"Body scanners are safe" is the wrong discussion. DHS should not even exist.

Author Topic: "Body scanners are safe" is the wrong discussion. DHS should not even exist.  (Read 4829 times)

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Offline Effie Trinket

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Airport scanners DHS report concludes airport scanners are safe
Proper discussion is:

DHS is unconstitutional, even if 9/11 were not a false flag.

The fact that 9/11 was a false flag makes the existence of DHS orders of magnitute more fraudulent and criminal to even exist as a corporation/agency/department.  

The fact that DHS has seized powers unto itself not authorized by the Constitution is high treason.

This is the proper mindset to take regarding this illegitimately flourishing cancer of an organization operating on U.S. soil.
No American citizen is obligated to listen to, heed, obey, regard, respect, nor submit to what is no different than an element of the 3rd Reich resurrected in America.

Even if terrorism was real in the context of their fantasy land narrative, the American people are responsible for protecting themselves.  The Constitution does not allow government to do the job of protecting Americans for them, it prevents them from interfering with our lives.

That was one of the reasons why the elite carried out 9/11--they needed something of such magnitude that it would make people believe a false narrative that they can't protect themselves against such an attack, that they need the government to save them.  They had to convince the American people that the Constitution facilitates catastrophic terrorism, and that it had to be abolished or countless others would allegedly die.
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Published 2 March 2012

http://www.homelandsecuritynewswire.com/dr20120302-dhs-report-concludes-airport-scanners-are-safe

A new report by the DHS Inspector General concludes that the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) full body scanners are safe; the IG reviewed five independent studies and concluded that an airline passenger would have to be subjected to 17,000 screenings a year, or forty-seven a day, to reach the limit of acceptable radiation dosing

A new report by the DHS Inspector General concludes that the Transportation Security Administration’s (TSA) full body scanners are safe.

In the report, released on Tuesday, the Inspector General reviewed five independent studies and concluded that an airline passenger would have to be subjected to 17,000 screenings a year, or forty-seven a day, to reach the limit of acceptable radiation dosing.

The Washington Times reports Senator Susan Collins (R – Maine), the ranking member of the Senate Homeland Security Committee, was not convinced by the report and maintained that an independent non-governmental organization should study the machines.

“This report is not the report I requested,” Collins said. “An independent study is needed to protect the public and determine what technology is worthy of taxpayer dollars,” she said.

The senator went on to say that additional studies need to be completed on specific groups that may be at greater risk like pregnant women and TSA employees.

The report also noted that not all of TSA’s employees had completed their training sessions with the machines, despite the agency’s insistence that all of its employees have been trained.

“This report demonstrates that the Transportation Security Administration should improve training for its employees in radiation safety and ensure that scanning machines are consistently calibrated,” said Representative Edward J. Markey (D – Massachusetts). “TSA must do a better job in enforcing its safety training, developing refresher courses for employees and ensuring consistent and uniform calibration of these machines.”

TSA’s full body scanners, particularly its 247 backscatter units, have drawn sharp criticism as they rely on radiation to scan an individual. Due to the potential health risks posed by the machines, the European Union has banned the use of backscatter body scanners, instead opting for millimeter wave x-ray machines, which do not emit radiation.

Defenders of backscatter scanners say the machines emit a minute amount of radiation, the equivalent of flying at high altitudes for a few minutes.