Re: Vladimir Putin

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Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #280 on: May 28, 2015, 01:02:26 PM »
Poll: 86% of Russians still support Putin
28.05.2015 | 12:43

The ruble and salaries may have plunged, but the number of Russian citizens who support Russian President Vladimir Putin remains at the record level of 86%, according to the results of a survey carried out by the Levada Center, an independent Russian polling and sociological research organization, according to an UNIAN correspondent.

http://www.unian.info/politics/1083020-poll-86-of-russians-still-support-putin.htmlhttp://

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #281 on: May 28, 2015, 01:42:03 PM »
Poll: 86% of Russians still support Putin
28.05.2015 | 12:43

The ruble and salaries may have plunged, but the number of Russian citizens who support Russian President Vladimir Putin remains at the record level of 86%, according to the results of a survey carried out by the Levada Center, an independent Russian polling and sociological research organization, according to an UNIAN correspondent.

http://www.unian.info/politics/1083020-poll-86-of-russians-still-support-putin.htmlhttp://

To put that in perspective, to get an American President with that kind of approval rating, you would have to look at F. Roosevelt - who had a brief spike of 80% in January 23rd 1942. This would because on the 19th of January Japan invaded Burma . . . and Isolationist America although angered by Pearl Harbour was not that enthused to be a late entry into world war 2.

Truman had an approval rating of 90% when World War 2 finished early with the A-Bomb, but it immedaitely fell like a led zepplin afterwards - it really was a one off spike.

JFK managed an 80% approval rating for just 7 months, I presume you all know why . . . And of LBJ got a free ride for 5 minutes following the assassination in Dallas, then it just steadily went downward for the rest of his presidency.

Obama has HALF the presidential approval of Putin.

So next time they run that propaganda that Putin is some kind of tyrant that hijacked the Kremlin and is deeply unpopular LAUGH.



Offline White Rose Sophie

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #282 on: June 01, 2015, 08:10:45 PM »
To put that in perspective, to get an American President with that kind of approval rating, you would have to look at F. Roosevelt - who had a brief spike of 80% in January 23rd 1942. This would because on the 19th of January Japan invaded Burma . . . and Isolationist America although angered by Pearl Harbour was not that enthused to be a late entry into world war 2.

Truman had an approval rating of 90% when World War 2 finished early with the A-Bomb, but it immedaitely fell like a led zepplin afterwards - it really was a one off spike.

JFK managed an 80% approval rating for just 7 months, I presume you all know why . . . And of LBJ got a free ride for 5 minutes following the assassination in Dallas, then it just steadily went downward for the rest of his presidency.

Obama has HALF the presidential approval of Putin.

So next time they run that propaganda that Putin is some kind of tyrant that hijacked the Kremlin and is deeply unpopular LAUGH.

What was Hitler's approval rating I wonder....in 1939 or so?

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #283 on: June 01, 2015, 08:41:58 PM »
What was Hitler's approval rating I wonder....in 1939 or so?

Not that good, but its a lesson in democracy. See after the Riechstag Fire, in a wave of popularity, bit like 911, they had an election and the Nazis only got 44% of the vote - but enough to get Hilter into real power. To be fair, Bush spiked a higher rating after 911.

Its one of the forgotten lessons, that Hilter actually came to power through the ballot box. Of course, once in power within a couple of months all other parties and opposition ceased to exist.

Putin is genuinely popular, I would imagine that if American President set income tax to a flat rate of only 11% - and at the same time dragged all the Barons and Oligarchs into the White House and said "I run the country not you, and your gonna pay taxes just like everyone else".

Of course that is what Putin did, which is why the media is busy painting him as a deeply unpopular tyrant.

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #284 on: June 02, 2015, 01:18:08 AM »
Not that good, but its a lesson in democracy. See after the Riechstag Fire, in a wave of popularity, bit like 911, they had an election and the Nazis only got 44% of the vote - but enough to get Hilter into real power. To be fair, Bush spiked a higher rating after 911.

Its one of the forgotten lessons, that Hilter actually came to power through the ballot box. Of course, once in power within a couple of months all other parties and opposition ceased to exist.

Putin is genuinely popular, I would imagine that if American President set income tax to a flat rate of only 11% - and at the same time dragged all the Barons and Oligarchs into the White House and said "I run the country not you, and your gonna pay taxes just like everyone else".

Of course that is what Putin did, which is why the media is busy painting him as a deeply unpopular tyrant.

Bingo, mate.  :)

Offline iamc2

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #285 on: June 02, 2015, 06:50:21 PM »
Tic-Tock socialism is creeping across the globe---and it started in the WEST: in about 1913!!!

I'll give Putin the thought that he is trying to do the right thing for his Nation---but: The New World Nazis always have a way of derailing change for the good...

I give Obama a '0' for doing NOTHING for my nation!
"When the Truth was murdered:
Common Sense ran away..."

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #286 on: June 03, 2015, 06:00:35 AM »
The Silent Coup: Putin vs. the Oligarchs
The putsch
http://nationalvanguard.org/2012/05/the-silent-coup-putin-vs-the-oligarchs/

It all started with NATO’s criminal war of unprovoked aggression against the sovereign state of Yugoslavia. The war was extremely unpopular in Russia, where the Serbs are viewed as Russia’s “little brothers” and fellow Orthodox Slavs. While he was in flight to the US to meet with American leaders, Primakov was told by Al Gore about the decision to bomb Yugoslavia. In mid-flight, Primakov ordered the plane to turn around and return to Moscow. Because Russia depended on loans and other financial aid from the West, Yeltsin’s government was not willing to risk confronting the United States and did nothing for the Serbs. Beginning to flounder, Yeltsin replaced Primakov with Sergei Stepashin. I happened to be in Moscow when the bombing started, and I remember seeing angry crowds as far as the eye could see protesting against the war. Upon learning that I was an American, every Russian I met wanted to express his opposition to the war and wanted me to try to explain why the United States government was acting in such a manner.

The American administration either did not know it at the time, or simply was too arrogant to care, but its actions had a huge impact on the future of Russia and its relations with the West. For many Russians, the bombing of Yugoslavia was simply too much: It was the ultimate sign that America could not be trusted and would attack Russia if it could. On June 11, 1999, the Russian military rejected the Kremlin’s capitulation and ordered Russian troops to seize the airport in Pristina, Kosovo. Yeltsin had lost control over his military. This was the beginning of a silent coup. With little choice, Yeltsin’s administration agreed to require the Foreign Ministry to coordinate its activities with the military and security apparatus. Yeltsin was left in office, but his time was running out. On August 10, Yeltsin fired Prime Minister Sergei Sephashin and replaced him with Vladimir Putin, an unknown former KGB officer and former head of the FSB.

Nobody knew what to think of Putin. He had very little political experience; he had only served as deputy mayor of St. Petersburg for a short time. He mouthed the right words about ‘democracy’ and ‘open markets.’ His actions as Prime Minister would soon increase his popularity. The Chechen war was reignited when Chechen rebels attacked several towns in the neighboring Russian Republic of Dagastan in August of 1999. Putin responded to the crisis with a firm hand. Without hesitation, he sent in the Russian military to crush the rebels. A series of apartment bombings in Moscow gave Putin even more room to move. Putin said that he would wipe out the Chechens “in the outhouse.” It is important to point out the widespread hostility many Russians have for Chechens and other ethnic groups from the Caucasian region. Soon, Putin’s popularity ratings went sky-high. After years of Yeltsin’s weak leadership, it seemed that a strong leader had finally arrived.

NOTE The Apartment Bombing is Russia's 911 False Flag
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_apartment_bombings

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #287 on: June 03, 2015, 06:06:37 AM »
The Silent Coup: Putin vs. the Oligarchs
The hunters become the hunted
http://nationalvanguard.org/2012/05/the-silent-coup-putin-vs-the-oligarchs/

For Berezovsky and the others, it seemed that Putin was the man they could count on for a “continuity of power.” However, Putin wasn’t their man at all. He represented different interests, and the security agencies were in the process of reclaiming power.

Berezovsky went about the task of preparing for the 2000 Presidential election. He organized and funded a new political party to back Putin called Unity. Even though this party had no real ideology, it won enough seats to make Unity the second largest bloc in the Duma, all on account of Putin’s popularity. (Other than the Communist Party, most political parties in Russia are not grass-roots organizations. They are simply parties set up to support a politician and people simply vote for the party that is headed by the politician they most agree with. When Russians think of the LPDR, they think of Zhirinovsky. When they think of Fatherland, they think of Lushkov. When they think of Unity, they think of President Putin.) At this time, Yeltsin’s primary concern was shielding himself and his family from future prosecution. The Duma’s earlier attempt to impeach him gave him an idea of what these forces might do if they ever came to power. He was even accused of “genocide against the Russian people.” In short, he believed his enemies would make him pay for his real or alleged crimes against Russia. Most likely, as part of the silent coup, a deal was struck to protect Yeltsin and his family from prosecution in exchange for Putin becoming Prime Minister and later President. When he became President, Putin’s very first act was to sign a decree granting Yeltsin immunity from prosecution. Yeltsin was saving his skin. After nine years of impoverishment, privatization scandals, the rise of the oligarchs, the use of the military against opposition forces, and two wars in Chechnya, Yeltsin had plenty to fear. And it seemed at first that Putin was indeed “one of the boys,” willing to play along with the Jewish money men.

On New Year’s eve 1999, President Yeltsin gave a surprise address to the nation. He announced that he was stepping down as President and naming Vladimir Putin acting President. In March of 2000, Putin easily won the election, but nobody knew exactly what to expect. They would soon find out.

Putin began to move with lighting speed. He announced that he would create one set of rules for everyone, including the oligarchs. He stated that he would initiate “vertical control” over the country, and began to move on the regional governors, who enjoyed a great deal of autonomy under Yeltsin. To do this, he launched a plan to divide the country into federal districts, with each district controlled by a supergovernor appointed by Putin. The existing 89 regional chiefs now had to report to these Putin appointees. Five of the seven men appointed by Putin were either former KGB or military officers — all people loyal to Putin. He followed this up with a campaign to oust certain governors on corruption charges. Then, Putin began to move against the same people who had supported him and helped him get elected: the oligarchs. Putin’s words about gaining control over “bandit capitalism” were for real, but he couldn’t go after all of the oligarchs at once. First on his hit list was Gusinsky.

Putin and his surrogates launched a relentless campaign against Gusinsky and his empire. Within one year, they were victorious. Gusinksy’s media conglomerate was called Media-Most. Media-Most was guaranteed a loan by Gazprom, a large state-controlled energy company, for $211 million in 1996. When Gusinsky was unable to pay back the loan to the creditor, Gazprom did, which boosted Gazprom’s stake in Media-Most. Gazprom received 25 per cent. plus one share of Gusinsky’s media empire. After Putin came to power, Gazprom soon became a hostile partner. Gazprom was no longer willing to take Gusinsky’s equity, and demanded cash. Putin’s team knew that Gusinsky wouldn’t be able to come up with the needed amount, which was part of their whole plan. Gusinsky began to openly criticize Putin, calling him an opponent of free speech. On May 11, 2000, Gusinsky was arrested as a suspect in a fraud case in a privatization deal involving a St. Petersburg television company, Russian Video. Gusinsky, one of Russia’s wealthiest men, a person who thought he was untouchable, was thrown into Moscow’s most notorious prison, Butyrskaya, an overcrowded eighteenth century jail.

While on a trip to Spain, Putin was asked about the scandal, but he replied that it was all a matter of business disputes. He replied that Gusinsky had taken out $1.3 billion in loans for his Media-Most and had “returned almost nothing.” He also added that “several days ago Gusinsky did not pay back another $200 million loan, and Gazprom again paid the outstanding debt. I wonder why Gazprom should spend money on this.”34 The Kremlin’s plan was brutally simple: to force Gusinsky to repay all of the loans at once, bankrupting him. Although the Western media did make claims that this was a matter of free speech in Russia being crushed, and President Clinton did speak with Putin on behalf of Gusinsky, the writing was already on the wall. Gusinsky’s time was up. The feared backlash had started. Once again, the cry of “anti-Semitism” was voiced, but this wouldn’t help Gusinsky. If the other oligarchs had realized that Putin wasn’t only after Gusinsky, they might have been able to come to his defense and save their corrupt system. They didn’t, and it would only be a matter of time before their turn came.

Gusinsky was formally charged with fraud and released on June 16. The pressure continued. Mikhail Lesin, the recently appointed Press Minister, was given the task of destroying the oligarch. Secret negotiations were held. In total, Gusinsky owed $473 million in dept to Gazprom. An ultimatum was presented to Gusinsky: If he sold his media empire to Gazprom, he would go free. Quite simple, really. They even offered the oligarch $300 million in cash, proving that this wasn’t really about money, but about control over Gusinsky’s media. Threats continued against Gusinsky. Raids continued against his businesses. On July 7, investigators hauled off boxes of documents from NTV. According to Gusinsky, “They said it more than once. There were constant threats to put me in jail cells with tubercular prisoners and people with AIDS…. I was indeed a hostage. When you have a gun to your head, you have two options: To meet the conditions of the bandits or take a bullet in your head.”35 It was wheeling and dealing, Russian style.

On July 18, Gusinsky signed a written statement saying that he was being forced against his will to sell his business, in exchange for a promise to drop the criminal charges and permission to go abroad. According to Gusinsky, it was Lesin who was forcing him to do it. On July 20, he signed a secret agreement to sell his empire for $300 million. On July 27, the prosecutors announced that they were dropping all charges against Gusinsky. He immediately boarded his private jet and flew to Spain, never to return to Russia. While in Spain, Gusinsky changed his mind about the deal, which resulted in prosecutors issuing arrest warrants through Interpol. Gusinsky was indeed detained in Spain and twice jailed, but the Spanish high court threw out the case. In April, Gazprom held a board meeting and moved to seize control of NTV. A new general director was appointed. On April 14, NTV was taken over by armed men, and the new director assumed control. Sevyodna, Gusinsky’s first newspaper, was closed. Gusinsky should have taken the $300 million while he had the chance, but he foolishly thought that he could fight Putin. Now it was all over for him.

Gusinsky was only the first. Other oligarchs who thought that they could escape were sadly mistaken. One of these was Boris Berezovsky, the man who did more than anyone else to get Putin elected. Berezovsky was under the mistaken impression that Putin owed him something for his support and that he was therefore ‘immune.’ When asked about any charges being brought against him, he replied: “To be honest, I am not expecting this, neither tomorrow nor in the near future.”36 However, as Putin had said during his meeting with the oligarchs, the rules of the game were now different. Berezovsky was next.

In August, Putin said that the oligarchs and their television channels had been destroying the state, as well as the army and navy. Kremlin aide Alexander Voloshin told Berezovsky “Listen, either you give up ORT within two weeks or you will follow Gusinsky.”

“This is not the way to talk to me,” Berezovsky replied. “You are forgetting something. I am not Gusinsky.”37Berezovsky arranged a meeting to speak directly with President Putin and get to the bottom of things. Apparently, he felt that he was powerful enough to convince the President to change his mind. Putin told Berezovsky that he had something to tell him. He opened a file, the same file prepared by Primakov when he started to go after Berezovsky. Putin began to read a document, which detailed the corruption of ORT. Berezovsky was in shock. Putin was completely serious, and he meant business. Realizing that it was useless to fight and that he could very well end up in prison, Berezovsky sold his interest in ORT and left the country. However, his troubles were not over. He would not be safe in London, and Berezovsky could not resist the temptation to continue to meddle in Russian politics. He was an addict, and power and politics were his drugs of choice. It is simply not in Berezovsky’s nature to keep quiet and be content with his money. This was his downfall.

While in London, Berezovsky set up yet another new political party in Russia, Liberal Russia, in 2002. Liberal Russia was meant to be an opposition party, and was bankrolled by Berezovsky. The fact that Berezovsky is such an unpopular figure in Russia gave this party little chance of success from the start. Berezovsky also continued to make accusations against the Kremlin, accusing the FSB of being behind a series of apartment blasts in 1999. He even accused the FSB of being behind the 2002 siege of a Chechen-seized theater in Moscow that left 129 hostages dead. Putin’s government responded by releasing information indicating that, in fact, Berezovsky has very close ties to the Chechen separatists — and has funded them.

The Kremlin had had enough of Berezovsky’s mischief. In March of 2003, Berezovsky was arrested in London on an extradition warrant charging him with fraud while head of the Logovaz car company.

Though he has so far managed to remain in his safe haven in Britain, it is very likely that Berezovsky could end up paying for some of his early crimes against the Russian people. In an effort to gain immunity, Berezovsky announced in early April 2003 that he was planning to run in the legislative elections in Russia: As a member of the Russian State Duma, he would enjoy parliamentary immunity. His effort fizzled out, and he has lost most of his support. Berezovsky is like a gambler who cannot quit while he is ahead. If he continues to insist on trying to influence Russian politics, it is very likely that he could end up in prison for the rest of his life, or even could lose his life. Those who know what he has done are now in a good position to fight him — and they are never going to forgive.

Offline regmeok

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #288 on: June 03, 2015, 07:21:49 AM »
Poll: 86% of Russians still support Putin
28.05.2015 | 12:43

The ruble and salaries may have plunged, but the number of Russian citizens who support Russian President Vladimir Putin remains at the record level of 86%, according to the results of a survey carried out by the Levada Center, an independent Russian polling and sociological research organization, according to an UNIAN correspondent.

http://www.unian.info/politics/1083020-poll-86-of-russians-still-support-putin.htmlhttp://

I would say that it is not correct. Have always wondered how they cook such numbers.

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #289 on: June 03, 2015, 08:57:56 AM »
I would say that it is not correct. Have always wondered how they cook such numbers.Hunter ValleyHunter Valley

I would say that they don't want another Boris Yeltsin.  ;D

Also aproval and votes are not the same as "like", "admire", "adore", or "love".

In 1945 Churchill - having just won the war and having a massive approval rating, promplty lost the election. Churchill did not just loose the election, it was a massacre landslide victory against Churchill. The opposition had ideas that there should be a new society after the war, Churchill wanted to return to the old society and cursed "socialism". So despite his approval ratings, he lost the election by a spectaculor margin. Well, at least by British standards of elections.

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #290 on: June 03, 2015, 09:06:56 AM »
I would say that they don't want another Boris Yeltsin.  ;D

Also aproval and votes are not the same as "like", "admire", "adore", or "love".

In 1945 Churchill - having just won the war and having a massive approval rating, promplty lost the election. Churchill did not just loose the election, it was a massacre landslide victory against Churchill. The opposition had ideas that there should be a new society after the war, Churchill wanted to return to the old society and cursed "socialism". So despite his approval ratings, he lost the election by a spectaculor margin. Well, at least by British standards of elections.

Lot of British died in WW2. Like old-new prime minister Churchill will remind live British on WW2 ?

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #291 on: June 03, 2015, 10:33:13 AM »
Churchlll was a conservative, he wanted to go back to how things was before the war.

People had dreams of a better brighter modern Britian at the end of the War, after all that suffering they wanted welfare, health care, housing and Churchill did not.

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #292 on: June 03, 2015, 10:49:26 AM »
Churchlll was a conservative, he wanted to go back to how things was before the war.

People had dreams of a better brighter modern Britian at the end of the War, after all that suffering they wanted welfare, health care, housing and Churchill did not.

I am sure that David Irving have other explanation for Churchill`s defeat on elections ( secret society "Focus").  ;)

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #293 on: June 03, 2015, 12:43:28 PM »
I am sure that David Irving have other explanation for Churchill`s defeat on elections ( secret society "Focus").  ;)

Two Views of History
http://www.threeworldwars.com/intro.htm

There are two fundamental ways to view history. We call one the catastrophic or accidental view of history. We call the other view the conspiratorial view of history.

Accidental History

In the catastrophic or accidental view of history we are led to believe that historical events, such as wars and revolutions were the direct result of some sudden or surprising event. While the catastrophic view is accurate for weather, volcanoes and earthquakes, it does not always provide a realistic view of humanity and events influenced by man.

Young, malleable American and other Western minds are sadly taught the Accidental view of history in the government school systems.  This view is reinforced throughout their lives by the controlled mass media.  As a result, when most discover the Conspiratorial View of History, the immediate reaction is shock, disbelief and a refusal to accept something other than they've been taught to believe.

Conspiratorial History

Conspiratorial history studies that part of history that is a product of man's planning. In conspiratorial history we are led to believe that events, such as wars and revolutions, are the result of planned events. While the conspiratorial view is not accurate for weather, volcanoes and earthquakes, it is a realistic and accurate view of the interrelationship of man and nations. Since the planning for most of these events was done in secret, we use the term conspiratorial history. That is; this history is the result of plans constructed in secret, which by definition is a conspiracy.

Interestingly enough, the Conspiratorial View of History is also the Biblical View of History.  Try Psalms 2 for starters.*

We believe that current world events are not simply circumstantial, but the result of an organized campaign by an elite group of unseen and widely unknown world leaders. Their goal is to exercise absolute dictatorial control over the world, to establish a New World Order.

Offline regmeok

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #294 on: June 03, 2015, 02:44:47 PM »
thing to be noted is that sociology is a tricky thing. who are you asking, what are you asking (approval of Putin v approval of Putin with regard to Crimea event сould be two different things. and the word(ing) 'approval, approval of Putin as a president' is too abstract, you can simply imagine one good thing that you think putin is responsible for and say 'yes' or just say it because Putin is presented as unresponsible for bad things so why not to say 'yes'), who is paying you (as I remember it is an old trick to exaggerate some numbers and show them to the public, and the public will take them into account from the point that 'so many people could not be wrong so I should take a similar position').

with regard to Putins 80% I remember one interview with gleb pavlovsky (kremlin ex-political advisor/technologist) who answered to ukranian interviewer that it is simply a bullshit. I cannot but agree.

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #295 on: June 03, 2015, 03:12:50 PM »
thing to be noted is that sociology is a tricky thing. who are you asking, what are you asking (approval of Putin v approval of Putin with regard to Crimea event сould be two different things. and the word(ing) 'approval, approval of Putin as a president' is too abstract, you can simply imagine one good thing that you think putin is responsible for and say 'yes' or just say it because Putin is presented as unresponsible for bad things so why not to say 'yes'), who is paying you (as I remember it is an old trick to exaggerate some numbers and show them to the public, and the public will take them into account from the point that 'so many people could not be wrong so I should take a similar position').

with regard to Putins 80% I remember one interview with gleb pavlovsky (kremlin ex-political advisor/technologist) who answered to ukranian interviewer that it is simply a bullshit. I cannot but agree.

Well our NATO politicians are in love with Oligarchs and Robber Barons, and Income Tax is at least double the rate in Russia. The lowest rate is about 25% and middle class like Doctors pay around  50% income tax ( roughly )

Want to swap ?
Say Putin for Obama ?
 ;D  :D  :o  ::)

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin - Secret Money Behind Vladimir Putin's War Machine
« Reply #296 on: June 03, 2015, 04:17:57 PM »
The Secret Money Behind Vladimir Putin's War Machine
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-06-02/putin-s-secret-budget-hides-shift-toward-war-economy

 If Vladimir Putin’s ends remain mysterious, so do the means.

Putin is allocating unprecedented amounts of secret funds to accelerate Russia’s largest military buildup since the Cold War, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The part of the federal budget that is so-called black -- authorized but not itemized -- has doubled since 2010 to 21 percent and now totals 3.2 trillion rubles ($60 billion), the Gaidar Institute, an independent think tank in Moscow, estimates.

Stung by sanctions over Ukraine and oil’s plunge, Putin is turning to defense spending to revive a shrinking economy. The outlays on new tanks, missiles and uniforms highlight the growing militarization that is swelling the deficit and crowding out services such as health care. Thousands of army conscripts will be moved into commercial enterprises for the first time to aid in the rearmament effort.

“The government has two urgent tasks: strengthening security at all levels of society and promoting innovation to end the macroeconomic stagnation,” said Ruslan Pukhov, director of the Center for Analysis of Strategies and Technologies and an adviser to the Defense Ministry in Moscow. “The solution to both problems is to intensify the development of the military-industrial complex.”

READ MORE
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-06-02/putin-s-secret-budget-hides-shift-toward-war-economy

Offline regmeok

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #297 on: June 04, 2015, 02:30:30 AM »
Well our NATO politicians are in love with Oligarchs and Robber Barons, and Income Tax is at least double the rate in Russia. The lowest rate is about 25% and middle class like Doctors pay around  50% income tax ( roughly )

Want to swap ?
Say Putin for Obama ?
 ;D  :D  :o  ::)
Yes, we can (swap).
1. dont know what to compare with NATO. but our military secret budget lines have surely created dozens of oligarchs.   
2. in Russia there are many somewhat hidden 'taxes'. 

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #298 on: June 04, 2015, 04:40:13 AM »
Yes, we can (swap).
1. dont know what to compare with NATO. but our military secret budget lines have surely created dozens of oligarchs.   
2. in Russia there are many somewhat hidden 'taxes'.

Sorry to tell you but we have even more hidden taxes.

Sales Tax called VAT is 17.5% on everything bought and  sold. .. .. ..
Petrol - Gas car go go juice is £1.20 a litre
Green Taxes on all energy Electric, Gas .. ...

I'm sure Russia will eventually catch up, but being behind is not allways bad !
Like being behind in Taxes !

Ok my examples are specific to Britian, but it is effectively the same across Europe. Our Govts are bigger and more powerful because they raise more Taxes.

America has lower Taxes, but hidden costs. You end up paying private companies insurance, and often the insurance costs a lot more. For example health insurance is about double the cost in america.

Western Govts have been running Monopolies and running at a Profit for a very long time. It is like the Mafia, but after many 100's years it has become 'respectable', but it is Mafia Family. Every biz pays protection money, every time anyone buys or sells it collects tax, everything it collects tax.

Don't get me wrong, I do not think Putin is an Angel. Its not that Putin is better, it is that in the West the Politicians are so bad its a joke.

They tell you in Russia that life in the West is "better", but is not better, just different.

For example, having a Dacha is impossible dream for anyone living in my country. You would have to be amazingly super rich to buy a Dacha. You have the world "dacha", we do not even have our own word for it.



Offline regmeok

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #299 on: June 04, 2015, 11:10:47 AM »
vat 18%
petrol seems to be 4 times cheaper  if I count correctly. 0.39£ per litre
have not heard about green taxes though

and dont know how to compare insurance spendings. in Russia 13% is income tax (and dont know how comparable this wording would be). and 34% is payments to all sorts of funds (medicine and other work related insurance, pension funds) but it is paid by employer so technically such payments are not figured on your account.
 
some attention to be paid to the tariffs of natural monopolies resulting in the final consumer's spendings, the growth of housing and communal services rates,  economic costs emerged due to ineffective burocracy and corruption,  12-15% morgage intest rate, 12,5% central bank interest rate (and i guess commercial credit intrest rate are similar) which is definitely no good for the buisnesses or any final consumers  ...custom duties makes car costs 40-50% bigger than in the west...

different indeed, but overall western people seems to be better off.

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #300 on: June 04, 2015, 11:41:53 AM »
Yes different.

When I lived in Europe many of the young people though life was better in America.
When I lived in America many of the young people though life was better in Europe.

We have an old saying "Grass is always greener the other side of the fence"

It always depends on who you are, what job do you do, etc .. .. ..

If you want land, then Europe is a very bad place. America is better, and Russia has more land than any other country in the world. See, depends what you want. If you want pop music, Russia is a bad place to be, Europe is a little better, and America is best.

I say this because it depends on the person.

I live now in Europe because my wife needs healthcare, and America is at least twice as expensive.


The best maths for working out where the best places to live is called GINI, it measures wealth inequality, which is what matters to normal ordinary people.

See Map, America might be rich, but many ordinary Americans live in poverty, the best place are scandinavian countries, like Sweeden. Russia ain't that bad. In fact for wealth inequality, its slightly better than America by a small amount.

How rich a country is on paper, is not the same as how rich normal people feel.
GINI gives a good maths answer.


Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #301 on: June 05, 2015, 01:49:33 PM »
Soccer 2018 Russia .... was that why Lynch exposed the fifa corruption?




http://www.newrepublic.com/article/118105/obama-clinton-cameron-and-more-world-leaders-soccer-balls
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #302 on: June 06, 2015, 06:13:05 PM »

http://news.yahoo.com/dont-afraid-russia-putin-tells-west-093154948.html
Don't be afraid of Russia, Putin tells West

By Anna SMOLCHENKO
10 hours ago
...
"I would like to say - there's no need to be afraid of Russia," Putin told Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera in an interview published Saturday, ruling out a major conflict between Russia and NATO member countries.

"The world has changed so much that people in their right mind cannot imagine such a large-scale military conflict today."

"We have other things to do
, I can assure you," the Russian president said.

"Only a sick person -- and even then only in his sleep -- can imagine that Russia would suddenly attack NATO."
,...



Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #303 on: June 07, 2015, 03:55:48 PM »
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2015/06/04/putin-pope-francis-meet/28503815/
Russia's Putin to meet with Pope Francis at the Vatican
Rosie Scammell, Religion News Service 7:06 p.m. EDT June 4, 2015

VATICAN CITY — Russian President Vladimir Putin will meet Pope Francis on Wednesday, with pressure on the pontiff to speak up about the Kremlin's role in the Ukraine conflict.

The visit, which was confirmed Thursday by the Holy See's chief spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, will be Putin's second meeting with Francis. The two leaders also met in the Vatican in November 2013.

But the ground between Moscow and Rome has shifted significantly in the interim, with Russia annexing the Crimea Peninsula last year and being accused of fomenting the ongoing war in eastern Ukraine.

The pope has previously expressed concern over the conflict; in his Easter message he wished for Ukraine to "rediscover peace and hope thanks to the commitment of all interested parties."

But Francis' decision not to specifically mention Russia has led to disappointment among Ukrainian Catholics — and speculation over whether the pope will raise the issue with Putin in their private meeting.

The two leaders may also revisit their earlier discussion of the Syrian war, a crisis the pope has highlighted repeatedly and one in which the Kremlin plays an important role.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline chris jones

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #304 on: June 07, 2015, 09:29:42 PM »
 I can't say much about the pope, I can say organized religions playing politics, keeping secret vaults, owning banks, wearing costumes, is beyond my comprehension of the Christs message as I interpret it.
 Corporate religions  irritate me. 

 ISIS will be a topic, what won't be mentioned is how they began, and what sector of governments and their controllers funded them and provided arms. The Ukraine will be discussed, what won't be mentioned is the Crimea was voted on by the people by an astounding 87% of the citizens.


 
 

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #305 on: June 20, 2015, 07:29:08 PM »
http://rt.com/business/268546-russia-greece-gas-deal/
Putin: €2bn Russia-Greece gas deal will help Athens pay its debt
 Published time: June 20, 2015 12:09


Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (L) speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin during a session of the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum 2015 (SPIEF 2015) in St. Petersburg, Russia, June 19, 2015. (Reuters/Mikhail Klimentyev/RIA Novosti/Kremlin)

A deal to jointly build an extension of the Turkish Stream gas pipeline across Greece will help Athens to settle its multibillion euro debt to international creditors, President Vladimir Putin said at the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline chris jones

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #306 on: June 21, 2015, 11:32:40 AM »
Big oil won't cotton to this.
   The US $ oil standard is and allways has been manipulated. The Saudis and USA among others have attempted to break the Russian economy which depended on 80% of its revenue.
   They in doing so will eventualy create competition , it is safe to say they will not cotton to Putin coming to the aid of of greece.
    Beside the point, Russia desires stability just as we do, (the people that is) not the superpowers.
This is but a cloud in the storm of the horizon, there will be much more fearmongering, black ops both finacialy and otherwise.  I anticipate severe reactions from the IMF players.

Offline Jackson Holly

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #307 on: July 26, 2015, 01:02:27 PM »


… Bbwaaa-haa-HAA-hhahaha!

Gotta see this STUPID TV Propaganda piece
that they run in KIEV and other Western
UKE markets.


1 Minute Propaganda Clip Reveals Intellectual
Level of Ukraine's "Democracy" (Video)

Free advice to Obama, Cameron, Merkel, et al:
You are backing the mental midgets in this affair.
Note giggling of viewers in the background


~~> SEE! http://russia-insider.com/en/politics/1-minute-propaganda-clip-reveals-intellectual-level-ukraines-democracy-video-q/ri8944
St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline chris jones

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #308 on: July 26, 2015, 05:31:01 PM »
  Looks like CNN at its finest.

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #309 on: July 27, 2015, 05:17:14 PM »
Putin: Europe must become more emancipated from the United States.  :)

http://www.srf.ch/news/international/europa-muss-unabhaengiger-von-den-usa-werdenhttp://

P.S. That is solution a problem in Europe and USA.

Offline regmeok

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #310 on: July 28, 2015, 08:42:00 PM »
https://youtu.be/5XCCGwbrYr0 (ignore speech, nothing funny, but video more or less watchable)

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #311 on: July 28, 2015, 09:27:24 PM »
Thank you regmeok

Offline donnay

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #312 on: July 28, 2015, 11:06:27 PM »
I think this goes here... 

Putin on the Ritz.


 8) :D
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #313 on: July 29, 2015, 01:28:57 AM »
^^^^^^^

  Nice donnay.

  Like him or not,  we would have been in full scale WW3 without him blocking some of the agenda of Oby and his puppet handlers.  Case in point--Putin has vowed to defend Syria---this limits what Oby can do. 

 
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline donnay

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #314 on: July 29, 2015, 08:43:25 AM »
^^^^^^^

  Nice donnay.

  Like him or not,  we would have been in full scale WW3 without him blocking some of the agenda of Oby and his puppet handlers.  Case in point--Putin has vowed to defend Syria---this limits what Oby can do.

Agreed.  However, they are all just fighting to see who sits at the head of the NWO table.
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #315 on: July 29, 2015, 09:12:16 AM »
Agreed.  However, they are all just fighting to see who sits at the head of the NWO table.

No. Vladimir Putin is a traitor of NWO. That is not my words !

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #316 on: July 29, 2015, 09:28:57 AM »
No. Vladimir Putin is a traitor of NWO. That is not my words !

  I think you are right Al.  If Putin was not there, the NWO would have already taken the countries of Ukraine and Syria and we would all be in WW3 now.  They are upset that they have spent billions on these projects and still haven't advanced their agenda.  They are way behind schedule. 

  BUT WE HAVE THIS FROM ZEROHEDGE....EXCERPT BELOW
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2015-07-28/end-draws-near-syrias-assad-putins-patience-wears-thin

The End Draws Near For Syria's Assad As Putin's Patience "Wears Thin"

Maybe not yet, but that could change quickly, especially if Assad were to lose the support of his most important ally, Vladimir Putin.

As we noted last month, the key outstanding question is this: what is the maximum pain level for Russia, which has the greatest vested interest in preserving the Assad regime?

We could have an answer to that very soon, as slumping commodities prices, falling demand from China (which was recently cited as the reason for "indefinite" delays to the Altai pipeline joint venture which would have delivered 30 bcm/y of Siberian gas to China), and economic sanctions from the West are squeezing Moscow and may ultimately prompt Putin to "consider the acceptability of other candidates" for the Syrian Presidency. Here’s WSJ with more:

And with Russia’s economy battered by a plunge in oil prices and Western sanctions, the government may be considering both the strategic and economic benefits of changing its stance on Mr. Assad.

But Fyodor Lukyanov, chairman of a Kremlin foreign-policy advisory council, said Russian policy makers are likely considering possible alternatives to the Syrian president.

"They are looking at the acceptability of other candidates at this point," he said, adding that he had not heard any names.

If Moscow does provide an opening to broker a negotiated exit for Mr. Assad, it would be a dramatic turn in the conflict.

Mr. Assad’s other major international backer, Iran, shows no signs of wavering in its crucial military and financial support for the Syrian regime. But the long-sought nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers reached earlier this month has also opened up the possibility of broader political cooperation between Tehran and the West on other regional issues such as the war in Syria.

Hadi al-Bahra, a senior member of the Turkey-based opposition umbrella group the Syrian National Coalition, said his alliance discussed Mr. Assad’s political fate with Russian officials for the first time in a meeting last month led by Russia’s Deputy Foreign Minister Mikhail Bogdanov. Ahmed Ramadan, another senior coalition member, also attended that meeting in the Turkish capital Ankara.

“We have been speaking with the Russians from the very beginning and we have not heard one word of criticism of Assad," Mr. Ramadan said. "But now, the Russians are discussing the alternatives with us."



 
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

EvadingGrid

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #317 on: July 29, 2015, 09:35:06 AM »
  I think you are right Al.  If Putin was not there, the NWO would have already taken the countries of Ukraine and Syria and we would all be in WW3 now.  They are upset that they have spent billions on these projects and still haven't advanced their agenda.  They are way behind schedule.

I think you are right, Putin has blocked too many of their moves and has policies such as population growth and old fashioned family values to be New World Order.

Offline donnay

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #318 on: July 29, 2015, 09:50:05 AM »
No. Vladimir Putin is a traitor of NWO. That is not my words !

Yeah but I still think there is a lot of infighting which is stalling the agenda.

Putin would probably like to rule the world.  He is no saint.
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Vladimir Putin
« Reply #319 on: July 29, 2015, 10:04:27 AM »
Yeah but I still think there is a lot of infighting which is stalling the agenda.

Putin would probably like to rule the world.  He is no saint.

No and No. Vladimir Putin would not like to rule the world and he is not saint.