SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA

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Offline Brocke

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SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« on: January 25, 2012, 05:42:46 PM »

After SOPA in the US, ACTA Being Discussed By The EU

    enigmax
    January 23, 2012

This is a guest article from SearchFreak, an internet engineer and chief executive of an Internet business that provides services to millions of users.

After Wikipedia and several thousand other sites staged a blackout recently, everybody nows knows about SOPA and PIPA.

But this is not the only piece of legislation being pushed by governments that many perceive as pro-censorship.

What is ACTA?

For those new to ACTA, or the Anti Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, it is an agreement between multiple countries to establish new international standards for intellectual property rights and enforcement. The European Union is one of those parties. The scope of ACTA includes counterfeit goods, generic medicines and copyright infringement on the Internet.

Why should I worry?

The procedure for drafting the text of the agreement and the text of the agreement itself have received numerous complaints. The negotiations and draft texts of this agreement were kept secret until finalized. Civil rights groups and developing countries were excluded from the negotiations but the MPAA, RIAA and pharma lobby were constantly consulted on the text.

Multiple groups and organizations that defend civil liberties have come out against ACTA saying that the treaty will restrict fundamental civil and digital rights, including the freedom of expression and communication privacy.

According to an analysis by the Free Software Foundation, ACTA would require that existing ISPs no longer host free software that can access copyrighted media, and DRM protected media would not be legally playable with free software.

Nate Anderson with Ars Technica pointed out that ACTA encourages service providers to collect and provide information about suspected infringers by giving them “safe harbor from certain legal threats”.

Under ACTA, copyright infringement on a commercial scale will be criminalized, but the standard for commercial scale is set low.

ACTA also allows criminal investigations and invasive searches to be performed against individuals for whom there is no probable cause: your laptop or iphone could be searched when you cross the border.

Oxfam says that ACTA will impact access to affordable medicines in the EU by curbing generic medicine competition. Put simply, it will make it harder to compete with big pharma. As if this is what we need right now, during harsh economic times, higher prices on medicine.

European Digital Rights (EDRi) says that, with ACTA, the interests of rightsholders are put ahead of free speech, privacy, and other fundamental rights. ACTA pushes Internet providers to carry out surveillance of their networks and disclose the personal information of alleged infringers to rightsholders.

ACTA would therefore place the regulation of free speech in the hands of private companies.

more: http://torrentfreak.com/after-sopa-in-the-us-acta-being-discussed-by-the-eu-120123/


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

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Offline Brocke

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2012, 05:49:37 PM »

Ireland Internet Censorship Treaty ACTA is being signed tomorrow (No more parodies)
http://youtu.be/KG3FpBzszFg

What Is ACTA?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N8Xg_C2YmG0

ACTA - 'The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement' is a proposed plurilateral agreement for the purpose of establishing international standards on intellectual property rights enforcement in Europe.

ACTA would establish a new international legal framework that would create its "own governing body outside existing international institutions" such as - the World Trade Organization (WTO), the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) or the United Nations.

An open letter signed by many organizations, including Consumers International, EDRi (27 European civil rights and privacy NGOs), the Free Software Foundation (FSF), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), ASIC (French trade association for web 2.0 companies), and the Free Knowledge Institute (FKI), states that "the current draft of ACTA would profoundly restrict the fundamental rights and freedoms of European citizens, most notably the freedom of expression and communication privacy."

The Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) in full – PDF
http://cdn.thejournal.ie/media/2012/01/20120125acta.pdf

Ireland and EU to sign controversial ACTA treaty tomorrow
6 hours ago 23,997 Views 56 Comments


IRELAND IS TO sign a controversial international agreement tomorrow which promises a major international crackdown on the trade of counterfeit goods – and illegal internet filesharing.

Irish representatives will sign the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) at a ceremony tomorrow – as will representatives from each of the other 26 European Union member states, and the EU itself.

Once the agreement is signed, it can then be formally ratified and adopted into law once it has been cleared by the European Parliament. The treaty will be signed tomorrow in Tokyo by Ireland’s ambassador to Japan, John Neary.

Although the treaty is primarily aimed at stopping the trade of counterfeited physical goods, it contains provisions which demand that participating countries offer equal protection and enforcement procedures against digital copyright infringement.

more: http://www.thejournal.ie/ireland-and-eu-to-sign-controversial-acta-treaty-tomorrow-336764-Jan2012/


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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'Cyber cannibals' spreading fear in China - Next we will watch each other!
« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2012, 01:02:11 AM »

'Cyber cannibals' spreading fear in China

Beijing (CNN) -- Do you ever get the feeling you are being watched? Closed circuit cameras recording your movements, strange noises on the phone line, phone calls that suddenly stop, emails being monitored, and private computer files and Facebook being hacked into. Oh yes, secrecy is no secret in China. Privacy is anything but private.

As human rights activists, artists, dissidents, lawyers and journalists can attest to, if the long arm of the Chinese state wants to get you, it can.

But it isn't only the authorities that people in China need to fear -- they may want to be wary of each other. A neighbor, a boss, a former friend... anyone is a suspect, anyone can be a so-called "cyber cannibal."

These online stalkers unite in a virtual manhunt or so-called "Human Flesh Search" to target perceived wrong-doers. They scour the web -- blogs, forums, anywhere personal information can be found -- peering into the deepest corners of someone's life, literally eating their privacy, revealing all secrets to exact their brand of punishment.

One admitted cyber cannibal told CNN he was part of a group that outed a so-called cat killer, a woman who allegedly posted pictures of herself on the net, torturing the animals. Her case captured widespread media attention.

"This is the cat-abusing model. After being human flesh searched, she shunned media all together. She could no longer live a normal life...had to cut off from most social activities. She could no longer show up in public," he told us.

Wang Jieyu can tell you all about the cyber cannibals' devastating reach. The Beijing television director has had his life turned inside out. His phone number, personal photos, where he works and even the identity of his parents and friends, are now public knowledge.

He has been abused in the vilest language via email, he is harassed day and night with hateful phone calls.

Now this once confident, sharply dressed, successful young man is reduced to hiding, wearing a mask in public for fear of being recognized.
I received too many emails, they phone me at all hours, people abuse me... they use dirty words.
Wang Jieyu

"My life has really been messed up in the past month," he said. "I received too many emails, they phone me at all hours, people abuse me... they use dirty words."

Opening his computer, he showed me page after page of abuse. Some of it is directed at his parents -- especially his mother who is targeted with crude sexual taunts.

Wang says it all started when he crossed a famous Chinese pop star, Shang Wenjie. He says he made a light-hearted jibe about Shang ona popular microblog -- a Chinese version of Twitter. Within hours the singer's fans went into a frenzy.

He doesn't accuse Shang of inciting the hatred, and her management has declined CNN's requests for comment. But Wang Jieyu's personal life has now gone viral.

"Every day, Shang's fans come and post nasty words from morning to night non-stop. My life and work was affected," he said.

Film maker Wang Jing has made a documentary about the phenomenon. He called it the "invisible killer," something he says taps into a deep-seated desire for vengeance, to get back at the world.

"I guess they are composed mainly of two kinds of people -- those who had tough luck with life themselves and thus hold grudges against others. They want to get even," he said.

The Human Flesh Search engine falls through the legal cracks in China. It is not outlawed, yet Chinese courts have described it as a dangerous phenomenon that undermines privacy laws.

Wang Jing says some are motivated by good, using it to uncover corruption and to highlight injustice. But he says too many others are out to destroy lives.

"It can easily go too far," he said. "If anyone wants to ruin another person's reputation he can simply make up things and ask others to 'human flesh search' for him. I know another case in which a boy searched for his ex-girlfriend after breaking up. After knowing her whereabouts, he went to find her and then killed her."

When we go out with Wang Jieyu he dons his mask. This is how he lives now, afraid of being recognized and abused, still paying the price, he says, for crossing the pop star's fans.

"I'm afraid that Shang Wenjie's fans might attack. They've attacked me twice now so I'm scared. So I wear a mask to prevent them from recognizing me."

But on the web there is nowhere to hide from the prying eyes of china's cyber cannibals.

http://edition.cnn.com/2012/02/08/world/asia/cyber-cannibal-china/index.html


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: 'Cyber cannibals' spreading fear in China - Next we will watch each other!
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2012, 03:08:33 AM »

Do you ever get the feeling you are being watched? Closed circuit cameras recording your movements, strange noises on the phone line, phone calls that suddenly stop, emails being monitored, and private computer files and Facebook being hacked into....


Wow... CNN is exposing what life has become under the surveillance grid here in the US! Amazing...

Quote

Oh yes, secrecy is no secret in China. Privacy is anything but private.
As human rights activists, artists, dissidents, lawyers and journalists can attest to, if the long arm of the Chinese state wants to get you, it can.



Oh...oops. They're talking about China.
Nevermind. All is "a-ok" here in the US.

Quote
But it isn't only the authorities that people in China need to fear -- they may want to be wary of each other. A neighbor, a boss, a former friend... anyone is a suspect, anyone can be a so-called "cyber cannibal."

But in China, you better be AFRAID: and you know those Chinese are coming after you too, as soon as they figure out how to cross the pacific on the internet. As a matter of fact; better stay OFF the internet to be safe. And for heavens sake, NEVER say anything critical about anyone or anything on the Internet. You might become a "HUMAN FLESH TARGET". Oooo... scary. Better watch TV. (CNN of course).

Quote
But on the web there is nowhere to hide from the prying eyes of china's cyber cannibals.

http://edition.cnn.com/2012/02/08/world/asia/cyber-cannibal-china/index.html


Thank you CNN, I feel safer now.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2012, 03:15:23 AM »
Can anyone share the connection between this SOPA/ACTA stuff and the imminent Google/YouTube changes?

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #5 on: February 14, 2012, 06:00:18 AM »

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #6 on: February 16, 2012, 01:26:17 PM »

Pirate Bay to replace all torrent files with magnet links

    By Lee Taylor
    February 14, 2012 11:14AM

The Pirate Bay will delete torrent files to become more resistant to being shut down.

THE world's most popular file-sharing website is to delete all torrent files in a bid to become more resistant to being shut down.

The Pirate Bay announced it would begin by taking down all torrent files shared by more than 10 people (peers) on February 29, TorrentFreak reports.

The website said torrent files would remain available through magnet links, which act like a hyperlink for your torrent to go directly to other people’s files. This means potential copyright material on torrent files will not be downloaded from the Pirate Bay’s servers.

To find out more about magnetic links and how they work, see Lifehacker.

The Pirate Bay said the new system is a “step forward in technology” and told TorrentFreak that the site is here to stay.

Last week researchers said they have created invincible file-sharing software that cannot be shut down by governments or anti-piracy organisations.

Known as Tribler, its creators say the only way to take it down “is to take the internet down”.

Developed by a team of researchers at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, the BitTorrent network doesn’t require torrent sites to find or download content. Instead it is based on pure peer-to-peer communication.

The news comes as a study revealed the lag between the US and the international release of a film is the most influential factor in online piracy.

The Reel Piracy: The Effect of Online Film Piracy on International Box Office Sales study in the US said to help stem losses, the film industry could release films simultaneously around the globe - or at least earlier than in the US.

The authors from the University of Missouri and Wellesley College, Massachussets, estimated that doing away with staggered releases could reduce box office losses by up to 7 per cent.

Earlier this month Sweden's Supreme Court said it will not hear an appeal brought by the founders The Pirate Bay, meaning jail terms and hefty fines imposed by an appeals court in 2010 stand.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/technology/pirate-bay-to-replace-all-torrent-files-with-magnetic-links/story-e6frfro0-1226270577873#ixzz1mZPUmnBN


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #7 on: February 16, 2012, 01:27:01 PM »

Is Tribler Unstoppable?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Znf7x8lbNoY

Tribler is software that could be a game changer. It doesn't rely on servers, search portals or domains the way that other programs do, instead when a person searches for a torrent file, their results will show peers who have that file on their own computers, and cut out the central database altogether. It also doesn't have any moderator and allows you to edit the names of the files within these public channels. And because there's no central location or server, many are saying that there's no way for the government to try to seize Tribler.


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline CaptBebops

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #8 on: February 16, 2012, 04:43:33 PM »
My musical satire of SOPA, PIPA and ACTA in "The Ballad of SOPA and PIPA":
http://youtu.be/-2ipmXeAyU0

Offline ekimdrachir

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #9 on: February 18, 2012, 12:57:42 PM »
Has anyone mentioned the new 'stop pedophiles' bill in Canada which will allow the government to track everyones online activity? Gun registry gets scrapped, and internet registry begins.

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #10 on: February 19, 2012, 01:43:00 PM »

Why east Europeans chose internet piracy

By Michael Winfrey

PRAGUE | Fri Feb 17, 2012 3:44pm EST

(Reuters) - Vitezslav, a 31-year-old Czech, is one of many people in the European Union's emerging east whose opposition to a new anti-pirating pact culminated this month in huge protests across the bloc that may now torpedo the treaty.

But far from the clichéd image of an impoverished eastern European who just wants to rip movies and songs for free, the young commodities trader is a savvy, modern media consumer who actually wants to pay for what he watches.

It is all about choice - or rather a lack of it.

Because he is unable to tap the cheap, instant access to digital media available through services like Netflix in more developed states, he pays 250 Czech crowns ($13) a month to ulozto.cz, a site that offers fast download rates of pirated material.

"People here got stuck on this site because there was no other provider where we could download movies. So we got used to it, and now we pay for higher download rates," said Vitezslav, who did not want to be identified by his last name.

"But if there was another legal service that would be as easy, I would do it. I pay for higher download rates, so why wouldn't I pay for something legal?"

Vitezslav's dilemma underscores a little-discussed aspect of the global anti-piracy debate.

While the United States and Hollywood are pushing to crack down on the illegal downloading that is rampant in developing countries like those in eastern Europe, they are not addressing a main reason behind the trend - that pirating is one of the only ways consumers can get at the products they want.

That issue has risen to the fore as the media industry's anti-pirating efforts have hit opposition in the form of public anger that may delay or even sink the newly signed Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) designed to crack down on digital theft.

MEDIA-LOVERS STYMIED

According to Joe Karaganis, director of Columbia University's Social Science Research Council (SSRC), film and music studios have marketed their products worldwide but have largely ignored consumers outside the richest countries.

That makes piracy largely a supply problem of pricing and access rather than a criminal conspiracy.

"There's an incredible divergence between this amazingly successful global marketing campaign for Hollywood goods and a real lack of interest in comparably expanding access to those goods," he said.

For many years in Prague, the only way to see films was to catch the few Hollywood blockbusters that trickled through theatres, buy DVDs for $30 or more months after their release overseas, or to rent from the video stores that piracy has now almost driven into extinction.

Last year, Apple finally expanded its iTunes store for music and films in the EU's 12 ex-communist states - eight years after its debut in America. But a limited selection is a turnoff for consumers used to instant access, and prices are higher despite incomes that are dwarfed by U.S. salaries.

Czech iTunes's, for example, offers the films "Fast Five" and "Bridesmaids" under their New Releases segment for 13.99 euros ($18.37). It has no option for rental.

Those films were available in the United States last summer, where they cost $14.99 to buy and $3.00 to rent. And American viewers can now see Oscar nominees "Moneyball" and "The Help," films available only in pirated versions in the Czech Republic.

In a study last year, the SSRC tried to discern the price of films adjusted for local incomes in developing countries.

It found that while a DVD of "The Dark Knight" cost $24 in the United States, that was the equivalent of $75 in Russia, and $641 in India when compared to local purchasing power.

The price of pirated DVDs in those countries were $25 and $54, still more expensive on a purchasing power basis than a legal copy in the United States.

"You have this amazing mix of slowly rising incomes, very high media prices, but a collapse in prices of technology," Karaganis said. "So you have this massive new infrastructure for digital media consumption with really no corresponding increase in legal access to affordable digital media goods."

RAMPANT PIRATING

But in a region where one leader, Romanian President Traian Basescu, once told Bill Gates that digital pirating helped his nation build a budding software industry, it is easy to see why companies are wary of wider distribution.

And although loss valuations are very hard to calculate - many times those who illegally download media would not buy it otherwise - industry groups estimate it amounts to tens of billions of dollars annually worldwide.

That is one of the main drivers behind ACTA, an accord whose authors say will strengthen the legal framework to crack down on copyright and trademark theft but whose opponents say will curb freedom on the Internet and encourage invasive surveillance.

Already signed by eight countries, the treaty needs all 27 EU states to ratify it by May 2013 and must clear European Parliament to come into force there. But that looks in doubt.

Governments have been given pause following demonstrations by tens of thousands of Europeans and attacks on government websites by "hacktivists" who oppose the pact.

The Germans, Czechs, Slovaks, Bulgarians, Lithuanians and others have postponed its ratification, and several officials have said it cannot be passed in its current form.

Slovenia's ambassador to Japan has apologized for signing it, while in Poland, deputies wore Vendetta protest masks in parliament in sympathy with treaty opponents and the prime minister said he could not rule out rejecting the pact.

Critics say the treaty was forged in secret, addresses only the concerns of copyright holders, has vague language that can lead to widespread censorship, and focuses only on enforcement.

Demonstrators fear it will transform illegal downloads from a civil offence to a crime punishable by jail time and will allow invasive surveillance that many compare to the tactics of former Communist regimes.

That strikes people like Ivan Bartos, chairman of the Czech Pirate Party that has been influential in anti-ACTA protests, as unfair, as it leaves media lovers with few options to join in the global digital media age.

"(Pirating) is caused by unavailability of the stuff and the bad market," he said. "A certain percentage of people will always download, but the rest is willing to buy if the material is available." ($1 = 18.9763 Czech crowns) ($1 = 0.7616 euros)

(Additional reporting by Robert Muller. Editing by Jeremy Gaunt.)

More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/17/us-internet-piracy-emergingeurope-idUSTRE81G1VL20120217


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
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He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #11 on: February 19, 2012, 01:44:47 PM »

Protests erupt across Europe against web piracy treaty

By Erik Kirschbaum and Irina Ivanova

BERLIN/SOFIA | Mon Feb 13, 2012 10:17am EST

(Reuters) - Tens of thousands of protesters took part in rallies across Europe on Saturday against an international anti-piracy agreement they fear will curb their freedom to download movies and music for free and encourage Internet surveillance.

More than 25,000 demonstrators braved freezing temperatures in German cities to march against the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) while 4,000 Bulgarians in Sofia rallied against the agreement designed to strengthen the legal framework for intellectual property rights.

There were thousands more - mostly young - demonstrators at other high-spirited rallies despite snow and freezing temperatures in cities including Warsaw, Prague, Bratislava, Bucharest, Vilnius, Paris, Brussels and Dublin.

"We don't feel safe anymore. The Internet was one of the few places where we could act freely," said Monica Tepelus, a 26-year-old programmer protesting with about 300 people in Bucharest.

Opposition to ACTA in Eastern Europe is especially strong and spreading rapidly. Protesters have compared it to the Big Brother-style surveillance used by former Communist regimes. Downloading films and music is also a popular way for many young Eastern Europeans to obtain free entertainment.

"Stop ACTA!" read a banner carried by one of the 2,000 marchers in central Berlin, where temperatures were -10 Celsius.

More: http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/13/us-europe-protest-acta-idUSTRE81A0I120120213


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Optimus

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2012, 02:23:39 PM »
Sherlock confirms that ‘Irish SOPA’ has been signed into law

JUNIOR MINISTER SEÁN Sherlock has this afternoon confirmed that the controversial statutory instrument that reinforces online copyright laws in Ireland has been signed into law.

The controversial ‘Irish SOPA’ legislation was the subject of much debate last month amid concerns it would limit internet freedom. Today Sherlock confirmed that the European Union (Copyright and Related Rights) Regulations 2012 has been signed into law.

The statutory instrument will make it possible for copyright holders to seek court injunctions against companies such as internet service providers or social networks whose systems are hosting copyright-infringing material.

Sherlock, the Minister for Research and Innovation, acknowledged in his statement today that prior to signing the statutory instrument there had been a call for it to be more detailed and prescriptive.

More: http://www.thejournal.ie/sherlock-confirms-that-%E2%80%98irish-sopa%E2%80%99-has-been-signed-into-law-369634-Feb2012/
“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

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GCHQ - every text message, email, website accessed and phone call monitored
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2012, 04:22:02 PM »

Rights groups attack Britain's snooping plans

    AFP
    April 02, 2012 5:59AM

RIGHTS groups have slammed British government plans to expand its powers to monitor email exchanges and website visits.

Under the new legislation, internet companies would be instructed to install hardware to allow the Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) - Britain's electronic "listening" agency" - to go through "on demand" every text message and email sent, websites accessed and phone calls made "in real time, the Sunday Times reported.

The plans are expected to be unveiled next month.

Nick Pickles, director of the Big Brother Watch campaign group, called the plans "an unprecedented step that will see Britain adopt the same kind of surveillance seen in China and Iran".

Shami Chakrabarti, director of civil liberties group Liberty, denounced the move as "a pretty drastic step in a democracy."

The Home Office interior ministry said ministers were preparing to legislate "as soon as parliamentary time allows" but said the data to be monitored would not include content.

"It is vital that police and security services are able to obtain communications data in certain circumstances to investigate serious crime and terrorism and to protect the public," a spokesman said.

"We need to take action to maintain the continued availability of communications data as technology changes.

"Communications data includes time, duration and dialling numbers of a phone call, or an email address.

"It does not include the content of any phone call or email and it is not the intention of government to make changes to the existing legal basis for the interception of communications."

An attempt to bring in similar measures was abandoned by the former Labour government in 2006 amid strong opposition.

However, ministers in the current Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government believe it is essential that the police and security services have access to such communications data in order to tackle terrorism and protect the public.

The plans would not allow GCHQ to access the content of communications without a warrant.

However, they would enable the agency to trace whom a group or individual had contacted, how often and for how long, the report said.

Read more: http://www.news.com.au/breaking-news/rights-groups-attack-britains-snooping-plans/story-e6frfku0-1226316034630#ixzz1qp16d9z5


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #14 on: April 11, 2012, 06:23:17 AM »

Dotcom case costs $1m, so far

AAP

11Apr12

THE fight to keep the US from extraditing Megaupload founder is costing New Zealand tax payers more than $1 million.

The bill so far is $NZ1.12m and it could prove to be the most expensive extradition case in New Zealand's history, TVNZ reports.

German-born Dotcom and three others are on bail awaiting a hearing - planned for August - to extradite them to the US, where they face charges of copyright infringement, money laundering and racketeering in relation to the popular file-sharing website.

Thirteen crown lawyers have been used, including two senior counsel in court, the solicitor-general and deputy solicitor-general, worth nearly $NZ1 million, according to information released under the Official Information Act information supplied by Crown Law.

That's on top of $NZ70,000 for the police raid that led to Dotcom's arrest and seizure of his assets, another $NZ62,000 to store and insure those assets, and just over $NZ20,000 on costs such as travel and accommodation for the crown's legal team.

The government is bearing the cost because of the 1970 reciprocal extradition treaty with the US, which sees the American government pay for extradition cases to return people here.

However, extradition lawyer Grant Illingworth told the broadcaster if the case benefits another government, that government should bear the cost.

More: http://tools.weeklytimesnow.com.au/stories/51610671.php


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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RT - New ISP Will Protect Users from SOPA CISPA Government Spying
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2012, 07:13:16 AM »

New ISP Will Protect Users from SOPA CISPA Government Spying Enough Is Enough Russia Today RT

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2bBuqqovU4U






That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2012, 03:55:39 PM »

Wiki founder fights against British student’s extradition over piracy

Published: 27 June, 2012, 18:29

http://www.rt.com/news/wikipedia-copyright-extradition-law-uk-880/

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has got over 70,000 signatures on a petition to save a British student from extradition to the US over copyright infringement charges. British MPs say the treaty as a whole is unfair and demand it be overhauled.

­Sheffield student Richard O'Dwyer, 24, faces extradition to America and up to 10 years in prison for alleged copyright offences after setting up a website with links to TV shows called TVShack.com.

Wiki-founder Wales wants UK Home Secretary Theresa May to step in and save O’Dwyer and sees his plight as a test case for copyright censorship laws.

Once a petition gets 100,000 signatures, they are considered for parliamentary debate.

“O'Dwyer is not a US citizen, he's lived in the UK all his life, his site was not hosted there, and most of his users were not from the US. America is trying to prosecute a UK citizen for an alleged crime which took place on UK soil,” Wales wrote in the petition.

He added that “copyright is an important institution, serving a beneficial moral and economic purpose” – but it does not mean that “we should abandon time-honored moral and legal principles to allow endless encroachments on our civil liberties in the interests of the moguls of Hollywood.”

The extradition law in question has recently come under fire, again. The Tory MP Dominic Raab has unearthed damning evidence that the extradition agreement between the UK and the US is lopsided.

The MP found Britain has sent more nationals to the US in the past six months than the Americans have handed over to Britain in the last seven years.

Since 2004 35 British nationals have been extradited to America while only seven US citizens have been extradited to the UK.

This is despite the massive population disparity between the countries; the US has a population of 311 million, 5 times greater than that of the UK’s 62 million.

Critics of the Act argue that extraditing British nationals to the US is easier than getting the US to send people to the UK because American authorities have to produce less evidence than their British counterparts.

The UK has to provide US authorities with “such information as would provide a reasonable basis to believe that the person sought committed the offence for which extradition is requested.”

However, if US authorities want to extradite a UK citizen authorities only need to sate the offence, provide an accurate description of the suspect and specify the punishment as set out in US statute.

The lopsided act was passed by Labour in 2003 and is currently being reviewed by the Home Secretary.   

As well as O’Dwyer, there have been a number of recent high profile and emotive cases of UK nationals who have tried to fight extradition to the US.

Gary Mckinnon has been doing it for the last 10 years. Mr Mckinnon who has Asperger’s syndrome, allegedly hacked into NASA and

Pentagon computers while looking for UFO’s from his bedroom computer. Medical experts have said that because of his condition it is likely he’ll kill himself if moved to the US.

Sixty-five year old pensioner Christopher Tappin was extradited to the US in February for allegedly supplying Iran with batteries for Hawk missiles.

He claims the FBI deliberately fabricated a case to entrap him in a carefully planned sting operation.

Mr Tappin, who used to run a freight business, says he had no idea that the batteries were destined for Iran or were for Hawk Missiles.

The Briton has used his car and house to cover huge legal fees and was held in solitary confinement in a Texas jail before being held in a cell with six other inmates. 

He was released on bail in April for $1 million; the case is on-going.

The United States maintains that extradition requests between the two countries must meet the same standard of evidence. The US Ambassador to London Louis Susman said in a statement earlier in the year, that the treaty was fair and balanced and promotes the interests of “justice in both our countries.”


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #17 on: July 10, 2012, 08:34:43 PM »

Megaupload's founder downloads on Hollywood

Extradition hearing delayed till March

By Natalie Apostolou
Posted in Music and Media, 10th July 2012 21:42 GMT

New Zealand’s Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom has dodged extradition to America until at least March 2013, following a New Zealand court’s decision to delay the hearing.

Both Dotcom's lawyer and Crown lawyers representing the US government agreed to the delay, the result of concerns over the methods used to search Dotcom’s house and seize his assets.
Click here to find out more!

The flamboyant entrepreneur took to Twitter to vent on the outcome; "extradition hearing delayed til March. Dirty delay tactics by the US. They destroyed my business. Took all my assets. Time does the rest."

He also found time to conduct an extensive and exclusive Skype interview with the movie industry trade bible, The Hollywood Reporter, in which he claimed that he wanted the hearing to go on as planned August 6 in order to allow his legal team to move forward with the case.

full article
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/07/10/megaupload_hearing_delayed/





Kim Dotcom Responds to Extradition Hearing Delay: U.S. 'Doesn't Have a Case' (Exclusive)

11:01 PM PDT 7/9/2012 by Daniel Miller

The founder of shuttered file-sharing service Megaupload tells THR he believes that "dirty delay tactics instead of evidence" are being deployed by the U.S. government.

A New Zealand court has delayed the extradition hearing for Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom until March because of the manner in which the search of Dotcom's countryside residence and the seizure of his assets were handled by authorities. The decision has sparked a fiery response from Dotcom, who discussed it in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter on Monday night.

interview here
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/kim-dotcom-megaupload-extradition-hearing-346676


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Wozniak: Web crackdown coming, freedom failing
« Reply #18 on: November 06, 2012, 05:46:27 AM »


Wozniak: Web crackdown coming, freedom failing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJnghGBBP2Q

Apple's co-founder fears that freedom of information is under attack, with the internet controlled and regulated in unnecessary and harmful ways. RT talked to Steve Wozniak on a range of topics, from Wikileaks to Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom.


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

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Re: Wozniak: Web crackdown coming, freedom failing
« Reply #19 on: November 06, 2012, 07:18:48 AM »

Wozniak: Web crackdown coming, freedom failing

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJnghGBBP2Q

Apple's co-founder fears that freedom of information is under attack, with the internet controlled and regulated in unnecessary and harmful ways. RT talked to Steve Wozniak on a range of topics, from Wikileaks to Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom.

I enjoyed that.  ;D

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Re: SOPA / PIPA / MPAA / ACTA
« Reply #20 on: June 15, 2013, 09:38:12 PM »

Attorney-General rejects metadata warrants: ‘Law enforcement would grind to a halt’

mark-dreyfus

http://delimiter.com.au/2013/06/12/attorney-general-rejects-metadata-warrants-law-enforcement-would-grind-to-a-halt/

Australia’s Federal Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus has made the extraordinary declaration that Australian law enforcement in Australia “would grind to a halt” if police officers and other law enforcement agents were forced to apply for a warrant every time they wanted to access Australians’ telecommunications data.

Last week Budget Estimates hearing sessions conducted in Canberra heard that the Australian Federal Police had made 43,362 internal requests for so-called ‘metadata’ (data pertaining to the numbers, email addresses time, length and date involved in phone calls or emails, but not the content) over the past financial year. No warrant is required for these requests.

The revelations, combined with historical data tracking law enforcement and other Federal Government agency use of metadata without warrants and the revelations over the past week that the US-based National Security Agency has gained backdoor access into the data servers of major technology companies such as Apple, Google and Microsoft, has spurred calls by Australian political groups for a ban on warrantless interception of Australian telecommunications data.

For example, the Australian Greens this week noted that it would next week introduce legislation to strengthen regulation of data collection on Australians, returning “normal warrant procedures” to law enforcement agencies accessing peoples’ private data.
 
“This is the first step to winding back the kind of surveillance overreach revealed by the PRISM whistleblower,” Greens communications spokesperson and Senator Scott Ludlam said in a statement. “Law enforcement agencies – not including ASIO – made 293,501 requests for telecommunications data in 2011-12, without a warrant or any judicial oversight. Under the Telecommunications Interception and Access Act, that’s entirely legal.”
 
“Vast amounts of private data are being accessed – including the precise location of everyone who carries a smartphone – without any recourse to the courts.  A law enforcement agency simply fills out a very basic form. My bill will return to the system where they will need a warrant.”

Similarly, the Wikileaks Party headed by Julian Assange issued a media release this week stating that if elected to the Senate, the party’s representatives would move to amend the Telecommunications (Interception and Access) Act so that all requests for access to data are subject to a warrant regime.

“In other words, security and police agencies will have to seek a warrant from a judicial officer- a full time member of the [Administrative Appeals Tribunal], a federal circuit judge or a federal court judge- before embarking on a data collection exercise,” the party said. “Further we would also seek to amend this Act so that there is a twice yearly tabling of information about the number of warrants applied for, the number of applications granted and the nature of those requests.”

However, speaking on the ABC’s 7:30 program last night, Federal Attorney-General Mark Dreyfus rejected the calls for warrants on telecommunications data to be re-introduced. “To require a warrant for every time, and it’s in the thousands, the mini thousands, of times that a law enforcement agency accesses this non contact telecommunications data would mean I think that law enforcement in Australia would grind to a halt,” Dreyfus said.

The Greens, the Wikileaks Party, the Pirate Party Australia, Electronic Frontiers Australia and many other organisations concerned with privacy and digital rights have signalled they are outraged by the NSA’s data collection activities, which may have given Australian agencies access to the data, and will be mirrored locally if the Federal Government’s plans to enact a data retention regime in Australia go ahead.

“Australians are also entitled to know if our security and police agencies are swapping or sharing data about Australians with overseas agencies.  Again ASIO in particular should be compelled by law to table yearly a report on data sharing with overseas agencies,” the Wikileaks Party said this week. “Agencies like ASIO and the Federal Police must not be allowed to be superior to the community and the Wikileaks Party core principles of transparency and accountability mean that all Australians should have the right to know what these powerful agencies are doing.”

“As the NSA PRISM revelations show us it also telcos and companies such as Google that are cooperating with security agencies in invasions of privacy of customers. The WLP believes the Telecommunications Act should be amended to compel all providers of information to security and police agencies to file an annual notice containing information about the number of requests they received for data access and how much data has been provided in the previous 12 months. This notice would include information about data handed over to foreign agencies as well as domestic agencies.”

Ludlam said the globe was currently seeing “unprecedented surveillance overreach by the United States Government, and new revelations that this information is being covertly shared with the British authorities”.

“The Australian Government now needs to disclose the extent to which it has been given access to the PRISM system to spy on Australians, and the usual bland assurances about national security will no longer wash. When I introduce the Bill, I will be asking the government to answer questions about who knew about the PRISM program, how much data is shared, and whether the Australian Privacy Principles are meaningless for citizens and Parliamentarians.”

This week Australia’s Foreign Minister Bob Carr said that he “wouldn’t think” Australians had anything to be concerned about in relation to the NSA Internet spy scandal which engulfed the United States last week, despite the fact that the issue appears to exclusively relate to NSA access to foreigners’ data on US cloud computing servers.
 
And on 7:30, Dreyfus echoed Carr’s confidence. “We’ve got a very complex legal regime here in Australia and we expect there to be a respecting of Australian’s privacy by all other countries,” the Attorney-General said. “There is a clear, firm safeguards regime here in Australia and no Australian agency has used other than in accordance with the existing legal regime in Australia, no Australian agency has had access to information on Australians.”

opinion/analysis
Frankly I do not believe either Dreyfus or Carr have any idea even what Australia’s own intelligence agencies are doing or what data they have access to from the NSA in this area, let along what the NSA itself has stored on Australians. The pair’s bland insistence that Australians have nothing to fear is easily seen through as the shallow assurances of politicians out of their depth in a field which they have little knowledge of.

What could it possibly cost Carr to have inquired, as Shadow Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull already has, of the United States Government, what data it is keeping on Australians? What could it possibly cost Dreyfus to commit to investigating what data Australia’s law enforcement agencies have access to from the US? Nothing, in either case.

I continually find it impossible to understand why it’s only minority political groups such as the Greens, Wikileaks and the Pirate Party, which demonstrate a strong interest in protecting the privacy rights of Australians and protecting the over-reach of the growing surveillance state. One suspects that ministers like Dreyfus and Carr have long been going through a process of acclimatisation at the hands of law enforcement agencies and public servants — a process of socialisation which leads to them being unable to objectively differentiate real, government-sponsored threats to Australians’ privacy and security from normal law enforcement activities.

You want telecommunications data on someone? Get a warrant. When did that simple concept become so hard for law enforcement agencies and politicians to understand and accept? Probably, I suspect, when those same authorities realised how easy it appeared to conduct more and more policing activities from the comfort and safety of their office — and not out in the field.


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche