Bus Revolt - Brazil

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Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #42 on: June 18, 2013, 05:34:09 PM »

Offline Bus Revolt

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Offline No2NWO

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #44 on: June 18, 2013, 11:02:20 PM »
Some "blast from the past" light reading I dug up.....  Don't lose sight of the Big Picture.


Brazil, the next global oil superpower poised to emerge from Lula Field crude... http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=201910.msg1202166#msg1202166

'God is Brazilian,' Lula says after oil find... http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=15913.0

George W. Bush has purchased 98,840 acres in Paraguay, near the Bolivian/Brazilian border. We Hate To Bring Up the Nazis, But They Fled To South America too ... http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=19666.0

Latin America’s Changing Mosiac... http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=27077.0

Brazil getting caught in NWO "climate change web"... http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=19890.0
"BEAT THEM BY NEVER JOINING THEM" ~ No2NWO
Rise and rise again, until lambs become lions.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #45 on: June 18, 2013, 11:16:51 PM »
Thank you
I will carefuly study these articles. There are many issues I have to wake people up about. Meanwhile I have more urgent matters:

http://nerdpride.com.br/nao-vamos-esquecer-do-pec-37/

Without achieving this victory (anti-PEC 37) we won't have legal power to achieve our objectives. I will study everything that is sent to me in this forum.

Cheers

Offline John_Back_From_The_Club_O

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #46 on: June 18, 2013, 11:26:59 PM »
Like I said. The media is portraying us like that. In every 10 protesters there is one guy who claims to be left. Our federal governement is comunist and we are fighting against that. Some left parties are using this but I know from being there myself what we are. Most people are just fed up with corruption. The reason why some people want free bus (not stuff) is because they cannot afford it. They need the transport and cannot afford it. Simple!
These left guys are losing credibility amongst the younger people. We are not being organized by them. It is a spontanous facebook driven protest against anticonstitucional stuff. Most protesters are actualy middle class students.
I do not believe in right or left. I am trying to preserve our constitution. We have a lack of basic infrastructure and people just want a better life. They are fed up with this PT (Party of Workers) with its marxist ideology.
The legislative governement is becoming more and more fascit. That is what people are saying! People do not want free stuff. They their corrupt politicians to be punished.
Do not believe the impression the media is trying to present. Our media is controled by the governement and private corporations who are trying to manipulate and change our claims.
Take care


Thank you for pointing out how the MSM is trying to STEER the protesters as lefty's. 

That's exactly what the BBC tried to spin Bilderberg protesters as these wacky way out-there types.
The Crowd Shouted... “Give us Barabbas!” ... and People, The NWO Gave Him To You.
http://www.dominicanajournal.org/give-us-barabbas/

https://www.greatagain.gov

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #47 on: June 18, 2013, 11:38:12 PM »
Thank you for pointing out how the MSM is trying to STEER the protesters as lefty's. 

That's exactly what the BBC tried to spin Bilderberg protesters as these wacky way out-there types.

By U.S. right-wing standards, the Brazilian "right-wing" is still way left-wing. Brazil needs a few Ron Pauls to popup and educate.

Offline No2NWO

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #48 on: June 18, 2013, 11:43:12 PM »

A New Day, a New Reason to Protest in Brazil

When protests first started in Brazil a week ago, the first response by the police and army was to fire rubber bullets and tear gas. Arrests were made. Journalists were shot at.

But what a difference a day makes.

Monday night saw over 200,000 Brazilians in Rio, São Paulo, Brasilia and other smaller cities, rise up and resist the repression they faced last week. Over 200,000 citizens, standing together, willing to take the bullets and make their voices heard.

And this time there were no rubber bullets, no tear gas.

Protests were allowed to carry on in the city centres without violence and abuse by authorities. It was a momentous occasion in a country that does not have the best track record in dealing with popular uprisings peacefully. There were minor incidences of vandalism and violence, but they only detracted from the power of a vast majority, marching peacefully.

Though the original R$0.20 bus fare price hike has not been forgotten, the manifestations have taken a much broader scope. As one particular national newspaper succinctly put it: Brazilians are protesting everything.

Like a sleeping giant, snapping awake from its slumber, the Brazilian population are raising their voices against everything they are unsatisfied about. The common thread, of course, is the sense of injustice.

Brazil has an extremely high tax regime, the average citizen pays similar tax to European countries, but the level of services Brazilians have access to is way more limited. The government has pledged to invest R$1.9bn in public health before 2014; but the federal government collected R$1trn in taxes in 2012 and will likely collect the same agin this year. That is a smaller than one percent investment in public healthcare.

Indignation is compounded when investments in the upcoming World Cup and Olympic Games are taken into account. It has been widely reported that the 2014 World Cup cost in excess of $30bn, more than the previous three World Cups combined. Not to mention that China (2008 Olympics) and South Africa (2010 World Cup) have been stuck with a number of unusable sports facilities, unfit for any other purpose beyond mega-events, and huge bill, to boot.

Brazil has also struggled with endemic corruption. The president of the aupreme court, Joaquim Barbosa, and the man who achieved convictions for a gang of powerful corrupt politicians associated with former president Lula (some of which are still in office, despite their jail sentences), recently declared: "Brazil is the only case of a democracy in the world where those convicted for corruption legislate against those that convicted them. We are the only democracy where decisions made by he Supreme Court may be changed by convicts. We are the only democracy in which parliamentarians take up political positions and confront the judiciary. We are the only country in the world where where those convicted make their habeas corpus or legislate to change the law and free themselves."

The proposal of the constitutional amendment number 37 (PEC 37) is a recurring cause for complaint among protesters. If approved it will in affect limit the powers of the Public Ministry to investigate corruption and abuse. On Thursday, 20 June, more demonstrations are scheduled, this time to protest against the chronic misadministration of the state by an unfit government, elected in a flawed system, into a corrupt one.

Not to mention lacking funds for public education.

Not to mention the lack of investment in public transport.

Not to mention the rising cost of living.

Not to mention the R$0.20 rise in bus fare. (Though mayors of many major cities are now falling over themselves to reverse the increase.)

There is plenty to complain about in Brazil. And the protests are certainly drawing attention from the top to the dissatisfaction of those at the bottom. The challenge that those involved in the protests will face now will be to convert this positive movement of public mobilisation and to convert it into significant change. With so much to complain about there is the risk of the uprisings losing focus.

Protesters who attended the Rio and São Paulo demonstrations described a positive atmosphere of solidarity. People were not divided by party of political affiliations, but stood together. Everyone I spoke to used the word 'beautiful'. And it was.

Now we must seize this miracle of public mobilisation and move forward to enact real change. This is a just the start for those wanting to change Brazil.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/rita-lobo/brazil-new-reason-to-protest_b_3459658.html
"BEAT THEM BY NEVER JOINING THEM" ~ No2NWO
Rise and rise again, until lambs become lions.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #49 on: June 18, 2013, 11:46:06 PM »
Dear Frank
That's because the USA surrounded Brazil with ships and forced it into a military dictatorship. All in name of fighting comunism. You must understant that the USA became a symbol of Imperialism over here. Meanwhile the USA sold the ideai of free trade. You sound like those speaches of the cold war over here.
Nothing personal...

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #50 on: June 18, 2013, 11:46:42 PM »
The Huffington Post is promoting this revolt??

That's scary. Huffington Post is Pro-Progressive and anti-Capitalist.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/rita-lobo/brazil-new-reason-to-protest_b_3459658.html

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #51 on: June 18, 2013, 11:51:56 PM »
Thanks No2NWO

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #52 on: June 18, 2013, 11:53:54 PM »
Dilma is also trying to promote the protest now. That is pathetic. Don't worry Frank we got it under control. We are no longor naive. People are fighting against media manipulation. That is one of the flags.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #53 on: June 18, 2013, 11:59:38 PM »
If you understand Portuguese Frank please read the comments:
http://www.facebook.com/fabio.camargo.75/posts/575226782497964?comment_id=6332331&offset=0&total_comments=25

If not try to get help from someone to do it.

Offline No2NWO

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #54 on: June 19, 2013, 12:06:33 AM »


Brazil protesters keep up pressure on government

SAO PAULO (AP) — About 50,000 protesters energetically returned to the streets of Brazil's biggest city Tuesday night, a demonstration of anger toward what they call a corrupt and inefficient government that has long ignored the demands of a growing middle class.

The protests were well organized via social media and mostly peaceful, like those the night before that drew 240,000 to the streets in several cities to demonstrate against the shoddy state of public transit, schools and other public services in this booming South American giant. Many railed against a gap between Brazil's heavy tax burden and its notoriously poor infrastructure.

Demonstrations have ballooned from initial protests last week called by a group complaining about the high cost of a woeful public transport system and demanding a rollback of a 10-cent hike in bus and subway fares.

While the protests have grown, reversing that fare hike remains the one concrete demand emanating from the streets. The rest, so far, are expressions of deep anger and discontentment — not just with the ruling government, but with the entire governing system. A common chant at the rallies has been "No parties!"

"What I hope comes from these protests is that the governing class comes to understand that we're the ones in charge, not them, and the politicians must learn to respect us," said Yasmine Gomes, a 22-year-old squeezed into the plaza in central Sao Paulo where Tuesday night's protest began.

Nearby, Bruno Barp, a 23-year-old law student said he had high hopes for the growing movement.

http://www.chron.com/news/world/article/Brazil-protesters-keep-up-pressure-on-government-4606456.php
"BEAT THEM BY NEVER JOINING THEM" ~ No2NWO
Rise and rise again, until lambs become lions.

Offline John_Back_From_The_Club_O

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #55 on: June 19, 2013, 12:15:38 AM »
Shedding Some Light On Brazil



Into the 1980's Brazil was well on it's way to becoming a real 'economic super power' in a cooperative between small to medium sized business and government working jointly on things like aerospace projects right on down to electronics, mass infrastructure projects...

The NWO put a stop that VERY POSITIVE future for Brazil.  The IMF came in under US support and pulled the plug on Brazils economic future where only NWO insiders like Ford motor company could have a 'successful' tool and die industry let alone PART OF an auto industry.

So, as central banks ALWYS DO.  They gave Brazil's population the 'solution' to their unemployment problen as a result of cutting Brazil's legs at the knees.  Socialism / communism.  Which is a dead end.
The Crowd Shouted... “Give us Barabbas!” ... and People, The NWO Gave Him To You.
http://www.dominicanajournal.org/give-us-barabbas/

https://www.greatagain.gov

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #56 on: June 19, 2013, 12:22:37 AM »
Brazilians currently do not care if something is left or right. They care about right and wrong. That's mthe essence of this movement.

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #57 on: June 19, 2013, 12:24:40 AM »
Brazilians currently do not care if something is left or right. They care about right and wrong. That's mthe essence of this movement.

Who defines "Right" and "Wrong"? When I say Right-Wing, I mean small government.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #58 on: June 19, 2013, 12:28:38 AM »
Over here when you say right wing people understand conservative and when you say small governement they understand liberal.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #59 on: June 19, 2013, 12:32:14 AM »
About right and wrong. You have to understand that it was a passionate comment. Of course the definition of right and wrong varies. What I meant is that there is a unified sentiment of ending corrution.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #60 on: June 19, 2013, 12:48:32 AM »
To be more accurate
PEC 37
PEC 33
It's 2 (amendements) actually. I am used to saying just PEC 37 because people don't pay attention.  :D
Anyway, I have this link in portuguese (Yea I know...sorry):
http://www.nacaojuridica.com.br/2013/06/entenda-tudo-sobre-pec-37-e-pec-33.html?m=1

Yours truly Eduardo

P.S. NSA! Learn from us! The NWO is doomed!

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #61 on: June 19, 2013, 12:53:36 AM »
I actually meant: JOIN US NSA! You deserve to be free!

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #62 on: June 19, 2013, 01:03:17 AM »
Rio de Janeiro police (the mean ones from "Tropa de Elite"):
http://www.facebook.com/FardadoDeBoinaPreta?hc_location=stream

Oh yea!

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #63 on: June 19, 2013, 10:59:48 AM »
Their biggest mistake was to target journalists:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W6QVLE8PQJ8

Offline archaeobee

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #64 on: June 19, 2013, 11:38:27 AM »
Hey Bus Revolt,

All the best to you in what are difficult times in Brazil. But at least you are doing something - something that matters (unlike most of the commentators on this or any other strand in infowars).

And please don't feel you have to defend yourself or your terminology - people like Frank Rep are like the Orwellian Thought Police who will jump on you if you use the wrong words (like 'free', 'socialism' etc) even if they are appropriate and true.

And don't believe the whole NWO rubbish - it's just a smokescreen for racism and exclusion. And the suggestion that you should get 'capitalist placards' out there - whatever they are!!! - is patently ridiculous. As history has shown us again and again discord within a movement will lead to that movement dissolving in chaos.

I'm probably saying the wrong things here - most people in infowars will think I'm part of the problem. I'm from Britain - a socialist who passionately believes in a free Health Service, and that government has a role to play in society. But maybe you disagree with me too!

However, I know that the majority of British people - liberal, naive, maybe deluded, but free - support you.

Good luck

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #65 on: June 19, 2013, 11:41:43 AM »
Frank you are right.
Wistleblower says "Passe Livre" is paid by PT:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RV1JtP4dyRA

http://www.flaviobolsonaro.com.br/

I am glad they are not the only movement. Now they are trying to use the protests to exempt the companies of taxes. We are  going to protest against that. The infowar is going on.

Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #66 on: June 19, 2013, 12:01:06 PM »
Dear archaeobee
We are all trying to do the best we can. For that we have to use the tools we have. Mine is going out with the protesters and helping to raise awareness about issues I believe are important.
I have just sent another message saying "passe livre" is paid by PT. However I do believe PT will not be able to control this one. I do believe they did not plan for things to go this way. Now they are trying to "solve the problem" by exempting companies. The problem is people are so into it now they won't stop. People who did not care about politics are discussing it. I am glad people are thinking!
The protests raised the anti-slavery awareness and people do not want totalitarism. Comunism is an ugly word.
If you see someone protesting against capitalism it is a minority. Also these anti-capitalists guys are actually protesting against IMF, great corporations and banks.
Yes I also believe in wellfare regarding health and transport. I KNOW we can afford it because I am aware of the money we pay and were we spend it. I do not see myself as a socialist or capitalist or "middlelist". This feeling is not mine alone. People here lost their faith in governement and ideologies. You can thank corruption for that. So now we have to learn to take responsability for ourselves. This is a colective agenda.
Is this scary? You bet! The media now is being forced to talk about it while trying to calm people down. We are having protests everyday now. Even in the countryside.
My work now will be to raise awareness that exempting companies is a trick. I am confident people will not buy it.

Yours truly

Offline archaeobee

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #67 on: June 19, 2013, 12:39:23 PM »
Dear Bus Revolt,

You're quite right - and Brazil has one of the strongest economies in the world and so can afford a welfare state like ours (probably better than ours too!!). Ideology can be a terrible thing - as can adhering to outmoded laws/rights (like the 2nd Amendment!!). When I say I'm a Socialist it's just means left-leaning - happy to pay taxes, help neighbours etc - in effect be a part of a greater whole. It's not perfect but it's far better than communist totalitarianism or the Nietzschean worship of the self that you see in right-wing Americans (though that's not really fair to Nietzsche).

It's funny - but a year or so ago there was a bit of a hoo-haa in America regarding Obama's healthcare reforms. In Britain we were rather mystified because our National Health Service was being held up by the American right-wing (the opponents of Obama) as an example of an evil communist system.

Which is why I say be wary of what some of the posters say here. They think we in Britain are communists -without actually knowing what communism was (or what the NHS is!). And as such they probably have little grasp of the realities of what is going on in Brazil - something we recognise in Europe, having seen and experienced similar popular demonstrations in the recent past - and, in fact, present (Turkey).

Non-violent protest is your fundamental right. And we support you. Believe me - what's happening in Brazil is getting full coverage in Britain......by the BBC - an organisation seen as bad by many right-wing Americans (including the not-so-lovely Alex Jones).

Don't lose faith in governments - just corrupt ones. No government is perfect - democracy cannot function in large countries; it was designed to work at the city-state level and even then (in the 5thC BC) was not what we would call a true democracy (high slave population, women 2nd class citizens - both with no vote). Whatever the imperfections, the only way forward is by the ballot box.

But I do understand your frustrations. And I truly hope for your success. Knowledge is the key - and it sounds like you're doing exactly the right thing.

Arch

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #68 on: June 19, 2013, 02:24:43 PM »


Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #70 on: June 19, 2013, 06:16:10 PM »
Good Luck! Bus Revolt.

http://www.cmjornal.xl.pt/detalhe/noticias/internacional/mundo/ministerio-publico-pede-bloqueio-de-bens-de-lula

Prosecutor asks locking goods Lula
The Federal Public Ministry (MPF) Brasilia has asked the courts to block the assets of former President Lula da Silva,

who accuses him of improper conduct for having used public money with a clear intent to promotion.

Offline No2NWO

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #71 on: June 19, 2013, 06:50:52 PM »
Violent protests mar Brazil-Mexico match in Fortaleza

Brazilian police have fired tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse some protesters in the city of Fortaleza, as unrest continues across the country.

At least 30,000 people rallied in the north-eastern city ahead of the Confederations Cup game with Mexico.

The unrest was sparked by transport price hikes in Sao Paulo but it has now grown into broader discontent over poor public services and corruption.

Authorities in Rio and Sao Paulo said recent price rises would be reversed.

The mayors of Cuiaba, Recife, Joao Pessoa and other cities have already announced a reduction in bus fares in response to Monday's protests, which saw more than 200,000 people take to the streets in more than a dozen cities.

The change of heart in Rio and Sao Paulo was announced by officials in the two cities on Wednesday.

The announcement will be seen as a major victory for the protest movement, correspondents say.

Governor of Sao Paulo state Geraldo Alckmin and the city's mayor, Fernando Haddad, said they had taken the step to allow for dialogue with peaceful protesters. Major demonstrations are planned for tomorrow in both Rio and Sao Paulo.

'Doing the right thing'
 
The protesters in Fortaleza began their march on the main road leading to the stadium.

Clashes erupted when the march was stopped by police. Some demonstrators began throwing stones, while police fired rubber bullets and tear gas.

protesters graphic
Several people were injured, including police officers.

Access to the stadium was blocked for at least 30 minutes, but police later allowed people to get in ahead of the game which started at 19:00 GMT.

A number of protesters do have tickets and are believed to be at the game, however no trouble has been reported during the match.

The BBC's Ben Smith in Fortaleza says that during the protest some demonstrators carried banners reading: "A teacher is worth more than Neymar" - in a reference to Brazil's star footballer who played - and scored a goal - against Mexico.

Meanwhile, other national team players expressed their support for the demonstrators.

"After seeing the people on the streets claiming for improvements, it makes me feel like joining them,'' striker Hulk was quoted as saying by the Associated Press.

"They are doing the right thing, what they are saying makes sense and we have to hear them. Brazil needs to improve, we all know that," he added.

In a separate development, the president of the football's world governing body FIFA, Sepp Blatter, urged protesters not to "use football to make their demands heard".

But speaking to Brazil's Globo TV, he added: "I can understand that people are not happy."

Dilemma
 
On Tuesday, riot police and protesters clashed in Sao Paulo - the largest city.

Shops and banks were vandalised by groups of masked activists, who fought other demonstrators trying to stop the violence.

The current unrest is the biggest since 1992, when people took to the streets to demand the impeachment of then-President Fernando Collor de Mello.

Vice-President Michel Temer cut short a visit to Israel and the Palestinian territories on Wednesday to return to Brazil.

However, President Dilma Rousseff said she was proud that so many people were fighting for a better country.

Brazil's government earlier warned that it would deploy the National Public Security Force (FNSP) in the five cities hosting the Confederations Cup: Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Salvador, Fortaleza and the capital, Brasilia.

The authorities said that Recife was the only host city not to request the support of the force. The tournament is seen as a curtain-raiser event for next year's football World Cup.

Many of the demonstrators have complained of the huge sums spent on construction for the World Cup and the 2016 Olympics, which will be hosted by Rio de Janeiro.

The dilemma for the country's political leadership is how to answer so many different concerns among a vast group of people with momentum and social media on their side, correspondents say.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-22979545
"BEAT THEM BY NEVER JOINING THEM" ~ No2NWO
Rise and rise again, until lambs become lions.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #72 on: June 19, 2013, 07:13:06 PM »
Thanks guys!
A bit of satire:
This is for the mayors who have decided to agree with the protestors...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSep7QJXKlE

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #73 on: June 19, 2013, 07:28:18 PM »

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #74 on: June 19, 2013, 07:52:57 PM »
Most people in our forum agree to this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v5iSn76I2xs

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #75 on: June 19, 2013, 08:53:00 PM »
The most watched videos on youtube. Now compare this list to other countries...

http://www.youtube.com/maisvistos

Yours, truly

Offline chris jones

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #76 on: June 19, 2013, 09:53:31 PM »
 Public transportation is necessity, especially so in Brazil. To any person living on a salary paying 20% or more is needed simply for transportation its a struggle.
 The people, well it's safe to say are seeing gigantic arena being built for the international games in the  multi billions they wonder why when they are barely surviving. People can get pizzed off.

The violence is not as severe as has been monitored on USA/ MSM, yes there is a %, isn't there allways.

 
 When people unite, the corps and pols  are forced to reevaluate.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #77 on: June 19, 2013, 10:06:30 PM »
Indeed Cris. The air smells like revolution. You may believe me or not but it is a leaderless movement. There are some leaders but in big numbers. This is its strenght and weakness. Tomorrow I will go out again. So far around 30 thousand people have confirmed their presence in porto Alegre tomorrow. I wish it were different but I believe there will be violence. The anraquists are planing for more. They always do. Besides that it is too big a mass to control.
However the great majority are pacifists (revolted ones).
Most people are more concerned with the everyday violence that we suffer. That is why people are so energetic despite the violence. They want to be heard.

Offline RollyPolly

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #78 on: June 19, 2013, 10:14:46 PM »
I heard the police love to fly over the poor areas and open fire into heavily populated neighborhoods to catch someone fleeing.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #79 on: June 19, 2013, 10:38:41 PM »
There are all sorts of things...