Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote

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Offline Suzu

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Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« on: January 29, 2013, 07:09:51 PM »
On today's show I heard Alex mention once again that the Hopi Indians have used peyote for thousands of years. This is FALSE, and I'm TIRED OF HEARING IT.

Hopi DON'T use peyote, it has NEVER been a part of their tradition.

I lived among the Hopi, on their reservation in Arizona, for almost ten years. I have attended peyote ceremonies in Arizona but I ALWAYS had to LEAVE Hopiland and go to either Navajo, Mohave, Pima, Ute, or other tribal lands.

Will someone please make sure that Alex learns the truth about Hopi and peyote?

Thank you.

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2013, 08:15:47 PM »



MESCALITO


 ... well, I may have guessed the HOPI use it in their
religion too. I know the plant is largely found south
of the border. When I lived in Tucson it was fairly easily
available and used religiously by the Yaqui and other tribes ...
and many other US native tribes (Mescalero Apache)
have taken it up, as at least a part of their pharmacopeia,
in the last century or so, as I remember.


St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2013, 08:41:19 PM »
It's a very rare (generally young) Hopi who uses peyote. Their ceremonial leaders (elders) discourage it. I've attended peyote meetings all over Arizona and never once found a Hopi in attendance. One time, a very misguided young Hopi man - he was into alcohol, sniffing glue, smoking pot and any/all means of getting a "buzz" - happened to overhear me talking with his uncle about one of the meetings I attended, and he asked me if I could "get some peyote" for him. If I had done it, I'd have been ostracized in the village where he lived.

Online Jackson Holly

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2013, 09:58:18 PM »


Suzu:

I moved out to Tucson from Alabama back in 1977 ... and
I largely chose that area because I had read Casteneda and,
well ... wanted to be there.



I had discovered mescaline in college days and did buttons
out in Tucson ....

THE HOPIs:  I once saw the autumn SNAKE DANCES at
Hotevilla, Third Mesa. I understand they don't allow 'outsiders'
to view those dances anymore ... as a matter of fact, they
didn't allow it then (about '79) ...

My gf and I saw a notice somewhere that there would be
dances in Hopiland that weekend, so we drove up ... hung out all day ...
finally a waitress (First Mesa) said she thought they had decided to do it
at Third Mesa, but no time was mentioned (that's the way they
do things) ... we found it ... hundreds of people all over the roofs ...
everywhere. We sat on the ground near this nice old lady ... struck
up a conversation ... she said it was to be the SNAKE DANCES and
the CORN MAIDEN dances. I apologized, asking if we should leave
because I knew they liked to keep it private ... she said, "No... we
believe that if you are here, the gods want you to be here."

It was one of the most wonderful things I have ever witnessed.


St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2013, 01:38:17 PM »
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2013, 09:50:34 PM »
He did it again on today's show.  >:( Does he never read this forum, or is he just being obstinate?  ???

Won't someone please tell Alex this is ridiculous? It's the equivalent of saying that Jewish people take Holy Communion, or saying Muslims celebrate Yom Kippur.  ::)

No Hopi are going to call Alex and correct him, even if they could get through. It's not their way.

Oh... by the way... Castaneda was a complete fraud. Ask any Yaqui Indian.


Online Jackson Holly

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2013, 11:14:41 PM »


By fraud do you mean Don Juan was a fictional character?

St. Augustine: “The truth is like a lion; you don't have to defend it.
Let it loose; it will defend itself."

Offline Jacob Law

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2013, 04:45:44 AM »

http://peyote.com/carlos-castaneda/index.html
Castaneda's lover reflects on shamanism and celebrity

http://peyote.com/peyote/peyote-news.html


interesting, but I think suzu is right about the Hopi
What do you under-stand?

Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2013, 01:46:58 PM »
interesting, but I think suzu is right about the Hopi

Of course I am. I may not be able to persuade Alex, but I wish he would at least get his facts straight because when any Hopi hear his nonsensical assertion that peyote is part of their religious tradition, his credibility with them goes right down the drain. But more importantly, why insult a whole nation of people, and spread misinformation about them, in front of the whole world? If you have any knowledge of what the Hopi have already suffered due to interference by the dominant culture, and if you have any shred of compassion, you don't add to their distress by blathering ill-informed ideas about them over the airwaves.

For those who may wish to know a little more about Hopi, a good starting point would be my friend Tom's publication, entitled "From The Beginning of Life to The Day of Purification".

Offline No2NWO

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2013, 01:55:43 AM »
Oh my.... I've spent a little time with Native American friends.... and none of them would be so enraged about one White Man's mistaken nugget of information as you are. In fact, most that I have met want the White Man to have zero information or be misinformed about their culture. They enjoy the secrecy and sometimes indulge in misinformation and I don't blame them. The Native American culture should be left to practice their beliefs without anyone elses opinions getting in the way especially as in the past.... the FEDS! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghost_Dance

Filed under: Much ado about nothing.

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Offline JT Coyoté

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2013, 03:37:04 AM »
Of course I am. I may not be able to persuade Alex, but I wish he would at least get his facts straight because when any Hopi hear his nonsensical assertion that peyote is part of their religious tradition, his credibility with them goes right down the drain. But more importantly, why insult a whole nation of people, and spread misinformation about them, in front of the whole world? If you have any knowledge of what the Hopi have already suffered due to interference by the dominant culture, and if you have any shred of compassion, you don't add to their distress by blathering ill-informed ideas about them over the airwaves.

For those who may wish to know a little more about Hopi, a good starting point would be my friend Tom's publication, entitled "From The Beginning of Life to The Day of Purification".

Yes, Suzu is absolutely correct. The Hopi are likely the most sober and traditionally spontaneous of all American Indian People. They are reputed as the most gifted and spiritual of the many tribes. Seers abound among the Hopi and they are respected for their ability as peace makers and resolvers of conflict.

Being part Cherokee and Choctaw... I was naturally curious about American Indian culture from a young age... it wasn't until 1974, when in my late 20s, that I was introduced to the Hopi by a friend who was studying Southwest Indian culture at the University of Montana. He sent me a copy of Frank Waters' 1963 book,  Book Of The Hopi: The First Revelation of the Hopi's Historical And Religious World View Of Life.

After a couple of months of reading and study, he sent me another book published in 1942 titled, Sun Chief: The Autobiography of a Hopi Indian, the life story of Don C. Talayesva, the Sun Chief. The book was edited by Talayesva's adopted clan brother Leo Simmons, and was introduced by Robert V. Hine. I still have both books. I read and occasionally reference from them from time to time.

There is no peyoté to be found in this culture, it would be as much a sacrilege for a Hopi to use peyoté as it would be for a believing Christian to worship a stone statue of Satan...

Suzu, I have not heard Alex say this, but I will check it out and make sure he knows the truth...

JTCoyoté

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talisman, before which difficulties and
obstacles vanish into air."
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Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2013, 08:12:56 PM »

Suzu, I have not heard Alex say this, but I will check it out and make sure he knows the truth...


Well, he did it again today - during the first hour of the show. This really, REALLY ticks me off. IF you did tell him that he's wrong about this, why does he not believe it??!!

Here's the proof -- link goes right to the time where he says it:

http://youtu.be/jSUkZlZ_Q-s?t=39m42s


Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #12 on: December 30, 2013, 08:54:22 PM »
Oh my.... I've spent a little time with Native American friends.... and none of them would be so enraged about one White Man's mistaken nugget of information as you are. In fact, most that I have met want the White Man to have zero information or be misinformed about their culture. They enjoy the secrecy and sometimes indulge in misinformation and I don't blame them. The Native American culture should be left to practice their beliefs without anyone elses opinions getting in the way

I agree with your last point but the rest of your post doesn't apply to Hopi. In fact, they have gone to great lengths to inform the world and particularly the U.S. government why their religious traditions are of vital importance to us all. Take some time to read this collection of old newsletters written by my Hopi friends, before you purport to speak of their wishes. Time and time again, Hopi elders have urged me and other non-Hopis to spread their message far and wide.

Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #13 on: March 21, 2014, 07:22:56 PM »
Suzu, I have not heard Alex say this, but I will check it out and make sure he knows the truth...
When?

He did it again today - near the end of Hour #2. The link below goes straight to the statement (he calls it "mescaline" this time - an even greater insult):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_TQWlBePUg&t=37m46s


Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2014, 03:21:56 AM »
My statement was NOT Irrelevant to the topic of your thread.

 Through out history; all of mankind has used, 'hallucinogens,' for the purpose of, 'hallucinating!'

 If you believe that all Native Americans can handle Peyote/with out someone having a BAD TRIP? That is just Wrong: as any hallucinating will take you to places you may not be able to handle!

 When you take a TRIP: just make sure the supplies you bring are put into a HEART that Understands The TRUTH... ;)

 pS: I did take a FEW TRIPS in the '70's'---so I am not giving you any BS.

Your comments are not BS and I didn't say they are; I merely said -- and still do -- that they are irrelevant in this thread.

Back on the topic: Over six thousand thread views and still no one has informed Alex???

Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2016, 07:25:27 PM »
I guess no one will ever tell Alex the truth.  :-\ He just said it again, emphatically, in Friday's broadcast:

https://youtu.be/CJ1cJgvViVE?t=53m54s

Offline Letsbereal

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2016, 07:59:47 PM »
Never heard of peyote before which could be an interesting subject.

Drugs use are often embedded in culture to give it meaning or because they are beneficial in some way.

Not saying this is the case with the Hopi Indians but in general.

The use of coffee is a good example of that the tribe around the coffee machine 'totem' in companies.

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Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2016, 08:04:47 PM »
I have been sending the following message to all of the moderators, one by one. (Ticked the box to save a copy in my sent items, to be sure I don't duplicate the message to any one person, but cannot find a link to my Sent Items. Can't send to more than one person at a time, and can only send six messages per hour, so it may take me a while to reach all of the mods. But I will get it done! If you have received such a message from me, please let me know what you can do about it. Thank you.)

Quote
For over three years I've been trying to get through to Alex Jones, to tell him that Hopi Indians do not, as a rule, ever use peyote. It is not and never has been "part of their religion" as he continuously insists. He may be thinking of some other tribe and using the name "Hopi" erroneously, or maybe he has some ax to grind with the Hopi and wants to malign their entire culture. Who knows.... But in case it is a simple mistake on his part, is there some way you can get the correct info to him? He said it again this Friday. Here's the latest evidence:
https://youtu.be/CJ1cJgvViVE?t=53m56s

I lived among the Hopi for nine years and became very familiar with their culture AND religious traditions. I was personally close to several of the elderly keepers of the faith -- leaders of the tribe, for their traditional culture is a theocracy. So this is from first-hand knowledge of the Hopi Way. Please, please do something to get him to stop insisting that they use peyote as part of their religion. It is as false as can be, and VERY offensive to not just Hopi but all who know and love them.

At the very least, please acknowledge that you have read this message.

Thank you.

Offline JT Coyoté

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #18 on: August 13, 2016, 09:35:13 PM »
I have been sending the following message to all of the moderators, one by one. (Ticked the box to save a copy in my sent items, to be sure I don't duplicate the message to any one person, but cannot find a link to my Sent Items. Can't send to more than one person at a time, and can only send six messages per hour, so it may take me a while to reach all of the mods. But I will get it done! If you have received such a message from me, please let me know what you can do about it. Thank you.)

Suzu is correct. Several decades ago as I mentioned earlier in this thread, I read Sun Chief, The story of a Hopi Chief and his people from the 1930s and '40s... as well as the Book of the Hopi which tells the long tale of their way, the round, and their essential cosmology...

For the Hopi to use any hallucinogen in the performance of their prayers and rituals would be the same as if a good Baptist Deacon were to stand up in front of the pulpit, rip off all of his clothes before the congregation, slice open his hands and draw a pentagram on the floor with his blood, then lay down on it and begin masturbating wildly screaming over and over, "Hail Satan!"

As Alex would say, I hate to broach vulgarity in analogy, but it seems that it is what it takes sometimes to get through to people... What say you brother..? It's not the Hopi, Alex... and even if the Yaqui may have used the drug in the old days in their more secret rituals, it is likely not so much so today I suspect... their freedom of religion to use it in any case harms no one save perhaps the individual Yaqui ingesting it...

The Muslim husband and wife who were engaged in the unlawful act of holding slaves in bondage in their home as their property, saying they have the religious right to remove the protected inalienable rights of another and bind them as slaves in the name of their religion because their prophet Mohammad had slaves... Well... it's only one step, just one more little step from this kind of slavery to human sacrifice...

That would have been a better analogy to draw, Alex...

I heard you say it the other day on the show, my brother... and my old well worn ears heard you say Hopi... if you said Yaqui, or said Hopi meaning to say Yaqui so be it, but the analogy either way is a weak one as I have explained... especially in describing the realm that would allow so-called religious freedom to abide the scourge and torture of barbarous slavery and satanic human sacrifice.

JTCoyoté

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Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #19 on: August 14, 2016, 11:18:03 AM »
So right NOT HOPI's !!! Other native American tribes adopted Peyote into their ceremonies :

Paiute Jack Wilson started the Ghost Dance in the 1880's but the Paiute got peyotism from other tribes:
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cI0Jfdkq4z8
Paiute Native American Shaman Wovoka and the Ghost Dance

Uploaded on Jan 3, 2007

The Ghost Dance appeared during a time of desperation for the Native American Indian people. The Ghost Dance started when Paiute shaman Jack Wilson or Wovoka had a vision that if our people would dance and sing we Indians would live again. The Ghost Dance spread throughout the land. In Dec. 1890 the military panicked and massacred innocent Lakota Indian people at Wound Knee while they danced. It is one of the worse incidents in United States history. Judy Trejo - Summit Lake (Tommo Agi) and Walker River (Agi) Paiute and Anita Collins - Shoshone and Walker River Paiute speak about Wovoka. The Round Dance was a traditional Great Basin dance that spread across the land in the form of the Ghost Dance, and is now part of many celebrations. Robbie Robertson sings "Ghost Dance".

Paiute Jack Wilson

http://www.wilderutopia.com/traditions/ghost-dance-and-peyote-medicine-the-spirit-world-of-the-caddo-people/
...
The Ghost Dance Religion

When the Ghost Dance [Nanissáanah] was introduced to the Caddos in 1890, they adapted it to long held religious beliefs. A Nevada Paiute named Wovoka (also known as Jack Wilson) prophesied dancing would reunite the living with the spirits of the dead and bring peace, prosperity, and unity to native peoples throughout the region, and the Ghost Dance spread as a two- four- or five-day round dance. From the time of the oldest ancestors, Caddos believed: Ah-ah-ha’-yo, father above, hears our daily prayers; he provides and protects us; there is a world beyond this one where our people gather after leaving mother earth.
...


John Wilson & John Inkanish Caddo Indians Texas and Oklahoma

H.P. Robinson, Fort Sill, Oklahoma Territory. Caddo Dancing Chiefs. Boudoir Card, 7 1/2&#8243; x 4 1/2,&#8221; of John Wilson, seated, and John Inkanish, Caddo Indians. The Caddo are a Southern Plains tribe related to the Wichita and the Pawnee, along the Red River. In 1874 they were relocated to their present reservation in Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. When the Ghost Dance swept through the Plains tribes, the Caddo were among those who adopted their own variant of the belief, a five-day ceremony of prayerful dancing. John Wilson wears a beaded cap elaborated with cow horns and feathers. A golden eagle wing fan with beaded cloth pendants is held in his left hand. He has a fringed and beaded leather shirt and leather half leggings secured by beaded garters. Inkanish holds a pipe-tomahawk. His leather shirt has a painted band across the center. His leather leggings are secured by beaded garters.  John Wilson was a Caddo-Delaware-French medicine man and religious leader. His Caddo name was Nishku, meaning & Moon Head.; Though he was of half-Delaware descent, quarter-blood French, and quarter-blood Caddo, John Wilson spoke only the Caddo language and identified only as a Caddo. He is believed to have been born in 1840, when his band of Caddo were still living in Texas. They were driven into Indian Territory in 1859. Wilson was a medicine man, who in 1880, became a peyote roadman. He became one of the most active leaders in the Ghost Dance in Indian Territory. During a two-week period, Wilson consumed large numbers of peyote buttons to gain new insights into conducting peyote ceremonies ;learning from the peyote and, as his nephew George Anderson put it peyote took pity on him.; The tribe had been exposed to the Half Moon peyote ceremony, but Wilson introduced the Big Moon ceremony to the tribe. Included with this image is a 3-page copy of an interview with Mrs. Frank Cussins, of Anadarko, Oklahoma, conducted on July 12, 1937. Mrs. Cussins; father was John Inkanish, half breed Caddo and white. VG. $1200


Ghost dancing relieved uncertainty that clouded the hopes of Caddo people. John Moon-head Wilson, a Delaware-Caddo, was one of the charismatic leaders who helped spread the Ghost Dance. In 1880, Wilson had become a peyote roadman. The tribe had known the Half Moon peyote ceremony, but Wilson introduced the Big Moon ceremony to them. Other religious dances and ceremonies were only initiated by women, and women today play an important role in the furthering of traditions to the next generations. The Caddo tribe continues to practice the Ghost Dance and remains active in the Native American Church today.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wilson_(Caddo)
John Wilson (ca. 1840-1901) was a Caddo-Delaware-French medicine man and religious leader. John Wilson's Caddo name was Nishkû'ntu, meaning "Moon Head
...
Wilson was a medicine man, who in 1880, became a peyote roadman.[3] He became one of the most active leaders in the Ghost Dance in Indian Territory.
...


http://www.psychedelic-library.org/nevada.htm
...

The next mention of Peyote in Nevada is in a report of Special Agent Dorrington dated May 12-13, 1917. Surprisingly, it refers to Jack Wilson, the Messiah and originator of the Ghost Dance of the 1890s. Wrote Dorrington:

    Use of peyote and mescal. There is absolutely no evidence indicating that either peyote or mescal is used on the reservations or that the Indians know anything about it. .. Jack Wilson resides in Mason Valley... He is the 'Messiah' and the originator of the 'Ghost Dance'. He appears to attract but little attention from Indians in this locality but apparently has considerable influence among distant tribes and he seemingly keeps in close touch with them; that he is corresponding with certain individuals in Montana, South Dakota, Wyoming and Oklahoma... It is further learned that even delegations have paid him a visit... He is also known as a 'medicine man' and practices some among his people, but most of his time is believed to be spent visiting the distant and more prosperous tribes and individuals from whom he procures large sums of money... Jack Wilson is a very dignified and striking Indian... From all accounts he has always been friendly with whites.. . A recent picture of Jack, taken by myself, is attached. It cost me the sum of one dollar, that is Jack made a 'touch' for that amount after the picture had been taken... After careful inquiry I am satisfied that Jack Wilson does not use peyote or mescal, nor has he encouraged its use by others.. . he is very temperate in his habits... he is constantly advising the Indians to abstain from the use of all drugs and intoxicants.
...


Sam Lone Bear - Oglala (Lakota) - circa 1910

From interviews with Indians in 1938 I learned of a Sioux Indian Peyote missionary, named Sam Lone Bear. Lone Bear had been proselytizing since 1914 in Utah, Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. He conducted Peyote rituals at Fallon and Pyramid Lake during several months in the summer of 1929. His success at "doctoring" attracted participants to his Peyote meeting at Nixon, Nevada, from as far away as McDermitt, Nevada, and Bishop, California. Lone Bear made his headquarters with Joe Green, a well-known and respected Paiute medicineman residing on the Pyramid Lake Reservation.

In 1938 Joe told me of his conversion to Peyotism notwithstanding his being an active and convinced Episcopalian, and also a practicing shaman. He had no difficulties being simultaneously a leader in three religions, a situation I have found repeatedly among Indian Peyotists.

| - - -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wovoka
Wovoka (c. 1856 - September 20, 1932),[1] also known as Jack Wilson, was the Northern Paiute religious leader who founded a second episode of the Ghost Dance movement. Wovoka means "cutter"[2] or "wood cutter" in the Northern Paiute language.
...
Wovoka claimed to have had a prophetic vision during the solar eclipse on January 1, 1889. Wovoka's vision entailed the resurrection of the Paiute dead and the removal of whites and their works from North America. Wovoka taught that in order to bring this vision to pass the Native Americans must live righteously and perform a traditional round dance, known as the Ghost dance, in a series of five-day gatherings. Wovoka's teachings spread quickly among many Native American peoples, notably the Lakota.

The Ghost Dance movement is known for being practiced by the victims of the Wounded Knee Massacre  (December 29, 1890) ;



| - - - -


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Native_American_Church
The Native American Church (NAC), also known as Peyotism and Peyote Religion, is a Native American religion characterized by mixed traditional as well as Protestant beliefs and by sacramental use of the entheogen peyote. The religion originated in the U.S. state of Oklahoma in the late nineteenth century after peyote was introduced to the southern Great Plains from Mexico.[1][2][3] Today it is the most widespread indigenous religion among Native Americans in the United States, Canada, and Mexico, with an estimated 250,000 adherents as of the late twentieth century.[4][5][6][7]

History of the peyote religion

The religion probably originated among the Kiowa in Oklahoma about 1890 and reflects the influence of traditional peyote use among Mesoamerican groups such as the Huichol. In 1918 many peyotists were brought together as the Native American Church.

Peyotism, or Peyote Religion, most widespread indigenous religious movement among North American Indians and one of the most influential forms of Pan-Indianism. The term peyote derives from the Nahuatl name peyotl for a cactus. The tops of the plants contain mescaline, an alkaloid drug that has hallucinogenic effects. It was used in Mexico in pre-Columbian times to induce supernatural visions and as a medicine.
....

History of persecution

Peyotism has been much persecuted. Although peyote was banned by government agents in 1888 and later by 15 states, Congress, backed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the churches, and some Indian groups, resisted repeated attempts from 1916 to 1937 to have its use prohibited. In self-defense, peyote groups sought incorporation under state laws—first in Oklahoma as the First-born Church of Jesus Christ in 1914, then as the Native American Church in 1918, and by 1960 in some further 11 states.

In the 1960s appeals by peyotists in the name of constitutional freedom of religion were supported by anthropologists and others and upheld in several state supreme courts.
...


Sedona Arizona:

http://www.peyoteway.org/

The Peyote Way Church of God is a non-sectarian, multicultural, experiential, Peyotist organization located in southeastern Arizona, in the remote Aravaipa wilderness
.

It is not affiliated with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, the Native American Church, or any other religious organizations, though we do accept people from all faiths. Church membership is open to all races. We encourage individuals to create their own rituals as they become acquainted with the great mystery. We believe that the Holy Sacrament Peyote, when taken according to our sacramental procedure and combined with a holistic lifestyle (see Word of Wisdom), can lead an individual toward a more spiritual life.

Peyote is currently listed as a controlled substance and its religious use is protected by Federal law only for Native American members of the Native American Church.

 Non-Indian Peyote use is protected in five states : AZ, NM, CO, NV, and OR. We do not have access to Peyote where it grows in South Texas and Mexico.
As it is an endangered species, we believe an essential and inseparable part of our religious practice is the growing and stewardship of the Holy Sacrament Peyote.
...

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http://nativeamericanchurches.org/

Oklevueha NAC welcomes people of all races, nationalities, religions and lifestyles without prejudice.

...
 If you desire to be blessed by having access to Native American Ceremonies and Medicines (such as Peyote, San Pedro, Ayahuasca and Cannabis) without legal interference, you will want to consider joining Oklevueha NAC and connecting with our medicine people.
...
Legally, the protections provided by the US Constitution and numerous court decisions apply to all registered members of Oklevueha Native American Church (or ONAC) regardless of race or national origin. Many Federal laws have been passed that protect and maintain access to their sacred ceremonial grounds, ceremonies and sacraments. These protections apply both on and off Federally Recognized Indian Reservations.

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see also:

Peyote Religion: A History
By Omer Call Stewart



history article:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1525/aa.1952.54.1.02a00350/pdf
...
AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST [54,1952
PEYOTE AND THE HOPI
SIR :

In the July-September issue of the American Anthropologist, Vol. 53, No. 3, there was an article by J. S. Slotkin on peyote. The major idea of the article was to show the earliest mention of the use of peyote north of the Rio Grande, and to give
evidence that an Isleta had brought the peyote to Taos from the Hopi
.

It would seem that both Slotkin and the Spanish could not distinguish peyote from jimson weed, or if it really was peyote that these Indians were using, they did not tell the truth as to its source.

The Hopi were ignorant of the use of peyote and the older generations still are today. The younger ones have heard of it although the majority of them do not even know what it looks like or anything about its use.

They have recently heard about it through the Indian schools, from the Oklahoma Indians.

Not one ethnologist working among the Hopi has ever mentioned the use of peyote among them. Another very important factor is that this cactus does not grow in the Hopi country, nor does it grow in the country of any tribe that surrounds the Hopi.

The use of the jimson weed as a medicine and by the doctors as a means of diagnosing a sickness, however, has its distribution westward into California.

WILLIAMT . BEAVER
FLAGSTAFF ARIZONA

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http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/anthpubs/ucb/text/ucp040-004.pdf
[PDF]Washo-Northern Paiute Peyotism - University of California, Berkeley
UNIVERSITY, OF CALIFORNIA BERKELEY
1944

OMER C. STEWART
...

My first experience with Washo-Paiute peyotism was made possible by Dr. S. F. Cook, who invited me in July, 1938, to accompany him on a field trip. On that expedition we talked of peyote with Indians from Reno to Bishop, and made fruitless inquiry concerning it from Bishop, around the southern Sierra Nevada, to Yosemite.

We were fortunate in being able to attend a peyote meeting conducted by Sam Dick near Mono Lake. As a result of that short visit in July, which revealed the possibilities of more intensive study, I received a grant from the University of California
to allow me to spend five weeks, beginning October 14, 1938, among the Washoe and Northern Paiute
. The greater part of the data in this monograph was obtained at that time. It was then I attended another peyote meeting, conducted by Ben Lancaster at Carson City.

...

In 1924, Dan Voorhees (P,1)" and Johnny Cleveland (P,1) heard that peyote was successfully used in a curing ritual in Oklahoma. A mixed-blood Sioux or Ponca, Tom Knudsen, the government farm agent then at Schurz, showed them
an Indian Service pamphlet condemning peyote, but told them his family had been cured by it.


Actual experience came through Leo Okio, an "Eastern Indian," who held meetings at Nixon, Fallon, and Schurz in the fall and winter of 1929-1930. When with the Northern Paiute, he lived with Joe Green, a Paiute shaman at Nixon, who befriended
him and was convinced of peyote's power after seeing Leo cure cases of paralysis and pneumonia. Joe learned the relevant songs and assisted in the ritual.

...

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Jacob Law

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #20 on: August 14, 2016, 03:30:27 PM »
I guess no one will ever tell Alex the truth.  :-\ He just said it again, emphatically, in Friday's broadcast:

https://youtu.be/CJ1cJgvViVE?t=53m54s

It's a problem when someone becomes famous; they become insulated from sources of truth and they will have a tendency to be isolated in the bubble of truth that made them famous.
They inherit the problem due to several reasons, but mostly those that are thieves and vultures develop a need to have defenses against the constant harassment and therefore much of the truth the flows in is distorted and diverted.
The thing is not to get to upset about it and be thankful he is out there promoting some important truth, even though there is error related to it.
There is much more to unravel; that is our job to build on the truth and don't get entangle with others lack perfection.     
What do you under-stand?

Offline Suzu

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Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #22 on: January 13, 2018, 03:10:17 PM »
https://twitter.com/suzu_804/status/951019986251689985

another Texan story ,....


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quanah_Parker


https://www.rogerebert.com/interviews/young-debbie-edwards-found-lana-wood-on-the-searchers



peyote,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quanah_Parker
Quanah Parker (Comanche kwana, "smell, odor") (c. 1845 or 1852 – February 23, 1911) was a Comanche war leader of the Quahadi ("Antelope") band of the Comanche people. He was born into the Nokoni ("Wanderers") band, the son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, an Anglo-American, who had been kidnapped as a child and assimilated into the tribe.

..
Founder of the Native American Church Movement

Quanah Parker is credited as one of the first important leaders of the Native American Church movement.[10] Parker adopted the peyote religion after having been gored in southern Texas by a bull.[citation needed] Parker was visiting his uncle, John Parker, in Texas where he was attacked, giving him severe wounds. To fight an onset of blood burning fever, a Mexican curandera was summoned and she prepared a strong peyote tea from fresh peyote to heal him. Thereafter, Quanah Parker became involved with peyote, which contains hordenine, mescaline or phenylethylamine alkaloids, and tyramine which act as natural antibiotics when taken in a combined form. Clinical studies indicate that peyocactin, a water-soluble crystalline substance separated from an ethanol extract of the plant, proved an effective antibiotic against 18 strains of penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, several other bacteria, and a fungus.[11]


see also:
http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/anthpubs/ucb/text/ucp040-004.pdf

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Suzu

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Re: Alex must STOP saying Hopi use peyote
« Reply #23 on: January 13, 2018, 04:05:38 PM »
Thank you, Tahoe Blue. I hadn't seen the info on medicinal uses of peyote however I have used it that way. I found that about an eighth of a tsp. of dried peyote would quickly alleviate a migraine headache that nothing else would touch. Once, when crossing the border, my vehicle was chosen for a thorough search. I had forgotten about the bag of dried peyote buttons in my glove box. Border guards took everything out of my vehicle while I waited in a chair under guard in a different building. Then they brought in the drug-sniffing dogs. Then I remembered the peyote and mentally prepared myself for the inevitable "zero tolerance" consequences -- that never came.... When I got back to the vehicle, there was the bag of peyote sitting on my dashboard.  :o :)