Rick Perry's connections to Enron

Author Topic: Rick Perry's connections to Enron  (Read 2285 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline gEEk squad

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,000
  • You're World Delivered... to the NSA
Rick Perry's connections to Enron
« on: June 23, 2011, 01:27:25 PM »
http://info.tpj.org/Lobby_Watch/enron.html

http://info.tpj.org/Lobby_Watch/enron.pdf

Enron's Blackout Cuts Power Behind Numerous Thrones

To break up utility monopolies and revolutionize how electricity flows into sockets, the late great Enron Corp. had to amass one of the greatest private concentrations of political power ever seen. Enron put its squeeze on politicians in successive U.S. presidencies, scattered foreign capitals, many state legislatures and Houston�s City Hall.

The chief mourners of Enron�s demise�apart from the investors and workers that it deceived�are the legions of lobbyists and politicians whom Enron fed. Enron spent $10.2 million in the last two election cycles (1997 through 2000) influencing Washington politicians.  During this period, Enron moved $1,003,273 to Texas PACs and state candidates, as well as spending up to $4.8 million on 89 Texas lobby contracts.



Bankrolling campaigns
Last year the Center for Public Integrity identified Enron as the single largest patron of George W. Bush�s political career. A frequent flier on Enron corporate jets, Bush received $774,100 from Enron�s PAC and executives�including $312,500 for his two gubernatorial campaigns.

Bush�s greatest gubernatorial gifts to Enron were:

    Deregulating state electric markets in 1999;
    Indulging �grandfathered air polluters;� and
    Laws protecting businesses from lawsuits.

 Enron (which has given $103,250 to Texans for Lawsuit Reform) is now suing its would-be corporate rescuer, Dynegy, even as it faces a slew of investor lawsuits.

In the Bush White House, Enron Chair Ken Lay reportedly is the only executive who got a private audience to discuss the administration�s energy policy with Vice President Dick Cheney. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chair Curt Hebert also resigned shortly after he said that Lay told him that he would lose Enron�s support in the White House if he kept opposing open access to privately owned power lines. Bush promptly replaced Hebert with Texas Public Utility Commis-sioner Pat Wood, who had Enron�s blessing.



Governor Rick Perry, who received the next largest chunk of Enron money, appointed former Enron de Mexico President Mario Max Yzaguirre as Public Utility Commission chair in June 2001.






Offline donnay

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 17,405
  • Live Free Or Die Trying!
Re: Rick Perry's connections to Enron
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2011, 01:29:58 PM »
Good job, Geek!!

If I am not mistaken, Kay Bailey Hutchinson was too!
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

Offline gEEk squad

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,000
  • You're World Delivered... to the NSA
Re: Rick Perry's connections to Enron
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2011, 01:31:08 PM »
More on Perry and Mario Max Yzaguirre

http://www.katecohen.com/entries/00000177.shtml

01/18/2002 On the day after Mario Max Yzaguirre, the former president of Enron de Mexico, became head honcho at the Texas Public Utilities Commission which regulates the electricity and telecommunications industries in the state the campaign treasury of the man who appointed him got a $25,000 donation from Enron Ubermeister Kenneth Lay. But that was just a coincidence, according to Gov. Rick Perry George W.'s replacement governor who received $212,000 from Enron, including the $25,000 donation from Lay after the appointment in June.

November is when Yzaguirre amended his appointment application to include his earlier high-ranking in the Enron empire. He said failing to reveal his true work history to his new employers the good people of the great state of Texas was "an oversight."

Well, coincidence and oversight have made Mr. Yzaguirre sizzle in the sunshine of public scrutiny and today, hunkering down armadillo-style, he rolled up and resigned his PUC post.

But, the Houston Chronicle reports that the Texas government is shot through with Enron money. And, many of officials have already gone out of their way to say they will not give any money back.

What will all these people do? The Texas Attorney General has already recused himself from any investigation. (He got $193,000 from Enron.) Can a whole government, curl up, roll away, hole-up and avoid being swallowed up by the big sink hole in Houston? I think we're seeing it try.