Bus Revolt - Brazil

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Offline Bus Revolt

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Bus Revolt - Brazil
« on: June 16, 2013, 05:32:53 PM »
Dear freedom lovers.
The reason I am here is because I have been a listener of Alex Jones on youtube for some time and now there is a huge revolt in my country (Brazil) against corruption. The name is Bus Revolt because it all started with some students who wanted to protest against the unfair price of bus. So my hometown (Porto Alegre) was the first of many to protest against that very specific issue.
Nonetheless the reasons for the protests are far deeper.
These protests reflect the feeling of a society that is supposed to be a democracy but is, instead, ruled by a corporative autocracy. Politicians are paid and bought for. At the same time this reflects a people that is very naive and not experienced in living in democracy. Life is becoming increasingly dificult and unfair. Violence is ramping. People are fed up. We also protest against the World Cup which is a huge policy to mesmerize the populus and make people forget about the real problems.
I am a history and foreign language teacher. I recognize how our state is ruled by corruption and I am aware that it is fascism. The media is trying to portray us (the revolt) as comunists. Despite having all kinds of political view the movement has no leaders and no party afiliation. We fight for justice and civil liberties.
Right now there are many protests going on. One of the reasons is because the politicians are trying to pass "PEC 37" (amendement 37) which is unconstitucional. Its aim is to limit the power of our supreme court as well as "Ministerio Publico" (Public Ministry), an institucion of the people to investigate corruption. In other words. They want to have a state governed by legislative and executive powers with no interference from the supreme court and no criminal investigation. They want to rule unchecked!
Thanks to Alex Jones I can see a lot clearer what's behind all of this and I have been trying to educate as many people as I can. I met an American from California who lives here in a protest  that didn't know the FED was private, for example.
I do believe this movement will grow on its own. I am not sure of what comes next because many people are still interested in soccer and do not want to think about problems.
I hope for the best. We are being supported world wide.
Truly your, Eduardo P.S.

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2013, 05:43:33 PM »
This appears to be a Socialist/Communist-led Revolt.

"We Want Free Stuff!"


Bus-Fare Protests Hit Brazil’s Two Biggest Cities

New York Times
June 13, 2013


Protests by an increasingly forceful movement coalescing against increases in bus fares shook Brazil’s two largest cities on Thursday night, the fourth time in a week that activists have taken to the streets in demonstrations that have been marked by clashes with security forces.

The protesters, mainly university students but also activists from leftist political parties, appear to be loosely tied to an organization called the Free Fare Movement, which advocates sharp decreases in public transportation fares or doing away with the fares and financing transit through tax increases.
....


Movimento Passe Livre

The Free Fare Movement (Portuguese: Movimento Passe Livre) is a Brazilian social movement that advocates for the adoption of free fares in mass transit. The movement was founded in a session during the Worldwide Social Forum in 2005, in Porto Alegre, and gained prominence for its participation in the planning of the 2013 Brazilian protests.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2013, 06:02:02 PM »
Like I said. The media is portraying us like that. In every 10 protesters there is one guy who claims to be left. Our federal governement is comunist and we are fighting against that. Some left parties are using this but I know from being there myself what we are. Most people are just fed up with corruption. The reason why some people want free bus (not stuff) is because they cannot afford it. They need the transport and cannot afford it. Simple!
These left guys are losing credibility amongst the younger people. We are not being organized by them. It is a spontanous facebook driven protest against anticonstitucional stuff. Most protesters are actualy middle class students.
I do not believe in right or left. I am trying to preserve our constitution. We have a lack of basic infrastructure and people just want a better life. They are fed up with this PT (Party of Workers) with its marxist ideology.
The legislative governement is becoming more and more fascit. That is what people are saying! People do not want free stuff. They their corrupt politicians to be punished.
Do not believe the impression the media is trying to present. Our media is controled by the governement and private corporations who are trying to manipulate and change our claims.
Take care

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2013, 06:09:10 PM »
The reason why some people want free bus (not stuff) is because they cannot afford it.

Nothing is free, you realize that right?

I am trying to preserve our constitution. We have a lack of basic infrastructure and people just want a better life. They are fed up with this PT (Party of Workers) with its marxist ideology.

The question is: What plans do you have to transform Brazil into a Free Market, Capitalist society with Limited Government?


"Movimento Passe Livre" is doomed for failure. You guys need to change your message to be supportive of Free Market competition.


Offline RollyPolly

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2013, 06:13:17 PM »
If the globalists are leeching the country dry while making it near impossible to own a car let alone pay for bus fare, I don't have a problem with the poor getting a reduced fare or even a free ride. They're paying for it one way or another anyway.

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2013, 07:27:40 PM »
If the globalists are leeching the country dry while making it near impossible to own a car let alone pay for bus fare, I don't have a problem with the poor getting a reduced fare or even a free ride. They're paying for it one way or another anyway.



http://www.wired.com/autopia/2008/05/jet-powered-bic/



Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2013, 09:57:56 PM »

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2013, 10:36:46 PM »
Dear friends
I do realize nothing is for free. The point is most of our taxes are being robbed by banks, companies  and/or corrupt politicians. We know what is affordable and what is not because we pay expensive and unfair taxes. I am personally not interested in the bus fare. The reason why I have joined my students to protest is beacause of the new law they are trying to vote (PEC 37).
This new law will transform our governement into a legal corrupted institution. That is what concerns me. I have been trying to get more and more support from these kids who are angry because I see an opportunity to wake them up. Most of them come from middle class and face a hard time finding decent jobs.
We are facing a huge inflation ahead of us and the governement lies about it. Our governement is used to lying all the time. It has been like this ever since we were a colony and it hasn't changed. We have never had a popular revolution like 1776. Our national elite paid Portugal to be "independent". We actually became economicaly dependent to England and its banks.
Then we had several dictatorships ruling with iron fist. Comunism became a seductive option. So far marxism has influenced our society and has been the ideology of many. However most people don't even know what it is, let alone care about it.
Since 1985 we have had an elected governement but people are not mature to vote. Since our education does not educate people to be politicaly responsible, they believe any false promises, including comunism.
The new generation is fed up with that. We have had our "Obama" (Lula). People really believed him to this point. Now, with his successor from the same party (Dilma), they are realizing it's just another form of facism disguised as democracy. That's what you actualy hear people saying if go out and protest. Some left wing parties are trying to use the masses of protesters. The media is also going along with that version of facts.
I really apreciate your criticisms. They are important for me to keep my mind alert about comunism. I am not concerned that another kind of comunism is going to take over bacause I know it would not be accepeted. This governement has proven how facist it is. By facist I mean politicians ruling over the law to pay for their interests and the corporations that support them while using the police and the media to repress protestors.
We live in one of the most corrupted political systems of the world. Sacandls are piling over each other. Some of the poor people tend to become robbers and drug dealers. Most are hardworkers though. Most do not care who is in charge. That's why I see this revolt as an opportunity to change the mind set of people. I am trying to educate people so they are not manipulated by cheap ideologies.
I do believe this is an opportunity to start a growing awakening. I do not have any plans for becoming a free capitalistic society to explain because we are legaly speaking a free capitalistic society. What we need is to protect our laws from being changed by these corrupted guys. Our supreme court has already arrested several guys. That is why they are trying to pass this law (PEC 37).
The great majority of people in brazil have no party beacause parties are seen as just a tool to be elected. Ideologies have lost their credibility. We face a change. What will it lead us to? I leave that answer opened to your opinions, suggestions and criticism. I only ask you to study Brazilian history and law like I did with your history and constitution before leaving any opinions.
Yours truly, Eduardo P. S.

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2013, 10:56:26 PM »
I do not have any plans for becoming a free capitalistic society to explain because we are legaly speaking a free capitalistic society. What we need is to protect our laws from being changed by these corrupted guys.

The movement you joined, the Movimento Passe Livre, sounds like they don't like your "free capitalistic society" because they want more free stuff from the government (more Socialism).

Try to focus on building a small group, at first, to promote limited government and free enterprise, we'll try our hardest to promote you guys and try to send funding your way. Stay away from Movimento Passe Livre and build your own group.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2013, 11:18:24 PM »
Thanks repp!
I have done that. The anti-PEC 37 movement:
http://www.facebook.com/events/381212458651104/

Please keep up the criticism!
Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2013, 11:28:08 PM »
A bit of our history:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvxFwWdYVe4

 Please help the anti-pec37 movement.
My best regards.

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2013, 11:53:17 PM »
Thanks repp!
I have done that. The anti-PEC 37 movement:
http://www.facebook.com/events/381212458651104/


Why are you using a Marxist Revolutionary Fist in your banner? That is highly suspicious.




P.S: I doubt you made this group. It has over 4,431 people going.

Offline Seeing

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #12 on: June 17, 2013, 01:21:32 AM »
First off welcome Bus Revolt. Secondly f**k off FrankRep. I don't think anyone is asking for free stuff. They are just tired of being fleeced by a mobbed up government. Like we should be tired as well. By the way who gives a rip about a clinched fist in a poster? Socialist, communist, capitalist. That's not the problem. I wouldn't wish the system we have in the USA on anyone.

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2013, 01:28:52 AM »
First off welcome Bus Revolt. Secondly f**k off FrankRep. I don't think anyone is asking for free stuff. They are just tired of being fleeced by a mobbed up government. Like we should be tired as well. By the way who gives a rip about a clinched fist in a poster? Socialist, communist, capitalist. That's not the problem. I wouldn't wish the system we have in the USA on anyone.

I tell him to create a group that promotes "limited government and free enterprise" and you tell me to "f**k off."

Awesome.

Offline Seeing

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2013, 01:34:52 AM »
I tell him to create a group that promotes "limited government and free enterprise" and you tell me to "f**k off."

Awesome.

Yea, I guess I did. That's not all you said now, is it?

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2013, 01:38:12 AM »
Yea, I guess I did. That's not all you said now, is it?

The groups he's getting involved with Do Not promote "limited government and free enterprise" and that's a major problem I'm pointing out.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2013, 01:39:18 AM »
That's right I did not create this anti-pec37 movement I am part of it as are all more enlightned  people (not in the iluminati fashion). That is what I meant. Sorry for not using the right words. It is a leaderless movement. That is why it is UNSTOPPABLE. The fist is there as a symbol of revolt. We do not care about its comunist background.
I do see myself as one of the creaters of this movement because I used the protests to raise awarenes about PEC 37. Most protesters did not know about it. So I do take the responsability of it as other people do.
I am not here to ask for funds or anything of the sort. I am here to prove to you that most of us are not comunists. We are freedom fighters.
Ask away! Criticise!
That is why I am here!
And this was today my friends (Rio de Janeiro):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2nFIZO3qjA

First we need to get read of facism, then comunism (even though it is the same).
Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline RollyPolly

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2013, 01:53:58 AM »
The groups he's getting involved with Do Not promote "limited government and free enterprise" and that's a major problem I'm pointing out.

The system that is currently in place has leached Brazil dry and is holding out for even more. People can't afford cars so they have to take public transportation but of course our elite masters have to make it impossible to do that too.

If they could ban all private cars here and get us onto buses, they'd jack up the rates obscenely high and then make us go into radiation boxes just to take a ride down the street.


Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #18 on: June 17, 2013, 02:17:40 AM »
I found this very enlightening article about what's going on in Brazil.





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Olavo de Carvalho, a political observer and writer from Brazil, tells The New American how communism burgeoned in Latin America, though it repeatedly fails to live up to its promises.
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Olavo de Carvalho on Communism in Latin America


Alex Newman | The New American   
15 March 2010


Olavo de Carvalho, an author and philosopher, is renowned as one of Brazil’s preeminent thinkers. He played a leading role in exposing subversive leftist organizations like the Foro de São Paulo in his work as a writer for some of Brazil’s most influential publications. In the course of writing an article about the socialist resurgence in Latin America, I interviewed Carvalho for The New American magazine.

The New American: Could you please tell me a little bit about yourself, your background, your work, your philosophy, and what motivated you to become involved in exposing the Foro de São Paulo?

Olavo de Carvalho: Notwithstanding having been a leftist militant as a teenager, I lost any interest in politics after severing my ties with the Left when I was 20 years old in 1969. From that time on, until I was 38, I worked as a text editor for newspapers and magazines and dedicated my free time to the study of philosophy, literature, cultural history, ancient esoteric traditions, and comparative religion. Though I delivered an occasional lecture here and there, I was happy to live as an anonymous scholar, perfectly unknown to public opinion and academic circles. It was only in the late ’80s that my attention was drawn to the ongoing destruction of high culture in Brazil, and I started to take notes on the alarming stupidities that were published in ever growing quantities by very influential Brazilian opinion makers, both academic and journalistic. Bit by bit I grasped the political factors that had generated that state of affairs, and in 1993 I wrote a book, The New Age and the Cultural Revolution, about the overtaking of higher education by the communist militancy, which was not at all interested in high culture, but only in gaining political power and profiting from the general dumbing down of Brazilian students. In 1995 I wrote The Garden of Afflictions, a study on the evolution of the idea of “Empire” in the West, since the times of Julius Caesar to the advent of the New World Order.... The following year I collected my notes about Brazilian cultural decay and published them under the title of The Collective Imbecile, ... leading some big newspapers to hire me as a weekly political columnist.... Meanwhile, I had founded an electronic newspaper, Mídia Sem Máscara (“Unmasked Media”), that intended to correct the most flagrant distortions of the news published by the big media.... In 2005, as I was getting tired of receiving weekly death threats from leftist maniacs, I found it was a good idea to accept a job as a Washington foreign correspondent that was offered to me by a traditional Brazilian business newspaper, the Diário do Comércio (“Business Daily”), and here I am living in Virginia with my family. I love to be here, because Americans, though already infected by the neo-communist virus, are not yet so stupid as Brazilians have become.

TNA: To what extent has the leftist movement gained power in Latin America? What factors led to this resurgence and how was it possible?

Carvalho: Communist and pro-communist parties rule about a dozen Latin American countries today. This fact, by itself, is enough to prove that the “end of communism,” proclaimed by the Right soon after the fall of the Soviet Union, is a myth. World communism was never only an appendix of the USSR. It actually created the USSR, not the other way around. It existed a century before the Russian Revolution and continued to exist after the nominal extinction of Soviet power. What made the resurgence of communism easier — not only in Latin America, but around the world — was the cowardly timidity of Western right-wingers who, instead of taking the opportunity of the fall of the USSR to punish the communists for their crimes, chose instead a policy of “extending them a hand,” as if asking for their pardon for having defeated them, and offering them all sorts of aid, enabling them to reappear with a new or attenuated identity, even protecting them from being called “communists” (the fashionable euphemism is now “populism”). I believe that this absurd surrender of the winners was also stimulated by powerful globalist circles, whose interest in establishing worldwide bureaucratic controls converges with the objectives of the communists. The number of billionaire companies which came to openly contribute to leftist parties is enormous. I call “meta-capitalists” the individuals and groups which grew so wealthy with the market economy that they can’t stand anymore being at the mercy of the free market and seek, instead, to control everything, supporting bureaucracy instead of capitalism. Meta-capitalists are natural allies of the communists.

An event that clearly symbolizes this union of apparent adversaries was the tributes paid to Lula, the Brazilian President, who in the same week was honored by the World Economic Forum in Davos, for his conversion to capitalism, and by the São Paulo Forum, for his allegiance to communism. The contradiction is only apparent. At the World Social Forum in Porto Alegre, which for public opinion embodies the opposite of the Davos Forum, the main demand was for a greater control over the world economy by big international organizations. Nobody there asked for shutting down the IMF or the World Bank, what they wanted was the integration of “civil society” — i.e., the World Social Forum — into those organizations. Many European NGOs [non-governmental organizations] which participate in the World Social Forum have a seat at the meetings of the World Bank and other international organizations. The “ideological” contrast serves only as propaganda. What we have is a gigantic symbiosis of all globalist and statist forces around the world.

TNA: How have the Foro de São Paulo and its members managed to become so influential? How can they be stopped?

Carvalho: The São Paulo Forum, created by Luis Inacio Lula da Silva and Fidel Castro in 1990 with the goal of regaining in Latin America what had been lost in Eastern Europe, is the strategic command of the communist and pro-communist movement in the continent. Its membership includes over 100 legal political parties as well as criminal organizations of drug traffickers and kidnappers, such as the FARC (“Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia”) and the Chilean MIR (“Movimiento de Izquierda Revolucionaria”). Legal parties cover up the activities of criminal groups, and these provide undercover financial resources to legal parties.... During 16 years big media and the establishment, in Latin America and in the United States, refused to touch upon the subject, handing to the strategists of the communist revolution the protection of silence. Some of them, such as the expert in Brazilian affairs at the Council on Foreign Relations, Kenneth Maxwell, even openly denied the existence of the Forum, though by that time I had already published, in my electronic newspaper Mídia Sem Máscara, the complete official proceedings of its annual meetings, which revealed with total clarity the scope of its ambitions and goals.

The Forum can only be stopped if the legal political parties in its membership are taken to court for the criminal activities covered up and protected by the organization. Brazilian President Lula, who chaired the Forum for 12 years, signed in 2001 an agreement of full support to the FARC, the same organization which provides training and military assistance to criminal gangs in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, such as the PCC (“First Command of the Capital”) and the “Red Command,” which kill tens of thousands of Brazilian citizens every year. When FARC or MIR agents are arrested in Brazil, immediately Lula’s [Workers’] Party, the PT [Portuguese: Portido dos Trabalhadores], acts to free them. What is this if not complicity in crime? ... Meanwhile, communist militants keep securing positions in the judiciary, so that as time goes by any lawsuit brought against this alliance of leftists and criminals becomes ever more unlikely to succeed.

TNA: What role have the Brazilian government and Lula in particular played in expanding the leftist movement’s power in Latin America? Is Lula a radical leftist, a moderate, or somewhere in between? What do his policies -indicate?

Carvalho: Lula’s ideological convictions don’t really matter, because they don’t even seem to exist. What exists is his loyalty to his cohorts in the militancy and to the commitments he made to the entities of the São Paulo Forum, which, if unfulfilled, would bring against him all the Latin American Left, leaving him without any support, not even from the Right, which is by now so weak that its support is worthless. A mediocre man doesn’t act out of convictions, but according to the objective pressures of his group of reference. It’s a waste of time to ask whether he “is” a true communist within himself or not. Within Lula there is only emptiness and meanness, but around him there is a well-organized structure of revolutionary power which he serves well and will never stop serving.

Foreign observers let themselves be impressed (or pretended to do so) by Lula’s “orthodox” economic policy and therefore concluded that he had changed his ideology. This is total nonsense. Lula only adopted these policies so that he would not have to fight two fronts simultaneously. Following the example of Lenin’s “New Economic Policy,” he sought to appease foreign investors while consolidating the power of leftist organizations in internal politics (using copious amounts of public money to finance them), and boycotting the Right in such a way that it is not able, as he himself recently declared, even to present its own candidate in the upcoming presidential elections [in October]. This will be the third presidential election without any right-wing candidate. As soon as it felt that the control of the Left over the country had been consolidated, the ruling party threw off its mask of moderation and began to propose radical measures such as state control over the media, the right of leftist organizations to invade and take rural properties as they see fit, etc.

TNA: Do you see the leftist resurgence as a monolithic threat under central control or rather as a splintered movement with various factions? Why? Assuming they exist, who are the leaders?

Carvalho: Throughout history the revolutionary movement has never depended on monolithic control to be able to grow and prosper. Even during the period of Soviet hegemony, the expansion of communism coexisted perfectly well with the deep internal dissent that separated the Soviets from the Chinese and from the radicalism of Latin America guerrillas. In the last dec-ades, the communist movement has perfected even more its capacity to deal with a variety of internal dissidences, using them as camouflage and as instruments to adapt itself to local situations. The linear party hierarchy, which had always been more an appearance than a reality, has been totally replaced by a flexible organization of “networks” connected via the Internet.... In Latin America, the leadership of the revolutionary movement still belongs to the founders of the São Paulo Forum: Lula, Marco Aurélio Garcia, Ricardo Kotscho, and others.

TNA: What role have Hugo Chavez and Venezuelan Petrodollars played in this resurgence? Is the Cuban government an important player?

Carvalho: Hugo Chavez is only a scarecrow that the Latin American Left waves before the world to distract the attention away from the São Paulo Forum, which is the true strategic command of the Latin American revolution. Cuba and Venezuela are important as shelters for terrorists and drug traffickers. In Venezuela and other Spanish-speaking countries ruled by the São Paulo Forum, there is strong and organized opposition, while in Brazil all that is left is the Left itself, which controls the scene absolutely.

TNA: How significant and deep are the ties of leftist leaders and political parties to terrorism and crime?

Carvalho: In Brazil, federal judge Odilon de Oliveira gathered proofs showing that FARC’s narco-guerrillas ... control a large chunk of local criminality. As a result, he became the most persecuted man in Latin America and now has to live as a prisoner in his own office, not being able even to go out to visit his family.... The FARC also provide guerrilla training for the militants of the “Landless Movement” (MST), an ironic name because that entity is one of the biggest landowners in Brazil today. The MST invades farms, destroys produce and equipment, sends away the (true) workers, and is invariably rewarded for its actions, receiving enormous sums of federal monies and the property of the invaded farms. Even more ironically, the main factor for Brazil’s economic success is the productivity of its big farms.... As for the Cuban government, its connections to drug trafficking have been proved several years ago in the book The Mafia from Havana: The Cuban Cosa Nostra.... The same connections exist with the Venezuelan government, as demonstrated by a report of the U.S. Congress from July 2009.... In Brazil, the alliance between the FARC and local criminal gangs has made it absolutely impossible to control crime activity. Nowadays, some 50,000 Brazilians are murdered every year. Instead of repressing the gangs that produce this insanity, the government grants them territorial autonomy and is even cynical enough to propose, as a remedy, disarming the honest population.

TNA: To what extent and in what way is the U.S. government involved in the region?

Carvalho: For several decades now, the attitude of the American government in the area has been ambiguous, to say the least. Bill Clinton’s Plan Colombia only offered economic and military aid to the Colombian government on the explicit condition that ... criminal organizations of a political nature be preserved [from] any damage. The result was that the old cartels were destroyed and the FARC became the absolute rulers of drug trafficking in the continent. In reality this kind of “war on drugs” is a war that favors the Left against Latin America. The Department of State is well informed about the São Paulo forum and its Brazilian leadership. When it supports Lula under the pretext that he is “a moderate,” in contrast with the “radical” Hugo Chavez, it is actually camouflaging the real danger so that it may grow sheltered from the sight of any intruder.

TNA: What role are multilateral and supranational institutions like ALBA, MERCOSUR, the Andean Community, and UNASUR playing in all of this? Could the integration process be used to eventually absorb all of Latin America under authoritarian control?

Carvalho: All these organizations were created under the inspiration of the idea of free trade, and there were even some people who saw in them a sign of formidable capitalist progress. However, we now understand that free trade is a double-edged sword, which can also be used to dissolve national sovereignties and to build upon their rubble a new structure of supranational power. Many political analysts who only look at things from an economic point of view fail to notice such danger. They imagine that the expansion of commercial ties is by itself a vaccine against communism.... Well, in today’s Latin America, the Left practically has the monopoly of political action in its hands, and indeed this is so much so that all those organizations you have mentioned — all of them — are being used for the creation of a kind of Union of Latin American Socialist Republics.

TNA: How serious is the threat of this resurgence? What do you see happening in both the near future and the long run?

Carvalho: There is no unified answer that applies to all Latin America. The situation is different in each country. For example, however unbelievable it may seem, there is a strong and organized resistance against the rise of neo-communism in Venezuela. Colombia, likewise, is a remarkable center of resistance. On the other hand, nowhere else has the Right been so utterly destroyed as it has been in Brazil, which is, for this very reason, the headquarters of Latin American revolution. When former Venezuelan presidential candidate Alejandro Peña set up UnoAmerica (Association of Democratic Organizations of the Americas), the only international organization devoted to fighting communism, he found no difficulty in obtaining effective support in most of the Spanish-speaking countries, but he has always had great difficulties finding support in Brazil.... In other countries, however, the Left is not so culturally hegemonic, which has made possible the organization of an effective and strong anti-communist action. From this point of view, then, Venezuela is in a better situation than Brazil, for if in the former country, the Right has been oppressed, in the latter it has already died, being now necessary to create a new Right out of nothing. In this sense, American political analysts are always getting it all backwards: They are alarmed at Venezuela and do not understand that the headquarters of the revolution is in Brazil.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #19 on: June 17, 2013, 02:56:58 AM »
That is correct Frank!
Thank you for bringing us this valuable info. For the reasons mentioned in that interview we are AGAINST PT (comunist party) and its corporativve autoritarism. Please understand that this movement is genunine and comunists are trying to controlo it.
Yours truly, Eduardo

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2013, 03:01:31 AM »
This is in Portuguese and agrees with the interview. You can understand it if you understand Spanish:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z9q9LaMgto0

We are fed up with PT!

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2013, 04:14:22 AM »
Help Brazil!
Don't come to the world cup!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=AIBYEXLGdSg

World Cup = Bread and circus

Offline RollyPolly

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #22 on: June 18, 2013, 12:26:18 AM »
100,000 line streets of Brazil to protest corruption



More than 100,000 people took to the streets in overwhelmingly peaceful protests in at least eight cities Monday, demonstrations that voiced the deep frustrations Brazilians feel about carrying heavy tax burdens but receiving woeful returns in public education, health, security and transportation.

In Sao Paulo, Brazil's economic hub, at least 65,000 protesters gathered at a small, treeless plaza then broke into three directions in a Carnival atmosphere, with drummers beating out samba rhythms as the crowds chanted anti-corruption jingles. They also focused on the cause that initially sparked the protests last week - a 10-cent hike in bus and subway fares.

Hundreds of protesters in the capital, Brasilia, peacefully marched on congress, where dozens scrambled up a ramp to a low-lying roof, dancing on the structure's large, hallmark upward-turned bowl designed by famed architect Oscar Niemeyer. Some congressional windows were broken, but police did not use force to contain the damage.

"This is a communal cry saying: 'We're not satisfied,'" Maria Claudia Cardoso said on a Sao Paulo avenue, taking turns waving a sign reading "#revolution" with her 16-year-old son, Fernando, as protesters streamed by.

"We're massacred by the government's taxes -- yet when we leave home in the morning to go to work, we don't know if we'll make it home alive because of the violence," she added. "We don't have good schools for our kids. Our hospitals are in awful shape. Corruption is rife. These protests will make history and wake our politicians up to the fact that we're not taking it anymore!"

The protests come after the opening matches of soccer's Confederations Cup over the weekend, just one month before a papal visit, a year before the World Cup and three years ahead of the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. The unrest is raising some security concerns, especially after protests last week in Sao Paulo and over the weekend in Rio produced injury-causing clashes with police.

Monday's demonstrations saw some violence. In Rio de Janeiro, a small group of protesters set a car on fire and threw rocks and flares at police. In the southern city of Porto Alegre, protesters hurled rocks at commuter trains.

But those were the exceptions to the peaceful norm.

Protest leaders went to pains to tell marchers that damaging public or private property would only damage their cause.

Police, too, changed tactics. In Sao Paulo, commanders said publicly Monday they would try to avoid violence, but warned they could resort to force if protesters destroyed property. During the first hours of the march that continued into the night there was barely any perceptible police presence.

The Sao Paulo march itself was a family oriented affair: A group of mothers received a rousing cheer when they arrived at the plaza where the march began, brandishing signs that said "Mothers Who Care Show Support."

"I'm here to make sure police don't hurt these kids," said Sandra Amalfe, whose 16-year-old daughter chatted with friends nearby. "We need better education, hospitals and security - not billions spent on the World Cup."

Officers in Rio fired tear gas and rubber bullets when a group of protesters invaded the state legislative assembly and hurled things at police. But most of the tens of thousands who protested in Rio did so peacefully, many of them dressed in white and brandishing placards and banners. Many people in the city left work early to avoid traffic jams downtown.

In Belo Horizonte, police estimated about 20,000 people joined a peaceful crowd protesting before a Confederations Cup match between Tahiti and Nigeria as police helicopters buzzed overhead and mounted officers patrolled the stadium area. Earlier in the day, demonstrators erected several barricades of burning tires on a nearby highway, disrupting traffic.

Protests also were reported in Curitiba, Belem and Salvador.

Marcos Lobo, a 45-year-old music producer who joined the protest in Sao Paulo, said the actions of police during earlier demonstrations persuaded him to come out Monday.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #23 on: June 18, 2013, 12:39:07 AM »
Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
This is only the begining.
Feel free to visit my facebook.
NSA I am not afraid of you so am posting my facebook here.
People of America learn from our example how powerful you are!

This is me:
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004270211388

My city had a violent breakdown I know but we cannot win all battles. I was in the middle of it. Interestingly it all happened on an old battlefield from a war in the 19th century. The war against corruption has begun!

Brazilia (We won this one):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TcYTideNHLU

Wistlerblower:
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=637177469643121&set=vb.447198775307659&type=2&theater

Love is the best weapon!

EvadingGrid

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #24 on: June 18, 2013, 01:41:13 AM »
Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
This is only the begining.
Feel free to visit my facebook.
NSA I am not afraid of you so am posting my facebook here.
People of America learn from our example how powerful you are!

This is me:
http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100004270211388

My city had a violent breakdown I know but we cannot win all battles. I was in the middle of it. Interestingly it all happened on an old battlefield from a war in the 19th century. The war against corruption has begun!

Brazilia (We won this one):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=TcYTideNHLU

Wistlerblower:
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=637177469643121&set=vb.447198775307659&type=2&theater

Love is the best weapon!

Thank you for joining the forum.

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #25 on: June 18, 2013, 03:28:28 AM »
Hundreds arrested in Brazil transport protests


Times of India
Jun 14, 2013


The Sao Paulo protests, which began last week, have been spearheaded by the Free Pass Movement, which is opposed to a recent increase in bus, metro and train ticket prices from $1.50 to $1.60 and wants free transport for students.

The group has called for another mass demonstration on Monday.
...

Thursday's Sao Paulo demonstration began with an estimated 5,000 youths -- many of them students waving red flags of the Trotskyist Unified Socialist Workers' Party (PSTU) and chanting leftist slogans -- massed outside the Baroque-style Municipal Theater near City Hall.

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #26 on: June 18, 2013, 04:27:37 AM »

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #27 on: June 18, 2013, 05:20:03 AM »
Thanks Jerry! Loved it!
Frank. Let me tell you more about my own protest (Porto Alegre). You see here we have been ruled by comunist party PT for decades! So what we have now is a bunch of angry kids looking for an answer. Of course you see those flags. I have personaly filmed two f.. comunist leaders in the protest. These guys are trying to "fish" people up. Meanwhile the globalists are trying to coordinate with that so they have an excuse to do what they did to us in our last protest. Thounsands of people in the protest  knew that.
Our news are manipulated by RBS and Globo networks. So when a bunch of angry kids. Just about 10 THOUSAND take the street and threaten the fisical security of the news agency they  rage war on us. You see Frank we are raging INFOWAR OVER HERE IN BRAZIL with Globo. Tell Alex that! The only real threat are the anarquists because they go to the protests with a confrontation agenda. If you saw what people were shouting (f..the world cup, f...Dilma (the ultimate female Stalin), F... globo, f...pec37, f.. parties).
Their strategy is to portray us as dawm comunists. Passe livre movement in Porto Alegre is less than a hundred people. We were 10 thousand today. Do you realy believe they came for passe livre? Well I was there and during all the protest people were shouting: "The people has awaken!" It was beautiful! When we approached the building of RBS (local Globo) the police came and the battle started. I was saved by an anarquist who had vinager on him to stop my lungs from colapsing because of gas. I do not care wether he is an anarquist or comunist or f...ist. I became his friend. I told him about this brodcast the BIS, the Brazilian constitution and he listened to me and called me brother of arms.
People came to me during the protest to thank me to warn them about PEC 37 (free corruption law). I have been trying to wake up some police about the real purpose of the United Nations. It is not that hard believe me. We are facing all the symptoms of globalization here so it is easier to see it.
I do not have anything in English to show you regarding what I just said (sorry). But here you go (portuguese):

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=637756922918509&set=vb.447198775307659&type=2&theater

Frank, listen. I think the Brazilian people is more awaken than the American. The following future events will prove my point.

Do not believe Globo Frank! They are a Rothschild controled corporation. These guys were created as result of the "Condor Operation" and you know that the globalists were in charge of that. Now they are supporting PT because PT is allied with the globalists as is any other party, except some few brave politicians. People do not believe in parties anymore. That alone is wonderful.
So we either use this oportunity to wake people up or keep on playing cold war games!
Yours truly, Eduardo Piccinini Sanchez (that is my name for you NSA)

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #28 on: June 18, 2013, 05:57:34 AM »

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2013, 06:28:59 AM »

Offline FrankRep

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #30 on: June 18, 2013, 09:30:16 AM »
Bus Revolt,

Right now you're being portrayed as Communists. In this protest, you must get the anti-Communist, Pro-Liberty, Pro-Capitalist supporters out there and known. Fly Capitalist banners and signs, do something.

If you don't, this revolt will backfire on you.   

Offline bento

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #31 on: June 18, 2013, 10:01:05 AM »
There are some religious "anarcho-capitalists" zealots here that promote any thing that isn't "royal libertarian" complete deregulation as dirty socialism. Some recognize that they have been duped by the Rockefellers into working against their own interests. They set this in place to capture people trying to escape the left/right paradine. Not to get too fare off topic but why are you a socialist  because you are fighting socialist to try and get your rights back(rhetorical question)? Gotta love the neo-anarchist "socialism for the rich" and "free market for the poor" people here. I am with Max Keiser on this, the big guys need to regulated by a "just" government. The neo-libritarin party advocates the strong feeding on the weak. I do not subscribe to this religion.
We are all the sum of our tears. Too little and the ground is not fertile, and nothing can grow there. Too much and the best of us is washed away.

Offline Valerius

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #32 on: June 18, 2013, 10:05:59 AM »
Supposed to be protesting all the new government subsidized stadiums, too.
"No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck."  -Frederick Douglass

Offline jerryweaver

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #33 on: June 18, 2013, 10:45:12 AM »
South Africa hosted some international sports gig. Poor south Africans were taxed for the shindig and the Gov sold the contracts to buddies and kept the profits.  

That is the real sport in sports.

The Brazilian bus fare increase was one of the tax increases on the poor to pay for the world cup.

I'm thinking unofficial (CIA sponsored)  rioting is not yet a world sporting event as US CNN isn't covering this.

When it is CIA sponsored rioting (Benghazi) we really get the play by play coverage.

http://www.cnn.com/    TOP STORY  http://www.cnn.com/2013/06/18/world/europe/turkey-protests/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

Istanbul (CNN) -- A man stood silently in Istanbul's Taksim Square for hours Monday night, defying police who had broken up weekend anti-government protests with tear gas and water cannon and drawing hundreds of others to emulate his vigil.
For more than five hours, he appeared to stare at a portrait of Kemal Ataturk, the founder of the modern Turkish state, on the side of the Ataturk Cultural Center. Police eventually moved in to arrest many of those who had joined him, but it was unclear Tuesday whether Erdem Gunduz -- a performance artist quickly dubbed the "standing man" -- was in custody.





Offline Valerius

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #34 on: June 18, 2013, 11:21:03 AM »
There are some religious "anarcho-capitalists" zealots here that promote any thing that isn't "royal libertarian" complete deregulation as dirty socialism. Some recognize that they have been duped by the Rockefellers into working against their own interests. They set this in place to capture people trying to escape the left/right paradine. Not to get too fare off topic but why are you a socialist  because you are fighting socialist to try and get your rights back(rhetorical question)? Gotta love the neo-anarchist "socialism for the rich" and "free market for the poor" people here. I am with Max Keiser on this, the big guys need to regulated by a "just" government. The neo-libritarin party advocates the strong feeding on the weak. I do not subscribe to this religion.

I think that is an overgeneralization.
"No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck."  -Frederick Douglass

Offline bento

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #35 on: June 18, 2013, 12:09:00 PM »
nope just first hand experience....
We are all the sum of our tears. Too little and the ground is not fertile, and nothing can grow there. Too much and the best of us is washed away.

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #36 on: June 18, 2013, 12:17:01 PM »
Guys!
That is the infowar. They do not show MOST

Offline Bus Revolt

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #37 on: June 18, 2013, 12:19:09 PM »
Guys!
That is the infowar. They do not show MOST of the messages protesting against other governement agendas. They only show the few red flags. We are doing our best. The media is doing their worst
Thnak you and stop playing cold war.

Offline RollyPolly

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #38 on: June 18, 2013, 02:27:03 PM »
Guys!
That is the infowar. They do not show MOST of the messages protesting against other governement agendas. They only show the few red flags. We are doing our best. The media is doing their worst
Thnak you and stop playing cold war.


Generally people who speak in broad terms or  attach silly labels to dismiss others are either willfully ignorant or purposely deceptive. Here you have two people using broad terms like "commie", "leftist", etc while ignoring the context of the subject. This is no different from dismissing the IRS scandal by saying "Who cares? They're a bunch of right wingers!" or "More wars! Show those hippies who is boss! USA! USA!". No matter which "side" you claim like a good little gang member, you are getting screwed from the top. Most people at the top of the pyramid don't have your best interests in mind.

Some of these same people were running interference on the Snowden revelations, instead of focusing on the context of the leaks they were asking "Is he a hero?", "Is his tie blue?", "why isnt he wearing a tie?", "why isnt he wearing a USA flag pin?", "Is he is a commie?".

They want you focused on everything but the message or the context of the discussion and if that fails, they will try to drive the discussion off the rails or in this case get the topic closed or moved.

Is it fair to question to motives of this movement? Absolutely! At the same time it is dishonest to scream "LEFTISTS!!!!!!!!" or "COMMIES!!!!!" without examining the broader context.

EvadingGrid

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Re: Bus Revolt
« Reply #39 on: June 18, 2013, 03:20:40 PM »
Guys!
That is the infowar. They do not show MOST of the messages protesting against other governement agendas. They only show the few red flags. We are doing our best. The media is doing their worst
Thnak you and stop playing cold war.


I understand.