New Joint Chiefs of Staff: Martin Dempsey...1st speech...100% RMA Bullshit!

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Offline Dig

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"If I can make it in Fallujah, I can make it anywhere"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oX6-S3v3aTQ



Martin Dempsey

General Martin E. Dempsey, USA is the 37th and current Chief of Staff of the Army. It was reported on May 25, 2011 that General Dempsey was President Obama's choice for Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He is expected to succeed Admiral Mullen when his term end on September 2011. He previously served as Commanding General, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command from December 8, 2008 to April 11, 2011. Prior to that, he served as Acting Commander, U.S. Central Command from March 24, 2008 to October 30, 2008 and Deputy Commander, U.S. Central Command from August 2007 to Mar 23, 2008 and as Commanding General, Multi-National Security Transition Command - Iraq (MNSTC-I) from August 2005 to August 2007. He assumed his current assignment on April 11, 2011.


Biography

Dempsey graduated from John S. Burke Catholic High School. Dempsey was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant, branched Armor, upon graduation from the United States Military Academy in 1974. He served as the Executive Officer of the 4th Bn 67th Armor (Bandits) in Friedberg Germany. He went on to be the Executive Officer of the 3rd Brigade 3rd Armored Division during Operation Desert Shield/Storm. He then commanded the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment as a Colonel.

In June 2003, then Brigadier General Dempsey assumed command of 1st Armored Division. He succeeded Lieutenant General Ricardo S. Sanchez who was promoted to command V Corps. Dempsey commanded 1st Armored Division until July 2005 including 13 months in Iraq from June 2003 to July 2004. While in Iraq, 1st Armored Division, in addition to its own brigades, had operational command over the 2nd Armored Cavalry Regiment and a brigade of the 82nd Airborne Division; the command, called "Task Force Iron" in recognition of the Division's nickname, "Old Ironsides", was the largest division-level command in the history of the United States Army.[citation needed]

It was during this time that the U.S. intervention in Iraq changed dramatically as Fallujah fell to Sunni extremists and supporters of Muqtada Sadr built their strength and rose up against American forces. Then Major General Dempsey and his command assumed responsibility for the Area of Operations in Baghdad as the insurgency incubated, grew, and exploded. General Dempsey has been described by Thomas Ricks in his book "Fiasco": "In the capital itself, the 1st Armored Division, after Sanchez assumed control of V Corps, was led by Gen. Martin Dempsey, was generally seen as handling a difficult (and inherited) job well, under the global spotlight of Baghdad."

On March 27, 2007 Lt. General Martin Dempsey was promoted from commander of Multi-National Security Transition Command-Iraq, to be reappointed as a lieutenant general and assigned as deputy commander of U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Fla. On February 5, 2008, Dempsey was nominated to head the Seventh United States Army/U.S. Army, Europe and was nominated for promotion to four-star general upon Senate approval. On March 11, 2008, Dempsey's Commander Admiral William J. Fallon retired from active service. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates accepted this as effective on March 31. Dempsey took over command as acting commander CENTCOM. On March 13, 2008, LTG Dempsey was confirmed by the United States Senate as Commander, Seventh United States Army/U.S. Army, Europe[1]. Due to the resignation of ADM Fallon, he never assumed command over Seventh Army and became Acting Commander, U.S. Central Command. Instead, GEN Carter F. Ham assumed this command of the Seventh Army on August 28, 2008. On December 8, 2008, Dempsey took command of United States Army Training and Doctrine Command.[1] On January 6, 2011, Defense Secretary Robert Gates announced that he will nominate General Dempsey to succeed General George Casey as the Army Chief of Staff.[2]
On February 8, 2011, Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates announced that President Barack Obama nominated Dempsey to be the 37th Chief of Staff of the United States Army.[3] On March 3, 2011, Dempsey testified before the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services for reappointment to the grade of general and to be the 37th Chief of Staff of the United States Army.[4] On March 15, 2011, the United States Senate Committee on Armed Services confirmed Dempsey to serve as the 37th Chief of Staff of the United States Army.[5] On April 11, 2011, Dempsey was officially sworn in as 37th Chief of Staff of the United States Army at a ceremony in Fort Myer.

With Admiral Mike Mullen set to retire as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in September 2011, President Obama needed to select his replacement. The Vice-Chairman, Marine General James Cartwright, who was initially believed to be the front runner for the job, had fallen out of favor among senior officials in the Defense department. Obama administration officials revealed on May 26, 2011 that the President would nominate General Dempsey to the post of Chairman. [6]


Education
1974 Bachelor of Science degree, United States Military Academy, West Point, NY
1984 Master of Arts degree in English, Duke University, Durham, NC
1988 Master of Military Art and Science degree, United States Army Command and General Staff College
1995 Master of Science degree in national security and strategic studies, National War College


Promotions
 2LT - 5 Jun 74
 1LT - 5 Jun 76
 CPT - 8 Aug 78
 MAJ - 1 Sep 85
 LTC - 1 Apr 91
 COL - 1 Sep 95
 BG - 1 Aug 01
 MG - 1 Sep 04
 LTG - 8 Sep 05
 GEN - 8 Dec 08



References
^ Tice, Jim (December 8, 2008). "Dempsey takes command of TRADOC". Army Times. http://www.armytimes.com/news/2008/12/army_command_change_120808w/. Retrieved 9 December 2008.
^ Bacon, Lance (January 6, 2011). "TRADOC head is pick to become chief of staff". Army Times. http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/01/army-general-martin-dempsey-is-chief-of-staff-pick-010611w/. Retrieved 6 January 2011.
^ "General Officer Announcements". Department of Defense. http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=14255. Retrieved 8 February 2011.
^ "Hearing Schedule". U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee. http://armed-services.senate.gov/e_witnesslist.cfm?id=5014. Retrieved 3 March 2011.
^ Brannen, Kate. "Sen. committee confirms Dempsey as Army chief". Sen. committee confirms Dempsey as Army chief. Army Times. http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/03/defense-dempsey-confirmed-as-next-army-chief-031511/. Retrieved 16 March 2011.
^ Starr, Barbara. "Obama to choose Army head as next Joint Chiefs chairman, officials say". Obama to choose Army head as next Joint Chiefs chairman, officials say. CNN. http://www.cnn.com/2011/POLITICS/05/26/joint.chiefs.chairman/index.html?hpt=T2. Retrieved 26 May 2011.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Meet the new Joint Chiefs of Staff: Martin Dempsey
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2011, 05:01:55 PM »
With Admiral Mike Mullen set to retire as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in September 2011, President Obama needed to select his replacement. The Vice-Chairman, Marine General James Cartwright, who was initially believed to be the front runner for the job, had fallen out of favor among senior officials in the Defense department.

Thankfully! General Cartwright is a perfect candidate to complete the Revolution in Military Affairs!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Cartwright

Excerpt:

James Cartwright, born on September 22, 1949 in Rockford, Illinois, He attended West High School and participated in the JROTC program. He then went on to the University of Iowa where he graduated in 1971 with a degree in Pre-medicine.

Cartwright was commissioned a second lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps in November 1971. He attended Naval Flight Officer training and graduated in April 1973. He attended Naval Aviator training and graduated in January 1977. He has operational assignments as an Naval Flight Officer in the F-4, and as a pilot in the F-4, OA-4, and F/A-18.[2]

Cartwright's operational assignments include: Commanding General, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing (2000–2002), Deputy Commanding General Marine Forces Atlantic (1999–2000), Commander Marine Aircraft Group 31 (1994–1996), Commander Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 (1992), Fixed Wing Operations Marine Aircraft Group 24 (1991), Commander Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 12 (1989–1990), Administration Officer and Officer-In-Charge Deployed Carrier Operations VMFAT-101 (1983–1985), Aircraft Maintenance Officer VMFA-235 (1979–1982), Line Division Officer VMFA-333 USS Nimitz (1975–1977), Embarkation OIC VMFA-251 & 232 (1973–1975).[2]

Cartwright's staff assignments include: Director for Force Structure, Resources and Assessment, J-8 the Joint Staff (2002–2004); Directorate for Force Structure, Resources and Assessment, J-8 the Joint Staff (1996–1999); Deputy Aviation Plans, Policy, and Budgets Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps (1993–1994); Assistant Program Manager for Engineering, F/A-18 Naval Air Systems Command (1986–1989).[2]

He graduated with distinction from the Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell AFB 1986, and received his Master of Arts in National Security and Strategic Studies from the Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island 1991. In 2008, he was honored with Naval War College Distinguished Graduate Leadership Award. He was selected for and completed a fellowship with Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994.[2]

From July 9, 2004 to September 1, 2004, Lieutenant General Cartwight served as Acting Commander, U.S. Strategic Command while awaiting official assumption of office and promotion as Strategic Command's new commander. On September 1, 2004, Cartwright was officially sworn in as Commander, U.S. Strategic Command.[3] He was promoted to full general on the same day.[4]
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Meet the new Joint Chiefs of Staff: Martin Dempsey
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2011, 05:07:44 PM »
Holy shit, this guy is a "back to basics" commander who actually seems to give a shit about the American soldier. Best thing about him that I have seen is that he considers "THE NATION" the highest priority and does not even discuss bullshit futuristic nonsense:



New Army chief of staff eyes big changes
http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/05/army-martin-dempsey-eyes-big-changes-050711w/
By Lance M. Bacon - Staff writer
Posted : Saturday May 7, 2011 9:04:16 EDT

The day after he became chief of staff of the Army, Gen. Martin Dempsey was given an in-depth assessment of the state of the Army he took over. It was not a pretty picture.

The report, assembled by a transition team of 20 hand-picked officers and NCOs, described an Army where:

• Tension exists among military and civilian leaders.

• Many soldiers lack training and discipline.

• Concerns about future deployments and budget cuts weigh heavily on senior leaders.

• Soldiers are promoted before they are ready for the next rank.

The Army Transition Team’s April 12 report, titled “What we heard ... ,” is a compilation of findings from anonymous surveys conducted with the Army’s leaders, soldiers and families.

Dempsey embraced the report as a catalog of opportunities — a road map to fix an Army frayed by 10 years of withering deployments to two wars.

“The report was very informative,” he wrote in an email to Army Times. “The team threaded together many different inputs into substantive and concrete insights that have informed my thinking on the way forward for our Army.”

Dempsey said he and Secretary John McHugh have built “a shared vision” for the Army moving forward. He said McHugh “has been a superb partner in helping me think through how to confront not only the challenges in front of us but importantly, the many opportunities we have to build a better Army for the nation.”

This approach speaks directly to the first order of change.
1. Better teamwork at the top

All of the assistant secretaries and the Army staff surveyed by the transition team said there has been “significant tension” between the civilian and military staffs. Some attributed this to a “bad match of personalities and working styles” of McHugh and former chief Gen. George Casey.

The assistant secretaries said they had little interaction with Casey. Those with military deputies had more favorable opinions, and most were complimentary of the Army Staff, but said it was “not sufficiently responsive or agile.” The assistant secretaries also said they would like to interview and comment on general officers being considered for key positions within their functional areas.

The Army Staff said its size and expertise put the assistant secretaries “at a disadvantage in collaborative open forums, which leads to the opaque, defensive decision-making style that is now prevalent.”

Undersecretary of the Army Joseph Westphal, while discussing the future Army on April 27, affirmed that the “big five” (the secretary, undersecretary, chief, vice chief and sergeant major of the Army) don’t meet regularly as a group — something Westphal hopes to see weekly or at least twice monthly.
2. Make better leaders

Fast promotions and record rates have created a massive gap in leadership, respondents said. Professional Military Education deferments and the lack of coaching and mentoring have negatively affected professional development.

Leader courses are “too short to be of value,” and intermediate-level education is a last “check the block” before promotion to lieutenant colonel, participants said.

Respondents called for slower promotion rates, a revised grade distribution, a focus on fundamentals and emphasis on home-station and virtual training.

Dempsey has taken some of the themes to the field. In a speech to troops in Iraq during his first week as chief, Dempsey said the Army is reviewing the promotion process to ensure that only the most qualified move on to the next rank.

“We’re promoting 95 to 98 percent of captains to major, 93 or 95 percent of majors to lieutenant colonel,” Dempsey said. “We’re not really separating out the true high performers that we should aspire to have. We shouldn’t be satisfied that 98 percent of captains are being promoted to major, because 98 percent of captains don’t deserve to be promoted to major. Statistically, that’s an infeasible percentage. And we’ve got to do the same thing on the noncommissioned officer (NCO) side.”
3. Let good leaders teach

The training base has been significantly undermanned and underfunded, the report said.

“TRADOC manning says 80 percent, but when you add in the drill sergeants and others who are manned at a targeted 100 percent, the rest of the training base is really at much lower manning levels,” one participant said. Another said instructor duty is not viewed as career-enhancing and the training base does not get the most talented leaders as a result.

The perceived gap between the operating and generating forces must be eliminated by ensuring soldiers and officers are not disadvantaged for serving in the generating force.

“Restore the luster to the institutional Army,” one participant said. “We used to send our best company commanders to go be instructors.”
4. Restore the ‘Profession of Arms’

Survey participants said the “Profession of Arms” is becoming a lost art, especially among junior officers and noncommissioned officers. Common military courtesies are fading, drill and ceremonial skills are wanting and some soldiers are not meeting fitness standards.

The dulling of these skills is largely due to the deployment cycle of the past decade. This only adds further concern because 72 percent of soldiers and 81 percent of staff sergeants and below entered service after the 9/11 attacks, as did 40 percent of warrant officers. Forty-five percent of officers and 72 percent of company-grade officers are also in that category.

Senior leaders described the post-9/11 soldiers as tactically experienced, culturally aware, eager and ready to serve. But they also are “at risk to disenchantment in a garrison environment,” prone to leadership through texting rather than personal contact, and were described as an “entitlement” and “train-me” generation.

“We are not a profession just because we say we are,” Dempsey said. “We have to live up to the standards.”
5. No double standards for discipline

Respondents said two different standards — one “deployment” and one “garrison” — are undermining discipline and allowing “some leaders to turn a blind eye to indiscipline and misconduct.” Participants reported “a large number of cases of willful disobedience.”

“We are frayed on accountability,” one participant said. “It boils down to hierarchy of values, loyalty to our subordinates or loyalty to our profession. Battle tested bonds cause leaders to look away.”
6. Keep commanders longer

One senior medical leader said the departure of leaders makes it difficult to manage high-risk soldiers.

“[The Army] should not change battalion commanders and sergeants major until after R+90,” or return date from deployment plus 90 days, the medical leader said. “Our system says that we cannot afford to keep them that long, but we can’t afford not to. We keep putting fresh riders on tired horses.”

This also has an effect on mentoring. Brigade and battalion commanders typically work for three to four division commanders during their tour and company commanders in echelons above brigade, or EABs, have three to five battalion commanders in a command tour, the report said.
7. Let good soldiers lead the way

Now is the time to reinforce “high standards with an attitude of individual and leader pride and willingness to self-police,” respondents said.

NCOs must have ownership of the daily activities in the unit.
8. Keep only who you need

In this era of pending budget and personnel cuts, respondents said it is time to maintain the innovative, combat-experienced leaders, eliminate underperforming officers and noncommissioned officers and tighten accession standards.

Medical nondeployable soldiers have become “a leading readiness challenge and significant drain on leaders’ time” and it takes “far too long” to get nondeployable soldiers out of the Army, the report said.

The approach is not lost on Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who in February told West Point cadets that it is important to focus on the top and bottom 20 percent of the force.

“The former to elevate and give more responsibility and opportunity, the latter to transition out, albeit with consideration and respect for the service they have rendered. Failure to do this risks frustrating, demoralizing and ultimately losing the leaders we will most need for the future,” he said.
9. Explain the way ahead

There is general uncertainty and a lack of understanding about the Army’s role after Iraq and Afghanistan, the report said. Full-spectrum operations also are a point of confusion. One brigade combat team commander described the doctrine as “everything from nuclear war to [counterinsurgency] and everything in between.”

Gates addressed this growing dilemma in his West Point speech.

The Army must “confront the reality that the most plausible, high-end scenarios for the U.S. military are primarily naval and air engagements,” he said, adding that “any future defense secretary who advises the president to again send a big American land army into Asia or into the Middle East or Africa should have his head examined.”
10. Give us fewer but better brigades

Westphal said a key point of discussion is whether all brigades should train to full-spectrum operations. He said it is important that the Army now look at specialized counterinsurgency, stabilization, and training/advisory brigades to deal with asymmetric warfare, which stands as a stark contrast to current doctrine.

Participants in the transition team survey like the brigade combat team model but want to refine the formation. For example, many called for an engineer and a third maneuver battalion in the BCTs, and are willing to give up BCTs to see it done. Respondents also said the EAB is completely broken, and relationships between BCTs, the division and the Corps need to be strengthened.

“You can plug and play modular units, but you can’t plug and play relationships,” one respondent said.
11. Fix acquisitions

Westphal agreed, saying “big changes” are needed on how quickly and effectively the Army makes acquisition decisions. He said such decisions must be resource-informed and transparent to the Army, industry and Congress. Lawmakers have expressed concern over modernization efforts due to previously flawed acquisition programs.
12. Fine-tune the deployment model

Leaders are still committed to a 1:3 deployment ratio, meaning three years at home for every year deployed. But the Army Force Generation model requires some fine-tuning, the report said.

While the model works, leaders said it makes less sense when supply exceeds demand and called it a “supply-based model in a demand-based world.” Leaders also agreed that divisions and brigades should be aligned as much as possible.

Manning also is an issue, as personnel often arrive too late in the process to allow for adequate training and deployment preparation, the report said.
13. Fix personnel management

Personnel management is a source of frustration, the report said. Manning remains the biggest frustration. In the words of one leader, the order to “man, train and equip” has become “train, equip and man.”

“Need a personnel system that restores human interface,” one respondent said. “Need a major course correction in our personnel management. We need to put the ‘person’ back in personnel management.”

Officers also said they want to have more input in their career paths.
14. Don’t build ‘two armies’

The transition team found growing concern over a perception that the Army is divided into “have” and “have-not” elements — namely, the Deployed Expeditionary Forces (haves) and the Contingency Expeditionary Forces (have nots). Leaders said constraints for non-DEF units are already setting in.
15. Specify how the reserve component will be used in the future

Lawmakers have repeatedly said the reserves must be sustained in order to meet current and future requirements. The Army Staff agreed that the reserve component “will play a key role in meeting future challenges,” but also expressed concerns about adequate access to critical functions. Other key questions include:

• Whether ready units will maintain adequate readiness to respond to a Haiti-like natural disaster.

• Whether there will be sufficient resources to maintain units from each components in the ready phase.

• Whether the Army can or will send a reserve unit when an active unit is also ready.
16. Protect benefits

Commanders said they see health care benefits getting cut, especially in the area of mental health, and are worried about the effects.

Westphal acknowledged Tricare, the commissaries and “all the benefits we’ve enjoyed” will come into question as budget cuts deepen.

Health care costs have more than doubled in the past decade to more than $50 billion. Gates, in the Pentagon’s 2012 budget request, looks to cut some of that cost by increasing Tricare Prime annual enrollment fees to $260 per year for an individual and $520 a year for a family. The current fees of $230 for an individual retiree and $460 for a family have not changed since 1996 when Tricare was created.
17. Provide better healthcare

Spouses at three of five major installations said they are frustrated with access to health care.

Respondents said behavioral health programs lack a focused approach and unity of effort. Spouses unanimously reported a stigma associated with seeking behavioral health services for both soldiers and family members. There also is a concern that the Army lacks the capacity — resources and commitment — for long-term soldier healthcare.
18. Give families quality dwell time

Unanimous feedback indicated a strong need for quality dwell time, meaning leaders must ensure soldiers can spend time with families.

Spouses said a 1:2 deployment ratio is “tolerable,” while a six-month deployment with 15 months home is “optimal,” as length of deployment impacts resiliency.

Spouses also said dwell does no good if the soldier is attending schools or doing field training throughout the time between deployments.
19. Fix family-assistance programs

Frustrations also were voiced regarding “unsynchronized, uncoordinated, overwhelming and too hard to navigate” family-assistance programs.

Multiple family-member programs cause redundancy and confusion, participants said. They want redundancies eliminated and funds better invested. This effort requires careful communication, some leaders warned, and cannot be seen as breaking faith with the Army Family Covenant.
20. Take care of children

Spouses at two large installations were “irate about the poor quality of education” and the lack of standards for transferring into another state’s school system.

The signal to families is that the Army does not care about children, respondents said. Many have turned to home schooling as a solution, they said.
21. Get back to being ‘America’s Army’

Respondents said the connection with the American people is strong but must be reinforced, and messages should define and enforce who the Army is, not the problems it has.

Participants said they felt the public’s connection with the soldier is stronger than its connection with the Army.

“Where is the message that says we are an elite unit?” one respondent asked. “You can try and join us, but you have to be tough and willing to fight for something bigger than self.”

“We should emphasize the role extraordinary leadership plays in who we are,” another said.

Dempsey said he and McHugh have used the transition team report, along with input and analysis from agencies such as academia, Congress, think tanks and mentors, to produce a shared vision that addresses nine focus areas the chief described as the “most important for our Army at this time in our history.”

They are: the nation, the joint fight, the Army family, mission command, the profession, leader development, the squad, the human dimension, and 21st century training.

Dempsey said he and McHugh will unveil the specifics in June during the Army’s birthday celebration.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Holy shit, this guy is a "back to basics" commander who actually seems to give a shit about the American soldier. Best thing about him that I have seen is that he considers "THE NATION" the highest priority and does not even discuss bullshit futuristic nonsense:



New Army chief of staff eyes big changes
http://www.armytimes.com/news/2011/05/army-martin-dempsey-eyes-big-changes-050711w/
By Lance M. Bacon - Staff writer
Posted : Saturday May 7, 2011 9:04:16 EDT

I am eating my words, here are his first comments:



New military head Dempsey urges response to Arab Spring
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/06/01/new-military-head-dempsey-urges-response-to-arab-spring/
By Agence France-Presse
Wednesday, June 1st, 2011 -- 8:27 am

LONDON (AFP) – The man named by President Barack Obama to be the top US military officer said Wednesday that American forces must adapt to an uncertain world after the Arab Spring and the death of Osama bin Laden. In his first public comments since Obama unveiled him as his formal pick for Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey also admitted that progress at a national level in Afghanistan was proving difficult. "The killing of Osama bin Laden was a great moment in terms of taking the leadership of Al-Qaeda and creating difficulties for that organisation," Dempsey told the Royal United Services Institute defence think-tank in London. But Dempsey underscored the idea that Al-Qaeda was in some ways a "leaderless" organisation that might regenerate in unexpected ways after US commandos killed bin Laden in Pakistan a month ago. "I don't know that we have yet come to understand what his particular demise might mean for the future," he said.

Dempsey told an audience of defence chiefs from countries including Britain, the United States, China and Brazil that the US military needs to adapt better to "viral" events like this year's revolutions in the Middle East.

"Here I think our imaginations are just beginning to touch the edges of what it might mean," he said, adding that so far "maybe we have not used our imaginations to the extent that we might use them."

He added: "What brought down Mubarak was Facebook and social networking, a leaderless organisation that rose up and we call the Arab Spring. So things can happen much more quickly than in the past.

"So in the context of a viral world we are trying to build an army that meets requirements."

Dempsey said that in Iraq there had been "vindication" for US efforts to hand over security to local forces, but in Afghanistan the "challenge has been and continues to be different." "There has been enormous progress made at the tactical level but the progress has been harder to link together with progress at the national level" in Afghanistan, he said. US forces are due to begin pulling out of Afghanistan next month with a full handover from NATO to Afghan forces due at the end of 2014. Dempsey, 59, who is the current chief of army staff, will replace Admiral Mike Mullen if he is confirmed by a Senate hearing.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Effie Trinket

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I am eating my words
If you want even more proof that you are NOW correct, and your new thread title is correct, "New Joint Chiefs of Staff: Martin Dempsey...1st speech...100% RMA Bullshit!", read this article--and look who wrote it:

http://www.commentarymagazine.com/2011/05/30/gen-dempsey-an-excellent-choice-for-chairman-of-joint-chiefs/

Contentions
Gen. Dempsey an Excellent Choice for Chairman of Joint Chiefs

Max Boot 05.30.2011 - 1:47 PM



I still think Gen. David Petraeus—the most successful general the U.S. has produced in decades—would have been the logical candidate to become chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Admiral James Stavridis, currently Supreme Allied Commander in Europe and before that the head of Southern Command, would have been another logical choice because of his diplomatic experience.

But it is hard to argue with the selection of Gen. Martin Dempsey, who was only recently tapped to become army chief of staff. He is a veteran of two combat tours in Iraq and a former acting commander of Central Command who is widely respected for his intellect and his grasp of Middle Eastern complexities. Certainly he is a far better choice than Gen. James Cartwright, the Marine who is the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs, and was widely seen as the front-runner for the top job until a few weeks ago in spite of his having absolutely no combat experience at a time of war.

Cartwright endeared himself to some in the White House by backing Vice President Biden in his opposition to the counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan, which was strongly backed by Defense Secretary Bob Gates and Admiral Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs. In the process, Cartwright got a reputation within the Pentagon as a devious and disloyal bureaucratic operator. If he had been appointed as chairman, a crisis in civil-military relations would have ensued. That flare-up has now been avoided.

As a bonus, the selection of Dempsey as chairman opened up the army chief of staff’s job for Gen. Ray Odierno, who did as much as Petraeus to make the surge in Iraq a success. Odierno has been on the frontlines as long as any senior general, and he will bring to his new job a comprehensive knowledge of all the army units that served under his command—which by this point must include most of the army.

Today’s announcements confirm the point I had made earlier about Obama: He has had to undergo a long period of on-the-job training and he has made a number of stumbles along the way but he also has a capacity to learn from experience and correct course before things go too disastrously awry. The decision to drop Cartwright in favor of Dempsey is another indication of that process in action.

Offline chris jones

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 Matin is a sold out NWO sukling.

Offline Al Bundy

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General Dempsey says that ISIS not direct threat for West and won`t recommend air strikes on ISIS in Syria yet.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/08/25/joint-chiefs-chairman-says-isis-not-direct-threat-to-west-wont-recommend-syria/http://

Offline Dude447

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Its more UK USA  policy gone bad .As far as Lybia is on the map ok Assad maybe a dictator but I would sooner support him than the CIA  funded  free Lybia BS army any day of the week

Offline Dude447

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O I said  Libya name the rest as far as I think . The thing that really gets me pissed is the amount of millitary and civilian people who end up getting killed

Offline Al Bundy

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Its more UK USA  policy gone bad .As far as Lybia is on the map ok Assad maybe a dictator but I would sooner support him than the CIA  funded  free Lybia BS army any day of the week

When you mentioned Lybia instead Syria :

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/24/libya-capital-under-islamist-control-tripoli-airport-seized-operation-dawnhttp://

Offline Dude447

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Thanks for the correction  Al  Assad Syria

Offline Dude447

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And for the record I think Gaddaf got 2 capped