about that.

Offline One Revelator

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The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2015, 10:16:09 AM »
There is some stuff on how they used Rap Music as a weapon against people.
There is also stuff about Rap Music and the Illuminati.

Hopefully some body will post about that.

You mean this? Intentionally introduced to make money for new, privatized prisons?

The Secret Meeting that Changed Rap Music and Destroyed a Generation

Hello,

After more than 20 years, I've finally decided to tell the world what I witnessed in 1991, which I believe was one of the biggest turning point in popular music, and ultimately American society. I have struggled for a long time weighing the pros and cons of making this story public as I was reluctant to implicate the individuals who were present that day. So I've simply decided to leave out names and all the details that may risk my personal well being and that of those who were, like me, dragged into something they weren't ready for.

Between the late 80's and early 90’s, I was what you may call a “decision maker” with one of the more established company in the music industry. I came from Europe in the early 80’s and quickly established myself in the business. The industry was different back then. Since technology and media weren’t accessible to people like they are today, the industry had more control over the public and had the means to influence them anyway it wanted. This may explain why in early 1991, I was invited to attend a closed door meeting with a small group of music business insiders to discuss rap music’s new direction. Little did I know that we would be asked to participate in one of the most unethical and destructive business practice I’ve ever seen.

The meeting was held at a private residence on the outskirts of Los Angeles. I remember about 25 to 30 people being there, most of them familiar faces. Speaking to those I knew, we joked about the theme of the meeting as many of us did not care for rap music and failed to see the purpose of being invited to a private gathering to discuss its future. Among the attendees was a small group of unfamiliar faces who stayed to themselves and made no attempt to socialize beyond their circle. Based on their behavior and formal appearances, they didn't seem to be in our industry. Our casual chatter was interrupted when we were asked to sign a confidentiality agreement preventing us from publicly discussing the information presented during the meeting. Needless to say, this intrigued and in some cases disturbed many of us. The agreement was only a page long but very clear on the matter and consequences which stated that violating the terms would result in job termination. We asked several people what this meeting was about and the reason for such secrecy but couldn't find anyone who had answers for us. A few people refused to sign and walked out. No one stopped them. I was tempted to follow but curiosity got the best of me. A man who was part of the “unfamiliar” group collected the agreements from us.

Quickly after the meeting began, one of my industry colleagues (who shall remain nameless like everyone else) thanked us for attending. He then gave the floor to a man who only introduced himself by first name and gave no further details about his personal background. I think he was the owner of the residence but it was never confirmed. He briefly praised all of us for the success we had achieved in our industry and congratulated us for being selected as part of this small group of “decision makers”. At this point I begin to feel slightly uncomfortable at the strangeness of this gathering. The subject quickly changed as the speaker went on to tell us that the respective companies we represented had invested in a very profitable industry which could become even more rewarding with our active involvement. He explained that the companies we work for had invested millions into the building of privately owned prisons and that our positions of influence in the music industry would actually impact the profitability of these investments. I remember many of us in the group immediately looking at each other in confusion. At the time, I didn’t know what a private prison was but I wasn't the only one. Sure enough, someone asked what these prisons were and what any of this had to do with us. We were told that these prisons were built by privately owned companies who received funding from the government based on the number of inmates. The more inmates, the more money the government would pay these prisons. It was also made clear to us that since these prisons are privately owned, as they become publicly traded, we’d be able to buy shares. Most of us were taken back by this. Again, a couple of people asked what this had to do with us. At this point, my industry colleague who had first opened the meeting took the floor again and answered our questions. He told us that since our employers had become silent investors in this prison business, it was now in their interest to make sure that these prisons remained filled. Our job would be to help make this happen by marketing music which promotes criminal behavior, rap being the music of choice. He assured us that this would be a great situation for us because rap music was becoming an increasingly profitable market for our companies, and as employee, we’d also be able to buy personal stocks in these prisons. Immediately, silence came over the room. You could have heard a pin drop. I remember looking around to make sure I wasn't dreaming and saw half of the people with dropped jaws. My daze was interrupted when someone shouted, “Is this a f****** joke?” At this point things became chaotic. Two of the men who were part of the “unfamiliar” group grabbed the man who shouted out and attempted to remove him from the house. A few of us, myself included, tried to intervene. One of them pulled out a gun and we all backed off. They separated us from the crowd and all four of us were escorted outside. My industry colleague who had opened the meeting earlier hurried out to meet us and reminded us that we had signed agreement and would suffer the consequences of speaking about this publicly or even with those who attended the meeting. I asked him why he was involved with something this corrupt and he replied that it was bigger than the music business and nothing we’d want to challenge without risking consequences. We all protested and as he walked back into the house I remember word for word the last thing he said, “It’s out of my hands now. Remember you signed an agreement.” He then closed the door behind him. The men rushed us to our cars and actually watched until we drove off.

A million things were going through my mind as I drove away and I eventually decided to pull over and park on a side street in order to collect my thoughts. I replayed everything in my mind repeatedly and it all seemed very surreal to me. I was angry with myself for not having taken a more active role in questioning what had been presented to us. I'd like to believe the shock of it all is what suspended my better nature. After what seemed like an eternity, I was able to calm myself enough to make it home. I didn't talk or call anyone that night. The next day back at the office, I was visibly out of it but blamed it on being under the weather. No one else in my department had been invited to the meeting and I felt a sense of guilt for not being able to share what I had witnessed. I thought about contacting the 3 others who wear kicked out of the house but I didn't remember their names and thought that tracking them down would probably bring unwanted attention. I considered speaking out publicly at the risk of losing my job but I realized I’d probably be jeopardizing more than my job and I wasn't willing to risk anything happening to my family. I thought about those men with guns and wondered who they were? I had been told that this was bigger than the music business and all I could do was let my imagination run free. There were no answers and no one to talk to. I tried to do a little bit of research on private prisons but didn’t uncover anything about the music business’ involvement. However, the information I did find confirmed how dangerous this prison business really was. Days turned into weeks and weeks into months. Eventually, it was as if the meeting had never taken place. It all seemed surreal. I became more reclusive and stopped going to any industry events unless professionally obligated to do so. On two occasions, I found myself attending the same function as my former colleague. Both times, our eyes met but nothing more was exchanged.

As the months passed, rap music had definitely changed direction. I was never a fan of it but even I could tell the difference. Rap acts that talked about politics or harmless fun were quickly fading away as gangster rap started dominating the airwaves. Only a few months had passed since the meeting but I suspect that the ideas presented that day had been successfully implemented. It was as if the order has been given to all major label executives. The music was climbing the charts and most companies when more than happy to capitalize on it. Each one was churning out their very own gangster rap acts on an assembly line. Everyone bought into it, consumers included. Violence and drug use became a central theme in most rap music. I spoke to a few of my peers in the industry to get their opinions on the new trend but was told repeatedly that it was all about supply and demand. Sadly many of them even expressed that the music reinforced their prejudice of minorities.

I officially quit the music business in 1993 but my heart had already left months before. I broke ties with the majority of my peers and removed myself from this thing I had once loved. I took some time off, returned to Europe for a few years, settled out of state, and lived a “quiet” life away from the world of entertainment. As the years passed, I managed to keep my secret, fearful of sharing it with the wrong person but also a little ashamed of not having had the balls to blow the whistle. But as rap got worse, my guilt grew. Fortunately, in the late 90’s, having the internet as a resource which wasn't at my disposal in the early days made it easier for me to investigate what is now labeled the prison industrial complex. Now that I have a greater understanding of how private prisons operate, things make much more sense than they ever have. I see how the criminalization of rap music played a big part in promoting racial stereotypes and misguided so many impressionable young minds into adopting these glorified criminal behaviors which often lead to incarceration. Twenty years of guilt is a heavy load to carry but the least I can do now is to share my story, hoping that fans of rap music realize how they’ve been used for the past 2 decades. Although I plan on remaining anonymous for obvious reasons, my goal now is to get this information out to as many people as possible. Please help me spread the word. Hopefully, others who attended the meeting back in 1991 will be inspired by this and tell their own stories. Most importantly, if only one life has been touched by my story, I pray it makes the weight of my guilt a little more tolerable.

Thank you.

http://www.hiphopisread.com/2012/04/secret-meeting-that-changed-rap-music.html
The number one cause of all human poverty, misery, and death is not global warming. It’s GLOBAL LYING.

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #7 on: August 23, 2015, 10:24:31 AM »

… I managed to escape from its influence for many years …
just didn't hear it, didn't like it, so just tuned it out …
don't watch much TV, current movies or listen to pop
radio, etc. Now that I have a teen boy, who listens CONSTANTLY
to this stuff I am trying to get a handle on it … so have sought
it out a bit … researched a bit … trying to understand my
son's infatuation with the ghetto culture … there is no other
way I can describe it … his trance-formation … his choices
are appalling … his 'heroes' disgust me … his language …
Oh My God …. he worries all the time about (literally) his skin being
"too white". And I know it is the "music" … and we are talking
about the guy who was literally #1 (grade point avg) in his
freshman class last year.

There is a MARKED difference in him and his other hip-hop-immersed
friends and the kids who listen to other music and embrace their
'whiteness' or 'browness' (in the case of the many Hispanics here) …
in demeanor, respect for authority, common-sense civility …
I could go on.

St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline iamc2

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #8 on: August 23, 2015, 10:30:17 AM »
                        RAP?

Ruin Americas People!

As a Musician since the age of 14---I Know this BS RAP Crap has helped to destroy Blacks and Whites---Period---it is The Devils Music! >:(
"When the Truth was murdered:
Common Sense ran away..."

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #9 on: August 23, 2015, 10:47:47 AM »
^^^^

… I know they will just say,
"Your parents said the same
thing about Elvis Presley …
and all that 'race music'!"

Well, in many ways our parents were correct in trying
to warn us about rock 'n roll's dark side … about it's
connections with the ghetto/drug/prison culture …
and the mob, etc. BUT … it is a matter of DEGREE!
Can someone enlighten us old farts about the RAP CULTURE?
Where is there ANY redeeming SOCIAL VALUE?
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline One Revelator

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2015, 11:06:59 AM »
I recently got a bug in my ear looping Led Zepplin's “Kashmir”.

When I think about Jimmy Page's spiritual practices and the influence that went into that particular music, I have to wonder if there was any redeeming social value back then.

Maybe the song does remain the same.

Were we really any different than the current generation at that age?
The number one cause of all human poverty, misery, and death is not global warming. It’s GLOBAL LYING.

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2015, 11:18:41 AM »
^^^


… it wasn't as INSANE … the violent anti-civilization …
back in the day … ZEP and other psych/drug groups
were choirboys in comparison … they only dabbled
in the ghetto culture.

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiNVTY2vezw
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline One Revelator

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2015, 12:02:27 PM »
Overall though. The demoralization effect was cumulative and subtle - over several generations.

We're just seeing what it eventually leads to.

Younger folks are more vulnerable to campaigns with emotional appeal. That's where older folks can be helpful.
The number one cause of all human poverty, misery, and death is not global warming. It’s GLOBAL LYING.

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2015, 12:14:19 PM »

… the music industry when I was growing up,
the TRUE SYNTHESIS of white & black cultures …
was a positive, uplifting thing … the best of both
European and African creative strains, blending
and melding into a strong and solid AMERICANA …
something that had been growing and strengthening
since mid-19th C., and before …
AND WE LOST IT.

ELVIS was important because he was a white
Govt Projects southerner … born and raised alongside
poor ghetto blacks … steeped in the music and cultures
of both sides of the tracks, in TUPELO and MEMPHIS.

Consider the content of his FIRST RECORD that he cut
at Sun Records in Memphis - "That's Alright, Mama", a
song written and recorded by Arthur Big Boy Cruddup:



√ CRUDDUP ORIGINAL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxHQUvCkV20&spfreload=10

√ ELVIS ON SUN: http://slagermuzeum.network.hu/video/elvis_presley/elvis_presley__that_s_alright_mama

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

… the "B" Side of that first record was "Blue Moon of Kentucky"
a BILL MONROE bluegrass tune:



√ BILL's ORIGINAL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAVFpThoeb4&spfreload=10

√ ELVIS SUN RECORDING:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AAOM-BRxcg&spfreload=10

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


… what happened to the 'give & take' … the 'blending',
the mutual respect that came together for a brief moment …
why this de-volution? Why the black disdain for all things white?
Why the ANGRY MOB mentality in all things black?
And the unacceptable cursing and blatant violently sexual 'lyrics'?

ROCK-a-BILLY = BLUES-a-COUNTRY = BLACK-a-WHITE

Remember the song "Mona Lisa" … written and recorded first
by another SUN artist, Carl Mann? Check it out:

√ CARL MANN ORIGINAL:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDqBIzbNt10

√ NAT KING COLE:https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=20&v=NIDX18Xl16s
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline donnay

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2015, 12:26:45 PM »
I have always called it CRAP. 
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

Online Al Bundy

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2015, 01:47:26 PM »
What about Sex, drugs and R`n`R ?

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2015, 03:10:03 PM »
^^^

"Eat thou and drink; tomorrow thou shalt die."   ….. Rossetti

 … A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
   A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread--and Thou
   Beside me singing in the Wilderness--
   Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!
     ….. The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam


… but we can not lose our selves to the pleasures of the flesh. … Jackson Holly  ;D

St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

EvadingGrid

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2015, 03:37:34 PM »

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2015, 03:39:50 PM »
^^^

… public enemy.

St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2015, 04:07:48 PM »


… I lost interest in "rap" as a musical form shortly after
the Sugarhill Gang's "Rappers Delight" in `79. There is a
place for children's nursery-rhyme-type sing-song lyrics
and a relentless, mechanical/hypnotic staccato rhythm …
I can take small doses of repetitive drum-machine licks,
ding-dong school horn riffs, mock-sexual groans from
drugged women, boring monotone ebonics, looped samples
from the JBs and loopy-sounding Auto-Tune … small doses …
but come on! 24x7x365!
We are saturated! Permeated! Glutted! Deluged! Bombarded!
Enough of this CRAP, already!

Is rap music real music?
http://www.debate.org/opinions/is-rap-music-real-music

Cheap sounding background beats, sampling other musicians, and talking sh*t does not music make 1. The beat: Years ago, I had a cheap Casio keyboard with pre-programmed beats and sounds. That is what I hear in today's rap - simple, push-button sounds from a cheap keyboard.
2. Sampling: If I were a musician who created a unique sound and wrote a song to go with it, then, with actual talented musicians, recorded that song, I would be furious if some no-talent rap "artist" stole it.
3. Vocals: This is the only somewhat original part of the rapper's "art." Sometimes rappers actually do a good of job mixing together rapidly "sung" vocal parts. Unfortunately, most of the lyrics are very weak to the point of sounding kind of silly, and there is almost nothing that sounds original. The use of similes is nauseating ("this is like that", "he is like ______", she is like _____"). Also, rap overtly uses vulgarity, sex, and promotes the use of alcohol and drugs. These lyrics are more for shock value than anything that is actually meaningful. And don't get me started on rhymes that remind me of a poem written by an 8 year-old. I miss the days when song lyrics were true poetry and it was often difficult to know the true meaning because one could interpret the song in different ways.

I haven't even discussed the personal life of rappers, their ridiculous choice of clothing and adornments, or the childish names they give themselves, but that's another argument.
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Online Al Bundy

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2015, 04:56:29 PM »
Maybe Serbian rap  ;D

Belgrade Syndicate -Witness (collaborator)

Everybody would want to have a life like this
To be criminal, Porsche – Kawasaki
This is real gangster thing, relax and sing
I grew up in the street where there was trouble everyday
I started in Germany, moving, wall painting,
Construction work with Turks, crashing* with Kurds
I came out of nowhere** that’s not even in the map
In West*** I learned what is real life
Here I got refined, I learned my ploy
I told to myself: I’m gonna make it, for sure
I found better job, worked little ‘on door handle’****
I wasn’t choosing clientele, I was accepting every client
Rouges made me, when I went to Frankfurt,
To drive them to the bank with a stocking on my head
I did some time in jail for that, **** it, I was kid,
Stabbed everyone who would call on me (point at me, judge me)
I used to do it to set the example, to gain the name,
Because elders told me that’s how it goes
When I was released, they called me from Service,
To do some small job, they gave me new passport
I am looking at my picture, but other name is written,
They didn’t say anything except where I should go
From Hamburg with ferry I went to Stockholm,
Chetniks and Ustashas(*), I killed them all
They told me: Keep all that you stole
Discoteques at night, I was spending a lot
Friends gathered, all from ex Yugoslavia
The war was raging there, and we all, golden hearts
Then the Service fell apart, but our group didn't
Down there (in Yugoslavia) sanctions, and to us here party

Everybody know who I am, that I came from the bottom
And that is why I take all I can, because it belongs to me
They know who I am, the Service, Army, cops
And that is why I take all I can, because it belongs to me

We went via Zurich all the way to French Riviera
We liked very much Cartier's jewelry stores
Too rich foreigner women caught our eye
They all, one by one, wanted to try real men
We all young sportsmen, tattoos, scars,
With long hairs, didn’t forgive them
Later we robbed them, then pimped for franks
We were keeping them all, don’t ask me brother (cousin)
You can’t believe it, we had a snack in Ritz
In the middle of my bite I ring, I was close to choke
I see plus three eight one (**) maybe my mother needs me
Or someone from my family from village? Who is calling me in the middle of the meal?
When some unfamiliar voice says: You know who is speaking
You are jerking around there while ours (our people) here are fighting
Pack your bags immediately and tomorrow be here
Don’t palter to us so we wouldn’t make a problem
I knew who was that, I packed as quick as I could
There are fifteen years that I haven’t been there
I hoped to see my family
But that didn’t happen, there I was in the middle of Bosnia
With a rank and crew, blinded Jeep
All according to the order, I didn’t ask anything
I didn’t touch anything except little of household appliances
All kind of stuff (***) we were loading into trucks
When I came to Belgrade I was watching everyone sullenly
All those city idlers I had put in order in no time

Little imposters and slobbers that play (act) something here
And a crow from the ground can pick their ***
And it wasn’t hard to take them all nicely
That’s my life, I don’t know differently (to live)

And whole city knows me, like I am from asphalt (criminal)
And let everybody to think that I am big scum
Because whole city knows me, a singer, a model (girls)
And every one of them says that I suck, but still gives to me

This city and country I have never loved
I lived here just because I had to
Everything here is for sale, and you see, that’s what I liked
For really little money you (can) buy everything that’s ruined
And companies and people, I gained reputation as well
Receptions, parades, cocktails, embassies,
I was paying clients, this and that (people)
Billboards, advertising, tours, campaigns,
Different women sang, these from television and from city((*))
That think I suck but do everything for money
I have built few churches to ease my conscience
After everything I’ve been trough, I am having troubles to fall asleep at night
But during the day I make a line (drugs), here and then, and inhale
Just little, to fix, I am not addicted
But I hear everything, when I am supposed to and what I’m not
Criminal and politics? In there you have a trouble
The ones I was supporting think they’re getting little now
And they were frightened a lot that I knew everything about them
An investigation started, about my business
They were looking for me, but they didn’t find me on property
I didn’t wait for them, but I didn’t go far
But down to the sea, where hand takes care of hand ((**))
There is no extradition here, or however it is said
I am free like a seagull here
They can look for me forever (till tomorrow – means forever)
And so I and my people who were hiding me were sitting on the shore
laughing, talking, ate some lobsters
And you can’t believe it brother (cousin)
Again my cell phone rings
Good old voice that persecute me for years
Says: We found you again, you won’t escape us
Choose what you find dearer (prefer): (to be) collaborator or the deceased?
It cut me alive (scared me), I wasn’t expecting it
It wasn’t easy to make a choice
But f*ck it, what to do, everyone love their life (@ss)
I packed my bags, run away, confessed everything in court
And old friends, all one by one, I betrayed
I expected the worse, that this time I am dead
But again, luckily, life surprised me
Thing that I didn’t expect happened
Clean past, clean conscience, I have nothing to regret
It is good that here, people really have bad memory
I have a new contract, I give to some others
And as far as I can see, brother (cousin) I will last for a long time still

And every child knows, world under the feet
And you are asking yourself how? What did you think honey?
And every child knows, world under the feet
And I am just wandering how much Serbia costs?


*Slept so deep that no one and nothing could wake him up, dead to the world.*
**Literally – C*nt town
***West – by West we mean developed countries in West and North Europe and USA
**** To work ‘on door handle’ – To break in and rob/steal (thanks Sewen) / Expression for taxi drivers when they get their customer on the street; costumer didn’t make a call to order taxi. It’s opportunity for driver to earn money aside.
(*) Chetniks were volunteer soldiers in the Serbian (Yugoslav) army, and Ustashas were soldiers in Croatia. Although Chetniks exist for a century now, they are both meant here as participants of the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina. They are both described in Wikipedia.
(**) +381 – calling number for Serbia
(***) Literally he says: All kinds of di*ks, which means all kinds of things
((*)) Singers from estrade are ones who publish albums and make concerts and ones that sing in city, town, are just performing in cafes.
((**)) It’s idiom, he went there where he will be protected by the people that are like him, and he will do the same for those who are protecting them

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5dKuC_G5zkhttp://

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2015, 05:44:02 PM »


… crazy f'ed up world:

'How Great Thou Art' gets Mississippi high school band pulled from halftime
http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2015/08/how_great_thou_art_gets_high_s.html

… so, some LIBTARD, SOULESS Judge says a High School Band
can't play this song … take the time to hear ELVIS do it … I dare you:


Elvis Presley How Great Thou Art Live 1972
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlfcvUtUoOM&spfreload=10


BUT THIS IS FINE AND DANDY:

Sexy Black Marching Band Dancers and Cheerleaders
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3W-6xcKC_I&spfreload=10
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline alexjonespodcast.com

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Re: THE RAP ANTI-CULTURE
« Reply #22 on: January 21, 2017, 02:36:23 PM »
There is plenty of hip hop and rap artists with a positive message, 
unfortunately the mainstream record labels have no interest in this at all,

Anyone who is into the real hip hop cannot stand the mainstream vapid, talentless, formulaic ,agenda-pushing,  BS that gets called hip hop in the mainstream, they are very different!   

Real hip hop is about reality, has positive messages even!   
The fake mainstream stuff promotes misogyny, drug culture, etc .
Even before I heard about that "letter" conspiracy mentioned above,  It was obvious to see they have an agenda about where they want to steer things.  Whether that letter theory really happened or not, it sure explains it good and is worth reading!
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