****US is funding "Cyber Al-Qaeda" army to destabilize countries and domestic FF

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Offline Eckhart Tolle

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US bankrolls 'shadow Internet for dissidents' abroad

(AFP) – 3 hours ago

WASHINGTON — The US government is financing the development of "shadow" Internet systems to enable dissidents abroad to get around government censors, The New York Times reported on Sunday.

The newspaper said the covert effort also includes attempts to create independent cellphone networks inside foreign countries.

The operation involves a fifth-floor shop on L Street in Washington, where a group of young entrepreneurs are fitting deceptively innocent-looking hardware into a prototype "Internet in a suitcase," the report said.

Financed with a $2.0 million State Department grant, the suitcase could be secreted across a border and quickly set up to allow wireless communications over a wide area with a link to the global Internet, the paper noted.

Some projects involve technology being developed in the United States while others pull together tools that have already been created by hackers from the so-called liberation technology movement, The Times said.

The State Department is financing the creation of stealth wireless networks that would enable activists to communicate outside the reach of governments in countries like Iran, Syria and Libya, the paper said.

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http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5jyLorww_LugjNffiBVsCsCOOgB9A?docId=CNG.1fcc0e7959c322e74e95e5dcb254ec68.271

Offline Dig

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IMF hit by Pentagon funded hackers to be blammed on a foreign government
http://www.interaksyon.com/article/5497/imf-hit-by-hackers-connected-to-a-foreign-government
12-Jun-11, 7:50 AM | Reuters

The International Monetary Fund has been hit by a cyber attack on its computer systems, an IMF spokesman said on Saturday, highlighting a growing rash of network break-ins at high-profile institutions. "The fund is fully functional," said IMF spokesman David Hawley. "I can confirm that we are investigating an incident. I am not in a position to elaborate further on the extent of the cybersecurity incident." Bloomberg News reported the IMF's computer system was attacked by hackers "believed to be connected to a foreign government, resulting in the loss of e-mails and other documents." The attack occurred before the May 14 arrest of former IMF Managing Director Dominique Strauss-Kahn on sexual assault charges, Bloomberg said. It did not identify a suspect government. Cybersecurity experts say it is very difficult to trace a sophisticated cyber break-in to its ultimate source. An official with the World Bank, the IMF's sister institution in Washington, said the World Bank had cut its network connection with the IMF out of "caution." The information shared on that link was "non sensitive info," the official added. "The World Bank Group, like any other large organization, is increasingly aware of potential threats to the security of our information system and we are constantly working to improve our defenses," said World Bank spokesman Rich Mills. The IMF, which has sensitive information on the economies of many nations, was hit during the last several months by what computer experts described as a large and sophisticated cyber attack, The New York Times reported. The newspaper said the IMF's board of directors was told on Wednesday about the attack. Experts say cyber threats are increasing worldwide. CIA Director Leon Panetta told the U.S. Congress this week the United States faces the "real possibility" of a crippling cyber attack. "The next Pearl Harbor that we confront," he said, could be a cyber attack that "cripples our power systems, our grid, our security systems, our financial systems, our governmental systems." "This is a real possibility in today's world," Panetta told his June 9 confirmation hearing in his bid to become the next U.S. defense secretary.

PENTAGON FUNDED AND ROCCKEFELLER PLANNED FALSE FLAG ATTACKS ON THE RISE
Internal IMF memos had warned employees to be on their guard. "Last week we detected some suspicious file transfers, and the subsequent investigation established that a Fund desktop computer had been compromised and used to access some Fund systems," said a June 8 email to employees from Chief Information Officer Jonathan Palmer. Details of the email were first reported by Bloomberg. Reuters' sources confirmed the wording of the email. "At this point, we have no reason to believe that any personal information was sought for fraud purposes," the message to employees said. The incident comes when attacks on computer systems are said by experts to be on the rise -- notably those targeting major companies and potentially compromising government security and customer information. For instance, Lockheed Martin Corp, the Pentagon's No. 1 supplier by sales and the biggest information technology provider to the U.S. government, disclosed two weeks ago that it had thwarted a "significant" cyberattack and said it was a "frequent target of adversaries around the world." Also hit recently have been Citigroup Inc, Sony Corp and Google. The attack on Lockheed followed the compromise of "SecurID" electronic keys issued by EMC's Ltd RSA Security division. SecurIDs are widely used electronic keys to computer systems, designed to thwart hackers by requiring two passcodes: one that is fixed and another that is automatically generated every few seconds by the security system. SecurIDs are used at the World Bank for remote log-ins. As an extra precaution, employees receive an automatic email each time they log in from outside, to flag the operation in case it was originated fraudulently by someone else, a World Bank staff member said. The IMF is seeking a new head following the resignation of Strauss-Kahn after he was charged with the sexual assault of a New York hotel maid.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Top 25% of world's hackers are under FBI control
The FBI and US secret service have used the threat of prison to create an army of cyber terrorists to control all cyber crime globally

http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/2011/jun/06/us-hackers-fbi-informer
Ed Pilkington in New York
guardian.co.uk, Monday 6 June 2011 16.12 BST

A quarter of hackers in the US have been recruited by federal authorities, according to Eric Corley, publisher of the hacker quarterly, 2600. Photograph: Getty Images The underground world of computer hackers has been so thoroughly infiltrated in the US by the FBI and secret service that it is now riddled with paranoia and mistrust, with an estimated one in four hackers secretly informing on their peers, a Guardian investigation has established. Cyber policing units have had such success in forcing online criminals to co-operate with their investigations through the threat of long prison sentences that they have managed to create an army of informants deep inside the hacking community. In some cases, popular illegal forums used by cyber criminals as marketplaces for stolen identities and credit card numbers have been run by hacker turncoats acting as FBI moles. In others, undercover FBI agents posing as "carders" – hackers specialising in ID theft – have themselves taken over the management of crime forums, using the intelligence gathered to put dozens of people behind bars.

So ubiquitous has the FBI informant network become that Eric Corley, who publishes the hacker quarterly, 2600, has estimated that 25% of hackers in the US may have been recruited by the federal authorities to be their eyes and ears. "Owing to the harsh penalties involved and the relative inexperience with the law that many hackers have, they are rather susceptible to intimidation," Corley told the Guardian. "It makes for very tense relationships," said John Young, who runs Cryptome, a website depository for secret documents along the lines of WikiLeaks. "There are dozens and dozens of hackers who have been shopped by people they thought they trusted." The best-known example of the phenomenon is Adrian Lamo, a convicted hacker who turned informant on Bradley Manning, who is suspected of passing secret documents to WikiLeaks. Manning had entered into a prolonged instant messaging conversation with Lamo, whom he trusted and asked for advice. Lamo repaid that trust by promptly handing over the 23-year-old intelligence specialist to the military authorities. Manning has now been in custody for more than a year. For acting as he did, Lamo has earned himself the sobriquet of Judas and the "world's most hated hacker", though he has insisted that he acted out of concern for those he believed could be harmed or even killed by the WikiLeaks publication of thousands of US diplomatic cables. "Obviously it's been much worse for him but it's certainly been no picnic for me," Lamo has said. "He followed his conscience, and I followed mine."

The latest challenge for the FBI in terms of domestic US breaches are the anarchistic co-operatives of "hacktivists" that have launched several high-profile cyber-attacks in recent months designed to make a statement. In the most recent case a group calling itself Lulz Security launched an audacious raid on the FBI's own linked organisation InfraGard. The raid, which was a blatant two fingers up at the agency, was said to have been a response to news that the Pentagon was poised to declare foreign cyber-attacks an act of war. Lulz Security shares qualities with the hacktivist group Anonymous that has launched attacks against companies including Visa and MasterCard as a protest against their decision to block donations to WikiLeaks. While Lulz Security is so recent a phenomenon that the FBI has yet to get a handle on it, Anonymous is already under pressure from the agency. There were raids on 40 addresses in the US and five in the UK in January, and a grand jury has been hearing evidence against the group in California at the start of a possible federal prosecution. Kevin Poulsen, senior editor at Wired magazine, believes the collective is classically vulnerable to infiltration and disruption. "We have already begun to see Anonymous members attack each other and out each other's IP addresses. That's the first step towards being susceptible to the FBI." Barrett Brown, who has acted as a spokesman for the otherwise secretive Anonymous, says it is fully aware of the FBI's interest. "The FBI are always there. They are always watching, always in the chatrooms. You don't know who is an informant and who isn't, and to that extent you are vulnerable."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Prepare for Cyber-War Tonkin Gulf False-Flag Attacks From the US
http://lewrockwell.com/douglas/douglas40.1.html
by Jack D. Douglas June 3, 2011


The U.S. and almost all nations today in our age of mass societies and Big Media Propaganda whip up war-lust among their people before attacking other nations.

The Nazis were masters of false-flag attacks, such as dressing up dead men in Polish uniforms and planting them on German soil and then screaming "Poland Is invading Germany!," which Poland would have done only if they had gone totally insane because it was obvious that Germany could annihilate them quickly, as it did after the false-flag attacks whipped the German people up for war [though probably not as much as the Nazis hoped to do].

The U.S. always goes to war ONLY under waving banners of righteous indignation over "Enemy attacks on the U.S.," "Terrorist threats against the U.S." and so on. Some of these immense Media Propaganda Barrages on Americans have been carefully whipped up by the administration in power, as Wilson did to prep Americans for WWI and as FDR did to push the U.S. into WWII to save the U.K. Some have been totally false-flag Big Lies, as was LBJ's "North Vietnamese attack on U.S. ships in the Tonkin Gulf" and Bush 2's "Iraqi WMD's Threaten America!" Some have been attacks by some small group within a huge nation, such as al-Queda in Afghanistan, which the U.S. used as a pretext for annihilating the whole nation with immense bomb and rocket attacks and then invading the whole nation and occupying it and killing and maiming and uprooting masses of people. I

The U.S. has been working furiously to develop Cyber-War technologies, both offensive and defensive. The U.S. apparently worked with Israel to launch an extremely complex and dangerous Cyber-War Attack on Iran's nuclear energy facilities in total secrecy and with not the slightest provocation from any Cyber Attacks from Iran, not even alleged, since Iran was hardly working on Cyber-War and that's how they got hit so hard by the secret Stuxnet attack on their nuclear energy programs.

Now the U.S. is openly declaring that it will use "Cyber Attacks" on important U.S. facilities as "causes of just war" for counter attacks with conventional military forces.

It will be totally easy for the U.S. to fake Cyber-Attacks on the U.S. any time they want from any supposed source in the world.

The world will come to see this as a threat to all developed nations from U.S. military attacks, as soon as they digest this news and think it out.

The U.S. has started another great armaments races, just as it did with nuclear weapons and many others. LIke all paranoids, the U.S. will insist "They're the ones attacking us!" but in fact it is the U.S. attacking the world, as it attacked Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia [many times], Yemen, Iran......

Nations with great high-tech capabilities and futures, such as China and Russia and Iran and India and Europe, must now arm themselves for cyber-war with the U.S. and conventional war.

As long as the American people believe these Big Military-Industrial-High Tech Lies, the U.S. will continue using them to produce terrible wars against largely defenseless little nations and then losing the immense wars to the tiny guerilla armies of peasants defending their homes and families.

Like paranoids so commonly, the U.S. has turned almost everyone against it, though few dare say so publicly to the Superpower. The U.S. sees enemies everywhere even when there are none and this makes everyone eventually an enemy. Paranoids become unintentional self-murderers.

The sane and reasonable and judicious thing for the U.S. to do would be to develop better and better DEFENSES AGAINST CYBER-ATTACKS, exactly as the U.S. private high-tech world is doing, not using "possible" future cyber-attacks as a justification for developing cyber-offenses and threatening all out military attacks.

Jack D. Douglas [send him mail] is a retired professor of sociology from the University of California at San Diego. He has published widely on all major aspects of human beings, most notably The Myth of the Welfare State.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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US Underwrites Internet Detour Around Censors


CONTENTS:
Citing interviews, planning documents, and classified diplomatic cables, the paper says the plan "ranges in scale, cost and sophistication." (More...)
The State Department is also reported to be funding new stealth wireless networks for use in countries like Iran, Syria, and Libya. (More...)

Citing interviews, planning documents, and classified diplomatic cables, the paper says the plan "ranges in scale, cost and sophistication." Its aim, the paper says, is to "deploy'shadow' Internet and mobile phone systems that dissidents can use to undermine repressive governments that seek to silence them by censoring or shutting down telecommunications networks." It describes a mix of technology being developed under the auspices of the United States and independent projects that have arisen as part of the global "liberation-technology movement." "The New York Times" says the plan has picked up steam since President Hosni Mubarak's ill-fated regime shut down the Internet in Egypt in the days before he was ousted in February. It identifies one project as "Internet in a suitcase," delivering quick wireless access to a broad area in an easily transportable manner. Another entails the creation of a parallel cell-phone network in Afghanistan to counter militants' efforts to shut down official channels of communication. [1] WASHINGTON, June 12 (Reuters) - The Obama administration is leading a global effort to establish "shadow" Internet and cellphone systems to help dissidents undermine authoritarian governments, the New York Times reported on Sunday. The effort has quickened since former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak's government shut down the country's Internet in the last days of his rule, said the Times report, which cited planning documents, classified diplomatic cables and sources. [2]

WASHINGTON — The U.S. government is financing the development of "shadow" Internet systems to enable dissidents abroad to get around government censors, The New York Times reported on Sunday. [3]

The State Department is also financing creation of stealth wireless networks to enable activists to communicate beyond the reach of governments in countries like Iran, Syria and Libya, the Times said, citing participants in the projects. Another project focuses on development of an "Internet in a suitcase" that could be smuggled across a border and deployed to allow wireless communication with a link to the global Internet, the Times reported. [2] Financed with a $US2 million ($1.9 million) State Department grant, the suitcase could be secreted across a border and quickly set up to allow wireless communications over a wide area with a link to the global internet. [4]

In one project, the U.S. State Department and Pentagon have spent at least $50 million to create an independent cellphone network in Afghanistan using towers on military bases in the country, the Times said, citing unnamed U.S. officials. [2] The U.S. government has also spent at least $50 million to create an independent cellphone network in Afghanistan using towers on protected military bases inside the country, The Times said. It is intended to offset the Taliban?s ability to shut down the official Afghan services, the report noted. [3]

The New York Times said today the covert effort also includes attempts to create independent cellphone networks inside foreign countries. [4]

The United States has embarked on an effort that officials say is aimed at helping dissidents around the world counter censorship by repressive governments, according to a report in "The New York Times." [1]

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is backing the U.S. effort, according to the report. "We see more and more people around the globe using the Internet, mobile phones and other technologies to make their voices heard as they protest against injustice and seek to realize their aspirations," the Times quoted Clinton as saying in an email response to a query on the subject. [2]

THE U.S. Government is reportedly financing the development of shadow internet systems to enable dissidents abroad to get around government censors. [4]

The Times said some projects involve technology being developed in the U.S. while others pull together tools that have already been created by hackers from the so-called liberation technology movement. [4] The operation is aimed at counteracting the Taliban insurgency's ability to shut down official Afghan services, the Times said. [2]

The State Department is also reported to be funding new stealth wireless networks for use in countries like Iran, Syria, and Libya. [1] The newspaper said the covert effort also includes attempts to create independent cellphone networks inside foreign countries. [3]

SOURCES

1. U.S. Said Aiming To Help Dissidents Fight High-Tech Censorship - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty 2011
2. Secret U.S. effort aims to help dissidents - report | Reuters
3. AFP: US bankrolls'shadow Internet for dissidents' abroad
4. US Government financing internet in a box suitcase to help dissidents avoid censors, newspaper reports | Information, Gadgets, Mobile Phones News & Reviews | News.com.au
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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US creates a "Cyber Al-Qaeda" to destroy sovereign countries
Clinton cites 'historic opportunity" to manufacture a new enemy for the future

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/43369742/ns/technology_and_science-the_new_york_times
By JAMES GLANZ and JOHN MARKOFF

The Obama administration is leading a global effort to deploy “shadow” Internet and mobile phone systems that dissidents can use to undermine repressive governments that seek to silence them by censoring or shutting down telecommunications networks. The effort includes secretive projects to create independent cellphone networks inside foreign countries, as well as one operation out of a spy novel in a fifth-floor shop on L Street in Washington, where a group of young entrepreneurs who look as if they could be in a garage band are fitting deceptively innocent-looking hardware into a prototype “Internet in a suitcase.” Financed with a $2 million State Department grant, the suitcase could be secreted across a border and quickly set up to allow wireless communication over a wide area with a link to the global Internet. The American effort, revealed in dozens of interviews, planning documents and classified diplomatic cables obtained by The New York Times, ranges in scale, cost and sophistication. Some projects involve technology that the United States is developing; others pull together tools that have already been created by hackers in a so-called liberation-technology movement sweeping the globe.

The State Department, for example, is financing the creation of stealth wireless networks that would enable activists to communicate outside the reach of governments in countries like Iran, Syria and Libya, according to participants in the projects. In one of the most ambitious efforts, United States officials say, the State Department and Pentagon have spent at least $50 million to create an independent cellphone network in Afghanistan using towers on protected military bases inside the country. It is intended to offset the Taliban’s ability to shut down the official Afghan services, seemingly at will. The effort has picked up momentum since the government of President Hosni Mubarak shut down the Egyptian Internet in the last days of his rule. In recent days, the Syrian government also temporarily disabled much of that country’s Internet, which had helped protesters mobilize.

The Obama administration’s initiative is in one sense a new front in a longstanding diplomatic push to defend free speech and nurture democracy. For decades, the United States has sent radio broadcasts into autocratic countries through Voice of America and other means. More recently, Washington has supported the development of software that preserves the anonymity of users in places like China, and training for citizens who want to pass information along the government-owned Internet without getting caught.  But the latest initiative depends on creating entirely separate pathways for communication. It has brought together an improbable alliance of diplomats and military engineers, young programmers and dissidents from at least a dozen countries, many of whom variously describe the new approach as more audacious and clever and, yes, cooler. Sometimes the State Department is simply taking advantage of enterprising dissidents who have found ways to get around government censorship. American diplomats are meeting with operatives who have been burying Chinese cellphones in the hills near the border with North Korea, where they can be dug up and used to make furtive calls, according to interviews and the diplomatic cables.

The new initiatives have found a champion in Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, whose department is spearheading the American effort. “We see more and more people around the globe using the Internet, mobile phones and other technologies to make their voices heard as they protest against injustice and seek to realize their aspirations,” Mrs. Clinton said in an e-mail response to a query on the topic. “There is a historic opportunity to effect positive change, change America supports,” she said. “So we’re focused on helping them do that, on helping them talk to each other, to their communities, to their governments and to the world.” Developers caution that independent networks come with downsides: repressive governments could use surveillance to pinpoint and arrest activists who use the technology or simply catch them bringing hardware across the border. But others believe that the risks are outweighed by the potential impact. “We’re going to build a separate infrastructure where the technology is nearly impossible to shut down, to control, to surveil,” said Sascha Meinrath, who is leading the “Internet in a suitcase” project as director of the Open Technology Initiative at the New America Foundation, a nonpartisan research group. “The implication is that this disempowers central authorities from infringing on people’s fundamental human right to communicate,” Mr. Meinrath added.

The invisible Web
In an anonymous office building on L Street in Washington, four unlikely State Department contractors sat around a table. Josh King, sporting multiple ear piercings and a studded leather wristband, taught himself programming while working as a barista. Thomas Gideon was an accomplished hacker. Dan Meredith, a bicycle polo enthusiast, helped companies protect their digital secrets. Then there was Mr. Meinrath, wearing a tie as the dean of the group at age 37. He has a master’s degree in psychology and helped set up wireless networks in underserved communities in Detroit and Philadelphia. The group’s suitcase project will rely on a version of “mesh network” technology, which can transform devices like cellphones or personal computers to create an invisible wireless web without a centralized hub. In other words, a voice, picture or e-mail message could hop directly between the modified wireless devices — each one acting as a mini cell “tower” and phone — and bypass the official network. Mr. Meinrath said that the suitcase would include small wireless antennas, which could increase the area of coverage; a laptop to administer the system; thumb drives and CDs to spread the software to more devices and encrypt the communications; and other components like Ethernet cables.

The project will also rely on the innovations of independent Internet and telecommunications developers. “The cool thing in this political context is that you cannot easily control it,” said Aaron Kaplan, an Austrian cybersecurity expert whose work will be used in the suitcase project. Mr. Kaplan has set up a functioning mesh network in Vienna and says related systems have operated in Venezuela, Indonesia and elsewhere. Mr. Meinrath said his team was focused on fitting the system into the bland-looking suitcase and making it simple to implement — by, say, using “pictograms” in the how-to manual. In addition to the Obama administration’s initiatives, there are almost a dozen independent ventures that also aim to make it possible for unskilled users to employ existing devices like laptops or smartphones to build a wireless network. One mesh network was created around Jalalabad, Afghanistan, as early as five years ago, using technology developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Creating simple lines of communication outside official ones is crucial, said Collin Anderson, a 26-year-old liberation-technology researcher from North Dakota who specializes in Iran, where the government all but shut down the Internet during protests in 2009. The slowdown made most “circumvention” technologies — the software legerdemain that helps dissidents sneak data along the state-controlled networks — nearly useless, he said. “No matter how much circumvention the protesters use, if the government slows the network down to a crawl, you can’t upload YouTube videos or Facebook postings,” Mr. Anderson said. “They need alternative ways of sharing information or alternative ways of getting it out of the country.” That need is so urgent, citizens are finding their own ways to set up rudimentary networks. Mehdi Yahyanejad, an Iranian expatriate and technology developer who co-founded a popular Persian-language Web site, estimates that nearly half the people who visit the site from inside Iran share files using Bluetooth — which is best known in the West for running wireless headsets and the like. In more closed societies, however, Bluetooth is used to discreetly beam information — a video, an electronic business card — directly from one cellphone to another. Mr. Yahyanejad said he and his research colleagues were also slated to receive State Department financing for a project that would modify Bluetooth so that a file containing, say, a video of a protester being beaten, could automatically jump from phone to phone within a “trusted network” of citizens. The system would be more limited than the suitcase but would only require the software modification on ordinary phones. By the end of 2011, the State Department will have spent some $70 million on circumvention efforts and related technologies, according to department figures. Mrs. Clinton has made Internet freedom into a signature cause. But the State Department has carefully framed its support as promoting free speech and human rights for their own sake, not as a policy aimed at destabilizing autocratic governments.  That distinction is difficult to maintain, said Clay Shirky, an assistant professor at New York University who studies the Internet and social media. “You can’t say, ‘All we want is for people to speak their minds, not bring down autocratic regimes’ — they’re the same thing,” Mr. Shirky said.  He added that the United States could expose itself to charges of hypocrisy if the State Department maintained its support, tacit or otherwise, for autocratic governments running countries like Saudi Arabia or Bahrain while deploying technology that was likely to undermine them.

Shadow cellphone system
In February 2009, Richard C. Holbrooke and Lt. Gen. John R. Allen were taking a helicopter tour over southern Afghanistan and getting a panoramic view of the cellphone towers dotting the remote countryside, according to two officials on the flight. By then, millions of Afghans were using cellphones, compared with a few thousand after the 2001 invasion. Towers built by private companies had sprung up across the country. The United States had promoted the network as a way to cultivate good will and encourage local businesses in a country that in other ways looked as if it had not changed much in centuries. There was just one problem, General Allen told Mr. Holbrooke, who only weeks before had been appointed special envoy to the region. With a combination of threats to phone company officials and attacks on the towers, the Taliban was able to shut down the main network in the countryside virtually at will. Local residents report that the networks are often out from 6 p.m. until 6 a.m., presumably to enable the Taliban to carry out operations without being reported to security forces. The Pentagon and State Department were soon collaborating on the project to build a “shadow” cellphone system in a country where repressive forces exert control over the official network. Details of the network, which the military named the Palisades project, are scarce, but current and former military and civilian officials said it relied in part on cell towers placed on protected American bases. A large tower on the Kandahar air base serves as a base station or data collection point for the network, officials said. A senior United States official said the towers were close to being up and running in the south and described the effort as a kind of 911 system that would be available to anyone with a cellphone. By shutting down cellphone service, the Taliban had found a potent strategic tool in its asymmetric battle with American and Afghan security forces. The United States is widely understood to use cellphone networks in Afghanistan, Iraq and other countries for intelligence gathering. And the ability to silence the network was also a powerful reminder to the local populace that the Taliban retained control over some of the most vital organs of the nation. When asked about the system, Lt. Col. John Dorrian, a spokesman for the American-led International Security Assistance Force, or ISAF, would only confirm the existence of a project to create what he called an “expeditionary cellular communication service” in Afghanistan. He said the project was being carried out in collaboration with the Afghan government in order to “restore 24/7 cellular access.” “As of yet the program is not fully operational, so it would be premature to go into details,” Colonel Dorrian said.  Colonel Dorrian declined to release cost figures. Estimates by United States military and civilian officials ranged widely, from $50 million to $250 million. A senior official said that Afghan officials, who anticipate taking over American bases when troops pull out, have insisted on an elaborate system. “The Afghans wanted the Cadillac plan, which is pretty expensive,” the official said.

Broad subversive effort
In May 2009, a North Korean defector named Kim met with officials at the American Consulate in Shenyang, a Chinese city about 120 miles from North Korea, according to a diplomatic cable. Officials wanted to know how Mr. Kim, who was active in smuggling others out of the country, communicated across the border. “Kim would not go into much detail,” the cable says, but did mention the burying of Chinese cellphones “on hillsides for people to dig up at night.” Mr. Kim said Dandong, China, and the surrounding Jilin Province “were natural gathering points for cross-border cellphone communication and for meeting sources.” The cellphones are able to pick up signals from towers in China, said Libby Liu, head of Radio Free Asia, the United States-financed broadcaster, who confirmed their existence and said her organization uses the calls to collect information for broadcasts as well.  The effort, in what is perhaps the world’s most closed nation, suggests just how many independent actors are involved in the subversive efforts. From the activist geeks on L Street in Washington to the military engineers in Afghanistan, the global appeal of the technology hints at the craving for open communication.  In a chat with a Times reporter via Facebook, Malik Ibrahim Sahad, the son of Libyan dissidents who largely grew up in suburban Virginia, said he was tapping into the Internet using a commercial satellite connection in Benghazi. “Internet is in dire need here. The people are cut off in that respect,” wrote Mr. Sahad, who had never been to Libya before the uprising and is now working in support of rebel authorities. Even so, he said, “I don’t think this revolution could have taken place without the existence of the World Wide Web.”
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Turkey arrests Pentagon funded Cyber Terror Patsies
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/06/14/turkey-arrests-32-alleged-members-of-anonymous/
By Agence France-Presse
Tuesday, June 14th, 2011 -- 4:34 pm

Turkish police have detained 32 suspected members of the online cyberactivism collective Anonymous, over possible links to attacks on a number of websites. The arrests were in response to a complaint from Turkey's Directorate of Telecommunications, whose website was taken down last Thursday as part of a protest against what Anonymous has said is government censorship of the internet. The Anatolia news agency reported on Tuesday that nine minors out of the group of 32 suspects had been released without charges, but that the remaining 23 were still being questioned. Turkey, whose ruling AKP party won a parliamentary vote on Sunday, plans to introduce a new internet filtering system in August, under which users will have to sign up for one of four filters - domestic, family, children and standard. Anonymous, a loose activist collective that previously attacked websites including Amazon and Mastercard, says the system will make it possible to keep records of people's online activity. Last week access to Turkey's telecoms authority website, identified as a main target in the group's "Operation Turkey" campaign was blocked at 1500GMT on Thursday. In a posting on its official website, Anonymous issued a statement pledging to fight what it said was internet censorship there. There has been a crackdown on the group in recent days. Last week Spanish police arrested three suspected members of the group on charges of cyber attacks against targets including Sony Corp's PlayStation Network, governments, businesses and banks. Police on Friday alleged the three arrested 'hacktivists' had been involved in recent attacks on the Japanese electronics manufacturer, Spanish banks BBVA and Bankia and Italian energy group Enel SpA. The arrests are the first in Spain against members of Anonymous following similar legal proceedings in the US and Britain. Police said all three men were Spanish and in their 30s. One worked in the merchant navy. The suspected Anonymous members, who were arrested in Almeria, Barcelona and Alicante, were guilty of co-ordinated computer hacking attacks from a server set up in a house in Gijon in the north of Spain, the Spanish police said. Sony shocked gamers in late April by revealing that hackers had stolen personal information from the accounts of 77 million users of its online video-games network. A week later, it said hackers had stolen data from another 25 million users of its computer games system. Sony's PlayStation Network was crippled for a month as the company tried to find and fix the problem. Anonymous, a loose grouping of activists which has carried out cyber attacks on organisations including Sony in the past, said at the time it was not responsible for those attacks and had no interest in stealing credit-card details. Its members describe themselves as internet freedom fighters and have previously brought down the websites of the Church of Scientology, Amazon, Mastercard and others they saw as hostile to WikiLeaks.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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VIDEO: US To Build Shadow Web Claiming "Internet Freedom" For Users
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