DEA Official: Mexican Drug Cartels Doing 'Tremendous Harm to Our Communities'

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Offline larsonstdoc

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http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/susan-jones/dea-official-mexican-drug-cartels-doing-tremendous-harm-our-communities

  DUH, Right?



CNSNews.com) - "When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best," Donald Trump said last month, prompting fierce denunciation for suggesting that some of the Mexicans coming here are bringing drugs and crime with them.

On Tuesday, a U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency official told Congress that Mexican drug cartels are fueling the U.S. heroin epidemic, producing crime and violence, and doing "tremendous harm to our communities." And no one disputed him.

"Overdose deaths involving heroin are increasing at an alarming rate, having almost tripled since 2010," Jack Riley, the acting deputy DEA administrator, told a House Justice subcommittee on Tuesday.

"Today’s heroin at the retail level costs less and is more potent than the heroin that DEA encountered a decade ago. It comes predominantly across the Southwest Border
and is produced with greater sophistication from powerful transnational criminal organizations (TCOs) like the Sinaloa Cartel. These Mexican-based TCOs are extremely dangerous and violent and continue to be the principal suppliers of heroin to the United States."

Riley produced a map showing how the Sinaloa cartel has infiltrated the nation by partnering with street gangs to peddle their drugs.

Offline jerryweaver

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Meth is also a big seller.

Offline jerryweaver

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Funny the militias in mexico throw out gov and cartels when they get Fed up.


Offline pac522

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  • Peace sells, but who's buying?
Whos is going to dispute him. The US government created this epidemic when it allowed pharmaceutical companies to push out hillbilly heroin a few years ago, wlagreens and cvs popped up on every corner replacing your local drug dealers and then the government pulled back, over regulating the pain medicine market, making it extremely difficult for people like me with legitimate chronic pain injuries to get the pain relief they need.

They have scared the shit out of legitimate doctors who now won't prescribe pain medicine long term unless you're dying of cancer. Many people have turned to illegal ways of getting it, including heroin use.

Thats it in a nut shell. What to do at this point?

Decriminalize, deregulate, treat users as patients not criminals, take away the black market and the cartels will follow.

But the biggest cartel won't allow that, the corporate run banks and their enforcement arms the alphabet agencies.
This country did not achieve greatness with the mindset of "safety first" but rather "live free or die".

Truth is the currency of love. R[̲̅ə̲̅٨̲̅٥̲̅٦̲̅]ution!

We are all running on Gods laptop.
The problem is the virus called the Illuminati.  ~EvadingGrid

The answer to 1984 is 1776.

Offline jerryweaver

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http://io9.com/how-todays-illegal-drugs-were-marketed-as-medicines-510258499

Once this information on how to brew opiates gets traction the opiate market will eventually go the way of marijuana.  People get bored with drugs if they're legal.

Home-brewed heroin? Scientists create yeast that can make sugar into opiates
Researchers have managed to reproduce the way poppies create morphine in the wild, but warn that the technology needs urgent regulation

 
http://www.theguardian.com/science/2015/may/18/home-brewed-heroin-scientists-yeast-that-can-make-sugar-into-opiates

Home-brewed heroin could become a reality, scientists have warned, following the creation of yeast strains designed to convert sugar into opiates.

The advance marks the first time that scientists have artificially reproduced the entire chemical pathway that takes place in poppy plants to produce morphine in the wild.

Scientists warned that the findings could pave the way for opium poppy farms being replaced by local morphine “breweries” and called for urgent regulation of the technology. In theory, opium brewing would be no more difficult to master than DIY beer kits, raising the possibility of people setting up Breaking Bad-style drug laboratories in their own homes.

Tania Bubela, a public health professor at the university of Alberta and co-author of a commentary on the research in the journal Nature, said: “In principle, anyone with access to the yeast strain and basic skills in fermentation could grow morphine-producing yeast using a home-brew kit for beer making.”