Fabian Headquarters used to belong to the Knights Templar

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worcesteradam

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Fabian Headquarters used to belong to the Knights Templar
« on: May 06, 2011, 04:51:44 PM »
The Fabian Society is a British socialist movement, whose purpose is to advance the principles of democratic socialism via gradualist and reformist, rather than revolutionary, means.

The Fabian Society was founded on 4 January 1884 in London as an offshoot of a society founded in 1883 called The Fellowship of the New Life. The Fellowship of the New Life was dissolved in 1898, but the Fabian Society grew to become the preeminent academic society in the United Kingdom in the Edwardian era, typified by the members of its vanguard Coefficients club. Public meetings of the Society were for many years held at Essex Hall, a popular location just off the Strand in central London.

Essex Street Chapel, also known as Essex Church, is a Unitarian place of worship in London. It was the first church in England set up with this doctrine. the General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches, the umbrella organisation for British Unitarianism, which is still based on the same site, in an office building called Essex Hall. This was completed by 1778, with financial support from Francis Dashwood, 15th Baron le Despencer, founder of the Hellfire Club,
The chapel was located just off the Strand, on a site formerly occupied by Essex House, London home of the Earl of Essex, hence the name of the street and the hall. It was about halfway between the City of London and Westminster.

Essex House was a house in London, built around 1575 for Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and originally called Leicester House.
The property occupied the site where the Outer Temple, part of the London headquarters of the Knights Templar, had previously stood , and was immediately adjacent to the Middle Temple, then one of the four principal Inns of Court.
The house fronted The Strand and was adjacent to the Middle Temple of the London headquarters of the Knights Templar.

Offline chrisfromchi

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Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Fabian Headquarters used to belong to the Knights Templar
« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2013, 06:21:21 PM »
http://www.forbiddensymbols.com/fabian-society/
...
The Fellowship of the New Life was dissolved in 1899,[4] but the Fabian Society grew to become the pre-eminent academic society in the United Kingdom in the Edwardian era, typified by the members of its vanguard Coefficients club. Public meetings of the Society were for many years held at Essex Hall, a popular location just off the Strand in central London.[5]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVZALJ0uR-c
Fabian Society: Pay for Permission to Use the Earth

http://truthstreammedia.com/fabian-society-pay-for-permission-to-use-the-earth/
In a document from the Fabian Society circa 1887, the prestigious UK socialist behind the founding of the Labour Party, are principles set against the private ownership of land and for the formation of a global commune. In particular, the group whose most notable members include playwright George Bernard Shaw and sci-fi writer H.G. Wells, says that people should "pay rent" for "permission to use the Earth."

Clearly, this a forerunner to global governance institution who are today trying restrict individual rights in the name of saving the Earth while driving the masses into a global collective ruled by secretive societies of elite members.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essex_House_(London)

Essex House was a house in London, built around 1575 for Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester and originally called Leicester House.

The property occupied the site where the Outer Temple, part of the London headquarters of the Knights Templar, had previously stood, and was immediately adjacent to the Middle Temple, then one of the four principal Inns of Court.

The house fronted The Strand and was adjacent to the Middle Temple of the London headquarters of the Knights Templar.

It was renamed Essex House after being inherited by Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex in 1588. The house was substantial. In 1590, it was recorded as having 42 bedrooms, plus a picture gallery, kitchens, outhouses, a banqueting suite and a chapel.

Essex’s mother, Lettice Knollys, leased out the house for a while, but she moved in later with her new husband, Sir Christopher Blount, as well as her son and his family. After the executions of Blount and Essex, she continued to live there until her death, leasing part of the house to James Hay, the first Earl of Carlisle. The house then became the property of Robert Devereux, 3rd Earl of Essex, who leased part of it to his brother-in-law, William Seymour, 1st Marquess of Hertford.

After the English Civil War, the family lost ownership as a result of their debts. Following the Restoration and the death of William Seymour, Sir Orlando Bridgeman lived in the house for a time. When the Duchess of Somerset died in 1674, she left the house to her granddaughter, whose husband, Sir Thomas Thynne, sold it, along with the adjoining lands and properties.

The main part of the house was demolished some time between 1674 and 1679. Essex Street was built on part of the site.

One of those buildings was used in the mid-1770s as a Dissenters' meeting house known as the Essex Street Chapel, where Unitarianism was first preached in England. The denominational headquarters are still on the site, now called Essex Hall. Their building footprint is believed to include the Tudor chapel of Essex House

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Devereux,_2nd_Earl_of_Essex
Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, KG PC (10 November 1565[1] – 25 February 1601) was an English nobleman and a favourite of Elizabeth I. Politically ambitious, and a committed general, he was placed under house arrest following a poor campaign in Ireland during the Nine Years' War in 1599. In 1601 he led an abortive coup d'état against the government and was executed for treason.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Assembly_of_Unitarian_and_Free_Christian_Churches

The General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches (GAUFCC) is the umbrella organisation for Unitarian, Free Christian and other liberal religious congregations in the United Kingdom. It was formed in 1928, with denominational roots going back to the Great Ejection of 1662. Its headquarters building is Essex Hall in central London, on the site of the first avowedly Unitarian chapel in England, set up in 1774.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Essex_Street_Chapel

The chapel was located just off the Strand, on a site formerly occupied by Essex House, London home of the Earl of Essex, hence the name of the street and the hall. It was about halfway between the City and Westminster, in the legal district of London.

From the mid-18th century, some rooms within the former nobleman's palace were used as the auction room of an up-scale bookseller named Samuel Paterson.[1]

This was easily adapted into a simple meeting house, but within a few years there was enough of a congregation, and enough donations, to have a new edifice raised on the foundations of the old. This was completed by 1778, with financial support from Francis Dashwood, 15th Baron le Despencer,[2] founder of the Hellfire Club, and Thomas Brand Hollis, political radical.[3]

Another supporter and trustee was Samuel Heywood, the chief justice.[4] Their building footprint is believed to include the Tudor chapel of Essex House.[5]
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Fabian Headquarters used to belong to the Knights Templar
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2017, 12:24:25 PM »
bump for Mithra in London ///
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5