Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?

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Offline Rtruth

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Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« on: January 04, 2012, 12:55:10 AM »
Okay first watch this really amazing home theater TV commercial that came out only a few months ago:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ui2svrceVew

When I saw this it really got me wondering.... So one day last week I was talking to my lil bro who's 17, big into gaming and stuff like that and we were discussing what the future might have in store. So I mentioned how in that TV commercial the bedroom gets transformed into almost like a hollow deck type of 3D theater experience. So I was saying imagine the possibilities of that?

For movies:
- watching as a bi standard (no interaction)
- having an option to have some limited interation (ie: the spy says to you quick take this gun and shoot whoever comes threw that door...)
- Having some kind of full interations where you play out a character in the movie???

For Gaming: basically full immersion into the game. Like a home VR system without all the bulky gear.

So anyway, where am I going with all this.....I was thinking about it. And talk about how TV could go from how addicitive it is now, to basically taking up all of people's spare time. And that might only be like 10 years into the future.

but my thought is it gets worse....

You know all this talk about how they want to wipe out people. Move the rest to specific prison type cities etc... Well perhaps by then the same concept will be available but exactly like the star trek hollow deck. So you want to go skiing? Well you use your hollow deck which is free, immediate, and could even simulate smells like crisp mountain air, temperatures, and feel quite real. Well if that was the case then you wouldn't need to leave the prison city. Why would you because you could do anything you want in your bedroom. Go surfing, skiing, or you make up one of any million scenarios. So again why would you need to leave the prison city to go on vacation, to visit people, to feel like your driving around in a road trip etc...

There's this book "The Popcorn Report" by faith popcorn where she talks about this type of cocooning effect, where eventually people might not leave there homes. Then you got movies like Surrogates (2009) with ole brucy, ha ha... So if you did need to leave your house then you'd log into your VR bot. Like it's just so crazy the concepts of the future that are out there.

So again it's just all a hypothetical, but I'm just saying if you think TV and gaming is addictive now it's crazy what might be right around the corner. At that point everyone will basically start to plug in and become addicted. Could be a way to control populations? What are your thoughts on this?  ???


Offline America2

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2012, 01:09:51 AM »
When I was a young boy, video games were addictive, but they were VERY simple. Just merely going through the motions - had an Atari, which was nothing compared to the systems today. Other video games like Asteroids, Super Mario Bros, etc were also pretty much nothing.

Now? The way they are created, it's as if you're LIVING IN THEM, making all the decisions. When I used to play the Madden NFL games in the 90's, it was just going through the motions. But once the 21st century was approaching, I couldn't believe the live-animation that was put in it.

Same with tv - tv shows were pretty simply back in the 80's, now? It's as if you're living IN them.

Offline Scarbo

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2012, 02:37:11 AM »
I'm glad I'm old enough that I grew up with board games, and capture the flag and kickball. A big part of what makes us human is being lost and not by accident. Naturally, the video games will take their addicted fans right to the hive-matrix reality. 

Offline America2

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #3 on: January 04, 2012, 10:33:01 AM »
I'm glad I'm old enough that I grew up with board games, and capture the flag and kickball. A big part of what makes us human is being lost and not by accident. Naturally, the video games will take their addicted fans right to the hive-matrix reality. 

Have you seen the new Monopoly games? They don't use paper money any more, but it's cash-less(the credit card machine). It's also set up to where the progammed machine KNOWS your moves.

Offline Rtruth

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2012, 01:52:52 AM »
I'm glad I'm old enough that I grew up with board games, and capture the flag and kickball. A big part of what makes us human is being lost and not by accident. Naturally, the video games will take their addicted fans right to the hive-matrix reality. 

Ya same, I just turned 37, so oddly enough in such a weird way I feel lucky to have seen life before the internet are. When kids would actually spend a lot of time outside playing. I still miss those days. We did endless things outside, or if it was inside it was just a mix of all kinds of stuff. I was into video games until I was about 18. Then life got busy. Then I didn't try anything til about 4 years ago when my brother introduced me to battle field 2. I got addicted to that since you're playing with and against characters all controlled by real people giving the game that real life feel. Like the characters in the game react the same way humans do as they are controlled by them. So a strong VR effect, and highly addictive. Now out of boredom I got BF3, haven't loaded it yet and still a bit nervous too, as the last session lasted 3.5 years. Still not sure if that was a good or bad use of my time??? The point being with the way all this is going, within as little as 50 years if things keep going this way, no one will need to leave there homes to do anything. Infact staying home and logging into some weird VR system will likely be way more fun than real life. Especially since most people can't afford the same excitment in the real world. But for a few hundred bucks you'll get all that's in the real world and far more. Like all kinds of fantasy games and stuff that's perhaps more interesting than real life, which for most people is the endless grind of 9 to 5. Anyway, these are getting to be strange times were living in to say the least.

Offline America2

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2012, 10:12:29 AM »
Ya same, I just turned 37, so oddly enough in such a weird way I feel lucky to have seen life before the internet are. When kids would actually spend a lot of time outside playing. I still miss those days. We did endless things outside, or if it was inside it was just a mix of all kinds of stuff. I was into video games until I was about 18. Then life got busy. Then I didn't try anything til about 4 years ago when my brother introduced me to battle field 2. I got addicted to that since you're playing with and against characters all controlled by real people giving the game that real life feel. Like the characters in the game react the same way humans do as they are controlled by them. So a strong VR effect, and highly addictive. Now out of boredom I got BF3, haven't loaded it yet and still a bit nervous too, as the last session lasted 3.5 years. Still not sure if that was a good or bad use of my time??? The point being with the way all this is going, within as little as 50 years if things keep going this way, no one will need to leave there homes to do anything. Infact staying home and logging into some weird VR system will likely be way more fun than real life. Especially since most people can't afford the same excitment in the real world. But for a few hundred bucks you'll get all that's in the real world and far more. Like all kinds of fantasy games and stuff that's perhaps more interesting than real life, which for most people is the endless grind of 9 to 5. Anyway, these are getting to be strange times were living in to say the least.

Yeah, alot has changed slowly but surely as I got older - when I was growing up as a kid in the 80's, all the movie theaters were just ORDINARY. Small to medium sized, with just ordinary screen and sounds. Even the theaters I saw the "Star Wars" movies at were just ORDINARY. It wasn't until 1997 when the big megaplexes started taking over(as well as DVDs over the ordinary video tapes), where there were BIG screens and LOUD sounds, as well as other "goodies" in the theaters like a video arcade, coffee shops, you name it.

It wasn't so much that these megaplexes had big screens and loud sounds, but they had a MUCH DIFFERENT feel to it...meaning alot of this stuff was MIND CONTROL.(ie-watching Spielberg's "Saving Private Ryan" in it was just that) It was as if your whole mind and soul was being taken over and manipulated with much, much more than the ordinary theaters.

Personally, I got addicted to the Madden NFL games in the 90's, when I was in my late 20's, until my mom pulled me over and warned me about this addition b/c it is very similar to gambling(which my grandfather had many years ago). I am very thankful she did b/c I ended up realizing the virtual realitiness that can suck one in and start living fantasy lives.

Yeah I too remember the days when kids in the 80's would go out and play more much more than anything else. During the summers we would play baseball in the streets. During the fall and winter we would get together to play football. Now? I really don't notice this much going on in my neighborhood. Instead, there's a wide range of video games, wide range of tv channels entertainment, you name it.

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2012, 10:23:41 AM »
Quote
Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?

Watch the movie, Idiocracy, and you'll know exactly where they're headed (TV especially).
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2012, 10:41:23 AM »
Yeah I too remember the days when kids in the 80's would go out and play more much more than anything else. During the summers we would play baseball in the streets. During the fall and winter we would get together to play football. Now? I really don't notice this much going on in my neighborhood. Instead, there's a wide range of video games, wide range of tv channels entertainment, you name it.

"Child psychologists speak of a fairly primitive stage of social development called 'parallel play' -- two kids in a sandbox, each playing with a toy but not really interacting with each other. In healthy development children outgrow parallel play. But the public spectacles of television leave us at that arrested stage of development, rarely moving beyond parallel attentiveness to the same external stimulus....

"The apotheosis of these trends can be found, most improbably, at the Holiday Bowling Lanes in New London, Connecticut. Mounted above each lane is a giant television screen displaying the evening's TV fare. Even on a full night of league play team members are no longer in lively conversation with one another about the day's events, public or private. Instead each stares silently at the screen while awaiting his or her turn. Even while bowling together, they are watching alone."

-- Robert Putnam, Bowling Alone, pp. 244-5






http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xi-EwOa1uc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=auG-6kp2nZE
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2012, 10:47:52 AM »
Communications theorist Joshua Meyrowitz notes that the electronic media allow social ties to be divorced from physical encounters. "Electronic media creates ties and associations that compete with those formed through live interaction in specific locations. Live encounters are certainly more 'special' and provide stronger and deeper relationships, but their relative number is decreasing." Political communications specialist Roderick Hart argues that television as a medium creates a false sense of companionship, making people feel intimate, informed, clever, busy, and important. The result is a kind of "remote-control politics," in which we as viewers feel engaged with our community without the effort of actually being engaged. Like junk food, TV, especially TV entertainment, satisfies cravings without real nourishment.
-- Robert D. Putnam

The above reminds me of the eloquent distinction John Taylor Gatto makes between “communities” and “networks.” Notice how the portion I boldfaced dovetails with Gatto’s “trout starvation” analogy in the following excerpt (all emphasis original):

-------------------------------------

A surprising number of otherwise sensible people find it hard to see why the scope and reach of our formal schooling networks should not be increased -- by extending the school day or year, for instance -- in order to provide an economical solution to the problems posed by the decay of the American family. One reason for their preference, I think, is that they have trouble understanding the real difference between communities and networks.

Because of this confusion, they conclude that replacing a bad network with a good one is the right way to go. Since I disagree so strongly with the fundamental premise that networks are workable substitutes for families, and because from anybody's point of view a lot more school is going to cost a lot more money, I thought I'd tell you why, from a schoolteacher's perspective, we shouldn't be thinking of more school, but of less.

People who admire our school institution usually admire networking in general and have an easy time seeing it's positive side but they overlook it's negative aspect -- that networks, even good ones, drain vitality from communities and families. They provide mechanical ("by the numbers") solutions to human problems, when a slow organic process of self awareness, self discovery and cooperation is what is required if any solution is to stick.

Think of the challenge of losing weight. It's possible to employ mechanical tricks to do this quickly, but I'm told that 95% of the poor souls who do, are only fooling themselves. The weight lost this way doesn't stay off, it comes back in a short time. Other network solutions are just as temporary: a group of law students may network to pass their college exams, but preparing a brief in private practice is often a solitary, lonely experience.

Aristotle saw, a long time ago, that fully participating in a complex range of human affairs was the only way to become fully human; in that he differed from Plato. What is gained from consulting a specialist and surrendering all judgment is often more than outweighed by a permanent loss of one's own volition. This discovery accounts for the curious texture of real communication, where people argue with their doctors, lawyers and ministers, tell craftsmen what they want instead of accepting what they get, frequently make their own food from scratch instead of buying it in a restaurant or defrosting it, and perform many similar acts of participation. A real community is, of course, a collection of real families who themselves function in this participatory way.

Networks, however, don't require the whole person, but only a narrow piece. If you function in a network, it asks you to supress all the parts of yourself except the network-interest part -- a highly unnatural act although one you can get used to. In exchange, the network will deliver efficiency in the pursuit of some limited aim. This is, in fact, a devil's bargain, since on the promise of some future gain, one must surrender the wholeness of one's present humanity. If you enter into too many of these bargains you will split yourself into many specialized pieces, none of them completely human. And no time is available to reintegrate them. This, ironically, is the destiny of many successful networkers and doubtless generates much business for divorce courts and therapists of a variety of persuasions.

The fragmentation caused by excessive networking creates diminished humanity, a sense our lives are out of control because they are. If we face the present school and community crisis squarely, with hopes of finding a better way, we need to accept that schools, as networks, create a large part of the agony of modern life. We don't need more schooling, we need less.

I expect you'll want some proof of that, even though the million or so people participating in education at home these days have begun to nibble at the edge of everybody's consciousness and promise to bite their way into national attention when details of their success get around a little more. So, for those of you who haven't heard that you don't need officially certified teachers to get a good education, let me try to expose some of the machinery that makes certified schooling so bad. And remember, if you're thinking, "but it's always been that way,"…that it really hasn't.

Compulsory schooling in factory schools is a very recent, very Massachusetts/New York development. Remember, too, that until thirty-odd years ago, you could escape mass schooling after school; now it is much harder to escape because another form of mass-schooling, television, has spread all over the place to blot up any attention spared by school. So what was merely grotesque in our national treatment of the young before 1960 has become tragic now that mass commercial entertainment, as addictive as any other hallucinogenic drug, has blocked the escape routes from mass schooling.

It is a fact generally ignored when considering the communal nature of institutional families like schools, large corporations, colleges, armies, hospitals, and government agencies that they are not real communities at all, but networks. Unlike communities, networks -- as I reminded you -- have a very narrow way of allowing people to associate, and that way is always across a short spectrum of one, or at most a few, specific uniformities.

In spite of ritual moments like the Christmas party or the office softball game -- when individual human components in the network "go home", they go home alone. And in spite of humanitarian support from fellow workers that eases emergencies -- when people in networks suffer, they suffer alone, unless they have a family or community to suffer with them.

Even with college dorm "communities," those most engaging and intimate simulations of community imaginable, who among us has not experienced an awful realization after graduation that we cannot remember our friends' names or faces very well? Or who, if one can remember, feels much desire to renew those associations?

It is a puzzling development, as yet poorly understood, that the "caring" in networks is in some important way feigned. Not maliciously, but in spite of any genuine emotional attractions that might be there, human behavior in network situations often resembles a dramatic act -- matching a script produced to meet the demands of a story. And, as such, the intimate moments in networks lack the sustaining value of their counterparts in community. Those of you who remember the wonderful closeness possible in army camp life or sports teams, and who have now forgotten those you were once close with, will understand what I mean. In contrast, have you ever forgotten an uncle or an aunt?

If the loss of true community entailed by masquerading in networks is not noticed in time, a condition arises in the victim's spirit very much like the "trout starvation" that used to strike wilderness explorers whose diet was made up exclusively of stream fish. While trout quell the pangs of hunger -- and even taste good -- the eater gradually suffers from want of sufficient nutrients.

Networks like schools are not communities, just as school training is not education. By preempting fifty percent of the total time of the young, by locking young people up with other young people exactly their own age, by ringing bells to start and stop work, by asking people to think about the same thing at the same time in the same way, by grading people the way we grade vegetables -- and in a dozen other vile and stupid ways -- network schools steal the vitality of communities and replace it with an ugly mechanism. No one survives these places with his/her humanity intact, not kids, not teachers, not administrators and not parents.

A community is a place in which people face each other over time in all their human variety, good parts, bad parts, and all the rest. Such places promote the highest quality of life possible, lives of engagement and participation. This happens in unexpected ways, but it never happens when you've spent more than a decade listening to other people talk and trying to do what they tell you to do, trying to please them, after the fashion of schools. It makes a real, lifelong difference whether you avoid that training or it traps you.

An example might clarify this. Networks of urban reformers will convene to consider the problems of homeless vagrants, but a community will think of its vagrants as real people, not abstractions. Ron, Dave or Marty -- a community will call its bums by their names. It makes a difference.

People interact on thousands of invisible pathways in a community, and the emotional payoff is correspondingly rich and complex. But networks can only manage a cartoon simulation of community and provide a very limited payoff.

-- John Taylor Gatto, Dumbing Us Down, pp. 51-57




-------------------------------------
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline stymo1

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2012, 10:56:09 AM »
The point being with the way all this is going, within as little as 50 years if things keep going this way, no one will need to leave there homes to do anything.



SURROGATES

In the future, widespread use of remotely-controlled androids called "surrogates" allow everyone to live in idealized forms from the safety of their homes. A surrogate's operator is protected from harm and feels no pain when their surrogate is damaged. FBI agent Tom Greer (Bruce Willis) has a strained relationship with his wife Maggie (Rosamund Pike), due to their son's death several years before. He never sees her outside of her surrogate and she criticizes his desire to interact via their real bodies.
" It's called the American Dream because you have to be asleep to believe it." -- George Carlin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acLW1vFO-2Q

Offline RabidSheep

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2012, 05:52:14 PM »
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=29689.0

Cybernetics transhumanist what!?!  ;)

Offline Rtruth

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2012, 11:34:06 PM »
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=29689.0

Cybernetics transhumanist what!?!  ;)

If a human was made into a cyborg. Each part of there body being replaced one part at a time. At what point would they stop being human anymore? Where is the human life, throughout the body or just in the brain and brain stem?

Offline RabidSheep

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2012, 10:46:42 PM »
If a human was made into a cyborg. Each part of there body being replaced one part at a time. At what point would they stop being human anymore? Where is the human life, throughout the body or just in the brain and brain stem?


Who knows. If you read further down the other thread I posted you will see this posted.

 
Controlling computers with Your Mind Now Possible
http://www.vidzest.com/media/366/Controlling_Video_Games_with_Your_Mind_Now_Possible/

Creepy stuff if you ask me. This is where most computers and video games are heading. Ibm, Microsoft, apple, darpa, they are all working on making this happen.

Offline Rtruth

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2012, 01:34:23 AM »


Who knows. If you read further down the other thread I posted you will see this posted.

 
Creepy stuff if you ask me. This is where most computers and video games are heading. Ibm, Microsoft, apple, darpa, they are all working on making this happen.

That's different.

Offline Zamo

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2012, 01:39:39 AM »
if nanotechnology advances, the movie Gamer would very much entail the future of gaming

Offline sentinelscout

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2012, 05:28:24 PM »
Holographic porn.
Real Eyes, Realize, Real Lies.

Offline Zamo

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2012, 08:42:10 PM »
Holographic porn.
what would be the purpose of that ;D

Offline sentinelscout

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2012, 06:39:03 AM »
what would be the purpose of that ;D

Rendering women obsolete, the bonus is you would probably even be able to "mute" the sound  :D
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Offline All4truth

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #18 on: January 10, 2012, 07:08:55 AM »
To me TV and Games are getting people used to seeing death and people dying.

My husband was channel surfing the other day, and landed on a channel where they where showing cocaine addicts overdosing and nearly dying.  The guy was giving then something that would stop them from dying and bring them back. 

All movies and shows nowadays seem to be getting people used to seeing that stuff.  They are getting more and more graphic by the year. 

I used to enjoy a good who done it movie, but now it's all gory and blood and showing way to much.  I can't watch those anymore.   

The video's are the same, blood and guts everywhere.  Getting our kids used to seeing all that stuff.

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Where do you think TV and Video games are headed?
« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2012, 07:14:53 AM »
Rendering women obsolete, the bonus is you would probably even be able to "mute" the sound  :D

Among other things...



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS37SNYjg8w


;)
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0