Curious Case of Criminal Last Names

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Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #80 on: February 23, 2016, 09:25:32 AM »
The Prophecy of The Presidents...what their names mean....

http://www.dailycrow.com/the-prophecy-of-the-presidents/

Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #81 on: April 08, 2016, 08:57:11 PM »
Teen suspect faces murder charge in Austin student's killing

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/U/US_UNIVERSITY_OF_TEXAS_BODY?SITE=AP&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2016-04-08-18-44-04

Meechaiel Criner wasn't believed to be a university student and hadn't been living in Austin long. Police Chief Art Acevedo said Criner could face additional charges in the slaying of 18-year-old Oregon-native Haruka Weiser
.....he was in possession of a women's bike, as well as Weiser's duffel bag and some of her other belongings, including her laptop.

Meaning of Criner

Criner Meaning:  one who quarrels or complains.



Read more: http://surnames.meaning-of-names.com/criner/#ixzz45HotFKGu

Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #82 on: June 30, 2016, 04:40:32 PM »
here is a post from my original thread from 2009....

Another strange dynamic to this Last Name Meaning business is that many of the gun fighters of the old west have last names that originated in West Riding in Yorkshire,which is where some of the battles between the Scots and Crown armies took place.The battle that the Stewart forces lost {Bonnie Prince Charly**resulted in the deportation of many on the losing side to America.So you see where I'm going with this...Racial memory? Fighting spirit in the DNA? There is something going on here but I haven't got all the puzzle pieces put together..
I do know that ghosts tend to inhabit wet areas more than dry areas...so I'm thinking some sort of generational spirit possesion.I do think that the worst sort of killers are possesed because the nature of some of their crimes is "beyond belief" What other explanation is there.

And here is a link to strange stories about Yorkshire

The Weird Wolds of Yorkshire: Inside the Mysterious Wold Newton Triangle

http://www.ancient-origins.net/myths-legends-europe/weird-wolds-yorkshire-inside-mysterious-wold-newton-triangle-003316?nopaging=1

Fold upon fold of the encircling hills, piled rich and golden,’ is how the writer (best known for her posthumous 1936 novel South Riding) Winifred Holtby, described England’s Yorkshire Wolds.


Eighty years on, here’s how a couple of tourist guides currently describe the area: “With hidden valleys, chalk streams and peaceful villages, the Yorkshire Wolds make a refreshing change from city life or a seaside break. It’s a fabulous place to unwind and enjoy the English countryside at its best.”

But, there is also a much darker side to this mysterious countryside.

It is a place where kings built hospices to protect weary travelers from wolves – and werewolves; a place where cloistered monks chronicled the predations of zombies, vampires and aliens; a place dotted with henges, barrows, tumuli and ancient burial mounds that superstitious locals once avoided for fear of encountering the fairy folk who dwelt there.

It was here, in prehistoric times, that the first settlers in this countryside worshipped before stone monoliths, while wearing masks fashioned from the skulls of animals, and where in later times, the county’s squirearchy had their masques disturbed by the screams of an unquiet skull.



Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #83 on: July 08, 2016, 05:59:30 PM »
The inheritance of crime

Eugenic ideas about criminal genes have been repudiated for decades, but a new biological approach to crime is emerging

https://aeon.co/essays/linking-crime-and-genetics-need-not-be-an-act-of-eugenics

Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #84 on: November 03, 2016, 10:35:40 AM »
A dozen things you might not know about Irish names

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/a-dozen-things-you-might-not-know-about-irish-names-1.2842791?utm_source=SurnameDb%20Newsletter&utm_campaign=e5efba79bc-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2016_11_03&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6b112e7745-e5efba79bc-91752793


   



The murder of Shane O’Neill: In the mid-1500s, Sean or Shane O’Neill, the Earl of Tyrone, was causing so many problems for the English crown that Elizabeth I banned the name O’Neill, on punishment of death and forfeiture of property. She would not be pleased to know that today O’Neill is a top ten Irish surname, and Sean is a top ten Irish given name. Photograph: Getty Images

I tell my mother to stop watching English movie "Elisabeth".  8)


































































 


1. Surnames developed in Ireland as early as the tenth century, making them among the first in Europe. The earliest recorded surname is Ó Cléirigh, meaning grandson of Cléirigh. There are now four O’ names in the Irish top 10 (O’Brien, O’Sullivan, O’Connor, O’Neill).



Online Al Bundy

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #85 on: November 07, 2016, 08:33:15 PM »
A dozen things you might not know about Irish names

http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/a-dozen-things-you-might-not-know-about-irish-names-1.2842791?utm_source=SurnameDb%20Newsletter&utm_campaign=e5efba79bc-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2016_11_03&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6b112e7745-e5efba79bc-91752793


   



The murder of Shane O’Neill: In the mid-1500s, Sean or Shane O’Neill, the Earl of Tyrone, was causing so many problems for the English crown that Elizabeth I banned the name O’Neill, on punishment of death and forfeiture of property. She would not be pleased to know that today O’Neill is a top ten Irish surname, and Sean is a top ten Irish given name. Photograph: Getty Images


































1. Surnames developed in Ireland as early as the tenth century, making them among the first in Europe. The earliest recorded surname is Ó Cléirigh, meaning grandson of Cléirigh. There are now four O’ names in the Irish top 10 (O’Brien, O’Sullivan, O’Connor, O’Neill).

I tell my mother to stop watching English movie "Elisabeth".  8)

Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #86 on: November 07, 2016, 08:51:57 PM »
Last name: Bundy

 This interesting surname, of Anglo-Saxon origin, with variant spellings Bownd, Bownde, Bounde, was at first a status surname for a peasant farmer or husbandman. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "bonda, bunda",

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Bundy#ixzz4PNTs79Ww



Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #87 on: November 07, 2016, 09:07:36 PM »
Here is the kety to the whole mystery   


i think i've found the missing piece of the puzzle regarding this idea....the solution is the Neanderthal/Cromagnan hybrids were pushed out of the prime real estate into the swamps ,forests,moors,and barron lands by the Cromagnans.....they live hand to mouth & become preditory...
..................time passes and around 1345 the Black Plague kills off 1/3  to 1/4 of the population of europe.....farm labor is hard to find so the Neanderthals are able to better themselves by becoming serfs....
..............................more time passes.....
the Industrial Revolution starts and the Neanderthals migrate to the cities..where they has access to gin,whiskey,gambling,prostitution,,etc...and again they revert to their previous preditory ways...they become criminals...but their last names given to them hundreds of years earlier follow them.....

Online Al Bundy

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #88 on: November 07, 2016, 09:10:53 PM »
Last name: Bundy

 This interesting surname, of Anglo-Saxon origin, with variant spellings Bownd, Bownde, Bounde, was at first a status surname for a peasant farmer or husbandman. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "bonda, bunda",

Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Bundy#ixzz4PNTs79Ww




Bundy - Band ( music) or bandit ( criminal, outlaw... ).

Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #89 on: December 03, 2016, 10:38:41 AM »
Robbie Mook was Hillary's campaign manager,,...

mook

 
Coined in the Scorsese film, 'Mean Streets', meaning a arsehole or loser.

I'm not paying, because this guy's a mook


#bastard #loser #arsehole #asshole #jerk

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=mook

Mook Name Meaning Shortened of Dutch van Mook, a habitational name from a place called Mook, in Dutch Limburg

http://www.ancestry.com/name-origin?surname=mook

Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #90 on: November 06, 2017, 05:48:02 AM »
thing that I noticed right away is the shooter's name Devin..Kelley

Devin      >>>>>>>> Devil.....Kelley >>>   Kills 

The Devil (from Greek: διάβολος diábolos "slanderer, accuser")[2] is, according to Christianity, the primary opponent of God.[1]

Christianity identifies the Devil ("Satan") with the Serpent who tempted Adam and Eve to eat the forbidden fruit, and describes him as a "fallen angel" who terrorizes the world through evil,[1] is the antithesis of Truth......

Kelley last name means>>>   contention , strife , grove  {of trees}

This interesting surname, with variant spellings Kelley and Kellie, has three distinct possible origins. Firstly, it is an Anglicized form of the great Old Gaelic name "O'Ceallaigh". The Gaelic prefix "O" indicates "male descendant of", plus the personal byname "Ceallach" meaning "strife" or "contention". . The surname may also be of English locational origin, from a place thus called in Devonshire, recorded as "Kelli" in the 1194 Pipe Rolls of that County, and named with the Welsh/Cornish "celli", grove. In 1521, the birth of Henry, son of William Kelly and Jane Trecarrell, was recorded in Kelly, Devonshire. Finally, the name may be of Scottish territorial origin from the lands of Kelly near Arbroath, Angus, named with the Gaelic element "coille", wood or grove. John de Kelly,

 Read more: http://www.surnamedb.com/Surname/Kelly#ixzz4xe8p46kg


Offline marlowe

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Re: Curious Case of Criminal Last Names
« Reply #91 on: November 14, 2017, 11:05:25 AM »
Roy Moore Is Accused of Sexual Misconduct by a Fifth Woman

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/13/us/politics/roy-moore-alabama-senate.html

Moore>>   dweller in a moor or fen....