Author Topic: Big explosion in Siberia  (Read 9787 times)

Offline Nailer

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,448
Big explosion in Siberia
« on: February 18, 2008, 12:49:21 pm »
Has anyone heard of the Big explosion in Siberia..here is a link , it looks huge like a laser going skyward in the pics.

http://www.englishrussia.com/?p=1777
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline UpsetBrit

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 613
  • I'M SPARTACUS!
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2008, 01:41:06 pm »
I saw a video from Iraq or showing multiple beams like that and the soldiers couldn't figure out what it was....

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=213_1199497168

Then the soldiers figured out what it was....

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=1cd_1200599195

So that's my explaination for the serbian GDI Ion Cannon.  ;D
One mind at a time...

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,099
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2008, 04:00:17 pm »





Definitely a weapon of the GDI forces, the Brotherhood of Nod, the GLA and Chinese do not have such a device.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline websuspect

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 418
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2008, 04:25:59 pm »
SDI.  Its a soviet satellite particle beam weapon.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/19/world/europe/19kosovo.html?em&ex=1203483600&en=65f0f4f28a809a80&ei=5087%0A

"BRUSSELS — The United States formally joined France and Britain in recognizing the independence of Kosovo on Monday, a day after the breakaway province declared itself independent of Serbia.

In a statement, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said the United States “has today formally recognized Kosovo as a sovereign and independent state. We congratulate the people of Kosovo on this historic occasion.”

Earlier, France and Britain had led European nations in recognizing Kosovo. Germany was also reported to have recognized Kosovo. The Associated Press reported that Serbia recalled its ambassador from the United States in protest.

In a television interview, President Bush called the people of Kosovo “independent,” although he stopped short of formal recognition. Mr. Bush is to make a formal, televised statement from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, where he is on a tour of African states, early on Tuesday morning local time, or 11:15 p.m. Eastern time on Monday, the White House said.

“The Kosovars are now independent,” Mr. Bush said in a live interview broadcast on NBC television from Arusha, Tanzania, according to Reuters. “It’s something I’ve advocated along with my government.”

Ms. Rice said Mr. Bush had agreed to Kosovo’s request to establish diplomatic relations, and she tried to reassure Serbia about the welfare of Kosovo’s Serbian minority. Ms. Rice spoke with Serbian President Boris Tadic by phone on Sunday.

“The United States takes this opportunity to reaffirm our friendship with Serbia, an ally during two world wars,” Ms. Rice said in the statement.

European foreign ministers meeting in Brussels appeared to reach a minimum common position acknowledging that Kosovo had declared independence, and allowing those nations that wanted formally to recognize it to do so.

But some, with their own separatist movements, remain loath to validate Kosovo’s unilateral move.

France and Britain said they would recognize Kosovo. Bernard Kouchner, France’s foreign minister, said a letter recognizing Kosovo as an independent state would be sent from President Nicolas Sarkozy to Pristina on Monday night. Mr. Kouchner said the declaration was “a victory for common sense,” and pointed to what he hoped would be future reconciliation between Serbia and Kosovo.

“I don’t know at what date, in which year, but Kosovo and Serbia will be together in the European Union,” he said.

However, the foreign minister of Spain, Miguel Angel Moratinos, told reporters that the declaration did not respect international law and Spain would not recognize Kosovo.

“The government of Spain will not recognize the unilateral act proclaimed yesterday by the assembly of Kosovo,” he said, according to Reuters.

Cyprus, Romania, Bulgaria, Slovakia and Greece have also been reluctant to recognize Kosovo.

The province declared independence from Serbia on Sunday, sending tens of thousands of ethnic Albanians streaming through the streets to celebrate what they hoped was the end of a long and bloody struggle for national self-determination.

Russia, which opposes Kosovo’s independence, demanded an emergency meeting of the United Nations Security Council on Sunday to proclaim the declaration “null and void,” but the meeting produced no resolution.

The Security Council agreed to a request by Russia and Serbia to hold an open meeting on Monday that was to be addressed by Mr. Tadic.

R. Nicholas Burns, the under secretary of state for political affairs, said in a conference call with reporters Monday that he did not expect any change in diplomatic relations with Serbia.

Mr. Burns also said that he did not foresee trouble with Russia. “I do not expect any kind of crisis with Russia over this,” he said. “I expect Russia to be supportive of stability in this region.”

In her statement, Ms. Rice said Kosovo’ s move should not be used as a precedent — a possible warning to Russia against encouraging independence movements in Russia-backed enclaves in Georgia.

“Kosovo cannot be seen as a precedent for any other situation in the world today,” she said.

But in Moscow, the Russian upper and lower house of Parliament on Monday released a joint statement signaling an intention to recognize the separatist enclaves of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, both in Georgia

Abkhazia and South Ossetia have announced their intention to seek recognition as independent states. Russia has already granted citizenship to most residents of Abkhazia and South Ossetia, and had hinted that it might recognize the regions’ independence if Western countries recognized Kosovo."

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,099
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2008, 04:36:17 pm »
SDI.  Its a soviet satellite particle beam weapon.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/19/world/europe/19kosovo.html?em&ex=1203483600&en=65f0f4f28a809a80&ei=5087%0A

"BRUSSELS — The United States formally joined France and Britain in recognizing the independence of Kosovo on Monday, a day after the breakaway province declared itself independent of Serbia.



U.S. satellite reconnaissance photo of suspected Soviet beam weapon installation near Semipalatinsk. Published July 28, 1980. (Courtesy Aviation Week & Space Technology)
http://www.pbs.org/tesla/ll/mp_sovi_pop.html

More onthe lost papers os Tesla: http://www.pbs.org/tesla/ll/ll_mispapers.html
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Stan

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,305
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2008, 04:39:38 pm »
Siberia. You had me wondering why I hadn't seen this on the news. Although I'm still wondering, when you consider the size of that explosion. Nice find.

Offline websuspect

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 418
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #6 on: February 18, 2008, 04:43:56 pm »


That design you posted sane is a refractive design.

it can hit satellites or special satelites can reflect or back to the ground.

Offline David Rothscum

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,683
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #7 on: February 18, 2008, 04:55:29 pm »
It's Siberia, someone please change the title.

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,099
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #8 on: February 18, 2008, 05:02:25 pm »
100 years later (you cannot make this shit up, or a planned Project Bluebeam event!)



A Project in Astronomical Art, Science, and History (In Progress) by William K. Hartmann
 http://www.psi.edu/projects/siberia/siberia.html
 Text and pictures © William K. Hartmann

 
 
 In Brief:
 
 At 7:17 AM on the morning of June 30, 1908, a mysterious explosion occurred in the skies over Siberia. It was caused by the impact and breakup of a large meteorite, at an altitude roughly six kilometers in the atmosphere. Realistic pictures of the event are unavailable. However, Russian scientists collected eyewitness accounts of the event. I believe that we now know enough about large impacts to "decode" the subjective descriptions of the witnesses and create realistic views of this historic asteroid impact as seen from different distances.
 
 
 
 What do we know about the explosion?
 
 You can get a sense of the magnitude of this event by comparing observations made at different distances. Seismic vibrations were recorded by sensitive instruments as much as 1000 km (600 mi) away. At 500 km (300 mi), observers reported "deafening bangs" and a fiery cloud on the horizon. About 170 km (110 mi) from the explosion, the object was seen in the cloudless, daytime sky as a brilliant, sunlike fireball; thunderous noises were heard. At distances around 60 km, people were thrown to the ground or even knocked unconscious; windows were broken and crockery knocked off shelves. Probably the closest observers were some reindeer herders asleep in their tents in several camps about 30 km (20 mi) from the site. They were blown into the air and knocked unconscious; one man was blown into a tree and later died. "Everything around was shrouded in smoke and fog from the burning fallen trees."
 
 
 My Paintings of the Event
 
 A few years ago, I decided to use eyewitness reports such as the following ones, collected by Russian scientists decades ago, to reconstruct the appearance of the event from various locations, and at various moments. Here are descriptions of my work so far.
 
 400 KM Southeast of Ground Zero
 
 View from Kirensk, two seconds before the explosion.
 Painting © William K. Hartmann
 
 
 Witnesses in the town of Kirensk and nearby towns at the same distance recollected the fireball flashing across the sky in the following terms:
 "A ball of fire...coming down obliquely. A few minutes later [we heard] separate deafening crash like peals of thunder...followed by eight loud bangs like gunshots."
 
 "A ball of fire appeared in the sky... As it approached the ground, it took on a flattened shape..."
 
 "A flying star with a fiery tail; its tail disappeared into the air."
 After this object passed across the sky, it approached the horizon where it was consistently described from this distance of 400 km, as appearing like a "pillar of fire," then replaced by "a cloud of smoke rising from the ground," or "a cloud of ash...on the horizon," or "a huge cloud of black smoke. "From a closer distance of around 200 km, several witnesses gave a better description of the object itself. It was called diffuse bright ball two or three times larger than the sun but not as bright; the trail was a "fiery-white band." Inconsistent colors were mentioned: white, red, flame-like, bluish-white. Perhaps it had a flame-like iridescence. I used these descriptions in this painting, but I compensated for the twice-greater distance. I used a visit to Washington state as an opportunity to find a landscape that generally matched the photos from Siberia, and then I painted this piney-woodland scene from life, adding the fireball from the above descriptions.
 
 60 KM South of Ground Zero
 
 View from Vanavara trading post, at the moment of the explosion.
 Painting © William K. Hartmann
 
 
 The Russians collected a number of accounts from eyewitnesses at the trading station, which was probably the closest permanent habitation. These included:
 "I was sitting on the porch of the house at the trading station, looking north. Suddenly in the north...the sky was split in two, and high above the forest the whole northern part of the sky appeared covered with fire. I felt a great heat, as if my shirt had caught fire... At that moment there was a bang in the sky, and a mighty crash... I was thrown twenty feet from the porch and lost consciousness for a moment.... The crash was followed by a noise like stones falling from the sky, or guns firing. The earth trembled.... At the moment when the sky opened, a hot wind, as if from a cannon, blew past the huts from the north. It damaged the onion plants. Later, we found that many panes in the windows had been blown out and the iron hasp in the barn door had been broken."
 A second witness said:
 "I saw the sky in the north open to the ground and fire poured out. The fire was brighter than the sun. We were terrified, but the sky closed again and immediately afterward, bangs like gunshots were heard. We thought stones were falling... I ran with my head down and covered, because I was afraid stones may fall on it."
 In this painting I tried to show the moment when "the sky opened and with fire." I used the more distant reports, of the fire ball spreading and flattening at the end of its trajectory, to give the shape of fiery trail and the explosive fireball. I painted the basic landscape from life in a Siberian-looking landscape outside of Flagstaff Arizona, basing the structures on old photos from the expeditions to the Siberian impact area.
 
 15 KM from Ground Zero
 
 A few minutes after the explosion
 Painting © William K. Hartmann
 
 
 Because the object exploded up in the atmosphere, instead of hitting the ground, it left no crater. The effect on the ground was limited to devastation of a large forest area. At ground zero, tree branches were stripped, leaving trunks standing up. But at distances from roughly 3 out to 10 miles, the trees were blown over, lying with tops pointed away from the blast. No one was known to have been this close to the blast. The closest humans were probably herders camped in tents roughly 30 km from ground zero. They related:
 "Early in the morning when everyone was asleep in the tent, it was blown up in the air along with its occupants. Some lost consciousness. When they regained consciousness, they heard a great deal of noise and saw the forest burning around them, much of it devastated."
 
 "The ground shook and incredibly prolonged roaring was heard. Everything round about was shrouded in smoke and fog from burning, falling trees. Eventually the noise died away and the wind dropped, but the forest went on burning. Many reindeer rushed away and were lost."
 One older man at about this distance was reportedly blown about forty feet into a tree, causing a compound fracture of his arm, and he soon died. Hundreds of the herders' reindeer, in the general area around ground zero, were killed. Many campsites and storage huts scattered in the area were destroyed. During a workshop of the International Association for the Astronomical Arts, I painted this view at Mt. St. Helens, Washington, where the devastated area bears an uncanny resemblance to the photos of the explosion site. At both the Siberian site and Mt. St. Helens are vistas where one sees nothing but felled trees, mile after mile, across distant hillsides. The transient heat flash from the fireball was felt by the witnesses at Vanavara, and apparently within about 30 km it was strong enough to ignite small temporary fires in the forest and singe tree bark. I based the view of the cloud in the sky on the distant reports of a ashy-colored cloud of smoke forming at the site of the blast; it was probably augmented some minutes later by smoke from the burning forest. Streamers of smoke from fragmented material would soon dissipate in air currents.
 
 170 km Southwest of Ground Zero
 
 Smoke on the horizon
 Painting © William K. Hartmann
 
 
 Some minutes after the explosion, distant observers reported a column of smoke on the horizon. The general terms indicated this was a vertical column. One observer said "Where the body disappeared behind the horizon, a pillar of dark smoke rose up." It seems unclear from the reports whether whis was (a) an mushroom-like cloud from the explosion fireball rising above the landscape and pulling up smoke from the ignted forest, (b) smoke from the forest fire, or (c), from some directions, a reference to the contrail, which would be vertical when seen under the flight path. I have wondered whether the dark color could result from the smoke of the explosion containing black, sooty carbonaceous particles, in the same way that the explosion clouds on Jupiter from the impact of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 were very dark. This view represents the scene from a vilage along the Angara River, about 170 km SW of the blast. The original was painted from among cabins in a state park in Oregon.
 
 
 What was the explosion?
 
 Because the meteorite did not strike the ground or make a crater, early researchers thought the object might be a weak, icy fragment of a comet, which vaporized explosively in the air, and left no residue on the ground. However, modern planetary scientists have much better tools for understanding meteorite explosion in the atmosphere. As a meteorite slams into the atmosphere at speeds around 12 to 20 km/sec or more, it experiences a strong mechanical shock, like a diver bellyflopping into water. This can break apart stones of a certain size range, which explode instead of hitting the ground. Some of them drop brick-sized fragments on the ground, but others, such as the one that hit Siberia, may produce primarily a fireball and cloud of fine dust and tiny fragments. In 1993 researchers Chris Chyba, Paul Thomas, and Kevin Zahnle studied the Siberian explosion and concluded it was of this type -- a stone meteorite that exploded in the atmosphere. This conclusion was supported when Russian researchers found tiny stoney particles embedded in the trees at the collision site, matching the composition of common stone meteorites. The original asteroid fragment may have been roughly 50-60 meters (50-60 yards) in diameter.
 
 
 If asteroids hit Earth, why don't we see more such explosions?
 
 Many asteroidal fragments circle the Sun; the Siberian object was merely the largest to hit the Earth in the last century or so. Had it hit a populated area, devastation would have been enormous. If there are many asteroid fragments, why don't we see more hits? We do! The problem is that they have not been understood until recently. Current studies reveal that such explosions may happen every couple of centuries; however, six out of seven happen over the ocean, and few happen over populated land. A key to the phenomenon is: the larger the impact the rarer it is. An Air Force satellite in the 1990s detected a smaller explosion over the Pacific. In 1972, a 1000-ton object skimmed tangentially through Earth's atmosphere over the Grand Tetons in Wyoming, and then skipped back out into space, like a stone skipping off water. It was photographed by tourists and detected by Air Force satellites. Had it continued on into the atmosphere, it could have caused a Hiroshima-scale explosion over Canada, somewhat smaller than the Siberian blast. Even larger objects have hit Earth, but they are more rare. For example, an iron asteroid fragment perhaps 100 m across hit Arizona about 20,000 years ago, leaving the kilometer-wide "Arizona Meteor Crater," which is open to visitors; and a 10-km asteroid hit Earth 65 million years ago, ending the reign of dinosaurs. Brick-sized interplanetary stones fall from the sky in various locations every year. Several houses and a car have been hit in recent decades. Tiny dust grains are even more common; they can be seen every night if you watch long enough; they are the bright streaks of light sometimes called "shooting stars." Interplanetary space contains many small bodies of different sizes. All of them move in elliptical orbits around the sun as prescribed by Kepler. Occasionally their orbits intersect those of planets, leading to a collision. Large enough bodies leave sizable craters on planets or satellites. This explains why impact craters are present on surfaces of planets and moons throughout the solar system. If we continue to study asteroids and build more telescopes for detecting and tracking them, we will have better information about the frequency of such asteroid impact-explosions, and more chance to have warning about impending impacts.
 
 
 Question
 
 Tunguska-sized explosions occur on Earth about once per century, and larger explosions the size of the largest H-bombs, occur about once per millennium. Many of these explode in the atmosphere and cause devastation over tens of kilometers, but don't leave long-lasting craters. Recall that 1/6 of Earth is covered by land and assume that roughly half the land surface is populated in the last 12,000 years, since humans moved into the Americas. Using these facts comment on whether meteorite explosions of this scale might plausibly have produced legends of wrathful or capricious celestial gods who could rain fire onto the Earth, as for example in the legend of the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah by celestial fire. Take into account that oral traditions, such as the associations of certain star patterns with constellations such as the Great Bear (Ursa Major), can apparently be passed down for thousands of years.
 
 Answer:
 
 Let's make use of what scientists call an "order of magnitude" estimate, or "back of the envelope calculation." If we imagine spectacular catastrophic explosions larger than Tunguska happening every 300 years, and having effects visible over 100 km or more from ground zero, then there would be one over land about every 1800 years, and perhaps one over a populated area every 3600 years or so. Thus it seems plausible that in 12,000 years of oral tradition and about 4000 years of written records in some cultures, there may have been one ore more explosions considerably larger than the Tunguska event. By the same logic, if Tunguska-scale events happen once per century, there could have been several just in the last several scattered around the populated land areas of the world in the last 3600 years.
 
 Thus, it seems at least plausible that large explosions of meteoritic objects were among the celestial events (together with smaller meteorite impacts, auroras, hurricanes, storms, and floods) that gave rise to belief in capricious god-like forces acting from the skies.
 
 
 Problem
 
 Recent scientific studies by meteorite researcher Christopher Chyba have estimated that the Tunguska event may have been caused by the explosion of a stony meteroid about 30 meters in diameter traveling at about 15 km/s. Compare the energy released by such an object with that of an atomic bomb sucs as those dropped on Japan in World War II.
 
 Answer:
 
 Here again we can make a simple "order of magnitude" calculation.
 
 First, we have to know the energy liberated by an A-bomb. The Hiroshima bomb expended the energy of roughly ten thousand tons of TNT, or 18 "kilotons" in military parlance. One kiloton (1 KT) is about 4.2 x 1012 joules (the joule is the unit of energy in the Standard International, or "SI," set of scientific units). The Hiroshima bomb thus represented roughly 8 x 1013 joules of energy.
 
 Now all we have to do is calculate the energy of the meteoroid. In freshman physics courses, you learn that the kinetic energy of a moving object is 1/2mV2.
 
 The trick in using any equation like this is to be sure to use the correct units. In SI, the units are meters, kilograms, and seconds, so that mass m must be in kilograms and velocity V must be in meters/second.
 
 Thus, right away we can say that V in the equation will be V = 15 km/s or 1.5 x 104 m/s.
 
 To get the mass, we have to figure out the mass of a 30-meter wide rock. Rock has a density of about 3000 kg per cubic meter, so we need to calculate the volume of the rock and multiply times this density. Thus we have,
 
 m = (4/3) PI R3 (3000 kg/m3) = (4/3) PI (15 m)3 (3000) = 4.2 x 107 kg.
 
 Thus the total energy is,
 
 E=1/2 (4.2 x 107 kg) (1.5 x 104 m/s)2 = 4.8 x 1015 joules.
 
 To be safe, let's imagine that half the kinetic energy is lost to noise, slowing, and fragmentation of the meteoroid before it explodes. That still leaves about 2 x 1015 joules for the Tunguska explosion, compared to about 3 x 1013 joules for the Hiroshima A-bomb.
 
 Thus, our estimate is that the Tunguska had an explosive energy roughly on order of 60 A-bombs, or 500 KT of TNT. It was closer in effect to a very large H-bomb.
 
 
 For further information:
 
 Chyba, C., P. Thomas, and K. Zahnle 1993. "The 1908 Tunguska Explosion: Atmospheric Disruption of a Stony Asteroid". Nature 361, p. 40-44. (Calculation of size of the bolide.)
 
 Gallant, Roy A. 1994 "Journey to Tunguska". Sky and Telescope, June, 38-43. (Description of a modern journey to the site, with photographs.)
 
 Krinov, E. L. 1966 Giant Meteorites (London: Pergamon Press). (Description of the site and interviews with witnesses).
 
 PSI home
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,099
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2008, 05:04:09 pm »
Tunguska event
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event
Trees felled by the Tunguska blast. Photograph from Kulik's 1927 expedition


The Tunguska Event, sometimes called the Tunguska explosion, was a massive explosion that occurred near the Podkamennaya (Lower Stony) Tunguska River in what is now Krasnoyarsk Krai of Russia, at around 7:17 a.m. on June 30, 1908 Julian (July 13 on Gregorian calendar).[dubious – discuss]

The explosion was most likely caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometers (3–6 miles) above Earth's surface. Different studies yielded varying estimates for the object's size,[1] including 30 meters,[2] 50 metres,[3] 60 metres,[4] 90 to 190 metres,[5] and up to 1200 metres in diameter.[6] Although the meteor or comet is considered to have burst prior to hitting the surface, this event is still referred to as an impact event. Estimates on the energy of the blast include 3–5 megatons[7] and as high as 30 megatons[8] of TNT. 10–15 megatons has been considered the most likely to be accurate[8] — about 1,000 times more powerful than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan.[9] The explosion felled an estimated 80 million trees over 2,150 square kilometers (830 square miles). It is estimated to have measured 5.0 on the Richter scale.

The Tunguska event is the largest impact event in recent history. An explosion of this magnitude had the potential to devastate large metropolitan areas had it occurred over a large city.[10] This possibility has helped to spark discussion of asteroid deflection strategies.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline PatriotX

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 736
  • When pawns come to life, things get interesting...
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #10 on: February 18, 2008, 05:43:20 pm »
Those pictures remind me of an instance last Summer where I met a fellow veteran who served in the Air Force and said he was the subject of mind-control and bio/physical experimentation.  He said he was subject to electromagnetic pulse weaponry and satellite technology.  He described himself as a "wet-wire" and spoke of the use of this technology to create what he dubbed "psycho-civilized society".  The pictures he gave me were of several grid pattern contrails, the sun with halo rings around it, strange "dark rays" like shadows running across the sky, and these infra-red like lasers (dropping like arrows closing in on a target).  I gave him some contacts and he left never to be seen again.

Crazy stuff going on to say the least.



Patriot X
Whose Game Are You Playing?

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,099
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #11 on: February 18, 2008, 05:59:33 pm »
I hate to say it, but notice how there are 2 beams of light?  Kind of like...


All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline lordssyndicate

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,141
  • Stop The New World Order
    • LinkedIn Profile
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #12 on: February 18, 2008, 07:39:50 pm »
Seems the SDI (particle beam weapon) is finally online. Russia has been working on getting it stable since before they were Russia again.....


The goal of the program is to have created a weapon capable of shooting down ICBMs and of course keyhole satellites.....

Seems they finally have a viable prototype and are now doing tests (perhaps even shooting down keyhole satellites ...)

This is getting quite interesting these days.......


"Biotechnology it's not so bad. It's just like all technologies it's in the wrong HANDS!"- Sepultura

Offline websuspect

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 418
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #13 on: February 18, 2008, 08:08:38 pm »
Hrm I wonder if they blasted the new spy satellite and thats why its not working.

Offline PatriotX

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 736
  • When pawns come to life, things get interesting...
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #14 on: February 19, 2008, 12:29:11 am »
Seems like the West and East are rattling sabers and flexing their space tights....


Patriot X   ;D
Whose Game Are You Playing?

Offline PatriotX

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 736
  • When pawns come to life, things get interesting...
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #15 on: February 19, 2008, 12:59:07 am »
Metereorite or Tesla touted "Death Ray" overshot???

1908....

http://www.fdrs.org/unbelievers_of_haarp.html

Who knows.


Patriot X
Whose Game Are You Playing?

Offline Sub-X

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,850
  • FEAR: False Evidence Appearing Real...
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2008, 01:05:23 am »
I hate to say it, but notice how there are 2 beams of light?  Kind of like...




When I first seen this today,that was the first thing that i thought of,but then I doubted myself and thought it couldn't be and dismissed the idea.
“If you strike at,imprison,or kill us,out of our prisons or graves we will still evoke a spirit that will thwart you,and perhaps,raise a force that will destroy you! We defy you! Do your worst!”-James Connolly 1909


DARK HALF-END GAME

Offline PatriotX

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 736
  • When pawns come to life, things get interesting...
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2008, 01:21:22 am »
A little bit o' dis....

http://www.mindcontrolforums.com/hambone/mth.html

And a little bit o' dat.... (note the primary location being Siberia in initial phases)....

http://english.mn.ru/english/issue.php?2002-10-1


But is any of this really reliable.  Not sure.  But I can tell you for a fact JACK, that I met someone personally who was horrified at what they are capable of and himself believed he was a victim of their psychtronic parlor tricks even more than mere weather modification.

The jury is still out for me as to how developed this stuff really is.  Part of what was working on him was extreme paranoia (no doubt), but he did back it up with pictures.  And I thought "I" was paranoid.



Patriot X
Whose Game Are You Playing?

Online pac522

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,872
  • Peace sells, but who's buying?
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #18 on: February 19, 2008, 01:30:45 am »
Tunguska event
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event
Trees felled by the Tunguska blast. Photograph from Kulik's 1927 expedition


The Tunguska Event, sometimes called the Tunguska explosion, was a massive explosion that occurred near the Podkamennaya (Lower Stony) Tunguska River in what is now Krasnoyarsk Krai of Russia, at around 7:17 a.m. on June 30, 1908 Julian (July 13 on Gregorian calendar).[dubious – discuss]

The explosion was most likely caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5–10 kilometers (3–6 miles) above Earth's surface. Different studies yielded varying estimates for the object's size,[1] including 30 meters,[2] 50 metres,[3] 60 metres,[4] 90 to 190 metres,[5] and up to 1200 metres in diameter.[6] Although the meteor or comet is considered to have burst prior to hitting the surface, this event is still referred to as an impact event. Estimates on the energy of the blast include 3–5 megatons[7] and as high as 30 megatons[8] of TNT. 10–15 megatons has been considered the most likely to be accurate[8] — about 1,000 times more powerful than the bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan.[9] The explosion felled an estimated 80 million trees over 2,150 square kilometers (830 square miles). It is estimated to have measured 5.0 on the Richter scale.

The Tunguska event is the largest impact event in recent history. An explosion of this magnitude had the potential to devastate large metropolitan areas had it occurred over a large city.[10] This possibility has helped to spark discussion of asteroid deflection strategies.

I just watched this on the History Channel. They had scientist today say that the peat was very rich with some nutrient and they were saying it must have been a fizzled out comet. Any way they did a what if over New York, check out the CGI, pretty cool.



http://www.youtube.com/v/dzMUapGPiaI&rel=1
This country did not achieve greatness with the mindset of "safety first" but rather "live free or die".

Truth is the currency of love. R[̲̅ə̲̅٨̲̅٥̲̅٦̲̅]ution!

We are all running on Gods laptop.
The problem is the virus called the Illuminati.  ~EvadingGrid

The answer to 1984 is 1776.

Offline PatriotX

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 736
  • When pawns come to life, things get interesting...
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2008, 01:34:01 am »
Interesting timing for these shows to say the least. 


Patriot X
Whose Game Are You Playing?

Offline blicknasty

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 123
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #20 on: May 24, 2008, 06:34:10 pm »
Very interesting.
"One should have insight into this world of dreams that passes in the twinkling of an eye."

Offline 70983

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,655
  • http://www.conspiracyshirts.com/
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #21 on: May 24, 2008, 06:52:33 pm »
Has anyone heard of the Big explosion in Siberia..

yeah, its called...Tunguska, lol
Ray McBerry for Governor of Georgia in 2010!  Reclaim the sovereignty of the States!

http://www.georgiafirst.org

Youtube Channel:  http://www.youtube.com/user/RayMcBerry

He has many informative videos advocating his candidacy.

Offline Brocke

  • Eleutherophiliac & Drapetomaniac
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,477
  • I am not a number, I am a free man!
    • Vimeo page
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #22 on: July 21, 2008, 06:45:45 am »
Tunguska explosion still unraveled 100 years after

30.06.2008    
Source: Pravda.Ru    
URL: http://english.pravda.ru/science/mysteries/105625-tunguska-0



The mystery, which took place 100 years ago, on June 30, 1908, not far from the Tunguska River in Russia’s Siberia, still remains unraveled. Many compare the power of the Tunguska catastrophe with the nuclear explosion of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although there were not so many casualties, since the meteorite or whatever it was fell down in the uninhabited area.

Science has not been able to explain the mysterious Tunguska phenomenon yet. Scientists and pseudo-scientists consider several versions which include antimatter, a miniature black hole and even an alien spaceship.

First researchers appeared on the site of the Tunguska disaster in more than ten years after the event occurred. Regular studies were launched only in the 1920s. Eyewitnesses told researchers that they had seen a huge pillar of fire in the sky and could feel the earthquake. The people living very far from the site of the catastrophe said that they could feel the heat in the air.

In 1930, astrophysicist Harlow Shapley found the biggest problem, which deprived scientists of sleep for decades: there was no crater on the site where the space body supposedly hit the Earth. The scientist put forward another version in an attempt to explain the mystery. Shapley believed that the Tunguska meteorite was not a meteorite but a comet or its fragments.

In 1940, Vladimir Royansky from the US-based Union College in Schenectady presumed that the Tunguska meteorite was made of antimatter. In 1941, Lincoln La Paz from the Ohio University in Columbus published two articles on this subject in Popular Astronomy magazine and substantiated the hypothesis. Afterwards, he sent a letter to the Academy of Sciences of the USSR suggesting to search for anomalous isotopes on the site of the impact to prove the presence of antimatter.

The idea was developed further by three prominent US scientists with Nobel Prize winners Willard Libby and Clyde Cowan (a discoverer of the neutrino) among them. Libby, the creator of the renowned radiocarbon dating (a process which revolutionized archeology), concluded that the space body of antimatter had not reached the Earth, but annihilated as a result of entering dense layers of the Earth’s atmosphere. However, gamma-ray detectors installed on first artificial satellites did not show any incidents of antimatter annihilation in near space.

In 1973, two physicists from the University of Texas presumed that the Tunguska meteorite was a miniature black hole which went through the Earth. Physicist Stephen Hawking believed that miniature black holes appeared after the Big Bang. However, there was no information about the miniature black home coming out of the planet at another end of the globe and thus producing an explosion similar to the Tunguska disaster.

There is also a simple version to explain the Tunguska mystery. It was said that the disaster was caused with an earthquake which triggered the discharged and the subsequent explosion of a huge amount of natural gas – up to ten million tons. In this case gas could form the pillar of fire rising up to the sky and spread a massive wave of heat.

Chris Chyba, Kevin Zahnle and Paul Thomas unraveled the biggest mystery of the Tunguska meteorite in 1993. With the help of computer models they showed that the meteorite exploded in the atmosphere into thousands of fragments and thus left no crater on the site of the impact.

Various UFO aficionados have claimed that the Tunguska event was the result of an exploding alien spaceship or even an alien weapon going off to "save the Earth from an imminent threat". These claims appear to originate from a science fiction story penned by Soviet engineer Alexander Kazantsev in 1946, in which a nuclear-powered Martian spaceship, seeking fresh water from Lake Baikal, blew up in mid-air. This story was inspired by Kazantsev's visit to Hiroshima in late 1945.

Many events in Kazantsev's tale were subsequently confused with the actual occurrences at Tunguska. The nuclear-powered UFO hypothesis was adopted by TV drama critics Thomas Atkins and John Baxter in their book The Fire Came By (1976). The 1998 television series The Secret KGB UFO Files (Phenomenon: The Lost Archives), broadcast on Turner Network Television, referred to the Tunguska event as "the Russian Roswell" and claimed that crashed UFO debris had been recovered from the site. In 2004, a group from the Tunguska Space Phenomenon Public State Fund claimed to have found the wreckage of an alien spacecraft at the site.

The proponents of the UFO hypothesis have never been able to provide any significant evidence for their claims. It should be noted that the Tunguska site is downrange from the Baikonur Cosmodrome and has been contaminated repeatedly by Russian space debris, most notably by the failed launch of the fifth Vostok test flight on December 22, 1960. The payload landed close to the Tunguska impact site, and a team of engineers was dispatched there to recover the capsule and its two canine passengers (who survived).


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

chirhonius

  • Guest
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #23 on: July 21, 2008, 07:24:05 am »


Kulik's party reached the site in 1927. To their surprise, no crater was to be found. There was instead a region of scorched trees about 50 kilometres (30 miles) across. A few near ground zero were still strangely standing upright, their branches and bark stripped off. Those farther away had been knocked down in a direction away from the center.

The Tunguska explosion may have been the result of an experiment by Nikola Tesla at his Wardenclyffe Tower, performed during Robert Peary's second North Pole expedition. Tesla had claimed that the tower could be used to transmit electromagnetic energy across large distances. The Wardenclyffe Tower was designed to utilize the largest version of Tesla's patented magnifying transmitter, popularly known as the Tesla Coil, to transmit electrical power into the earth as well as the upper atmosphere.

In 1908, Tesla allegedly sent a cryptic communication to the American explorer, Robert E. Peary, advising him to be on the alert and make notes of any unusual auroral phenomena encountered as he attempted to reach the North Pole. Allegedly Tesla fired up his transmitter for a trial run and attempted to generate and direct his ethereal oscillations toward the North Pole in the hope of stimulating the polar aurora and perhaps attracting world attention to his invention. It is alleged that Tesla's trial run coincided with the Tunguska event in Siberia.

Pull up google earth and draw a line from tungska to new york. Follow approx the W70' meridian North and over the north pole.
Obviously Tesla didnt want to blow up Mr. Peary so he fired it well in front of his expedition.


Offline TruthHunter

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 640
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2008, 08:42:32 pm »

Kulik's party reached the site in 1927. To their surprise, no crater was to be found. There was instead a region of scorched trees about 50 kilometres (30 miles) across. A few near ground zero were still strangely standing upright, their branches and bark stripped off. Those farther away had been knocked down in a direction away from the center.

The Tunguska explosion may have been the result of an experiment by Nikola Tesla at his Wardenclyffe Tower, performed during Robert Peary's second North Pole expedition. Tesla had claimed that the tower could be used to transmit electromagnetic energy across large distances. The Wardenclyffe Tower was designed to utilize the largest version of Tesla's patented magnifying transmitter, popularly known as the Tesla Coil, to transmit electrical power into the earth as well as the upper atmosphere.

In 1908, Tesla allegedly sent a cryptic communication to the American explorer, Robert E. Peary, advising him to be on the alert and make notes of any unusual auroral phenomena encountered as he attempted to reach the North Pole. Allegedly Tesla fired up his transmitter for a trial run and attempted to generate and direct his ethereal oscillations toward the North Pole in the hope of stimulating the polar aurora and perhaps attracting world attention to his invention. It is alleged that Tesla's trial run coincided with the Tunguska event in Siberia.

Pull up google earth and draw a line from tungska to new york. Follow approx the W70' meridian North and over the north pole.
Obviously Tesla didnt want to blow up Mr. Peary so he fired it well in front of his expedition.



Tesla Ray=HAARP

Offline Typhoon

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 648
Re: Big explosion in Siberia
« Reply #25 on: September 06, 2008, 03:25:56 pm »





Definitely a weapon of the GDI forces, the Brotherhood of Nod, the GLA and Chinese do not have such a device.

Definitely GDI ion cannon,
btw i wonder why the pictures are in colour..
did they have colour cameras in 1908?
"I have met with the Antichrist... He is cruel and intrepid. He frightened me." - Adolf Hitler
"One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them." - J.R.R. Tolkien