Bus Revolt - Brazil

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Offline RollyPolly

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #80 on: June 19, 2013, 10:41:02 PM »
There are all sorts of things...

Is it common for police to do that in Brazil?

I forgot to ask.

Offline No2NWO

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #81 on: June 19, 2013, 10:47:22 PM »
Ok Bus Revolt, You'll need to have big aspirations to help you're people in my opinion. First, you'll need to evict the Bushes, Soros' and other globalist scum multi-billionaires who seek to enslave you and steal your beautiful country and it's natural resources by buying criminals to create laws that will ensure such slavery.

These evil criminal politicians that are selling you out are owned by them. Globalists love to create and employ criminals, because criminals have nothing to lose. You need to identify all of these paid for political puppets and expell them from your country as well.

If you can start with a clean slate, you'll need to set up a system which will ensure that none of your politicians, none of your military commanders and none of your police force ever accept monitary compensations for ANYTHING but their PUBLIC SERVICE as per their contracts. Those who desire to achieve great personal wealth are those who are willing to commit great atrocities. Sever ANY outside globalist purse strings and set up a system of checks and balances that will keep your public servants honest and accountable at all times.

That is just my opinion...  in hopes I'm not telling you anything you don't already know.

"BEAT THEM BY NEVER JOINING THEM" ~ No2NWO
Rise and rise again, until lambs become lions.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #82 on: June 20, 2013, 06:13:49 AM »
Dear Rolly and dear No2NWO
I can't sleep and my mind won't stop. Thank you for your suggestions. I can confidentely say that most people is aware that we are being ruled by criminals. The point is we are fed up with the "norm". Everytime someone complains it is like this person is an outcast. I guess now it is the opposite. It is a "mafia" culture so you cannot say anything. We are hoping to change that and bring criminals to justice.
The police has a similar issue. Some police are just criminals. I have also met many HONEST police along my life.
The honest ones are also feeling it is the time to fight corruption. The movie "Tropa de Elite" portrays this struggle very accurately. Regarding your remark Rolly. I think it is a little exagerate to say the police goes out shooting like that but I have to confess that it happens here and there. However I see this as more of a problem of cultural value rather than just violence. It is an expression of the way the society (not just the police) sees the very poor ones. Racism is also an issue.
Like I told Frank. The "left" are the ones talking about globalists and their banks. At least those honest ones. Right now I am not concerned with parties (despite their flags). What concerns me and others is to fight the criminals. We have been promised a lot by both right and left. Now we see them as the same criminals.
During last protest I saw how angry everybody got when passing in front of parties headquarters (PT, PMDB, PSDB, etc.). We do not have a tradition of strong tradicional parties like in England and the USA. Politicians change parties like they change cothes. Big mistake!
Now this is the result:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HK6-mpdKLK0

Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #83 on: June 20, 2013, 10:35:09 AM »
I hope this idea doesn't get ANY support from officers:

http://www.facebook.com/GolpeMilitar2014

Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline One Revelator

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #84 on: June 20, 2013, 11:21:08 AM »
Brazilian Protests Succeed In Reversing Bus, Subway Fare Hike

Submitted by Tyler Durden on 06/19/2013 18:04 -0400

The Brazilian protests, which swept through the country with the raging bear market (and the pulled mega-IPO) over the past week, and which had the goal of reducing a recent bus-fare increase among other assorted protest goals, appear to have succeeded. At least when it comes to the fare increase. As for the other protester demands, listed below, it may take a little longer.

AP reports:
Brazilian leaders in Sao Paulo say they are reversing a 10-cent hike in bus and subway fares that has sparked widespread protests across the nation.
 
Sao Paulo Mayor Fernando Haddad and Sao Paulo state Gov. Geraldo Alckmin said at a joint news conference Wednesday that the fare increase is now reversed.
 
However, it was not clear what impact the action would have on the protests that have broken out in several Brazilian cities.
 
The protests have evolved into communal outcries that have moved well beyond the original demand that public transportation fares be lowered.
 
Protests are continuing in Rio's sister city Niteroi and in northeastern Brazil.
The good news: protests still work in some cases. The bad news: a 10 cent fare increase is a far more manageable issue to resolve than corruption, violence, police repression, and corrupt politicians which are some of the other protest causes.



http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-06-19/brazilian-protests-succeed-reversing-bus-subway-fare-hike

Also featured on www.prisonplanet.com today.
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Offline chris jones

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #85 on: June 20, 2013, 12:36:30 PM »
Bus stop.
  You mentioned,quote The police has a similar issue. Some police are just criminals. I have also met many HONEST police along my life.
The honest ones are also feeling it is the time to fight corruption. The movie "Tropa de Elite" portrays this struggle very accurately

  Corruption within any police department is a trail to those who supervise them, their superiors. Either they are on the take, ( in the circle) don't care as long as they get a paycheck and the bennnys, or are a bit worried they may have an accident, suicide, jump of a building or simply get gunned down.
   One head of the HYDRA is law enforcement WHY- they are controlled by politicians. As you said there are decent folks who are police/honest, do they like what is going on, NO, what can they do against any organized inner circle of shiitbags?
 A chief of police is basically a pol with a badge, up and onward to reps and the position of govenor of the state, and then of course to the true power in higher office.
    You know how the USA has taken the fall.  Corruption, constitutuional disregard, parasites placed in gov positions,clandetine operatives with a license, golbal elitist pulling their strings along with big corporations suking the peoples blood.
     Once, the USA was looked upon as a beacon of light to this world,opportunity, freedom equality, unfortunelty the 01% decided it was time to eliminate men of honor, charismatic, honorable men,  the 3 K's presented a threat to the elite mafia each were assassinated. The message sent, the real powers will not tolerate men of honor, or  competition. They want it all, peons in their oppinion are a large mass of eaters, a virus.
 They do need those of their ilk, specific highly intellegent people, and slaves to fullfill their needs.
Human nature is a bitch, powermongers exist at every level of society, that said I am pleased to see people uniting with one standard, we the people have a voice and will be heard.
There will be agitators, infiltrators who will create violent acts & some who are so enraged they react in this manner, they will be focused on by news media, as is S.O.P. (However I recomend the peacefull citizens attempt to keep them isolated).
     
   

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #86 on: June 20, 2013, 02:02:33 PM »
Thank you One Revelator. Thank you Chris.

Offline RollyPolly

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #87 on: June 20, 2013, 03:18:55 PM »
Brazil fare hikes rolled back in victory for protests

Quote
RIO DE JANEIRO, Jun 20 – Brazil’s two biggest cities rolled back transit fare hikes that had triggered massive protests as demonstrators clashed with police outside a Confederations Cup match.

The move Wednesday by authorities in Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro marked a major victory for the protests, which are the biggest Brazil has seen in two decades and have evoked comparisons with the Arab Spring and the unrest in Turkey.

The demonstrations were triggered by the rate hikes, but have swelled with fury at the government’s lavish spending on the Confederations Cup and next year’s World Cup, which critics say comes at the expense of social programs.

Sao Paulo State Governor Geraldo Alckmin said metro, train and bus fares would revert to $1.35 from $1.44 from next Monday at the current exchange rate, while Rio Mayor Eduardo Paes said bus fares would go back to $1.24 from $1.33.

Several other Brazilian cities, including Porto Alegre and Recife, had already canceled their own fare hikes.

The fare increases may appear modest but they were seen by many as a major burden in a country where the minimum monthly wage is currently only $306.

The current wave of unrest began nearly two weeks ago in Sao Paulo and rapidly spread to other cities just as the country on Saturday kicked off the Confederations Cup, a dry run for next year’s World Cup.

The government has earmarked $15 billion for the Confederations Cup and the World Cup — events aimed at showcasing Brazil’s recent economic boom and rising global stature.

But the protesters — including many young people who feel left behind by the vaunted economic growth — have accused the government of neglecting health and education while pouring funds into sports stadiums.

In Fortaleza, where Brazil beat Mexico 2-0 in their second Confederations Cup match, some of the roughly 10,000 protesters hurled stones at security forces, who responded with tear gas and rubber bullets.

One person suffered an eye injury and a second was taken away on a stretcher in Fortaleza, one of six cities hosting matches in the Confederations Cup and where elite police units have fanned out to protect the sites.

“Forward, forward,” the demonstrators shouted as a cordon of police blocked access to the $240 million Castelao stadium. An indignant woman declared “this is a dictatorship” as police fired rubber bullets.

The justice ministry had ordered a crack federal police unit to deploy in five Confederations Cup host stadiums located in the states of Rio de Janeiro, Bahia, Minas Gerais, Ceara as well as in the federal district of Brasilia.

The National Force, composed of police and firefighters from different states that are called up for duty on special occasions, is a “conciliatory, mediating” force, “not repressive,” the ministry said.

In Fortaleza, a city of 3.5 million where 6,000 additional state police troopers were deployed, protesters railed against the country’s political class, accusing it of corruption and mismanagement.

“We are protesting the use of public funds for the construction of stadiums, money that should be used for education,” said 18-year-old Matheus Dantas, amid a sea of Brazilian flags.

“Brazil, we are going to wake up — a professor is worth more than Neymar,” the demonstrators in Fortaleza shouted, referring to a popular star of the national team.

Ahead of the match against Mexico, Neymar joined his Selecao teammates in backing the escalating social protests and chided President Dilma Rousseff’s government for failing to deliver adequate social services.

“Saddened by all that is occurring in Brazil,” Neymar said in a statement.

“I always had faith that it would not be necessary to come to the point of having to take to the streets to demand better conditions for transport, health, education and security,” he said.

Thousands of people also marched in peaceful protests in several cities, including Belo Horizonte, suburban Sao Paulo and Niteroi, a city near Rio where some 7,000 people marched peacefully.

As night fell in Niteroi, riot police fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse scores of demonstrators who ransacked a bank branch, set up barricades, lit fires and tried to overturn a bus.

On Tuesday, at least 50,000 people flooded the streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil’s most populous city and the nation’s industrial capital, to vent their anger at the country’s politicians, including Rousseff.

http://www.capitalfm.co.ke/news/2013/06/brazil-fare-hikes-rolled-back-in-victory-for-protests/

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #88 on: June 20, 2013, 04:36:46 PM »
Hey Holly!
Nice! Regarding the fus fare. They are pretending to solve the problem while making it worse!!! Why? Because it is through tax exemption. It will lead to more profit for the companies and less money to the cities, states and the federal governement. In the end we end up losing. Anyway... there are other issues thare deserve more urgent attention.
I am going to protest now. It is raining...dawm!

Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline chris jones

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #89 on: June 20, 2013, 07:06:21 PM »
 I'm keeping track of this right now, 99% of the demonstrators are peacefull, there has been a minisclue % of violence, SURE there is allways a few who resort to this, please don't interperet this as a violent movement, the vast, vast, vast, majority are peacefully marching.
If this was a totaly violent march 35,000 people would have overun any SHOCK teams (riot squads) we all- know this.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #90 on: June 20, 2013, 10:21:26 PM »
Hi Chris
I believe you. I actally know that.
We were in front the City Hall. Then we followed in peace through Borges de Medeiros Avenue and Joa Pessoa Avenue. I saw no violence nor vandalism. Then we arrived at Ipiranga Avenue next to RBS (local Globo). I saw no violence at all untill this point. The police started to atack with gaz (a lot). Then they slowly advanced throwing more and more gaz. But people insisted and peacefuly protested in front of them. So they used the cavalry and it worked.
It was violent yes and some people reacted but nothing violent. I, for instance, raised my arms and said: I am a teacher not a bandit. Some shouted: I am not a gangster! or You are body guards for RBS! It was real chaos. They shouted many things but nothing to instigate violence.
That's it! Any questions?

Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #91 on: June 21, 2013, 10:06:49 AM »
That's what I have been trying to make people aware:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4L8WlBFlGQ

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #92 on: June 21, 2013, 12:57:33 PM »
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jun/21/brazil-protests-president-emergency-meeting
Brazil protests: president to hold emergency meeting

Night of protests draws vast crowds in cities across Brazil, with a total turnout estimated at 2 million

Jonathan Watts in Rio de Janeiro
guardian.co.uk, Friday 21 June 2013 05.43 EDT

   

Brazil's president, Dilma Rousseff, and key ministers are to hold an emergency meeting on Friday following a night of protests that saw Rio de Janeiro and dozens of other cities echo with percussion grenades and swirl with teargas as riot police scattered the biggest demonstrations in more than two decades.

The protests were sparked last week by opposition to rising bus fares, but they have spread rapidly to encompass a range of grievances, as was evident from the placards. "Stop corruption. Change Brazil"; "Halt evictions"; "Come to the street. It's the only place we don't pay taxes"; "Government failure to understand education will lead to revolution

Rousseff's office said she had cancelled a trip to Japan next week.

A former student radical herself, Rousseff has tried to mollify the protesters by praising their peaceful and democratic spirit. Partly at her prompting, Rio, São Paulo and other cities have reversed the increase in public transport fares, but this has failed to quell the unrest.

A vast crowd – estimated by the authorities at 300,000 and more than a million by participants – filled Rio's streets, one of a wave of huge nationwide marches against corruption, police brutality, poor public services and excessive spending on the World Cup

...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #93 on: June 21, 2013, 01:04:04 PM »


  We are going to see more of these protests worldwide.

  WHEN THE PEOPLE LOSE EVERYTHING, THEY LOSE IT.
                                             ---Gerald Celente
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Offline One Revelator

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #94 on: June 21, 2013, 01:05:39 PM »
Makow just picked up on this. Images at his link if they don't show up here.

Brazilian Explains Popular Outrage
June 21, 2013
http://henrymakow.com/upload_images/0%2C%2C16897299_303%2C00.jpg


At least one million people have taken to the streets of Brazil, protesting everything from corruption and poor public services to the costs of the 2014 World Cup. The wave of protests hit at least 80 cities. The President is in emergency meetings.

A government-sponsored Marxist protest against transit fare increases in Sao Paulo (where the Opposition is in power) has backfired into a nation-wide popular uprising. Marcos explains what's behind the mass frustration.

by Marcos, in Sao Paulo
(henrymakow.com)

Brazil is on fire.

Initially the protests were started by Communists, complaining of a small (US$ 0,09) bus fare raise.

The tiny (40 members) "free ride group" was helped by a government funded NGO. Today the 23-year-old tattooed waitress who leads the group said they are "anti-capitalist" and that they now want rural and urban land redistribution. This is Marxism.

http://henrymakow.com/upload_images/s1.reutersmedia.net.jpg


However, things got out of hand and grew exponentially because of the internet. Most cities cancelled the bus fare raise. If this was only a protest about this petty issue, things would be peaceful today.

The government Communists shot themselves in the foot because they were overconfident and didn't count on the force of the internet and the dissatisfaction of the people. They are still trying to get the control back, but people just shoved them off. Today the president of the government's Workers Party called their militants to the street, but there were fights and people called them "opportunists".

It was a battle between green &yellow national flag carriers and red flag carriers. The reds lost. People in big cities hate Lula's Party. Everybody knows they have won because they gave dole money to buy votes in the backward underdeveloped areas (which remain underdeveloped). Yesterday 600 people got together in front of the former president's apartment building, calling him a thief (which he is).

The truth is that Marxists have been in power for a decade and people are fed up about several issues:

http://henrymakow.com/upload_images/protests.jpg


- US$ 28 Billion being wasted in the World Cup, with several corruption scandals.

- The criminals from the Workers Party who have already been convicted of corruption and buying out Congressmen, are still at large because of several tricks of the lawyers.

- The government is trying to pass the PEC37 law, which basically forbids any kind of investigation on corruption.

- Inflation is rising every month and the GDP growth was almost null.

- President Dilma has now 39 Ministries. She gives one for each corrupt ally in order to buy support in the Congress. We see a huge corruption scandal every week in the news.

- People who work are tired of seeing militants invading farms, and small groups and NGOs  getting tons of money from the government. Taxes are at 40% of GDP.  Education is in ruins, only teaching Marxism and gay issues, public health is a disgrace.

- Dilma is selling out Brazil in order too help Communist allies in Latin America, especially Cuba and Venezuela.  For example, she builds a harbor in Havana while our ports are falling apart. There are dozens of other examples. She has now given one billion dollars to African countries (debt pardon) because Brazilian construction companies with businesses there will give her money for her election campaign.

Now the protests area totally disconnected and without leadership. Nobody knows what will happen.

 Dilma called the Army (the irony) to defend the Palace...mobs trying to invade the Ministry of Foreign Relations...All roads out of Sao Paulo have been blocked by protesters...Rio's mayor Palace under attack...

http://henrymakow.com/upload_images/teargas.jpg

 (This photo of a woman being pepper sprayed went viral.)

Brazil has never seen anything like it. Even small cities are seeing protests with 10, 20K people.

The problem is that there is no conservative leadership in the country. It is possible that Communists may sacrifice the Workers Party and try to be more radical, pushing for a Venezuela style revolution. The Left is organized and has a strategy, based on the Forum of Sao Paulo organization.

They will do whatever it takes to direct the popular dissatisfaction. Some conservative people are organizing protests too.

At this moment, all we have is speculation.

http://henrymakow.com/2013/06/Volcano-of-Rage-Erupts-in-Brazil.html
The number one cause of all human poverty, misery, and death is not global warming. It’s GLOBAL LYING.

Offline chris jones

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #95 on: June 21, 2013, 02:42:54 PM »
 Marcos, in Sao Paulo, wrote the following.
(henrymakow.com)
Brazil is on fire.
Initially the protests were started by Communists, complaining of a small (US$ 0,09) bus fare raise.

This is total Bull shiite. The Brazil population are not fond of communists, thats it. The last time the the communist regime raised its head the people armed themselves, the vast majority of folks in Brazil are God fearing people / anti communist..
  Marcos is lableing hard working people,the commoners, what a mucken joke.
This was the straw that broke the camels back, thats all. Raising cost of public transportation may have been the spark that set the fire, but it was more and this guy knows it.
  Come on Marcos if your reading this, send me a message and we can get down and dirty with your remarks.
The young generation want better education, all the folks want more invested in hospitols.   Basic stuff.
  On a level with the USA the coffers have been hit on by some pols, at least they were exposed. In the USA they just seem to be ignored. That is with the exception of the awake.

 


Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #96 on: June 21, 2013, 03:13:07 PM »
Thanks Chris

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #97 on: June 21, 2013, 03:18:40 PM »
By the way.
This is the "comunist" protest that started it all. Even in this one most people did not care about parties or dicredited ideologies:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoLuEXcurBQ

São Paulo was influenced by this.
Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #98 on: June 21, 2013, 07:18:36 PM »
Guys I have received alerts about a new prty trying to use these protests. I have also seen some military coup propaganda material. I am scared this movement is becoming too out of control. I am sure Brazilians are protesting for a better Brazil. The problem is the usual totalitarian forces are emerging and I fear the people will be naive.

Your truly, Eduardo

http://www.facebook.com/PSPC56

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #99 on: June 21, 2013, 07:36:23 PM »
I have decided to gather more info about PEC 37. I am suspecting all of this is misinformation.
I refuse to be used.
Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #100 on: June 21, 2013, 08:08:54 PM »
I have decided to gather more info about PEC 37. I am suspecting all of this is misinformation.
I refuse to be used.
Yours truly, Eduardo

  Thanks for keeping us posted Eduardo.
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #101 on: June 21, 2013, 08:55:03 PM »
I was in the chat now and the Guys from "bloco de luta" that I am suspecting about were treating each other as "prabhu". I suspect is a cult. I said: "prabhu"? been there done that, I'm out. One of them just replied: hehehehe

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #102 on: June 21, 2013, 09:07:51 PM »
Guys
In the chat:
I then replyed: "Atmavan maniate Jagat" which means "I see the world according to my world" and they understood it!  Then they sent me a picture of a guy being hanged saying: for those who have just wake up. Do I have to say more?
Guys I am out of this.

I hope you can see and understand what is happening better than me. I am not going to be manipulated.
Yours truly, Eduardo

P.S. Someone help us

Offline chris jones

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #103 on: June 21, 2013, 09:16:36 PM »
I believe Brazil has been down this road, MILITARY controll, I can't see this happening again.
 I do believe that infiltrates are allways involved in any public demo, be they paid to raise hell, a pol party attempting to infiltrate,  and yes even those who may be seeking a coup.
   Your second reply is off the map, I can't get a grasp on it. Can you explain in detail.
    
BUT the evidence reveals they are citizens from all walks of life, not led by any affiliation other than the right to be heard.
The people are seeking to end corruption be it corp or political, better education and hospitals, isn't that the bottom line?
  Lets face it, corruption exists in every government or society, that's life/human nature. The answer is exposure and criminal charges, it all begins with the people having a voice and reps to act on them.
I was in the chat now and the Guys from "bloco de luta" that I am suspecting about were treating each other as "prabhu". I suspect is a cult. I said: "prabhu"? been there done that, I'm out. One of them just replied: hehehehe

Your second reply is off the map, I can't get a grasp on it. Can you explain in detail.

Hi bus stop, I don't understand  this post. Is what you refering to cultists are in the deal, I get the fighting block deal, the other I don't.

As for military rule, a coup.
I believe Brazil has been down this road, MILITARY controll, I can't see this happening again.
 I do believe that infiltrates are allways % involved in any public demo, be they paid to raise hell, a pol party attempting to infiltrate,  and yes even those who may be seeking a coup.
    BUT the evidence reveals they are citizens from all walks of life, not led by any affiliation other than the right to be heard.
The people are seeking to end corruption be it corp or political, better education and hospitals, isn't that the bottom line?
  Lets face it, corruption exists in every government or society, that's life/human nature. The answer is exposure and criminal charges, it all begins with the people having a voice and reps to act on them.

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #104 on: June 21, 2013, 09:29:43 PM »


  Hey Chris.  Can the people have guns in Brazil?
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #105 on: June 21, 2013, 09:32:44 PM »
Prabhu is the way some hindu cults call each other, meaning master. I might be freaking out due to the plurarity of movements. Sorry for that. I just hope you are right Chris because I am not sure about the outcome anymore.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #106 on: June 21, 2013, 09:34:18 PM »
I used to be in a hindu cult.

Offline chris jones

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #107 on: June 21, 2013, 09:37:20 PM »

  Hey Chris.  Can the people have guns in Brazil?
           Yes, legal backgrounds are involved, training, verification of ability, etc. Fo a right to carry. For home security is appears to be less stressing.
          In short: Concealed weapon carry is stringent.

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #108 on: June 21, 2013, 09:39:43 PM »
           Yes, legal backgrounds are involved, training, verification of ability, etc. Fo a right to carry. For home security is appears to be less stressing.
          In short: Concealed weapon carry is stringent.

  Thank you.  Is there talk of gun control down there from the libs?
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #109 on: June 21, 2013, 09:42:32 PM »
Some years ago we had a referendum and people vote for having guns.

Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #110 on: June 21, 2013, 09:47:09 PM »
Some years ago we had a referendum and people vote for having guns.

  Good news.  Make sure you keep them.  There is going to be a lot more turbulence in Brazil.
I'M A DEPLORABLE KNUCKLEHEAD THAT SUPPORTS PRESIDENT TRUMP.  MAY GOD BLESS HIM AND KEEP HIM SAFE.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #111 on: June 21, 2013, 09:58:34 PM »
I hope you are wrong.

Offline One Revelator

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #112 on: June 21, 2013, 10:31:10 PM »
Guys
In the chat:
I then replyed: "Atmavan maniate Jagat" which means "I see the world according to my world" and they understood it!  Then they sent me a picture of a guy being hanged saying: for those who have just wake up. Do I have to say more?

Well. if the current protest numbers are correct, then you can let them know that they will have to track down and hang over one million people. I'd be tempted to send back a picture of a lynch mob and ask how they plan to deal with that.
The number one cause of all human poverty, misery, and death is not global warming. It’s GLOBAL LYING.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #113 on: June 21, 2013, 10:45:29 PM »

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #114 on: June 22, 2013, 02:04:38 AM »
President's speech and agenda. All of it was already in the agenda BEFORE the protests.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEj3UH69g5k

Yours truly

Offline No2NWO

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #115 on: June 22, 2013, 02:13:27 AM »
Brazil leader breaks silence about protests


BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff spoke about her generation's struggles in battling a dictatorship during a prime-time speech meant to connect with the nation's youth who have energized widespread and at times violent anti-government protests.

The 10-minute address ended Rousseff's much-criticized silence in the face of the protests. She promised to make improvements in urban transportation and to battle corruption, but offered few details as to how that will happen.

The leader added she would soon hold a meeting with leaders of the protest movement, governors and the mayors of major cities. But it remained unclear exactly who could represent the massive and decentralized groups of demonstrators taking to the streets, venting anger against woeful public services despite a high tax burden.

Rousseff said that her government would create a national plan for public transportation in cities — a hike in bus and subway fares in many cities was the original complaint of the protests. She also reiterated her backing for a plan before congress to invest all oil revenue royalties in education and a promise she made earlier to bring in foreign doctors to areas that lack physicians.

"I want institutions that are more transparent, more resistant to wrongdoing," Rousseff said in reference to perceptions of deep corruption in Brazilian politics, which is emerging as a focal point of the protests. "It's citizenship and not economic power that must be heard first."

The leader, a former Marxist rebel who fought against Brazil's 1964-1985 military regime and was imprisoned for three years and tortured by the junta, pointedly referred to earlier sacrifices made to free the nation from dictatorship.

"My generation fought a lot so that the voice of the streets could be heard," Rousseff said. "Many were persecuted, tortured and many died for this. The voice of the street must be heard and respected and it can't be confused with the noise and truculence of some troublemakers."

Edvaldo Chaves, a 61-year-old doorman in Rio's upscale Flamengo neighborhood, said he found the speech convincing.

"I thought she seemed calm and cool. Plus, because she was a guerrilla and was in exile, she talks about the issue of protests convincingly," Chaves said. "I think things are going to calm down. We'll probably keep seeing people in the streets but probably small numbers now."

But Bruna Romao, an 18-year-old store clerk in Sao Paulo, said Rousseff's words probably wouldn't have an impact.

"Brazilians are passionate," she said. "We boil over quickly but also cool down fast. But this time it's different, people are in full revolt. I don't see things calming down anytime soon."

Trying to decipher the president's reaction to the unrest had become a national guessing game, especially after some 1 million anti-government demonstrators took to the streets nationwide Thursday night to denounce everything from poor public services to the billions of dollars spent preparing for next year's World Cup soccer tournament and the 2016 Olympics in Brazil.

The protests continued Friday, as about 1,000 people marched in western Rio de Janeiro city, with some looting stores and invading an enormous $250 million arts center that remains empty after several years of construction. Police tried to disperse the crowd with tear gas as they were pelted with rocks. Police said some in the crowd were armed and firing at officers.

Local radio was also reporting that protesters were heading to the apartment of Rio state Gov. Sergio Cabral in the posh Rio neighborhood of Ipanema.

Other protests broke out in the country's biggest city, Sao Paulo, where traffic was paralyzed but no violence reported, and in Fortaleza in the country's northeast. Demonstrators were calling for more mobilizations in 10 cities on Saturday.

The National Conference of Brazilian Bishops came out in favor of the protests, saying that it maintains "solidarity and support for the demonstrations, as long as they remain peaceful."

"This is a phenomenon involving the Brazilian people and the awakening of a new consciousness," church leaders said in the statement. "The protests show all of us that we cannot live in a country with so much inequality."

Rousseff had never held elected office before she became president in 2011 and remains clearly uncomfortable in the spotlight.

She's the political protege of former President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, a charismatic ex-union leader whose tremendous popularity helped usher his former chief of staff to the country's top office. A career technocrat and trained economist, Rousseff's tough managerial style under Silva earned her the moniker "the Iron Lady," a name she has said she detests.

While Rousseff stayed away from the public eye for most of the week, Roberto Jaguaribe, the nation's ambassador to Britain, told news channel CNN Friday the government was first trying to contain the protests.

He labeled as "very delicate" the myriad demands emanating from protesters in the streets.

"One of our ministers who's dealing with these issues of civil society said that it would be presumptuous on our part to think we know what's taking place," Jaguaribe said. "This is a very dynamic process. We're trying to figure out what's going on because who do we speak to, who are the leaders of the process?"

Marlise Matos, a political science professor at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, said before Rousseff spoke that answer wasn't good enough.

"The government has to respond, even if the agenda seems unclear and wide open," she said. "It should be the president herself who should come out and provide a response. But I think the government is still making strategic calculations to decide how to respond. What I'd like to see as a response is a call for a referendum on political reform. Let the people decide what kind of political and electoral system we have."

Social media and mass emails were buzzing with calls for a general strike next week. However, Brazil's two largest nationwide unions, the Central Workers Union and the Union Force, said they knew nothing about such an action, though they do support the protests.

A Thursday night march in Sao Paulo was the first with a strong union presence, as a drum corps led members wearing matching shirts down the city's main avenue. Many protesters have called for a movement with no ties to political parties or unions, which are widely considered corrupt here.

Several cities have cancelled the transit fare hikes that had originally sparked the demonstrations a week ago, but the outrage has only grown more intense.

Demonstrations for Saturday have been called by a group opposing a federal bill that would limit the power of prosecutors to investigate crimes.

Most protesters have been peaceful, and crowds have taken to chanting "No violence! No violence!" when small groups have prepared to burn and smash. The more violent demonstrators have usually taken over once night has fallen.

The unrest is hitting the nation as it hosts the Confederations Cup soccer tournament, with tens of thousands of foreign visitors in attendance.

Carlos Cardozo, a 62-year-old financial consultant who joined Friday's protest in Rio, said he thought the unrest could cost Rousseff next year's elections. Even as recently as last week, Rousseff had enjoyed a 74 percent approval rating in a poll by the business group the National Transport Confederation.

"Her paying lip service by saying she's in favor of the protests is not helping her cause," Cardozo said. "People want to see real action, real decisions, and it's not this government that's capable of delivering."

http://www.chron.com/news/article/Brazil-leader-breaks-silence-about-protests-4613752.php
"BEAT THEM BY NEVER JOINING THEM" ~ No2NWO
Rise and rise again, until lambs become lions.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #116 on: June 22, 2013, 02:53:35 AM »
She was also involved in bank robbery. She did not convince me. She did not answer to most of the voices on the street. I am not sure of what is going on. I am affraid that the descentralisation of the protests might be used in the governement's favor. She did not talk about corruption. Meanwhile they are creating the "Military Party" and the "Party for National Securty. The leaders of such parties were instigating hatred against party flags. They had no flags but they were right wing atacking the "red flags". The same thing happened before 1964 and the Military coup. As a history teacher that freaks me out.
She did not give any concrete answers I mean. Only rhetoric.

Offline No2NWO

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #117 on: June 22, 2013, 04:00:40 AM »
Which takes me back to my earlier post....

You'll need to have big aspirations to help you're people in my opinion. First, you'll need to evict the Bushes, Soros' and other globalist scum multi-billionaires who seek to enslave you and steal your beautiful country and it's natural resources by buying criminals to create laws that will ensure such slavery.

These evil criminal politicians that are selling you out are owned by them. Globalists love to create and employ criminals, because criminals have nothing to lose. You need to identify all of these paid for political puppets and expell them from your country as well.

If you can start with a clean slate, you'll need to set up a system which will ensure that none of your politicians, none of your military commanders and none of your police force ever accept monitary compensations for ANYTHING but their PUBLIC SERVICE as per their contracts. Those who desire to achieve great personal wealth are those who are willing to commit great atrocities. Sever ANY outside globalist purse strings and set up a system of checks and balances that will keep your public servants honest and accountable at all times.

That is just my opinion...  in hopes I'm not telling you anything you don't already know.



These are some lessons we've learned as Americans.
"BEAT THEM BY NEVER JOINING THEM" ~ No2NWO
Rise and rise again, until lambs become lions.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #118 on: June 22, 2013, 09:04:53 AM »
Yes Americans you have learned some lessons. I just think that now it is out o control. I has become an oportunity for old forces to emerge.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt - Brazil
« Reply #119 on: June 22, 2013, 03:45:31 PM »
Chris. The federal police claims in this article to be against some new laws. I thought this might interest you. I am checking these guys because they are also protesting PEC 37. You speak Portuguese right?

http://www.fenapef.org.br/fenapef//main/especial_rip


Their Homepage:

http://www.fenapef.org.br/fenapef/


Yours truly