In Case You Didn't Notice, Why is the American Flag worn backwards on uniforms?

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Neo:


Everywhere you look these days government issued uniforms are wearing the flag backwards. Since 2004, this has been official policy. Lately, I've noticed prison guards, police tactical units, emergency workers, military and civilian aircraft, etc. displaying the flag backwards. Though, U.S. professional sporting teams haven't converted yet. If you look on the back of a $20 dollar bill, you will see the flag flying backwards on top of the White House. The NWO are slaves to symbolism, ritual, time and dates.

I present to you two mainstream websites giving their answers.

The backward appearance of the U.S. flag on the serviceman's sleeve in this picture is not a mistake or anomaly. As the military newspaper Stars & Stripes explained, the flag patch worn on the right shoulder of a U.S. soldier's uniform is deliberately reversed:

    Why do American soldiers wear the U.S. flag insignia "backwards" on the right shoulder of their utility uniforms, with the canton (the rectangle with the stars) on an observer's right?

    It's a question that soldiers hear frequently as they travel through civilian airports, or talk to members of other services.

    And it does look "wrong," because U.S. federal code calls for the canton to always be positioned to the left. The soldiers aren't wrong, however, and neither are their tailors, Lt. Col. Stanley Heath, an Army spokesman, explained in a telephone interview.

    The Army actually has two authorized flag patches, one to be worn on the left shoulder, with the canton facing left, and another "reverse field" patch worn on the right, with the canton facing right.

    The two different orientations are mandated because Army regulations call for the flag "to be worn so that to observers, it looks as if the flag is flying against a breeze," Heath said.

    What does a stiff wind have to do with this custom?

    In fact, the rule is a nod to the U.S. Army's early history, when wars were fought as a series of carefully choreographed battles — two armies meeting on a field, clashing head-on until one side emerged victorious.

    In those battles, both mounted cavalry and infantry units would always designate one soldier as "standard bearer," to carry the Colors into the fight.

    As the standard bearer charged, his rapid forward momentum would cause the flag to stream back.

    And since the Stars and Stripes is mounted with the canton closest to the pole, that section would always be forward.

    So if a soldier is charging into the battle, the flag would give the appearance of forward motion. For the right shoulder, the flag only appears "backward."

    And that's why soldiers wear the flag patches on the right shoulder "backward." Because retreat in battle, as any soldier will tell you, is not the Army way. Source: http://www.snopes.com/photos/military/patch.asp

On Military.com's website:

Answer: Army Regulation 670-1, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, is the governing authority for the wear of Army uniforms. Paragraph 28-18 governs the wear of the United States Flag on Army Uniforms.

The flag may only be worn on the utility and organizational uniforms (such as the camouflage BDU). The flag may only be worn during joint-duty and multinational deployments. When the service member returns to home station, the flag must be removed. (Guide Note: A message went out in February 2004 changing this restriction, and making the U.S. Flag a mandatory uniform component for all soldiers, effective October 1, 2005).

Chapter 1, Title 4, United States Code, provides for the design of the U.S. flag and specifies the colors as red, white, and blue. Colors other than red, white, and blue violate the U.S. Code; therefore, subdued-colored flags are not authorized for wear. Joint commanders have to make the decision as to whether or not the wear of a full-color flag, for morale purposes, is more important than having all aspects of the uniform camouflaged.

When approved for wear, the full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is sewn 1/2 inch below the right shoulder seam of the temperate, hot-weather, enhanced hot-weather, and desert BDU; the BDU field jacket; and the cold-weather uniform. The flag is worn on the right shoulder, because, in the military, the "place of honor" is to a military member's right.

The full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is worn so that the star field faces forward, or to the flag’s own right. When worn in this manner, the flag is facing to the observer’s right, and gives the effect of the flag flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward.

The rule dates back to the Army's early history, when both mounted cavalry and infantry units would designate a standard bearer, who carried the Colors into battle. As he charged, his forward momentum caused the flag to stream back. Since the Stars and Stripes are mounted with the canton closest to the pole, that section stayed to the right, while the stripes flew to the left.

Here are some interesting tidbits from a former US serviceman and a patriot on a message blog:

Source http://www.murdoconline.net/archives/000049.html

When I wore the uniform of the United States Air Force I never, absolutely never, saw an American flag displayed backwards on a uniform or anywhere else. The first "backwards flag" I recall seeing was on the sleeves of our forces in Iraq in 2003. They were not on the uniform of those in the Gulf War of 1991 or any previous war. I recall that for a while I saw at least some uniforms with both the reverse flag on the right sleeve and the traditional flag above the left breast pocket.

Now I understand that it is against regulation and subject to disciplinary action for anyone in a U.S. Armed Service to have any flag displayed other than the reverse flag. Why would the military outlaw the traditional American flag (the real one) to be worn by Americans in uniform? Would another 2 by 3 inch piece of cloth on a uniform bust the Pentagon's half trillion dollar budget?

It seems to me that if anyone is going out of their way and making excessive effort over something supposedly of no consequence, it is the military command. For reasons that to me seem utterly trivial if not indeed bizarre, they substitute a bogus reverse representation of the flag for the real one and then proceed to make the real one illegal.

Think about it for a minute. We have a flag that has represented this nation for over two hundred years in war and peace, one that has acquired a great and honorable tradition as well as an exact code of display and ceremony. It has become known the world over in countless images. And I would suggest everyone who professes to love the flag and all it represents to go and look at what is surely the most famous image of all, the raising of the flag on Iwo Jima in World War II. The flag is waving in the breeze and the blue field is to the left, damn it, not the right. No backwards flag!

I'm not certain about the reverse flag in regard to the International Laws of Warfare discussed in a prior post, but I believe there may be something to it because I recall reading about some troops having to remove national insignia from their uniforms before they could be placed under United Nations command in a peacekeeping mission. I don't know enough yet to be certain if the reverse flag is the product of sinister or merely uninformed motives, but I'm highly suspicious and will continue to search for the truth.

by James Macchi
The "backwards flag" is no silly affectation. It is part of a well-planned and coordinated effort to subvert our national sovereignty. As pointed out, reversing the display of a nation's flag can sometimes result in the flag becoming that of another nation.

At any rate, it ceases to be a legally emblematic of the sponsoring nation. It is part of the body of the International Laws of Warfare that combatants not PROPERLY displaying the flag of their nation on their uniforms are not considered to be under the command and control of that nation. All this nonsense about a flag emblem sewn on a uniform not looking like a flag on a pole moving backwards is the most ridiculous and transparent non-reason that I can imagine to try to disguise the real intent.

No rational 7-year old would buy such idiocy, but most adults will because they have had more years of government indoctrination. Because we are fighting a worldwide "War on Terrorism", surrender of any and all of our rights, individual as well as national, is expected and will, almost universally, be gladly given.

Martial law under a high-tech police state is just around the corner, folks. And when it arrives, it will give me no pleasure to say "I told you so" to all those who, certain that "It can't happen here in the land of the free", invariably dismiss this horrific prospect. On that awful day, we will all find it much more difficult to maintain our lives, let alone our freedoms.

Do explore Jordan Maxwell's and David Icke's books and videos to illustrate the pervasive Illuminati symbolism that's plastered all over America.

Sonja:
What you are saying I think is really important. I think it deserves to be looked at by us, decifered and dissected as underground people because it doesnt mean just 'nothing'. It's the first I've seen, I dont know what to think of it, but we need to take a damn good look at it as far as symbolism goes. There are NO symbols that do not suggest intent, and this one is BIG. A reverse Flag on soldiers uniforms MEANS Something and its not 'charging into battle' in this depiction.
I am very unnerved by this and kudos for you to bring this to our attention. I hope this thread gets plenty of notice, great awareness and great work! Hopefully someone here can move on it, it's out of my realm of knowledge.

Dan:
I was in the Navy in the mid 90's until 2000, and I saw the reverse flag on every uniform that required flag patches.  One flying the right way, and on the other side of the service member, one flying the other way (backwards).  It is symbolism as far as I know, but only to display the flag as flying in a breeze.  It is also on air craft.  On the left side of the plane it flies with the tail, on the right, against it (as seen in this pic).  If you do find something, I would be interested, but alas...I don't think there is anything there.  Good hunting.

Dan

hellcatjr:
Doubtful, I could have sworn the blue was always left aligned! I mean the ENTIRE flag is symbolic, from the stripes to the stars, colours and all, let's be realistic here!

Remember, this hasn't been our government for over seventy five years, we lost that power to the monopoly men ever since...

Loungin:
Another important note is the Gold Trim.  I think there is already a post on this forum, recently, about this gold trim.

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