EXPOSED: All Identity Theft Operations are directed by the US Secret Service!!!

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Offline Overcast

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From: www.wired.com


Hacker Claims U.S. Authorized His Crimes

In Surprise Appeal, TJX Hacker Claims U.S. Authorized His Crimes

    * By Kim Zetter

Albert Gonzalez, the hacker who masterminded the largest credit card heists in U.S. history, is asking a federal judge to throw out his earlier guilty pleas and lift his record-breaking 20-year prison sentence, on allegations that the government authorized his years-long crime spree.

Gonzalez, 29, admitted last year that he and accomplices hacked into TJX, Office Max, Dave & Busters, Heartland Payment Systems and other companies to steal more than 130 million credit and debit card numbers, in what the government deemed the biggest computer crime case ever prosecuted in the United States. He’s currently serving time at the Milan low-security federal prison in southeastern Michigan, with a release date in the year 2025.

The government has acknowledged that Gonzalez was a key undercover Secret Service informant at the time of the breaches. Now, in a March 24 habeas corpus petition filed in the U.S. District Court in Massachusetts, Gonzalez asserts that the Secret Service authorized him to commit the crimes.

“I still believe that I was acting on behalf of the United States Secret Service and that I was authorized and directed to engage in the conduct I committed as part of my assignment to gather intelligence and seek out international cyber criminals,” he wrote. “I now know and understand that I have been used as a scapegoat to cover someone’s mistakes.”

In his 25-page petition, he faults one of his attorneys for failing to prepare a “Public Authority” defense, by which someone who commits a crime argues that he did so with the approval of government authorities.

He says his attorneys never discussed a Public Authority defense with him. Had he known the option existed, he would never have pleaded guilty.

Habeas motions, known as 2255 motions, can be used by convicted prisoners to assert defective counsel or other jurisdictional and constitutional issues outside of a direct appeal. Gonzalez is acting as his own attorney in the petition.

Gonzalez became a confidential informant for the Secret Service when he was arrested in New York in 2003 after withdrawing cash from ATMs using stolen card numbers. While working closely with agents for more than four years to put other carders behind bars, he was simultaneously running a criminal enterprise he dubbed “Operation Get Rich or Die Tryin’,” according to court documents.

He was arrested in 2008 and eventually pleaded guilty to conspiracy and computer fraud, among other charges. He received two sentences last March amounting to 20 years and a day in prison — the lengthiest punishment ever imposed for computer or identity theft crimes.

At one of his sentencing hearings, Gonzalez told the court that he deeply regretted his crimes and was remorseful for having taken advantage of the personal relationships he’d forged.

“Particularly one I had with a certain government agency … that gave me a second chance in life,” he said.

But in the motion to withdraw his plea, he asserts that “each and every illegal act” he was charged with was conducted during covert operations that were controlled and operated by the Secret Service.

He writes that when he was arrested in May 2008 by Miami police, he “was expecting Secret Service to come and take custody of me and squash the charges.” Instead, he was charged with crimes that he says he committed on the government’s behalf.

Gonzalez’s former attorney, Rene Palomino, disputes assertions that the Secret Service approved Gonzalez’s crimes.

“He was given the opportunity of a lifetime to work for the Secret Service,” Palomino says. “He chose to become a criminal, bottom line, and become a double agent working both sides — the criminal side and the legal side.”

In his petition, Gonzalez faults Palomino and co-counsel Martin Weinberg with failing to file a notice of appeal as he requested after his sentencing and, more important, failing to file a motion to suppress evidence obtained from a Ukrainian carder’s laptop after his arrest in Turkey.

Gonzalez says that in 2007 the carder, Maksym “Maksik” Yastremskiy, was tortured by Turkish officials in order to obtain the passphrase to decrypt his computer.

Yastremskiy was considered the top card vendor in the underground and allegedly earned more than $11 million selling stolen credit and debit card data. He was lured to a meeting in Turkey with an undercover operative, where he was nabbed.

Gonzalez says prior to Yastremskiy’s arrest, he had been passing information about the carder’s activities to his government handlers and was even congratulated by Secret Service agent Steve Ward over lunch after the arrest. He also writes that Ward told him that the Turks had “beat Yastremskiy’s ass and made him give up the passphrase.”

Data gleaned from the laptop, along with other information, allowed authorities to zero in on two hackers who appeared to be Yastremskiy’s biggest suppliers of stolen card data from top retailers such as TJX, OfficeMax and Dave & Busters. One of the suppliers, “Segvec,” was eventually identified as Gonzalez.

When he was arrested in 2008, Gonzalez told Palomino about Yastremskiy’s alleged beating and asked him to investigate. But when Palomino sought funds from Gonzalez’s parents to fly to Turkey, Gonzalez’s parents said they couldn’t afford it.

Without an affidavit, Palomino told Gonzalez, he couldn’t file a motion to suppress. Palomino was “ineffective” for failing to file the motion, Gonzalez writes. Had he done so, the evidence would have been suppressed, and the government “would have had no case against me.”

In his petition, Gonzalez further argues that he should be allowed to withdraw his plea because the government failed to uphold its part of the agreement. He was told that if he pleaded guilty, the government would ask the court to consolidate the three cases against him — in New York, New Jersey and Massachusetts — into a single case before one judge, allowing him to receive a single sentence.

Prosecutors did request a consolidation from the court, but the court agreed to consolidate only two of the cases. Gonzalez ended up receiving two sentences — 20 years, and 20 years and a day — which he is serving concurrently.

Palomino insists his former client has no grounds for withdrawing his plea.

“This was a negotiated plea,” says Palomino. “He knew what he was getting into when he signed off on this agreement.”

Regarding his failure to file a motion to suppress evidence obtained under torture, Palomino says, “We researched the issue regarding the evidence, and there were no grounds for suppression. Everything that was legally possible that could have been done for him was done for him. Nothing was left undone.”

The filing provides a glimpse at some of Gonzalez’s undercover work and at the relationship he formed with his handlers, Secret Service agents David Esposito and Steve Ward, who he says paid him $1,200 a month in cash for the work he performed.

Using the online names “Cumbajohnny” and “Segvec,” Gonzalez engaged carders in underground chat rooms and helped set them up to be busted. During his undercover time, he went to California for a week for one operation and to Chicago, where he helped set up a honeypot.

He was also invited to Secret Service headquarters in Washington, D.C., to give a presentation on malware and computer-security vulnerabilities. He proved himself so trustworthy, that he was invited to agent briefings and became privy to “highly confidential information.”


He even went bike riding and bar hopping with his handlers in the evening after work.

“They treated me like one of their own and did everything but give me a gun and a badge,” Gonzalez writes. “On one occasion, even the possibility of a gun for protection was discussed if the need ever arose.”

In 2004, he participated in his biggest sting operation from a military base at Cavens Point, New Jersey. Called Operation Firewall, the groundbreaking sting focused on carders on an underground forum called Shadowcrew and led to arrests of more than 20 people.

After Operation Firewall ended, Gonzalez moved back to Miami, where he’d grown up, and continued to work undercover for the agency on the “Shadow Ops” operation. A former associate of Gonzalez told Threat Level previously that it was during this period that he began earning $75,000 a year working for the Secret Service. It was also during this period that he committed the bulk of the crimes for which he was later charged.

Gonzalez writes that when the agents asked him to commit acts he knew were illegal, he complied, “to please the Agents who had shown me such respect and friendship.” He said the agents told him they had his back and would intervene if he was ever arrested.

“At that point I would have done anything they asked me to do,” he writes. “I was overwhelmed and felt like I could do no wrong.”

Gonzalez says the agents even turned a blind eye when he committed crimes in order to resolve a $5,000 debt with an unnamed Russian carder. Gonzalez incurred the debt before he began working for the feds and didn’t have the funds to clear it.

He says he told the agents that if he didn’t repay the debt, he’d lose credibility in the underground and thus his effectiveness as an informant. Agent Ward allegedly told him, “Go do your thing and pay the debt, just don’t get caught.”

“All of this inflated my ego and made me feel very important and made me feel like I was really a part of the Secret Service with the backing and support of the Government Agency,” Gonzalez writes.

“One day I was unknown and nothing, and the next day I am being hailed as a genius and giving presentations to Secret Service Agents in Washington, D.C. All of this was mind boggling for me.”

A Secret Service official told Threat Level that because the case was going through the appellate process he was unable to comment.
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

Offline attietewd

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Re: Hacker Claims U.S. Authorized His Crimes
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2011, 02:30:22 AM »
Do I believe him?  Yes, it's the government MO, it's what they do, use people then discard them.  Sometimes they use them to death.
“Thus, condemnation will never come to those who are in Christ Jesus…”

Offline Dig

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INSIDE JOB / RED CELL OPERATIONS / FALSE FLAG / HUMAN INTELLIGENCE GATHERING / NATIONAL RECONAISSANCE OFFICE / FBI $1 BILLION BIOMETRICS DATA MINING FACILITY


MASTER CARD THEIF BLOWS THE WHISTLE:
US government authorized his crimes

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/04/08/master-credit-card-thief-claims-us-government-authorized-his-crimes/
By Muriel Kane Friday, April 8th, 2011 -- 8:21 pm



A year ago, Albert Gonzalez confessed to having led an operation that stole more than 130 million credit and debit card numbers by hacking into computers at TJ Maxx and other retailers and was sentenced to twenty years in prison. Now he wants his conviction overturned on the grounds that the US Secret Service authorized him to do it.

In a habeas corpus petition filed on March 24, Gonzales writes,

“I still believe that I was acting on behalf of the United States Secret Service and that I was authorized and directed to engage in the conduct I committed as part of my assignment to gather intelligence and seek out international cybercriminals. ... I now know and understand that I have been used as a scapegoat to cover someone’s mistakes.”

According to The Register, however, "Gonzalez, 29, who escaped jail time back in 2004 over his involvement in the sale of 1.5 million stolen credit and ATM card numbers while a member of the Shadowcrew group by ratting out his erstwhile partners in cybercrime, went on to bigger and better things. While supposedly working for the Secret Service, he acted as ringleader in a massive credit card theft and laundering operation involving an estimated 170 million credit cards between around July 2005 and his arrest in May 2008."

Gonzalez himself claims that the Secret Service "treated me like one of their own" and that he was even invited to brief the government agents on malware and other security vulnerabilities. “All of this inflated my ego and made me feel very important and made me feel like I was really a part of the Secret Service with the backing and support of the Government Agency,” he writes. "One day I was unknown and nothing and the next day I am being hailed as a genius."

Gonzalez alleges that everything he did was controlled by the Secret Service and that he expected them to step in after he was arrested by Miami police in 2008 "and take custody of me and squash the charges." He also says his former lawyers never told him he could use a "Public Authority defense" -- arguing that he had government approval to commit his crimes -- and that he would not have pleaded guilty if he had known.

One of those lawyers, Rene Palomino, disputes this claim, insisting, “He was given the opportunity of a lifetime to work for the Secret Service. He chose to become a criminal, bottom line, and become a double agent working both sides — the criminal side and the legal side.”

The Register largely agrees, writing that "the petition provides a fascinating insight into the life of a cybercrime informant and cites example that would support the contention that Secret Service informants turned a blind eye to some low-level scams carried out by Gonzalez. ... It's a much bigger stretch, however, to come away with the conclusion that the Secret Service had granted Gonzalez carte blanche to carry out the biggest cybercrime operation ever uncovered."

Adding an additional twist to the story, Gonzales claims that his lawyers failed to file a motion to suppress evidence obtained from a Ukrainian vendor of stolen card data who was allegedly tortured by Turkish officials to obtain access to data on his computer which implicated Gonzalez.

Palomino says he was unable to do anything because Gonzalez's parents didn't have the money to pay for him to fly to Turkey to investigate the matter. He also insists, "We researched the issue regarding the evidence, and there were no grounds for suppression."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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For decades we were being conditioned to believe that all terrorists are fundamentalist religious nuts.

Now we know the truth...

ALL TERRRORISTS (INCLUDING CYBER TERRORISTS) WORK FOR NON-CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES!
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline agentbluescreen

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Poor boy was sure no Osama bin Ladin eh?

Catch me if you can-ers only get away with this stuff in movies, or by never getting caught, LOL.

Offline Satyagraha

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INSIDE JOB / RED CELL OPERATIONS / FALSE FLAG / HUMAN INTELLIGENCE GATHERING / NATIONAL RECONAISSANCE OFFICE / FBI $1 BILLION BIOMETRICS DATA MINING FACILITY


MASTER CARD THEIF BLOWS THE WHISTLE:
US government authorized his crimes

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/04/08/master-credit-card-thief-claims-us-government-authorized-his-crimes/
By Muriel Kane Friday, April 8th, 2011 -- 8:21 pm

....

The Register largely agrees, writing that "the petition provides a fascinating insight into the life of a cybercrime informant and cites example that would support the contention that Secret Service informants turned a blind eye to some low-level scams carried out by Gonzalez. ... It's a much bigger stretch, however, to come away with the conclusion that the Secret Service had granted Gonzalez carte blanche to carry out the biggest cybercrime operation ever uncovered."...


"It's a much bigger stretch" - LIKE HELL!

GET A CLUE AS*HOLES! It's not a stretch at all - it's IN YOUR FACE.


The terrorists are using "EFFECTS BASED OPERATIONS" - manufacturing crises - this is PROOF.

And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Bank's antifraud tactics stun security expert: How much do they know?
AVG's Roger Thompson discusses brush identity-theft prevention measures
http://www.networkworld.com/news/2009/121409-bank-antifraud-measures.html
By Ellen Messmer, Network World
December 14, 2009 03:54 PM ET

Checking out of a Hilton hotel in London, security expert Roger Thompson was told his Visa card had been declined due to suspicions it was stolen, a situation that only got more disconcerting when he learned the bank that issued the card had more personal information on him and his family members than he ever imagined.

In a tale he relates in his blog, Thompson, chief research officer at AVG, said he was compelled to answer questions on the phone from a Wachovia Bank representative in its fraud-prevention division to prove he was really Roger Thompson and not a credit-card thief checking out of the London hotel.

It turns out Thompson's Visa card was flagged and suspended because he hadn't told the bank he was travelling overseas, a requirement he didn't know the bank had.

But the "scary bit" about it all, he says, is that the bank fraud-prevention representative
didn't just ask him to give the correct answers to questions such as his mother's maiden name,
which he had provided to the bank for fraud detection purposes, but also a host of other questions
about his daughter-in-law that he had no idea it knew.


"I was in shock," Thompson says about what he found out that Wachovia Bank had stored "at their fingertips" related to his daughter-in-law -- information Thompson thinks the bank may have found out through Facebook.

"They used her maiden name, they knew she was my daughter in-law, they wanted me to best describe the age range for this person," Thompson says, adding that he was in "shock and indignation" about how they would know all this, including how long she was married.

The bank fraud-prevention representative indicated it was all "publicly available information," he says. At the hotel on the phone, Thompson answered the questions about his daughter-in-law, the bank lifted the suspension on his credit card, and he paid his bill and left for the airport.

Thompson says he wracked his brain to figure out where the bank may have gotten this information about his daughter-in-law but he could only reason it was from Facebook, where she's a friend.

Thompson, a security expert with decades of experience in identifying malware, fraud and hacker exploits of social-networking sites, such as MySpace and Facebook, says he doesn't see this as an issue around Facebook per se. Rather, this is about what kind of data that corporations may be collecting from Facebook or other social-networking sites -- if they are. He adds this strikes him as a serious data-privacy issue, and he notes that if a bank has this kind of database information on him, "they probably have it on you, too."

Lisa Westermann, assistant vice president, public relations at Wells Fargo & Company's Card Services and Consumer Lending division, issued the following statement about its practices, saying, "I confirmed that we do not gather information from social networking sites. Our fraud prevention strategies are considered proprietary to help ensure they are effective." She added, "We do encourage customers to let us know if they are travelling so we don't put a hold on their account for unusual spending patterns."
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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RED TEAM MEMBER SACRIFICED: Gonzalez takes the fall.
Other red team members take note:
any day you could wind up being scapegoated - it's your job!


================================

Do Punishments Fit the Cybercrime?
http://www.infosecurity-us.com/view/12029/do-punishments-fit-the-cybercrime-/
25 August 2010
(ISC)˛ U.S. Government Advisory Board Executive Writer's Bureau

Although some collaborative strides have been made, the international law enforcement community still lacks sufficient resources and skills to have substantial impact on the cybercrime juggernaut. The (ISC)˛ U.S. Government Advisory Board examines deterrent effects of recent high-profile prosecutions, legislative gaps, challenges in US cybercrime laws, and obstacles facing international law enforcement strategies.

The March 25, 2010, sentencing of hacker Albert Gonzalez to 20 years in prison and millions of dollars in restitution was historic because it was the stiffest verdict imposed for a financial crime, and the longest US prison term in history for a cybercrime. It dwarfs the sentence recently imposed on hacker Max Ray Vision, who received 13 years in prison for similar crimes.

Gonzalez (aka ‘soupnazi’, ‘cumbajohnny’, ‘j4guar17’, or ‘segvec’) was sentenced for leading a gang of cyber thieves who stole more than 130 million credit and debit card numbers from TJ Maxx (TJX) and other retailers. Gonzalez’s sentencing followed two others related to the TJX hacks.


In December 2009, Stephen Watt, a former coder for Morgan Stanley, was sentenced to two years in prison for providing the sniffer that Gonzalez used in the TJX hack. Watt was also ordered to pay restitution to TJX, jointly with other accomplices, in the amount of $171.5 million.

"Prior to the Gonzalez sentence of “near-life” for computer fraud, there was a marked absence of tangible or identifiably deterrent sentences for digital crime"
Additionally, Humza Zaman, a former network security manager at Barclays Bank, was sentenced to 46 months in prison and fined $75 000 for serving as a money courier for Gonzalez. He was charged with laundering between $600 000 and $800 000 for the famed TJX hacker.

Gonzalez was also concurrently sentenced in another case involving breaches at Heartland Payment Systems (a New Jersey card-processing company), Hannaford Brothers supermarket chain, 7-Eleven and two national retailers that are unidentified in court documents.

Setting a Precedent

In light of the relative impunity with which cybercriminals currently operate, the argument can easily be made that both national and international law enforcement communities are ill equipped to stem the rapidly rising tide of cybercrime. Prior to the Gonzalez sentence of “near-life” for computer fraud, there was a marked absence of tangible or identifiably deterrent sentences for digital crime. If the 1999 highly publicized criminal conviction of notorious hacker, Kevin Mitnick – involving a five-year prison term and $25 000 in restitution – was intended to ‘send a message’ to other would-be hackers, then the message was lost on Gonzalez and his gang. Gonzalez dubbed his criminal enterprise ‘Operation Get Rich or Die Tryin’, and confided to accomplices that his goal was to earn $15 million from his schemes, buy a yacht and retire.

"Specific US computer crime statutes, such as The Wiretap Act or the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, are woefully outdated and inadequate to handle the pace of technological advancement in today’s world"
Gonzalez was well on his way to achieving his goal when he was finally jailed six years into his crime spree. Regardless of his near-life sentence, skilled and increasingly unskilled cybercriminals are being lured by the internet’s perceived anonymity and ubiquity, combined with a potentially fast, easy financial gain. It is doubtful that stiffer sentences will substantially impact the cybercrime juggernaut.

Right Under Our Noses

The Gonzalez case was also historic from another perspective. It is emblematic of not only the transformation in how computer crimes are being perpetrated, but it also sheds light on the subsequent evolution of how these crimes are being investigated.

Cyber security and law enforcement communities have progressively improved their ability to deal with cybercrime, largely as a result of increased spending, training, and bringing ‘non-traditional’, sometimes controversial tactics and techniques to the exploding threat space. The Gonzalez case provides a textbook example of how one such controversial technique can backfire on law enforcement.

"It is doubtful that stiffer sentences will substantially impact the cybercrime juggernaut"

Gonzalez initially popped up in a law enforcement dragnet in 2003, when he was arrested for making fraudulent ATM withdrawals in New York. Under the nickname ‘Cumbajohnny’, he was, at the time, a top administrator on a carding site called “Shadow crew”, where crooks trafficked in stolen bank card data and other goods. Upon discovery of how central his role was in the carding community, the US Secret Service freed him but then hired him to work undercover on the site. Gonzalez then lured his associates into using a supposedly secure virtual private network (VPN) that was wiretapped by the Secret Service.

After a year-long undercover sting operation, 28 members of the site were arrested, and the site was taken down. Although Gonzalez continued to help the Secret Service as a salaried employee, earning $75 000 a year, he adopted a new online identity, ‘segvec’, and resumed his criminal activity under the noses of the agents who were paying him. He ramped up his activities to a level that far exceeded any crimes he had committed prior to his arrest. Until it was discovered in May of 2008, law enforcement had no idea that the ‘segvec’ they were furiously chasing for more than a year was, in reality, a salaried informant employed by the Secret Service.

Legislation that’s Behind the Times

From a legislative perspective, many existing criminal laws in national and international jurisdictions were originally drafted to deal with physical acts, and thus do not clearly prohibit equivalent virtual acts performed online. Historically in the US, the use of electronic surveillance for legitimate purposes such as intelligence and law enforcement investigation, as well as for illegitimate purposes, spurred the enactment of a number of laws intended to comprehensively address such activities.

Congress passed the first federal wiretap statute as a temporary measure to prevent disclosure of domestic telephone or telegraph communications during World War I. Despite several notable legislative advances since then, very specific US computer crime statutes, such as The Wiretap Act or the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, are woefully outdated and inadequate to handle the pace of technological advancement in today’s world. The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act was written in 1986, before information systems became such an integral part of American life. Consequently, prosecutors must find plausible ways to apply the law, hope that the judiciary and juries understand the severity of the crime and can, within the limitations dictated by the law, penalize appropriately.

"Despite recent upswings in the number of stiffer penalties and fines for cybercrimes, the requisite level of deterrence is still missing, and the tide of cybercrime continues to rise rapidly"
The salient lessons to be learned from the legislative challenge is that several jurisdictions have yet to update their laws to prohibit ‘new’ crimes such as hacking and denial-of-service attacks, or to penalize these crimes sufficiently to act as a deterrent. Furthermore, many of those jurisdictions that do have clear criminal laws also have not adopted the procedural mechanisms necessary to enable law enforcement to investigate cybercrime effectively, or they may not have established treaties and policies that permit international cooperation, which is essential in combating cybercrime.

Industry has been helping to support the development of strong international legal regimes in a number of ways, including efforts to amplify the message of encouraging countries to adopt and ratify the Council of Europe Convention on Cybercrime. It’s a powerful international instrument on cybercrime, and is increasingly viewed as providing a global standard for criminalization obligations and governmental cooperation in this area. The Convention on Cybercrime provides an important baseline for effective international cybercrime enforcement by requiring signatories to update and adopt laws and procedures to address crime in the online environment by providing for mutual investigative assistance between signatories.

We’ve also seen very tangible results of industry identifying those areas where existing laws are inadequate, bringing them to the attention of lawmakers and supporting efforts for reform, such as anti-spam legislation and the recent Botnet Task Force led by Microsoft.

Despite recent upswings in the number of stiffer penalties and fines for cybercrimes, the requisite level of deterrence is still missing, and the tide of cybercrime continues to rapidly rise. The challenge of disparate national and regional laws and practices concerning the investigation and prosecution of cybercrime, data preservation, protection and privacy is substantial, but until these issues are resolved they will continue to stymie national and international law enforcement efforts.

=========================

Members of the (ISC)˛ U.S. Government Advisory Board Executive Writer’s Bureau include federal IT security experts from government and industry.
Visit the (ISC)˛  website for a full list of Bureau members.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Hackers Indicted For Stealing More Than 5 000 Account Numbers at Dave & Buster’s
http://www.infosecurity-us.com/view/1215/hackers-indicted-for-stealing-more-than-5-000-account-numbers-at-dave-busters/
16 May 2008

A US federal grand jury has indicted three alleged hackers charged with stealing credit and debit card numbers from a national restaurant chain, Dave & Buster’s.

A US federal grand jury has indicted three alleged hackers charged with stealing credit and debit card numbers from a national restaurant chain, Dave & Buster’s.

The 27-count indictment charges Maksym Yastremskiy of the Ukraine and Aleksandr Suvorov of Estonia include two charges of computer fraud, wire fraud, conspiracy to possess unauthorized access devices, aggravated identity theft, computer fraud and counts of interception of electronic communications, among others.

Suvorov was arrested by German officials in March and is in jail there pending German action on a US extradition request, the Justice Department said, while Yastremskiy was arrested by Turkish officials and a formal request for his extradition to the US has been made to the Turkish government.

A one count complaint charges Albert Gonzalez of Florida, aka “Segvec,” with wire fraud conspiracy related to the scheme. According to the complaint, Internet chat room conversations indicate Gonzalez provided the sniffer software used to intercept the credit and debit card numbers.

Gonzalez was arrested this month in Miami, Florida by the Secret Service.


Yastremskiy and Suvorov allegedly gained entry into 11 of the company’s cash registers that were linked to point of sale (POS) computer servers, installing a packet sniffer on the network.

The code was configured to capture card data as it moved from the restaurant’s point-of-sale server through the computer system at the company’s corporate headquarters to the data processor’s computer system.

The Justice Department said at one restaurant location the packet sniffer captured track 2 data, (which includes the customer’s account number and expiration date, but not the cardholder’s name or other personally identifiable information), for roughly 5 000 credit and debit cards, eventually causing losses of at least $600 000 to the financial institutions that issued the credit and debit cards.

“Operating from locations in the US and abroad, these defendants hacked into computer systems and stole credit and debit card data from unsuspecting victims for their personal enrichment,” assistant attorney general for the criminal division Alice Fisher said in a statement. “The Department of Justice will be vigilant against these online hacker schemes that harm the integrity of the marketplace and victimize the public.”

The data was illegally accessed from Dave & Buster’s company computer systems during the card verification and transmission process. Dave & Buster’s said it was alerted to the potential data intrusion in late August 2007 and immediately contacted the Secret Service.

The stores involved were located in Colorado, New York, Michigan, Illinois, Ohio, Florida, California and Texas. The thefts occurred from May through August 2007.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Oklahoma hospital suffers data breach of 84,000 patient records
http://www.infosecurity-us.com/view/17024/oklahoma-hospital-suffers-data-breach-of-84000-patient-records/
01 April 2011

A computer containing personal information on 84,000 patients was stolen from the Saint Francis Health System in Tulsa, Okla., the facility admitted recently.

The computer contained names, social security numbers, addresses, and diagnostic information on 84,000 patients who were treated at the Saint Francis Broken Arrow outpatient facility prior to 2004, the facility said in a statement.

Saint Francis Health System notified the police when the breach was discovered and sent out notification letters to patients, as well as to employees who had information stored on the computer.

The hospital system said that it is offering an identity theft protection program for those affected by the breach. It stressed that the information was password protected and that it had not received any reports of misuse of the information as a result of the breach.

“The number of records stored on this equipment represents less than five percent of the total number of former patients in our data base”, the statement said.

The medical facility is instituting new information security measures as a result of the breach, including reviewing security processes at all remote information system rooms, improving security data storage technology, and hiring a third-party security company to assist in refining its data security program.

“We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this has caused our patients and employees from Saint Francis Broken Arrow”, the statement added.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Mobile device security is neglected by most Americans, survey finds
http://www.infosecurity-us.com/view/13515/mobile-device-security-is-neglected-by-most-americans-survey-finds/
27 October 2010

===============TRANSLATION================
Since Americans are neglecting mobile device security,
the Fatherland must do it for you... we show you are irresponsible,
so we'll come up with a solution to keep you safe.

=========================================

A majority of Americans surveyed are neglecting to take basic information security steps for their mobile devices, according to a survey by Unisys.

A full 63% of Americans said that they did not regularly use or update passwords on their mobile devices, according to the Unisys Security Index survey.


“As millions of consumer devices such as mobile phones continue to penetrate the workplace, the survey’s finding on consumers’ inattention to securing mobile devices should serve as a wake-up call for consumers and enterprises to actively pursue measures to protect the information exchanged with and residing on these devices”, said Mark Cohn, vice president of enterprise security for Unisys. “Enterprises, as well as the manufacturers of mobile devices, should take steps to ensure that sensitive data protection is enabled by default and is as simple and convenient as possible.”

In an interview with Infosecurity, Steve Vinsik, vice president for critical infrastructure protection at Unisys Federal Systems, offered a more sanguine view of consumers’ lack of interest in mobile device security.

“This result can be seen in a number of different ways. One, the mobile device is just a tool to get into the application that they use on the internet; these applications have user names and passwords. So consumers do not see these devices as a place to store their secure information, but more as a portal to access their personal information online, and that’s where they have the stronger passwords,” Vinsik observed.

Two, more people are bringing their personal mobile devices into the corporate enterprise, where security concerns are higher, he said. As a result, the enterprise is imposing information security measures on these mobile devices as a requirement for use in the corporate environment.

“As an enterprise, I can institute a password policy requirement on that mobile device. If an employee wants to get on my network, I’m going to require that they have a digital certificate and a complex password. So, are we concerned that a large part of the public doesn’t want to have passwords on their mobile devices? No, we don’t see that as a big security concern. We see it more as a question of how they want to use the device”, he observed.

In another noteworthy survey result, 61% of Americans favored giving the US president the authority to shut down portions of the internet, a so-called kill switch. “Our survey shows that the American public recognizes the danger of a cyber attack and wants the federal government to take an active role in extending the nation’s cyber defense”, said Patricia Titus, Unisys chief information security officer. “It will be up to officials in all branches of the federal government to respond to this call to action in a way that is measured and well planned.”

Congress is currently considering legislation that would significantly expand the president’s powers in the area of cyber defense, including the authority to declare a state of emergency and shut down industrial networks and parts of the internet. However, no action is expected on the legislation until after the mid-term elections.

Vinsik noted that the president already has the power to shut down the telecommunications network under the Communications Act of 1934, as amended in 1996, in case of emergency or war. “The authority is already there. The debate is whether that authority should be used for the internet,” he said. “The concept is a great idea, but the substantiation and deployment of it raises a number of issues, such as economic impact and privacy concerns”, he added.

The biannual Unisys Security Index surveys consumer opinion in four areas of security: financial, national, internet, and personal safety. More than 1000 Americans responded to the latest survey. The results are tallied on a scale of 0–300, with 300 representing the highest level of concern.

In the latest survey, the overall score for the United States was 136, a dramatic decline from the 147 posted in the February 2010 survey, reflecting a decrease in concern across all four areas of security.

National security and financial security continued to rank as the US public’s greatest areas of concern, with more than half (59%) “extremely” or “very” concerned about US national security. In addition, 57% of Americans were seriously concerned about identity theft, and the same percentage was also seriously concerned about credit card and debit card fraud.

American’s fear surrounding internet security continues to be on the decline with the number of Americans “not concerned” about computer security in relation to viruses or spam increasing to 34%, the greatest number since the Index’s inception. The most dramatic decline was reported in those “seriously concerned” about the security of shopping or banking online, from 43% in February 2010 to 34% in August 2010.

The survey is conducted in 11 countries, involving more than 10 000 consumers worldwide. According to the global results, security concerns were highest in Brazil, which reported an overall index score of 185, closely followed by Hong Kong with a score of 172. The Netherlands reported the lowest level of concern with an overall score of 71.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Dig

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You can keep your "rewards" cards!! 


Kroger Customer Deeply Concerned About Epsilon Security Breach

Jeanne Rose Jeanne Rose – Mon Apr 4, 4:24 pm ET

COMMENTARY | The Los Angeles Times reports that Epsilon, an online marketing company that manages customer data for many major retail stores, was hacked into this past week. Some of the customer data that was compromised includes those who receive e-mails from Kroger, Best Buy, US Bank, JPMorgan Chase and Walgreens. It was reported that only customer e-mail addresses and names were hacked into.

Unfortunately, I am one of millions affected by this security breach.

I am a longtime customer of Kroger, so when I received my Kroger Savings Card over six years ago, I gave them my personal information thinking it would be kept confidential. I signed up for the Kroger e-mails because they alert me to special savings going on in my area and also alert me of promotions going on within the company.

I received an e-mail this weekend alerting me of the security breach but it assured me that only names and e-mail addresses were exposed -- I find that hard to believe. I do not see how the breach only affects names and e-mail addresses in the customer database when there is a lot of sensitive information tied to your Kroger account.

The e-mail also said that I might receive spam e-mails and not to open anything I am not familiar with, which is currently what I do anyway when it comes to protecting my computer from malware. I always get a lot of spam e-mails due to the various free samples I sign up for through websites, so honestly I doubt I would notice a few more in my spam folder each day, but it will definitely have me on high alert. I am now going to be suspicious of any e-mail that comes from Kroger because I will not be able to tell a legitimate e-mail from a spam message.

I am very concerned about this security breach with Kroger because I have given them basically all of my personal information in order to link my Kroger account so I could download coupons digitally. I know that Kroger has my name, age, phone number, Kroger Savings Card number, address, and e-mail address. This is a huge security risk because even if someone only has a name and e-mail address, there are plenty of ways they can find out who you are. Most people who sign up for an e-mail account give information such as their city or state, so someone could easily figure out where you live. I am deeply concerned that the sensitive information I gave Kroger in order to better my service with the company will lead to spam e-mails and maybe even telemarketing calls.

Continued...
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline buckwheat

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It's a bit of a leap to conclude that ALL identity theft is driven by the US government just because this incident might have been, IF the claims of one man accused of a crime are true.

It's like saying if the assassination of JFK really was a government conspiracy then ALL people shot with guns were shot at the order of the US government.

Offline attietewd

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It's a bit of a leap to conclude that ALL identity theft is driven by the US government just because this incident might have been, IF the claims of one man accused of a crime are true.

It's like saying if the assassination of JFK really was a government conspiracy then ALL people shot with guns were shot at the order of the US government.

The key word being "operations".  It is not inferring that every identity theft is government directed.  But it is saying that all operations involving large covert groups are directed by branches of the government including directing crimes of identity theft. 
“Thus, condemnation will never come to those who are in Christ Jesus…”

Offline Dig

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It's a bit of a leap to conclude that ALL identity theft is driven by the US government just because this incident might have been, IF the claims of one man accused of a crime are true.

It's like saying if the assassination of JFK really was a government conspiracy then ALL people shot with guns were shot at the order of the US government.

It's a bit of a leap to conclude that your baseless comparison which fails to take into account the "operational" aspect dileneated in the thesis would be seen as anything other than a lack of research into the situation as there are scores of incidences of the largest identity thefts being conducted by the Bilderberg controlled unconstitutional government agencies. These trilateral terrorists are the ones to fear the most because they gain more power, the larger the crime. It is like saying that because a non-conspiracy ended up in a handgun homocide then all handgun homicides must never be investigated from an aspect of a possible conspiracy.

Here is a 10 year government operation involving millions of hijacked computers which the FBI finally had to shut down because the high crimes and act of treason became too costly to cover up anymore:

FBI disables Red Cell Operation known as ‘Coreflood’ botnet and seizes government servers
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2011/04/13/fbi-disables-coreflood-botnet-seizes-servers/
By Agence France-Presse Wednesday, April 13th, 2011 -- 5:56 pm

WASHINGTON – The US authorities have disabled a vast network of virus-infected computers used by cyber criminals to steal passwords and financial information, the Justice Department and FBI announced Wednesday. The "Coreflood" botnet is believed to have operated for nearly a decade and to have infected more than two million computers around the world, they said in a joint statement. The Justice Department and FBI said charges of wire fraud, bank fraud and illegal interception of electronic communications had been filed against 13 suspects identified in court papers only as John Doe 1, John Doe 2, etc. Five computer servers and 29 Internet domain names were seized as part of the operation, described as the "most complete and comprehensive enforcement action ever taken by US authorities to disable an international botnet." A botnet is a network of malware-infected computers that can be controlled remotely from other computers to carry out attacks or other operations. Coreflood, which exploited a vulnerability in computers running Microsoft's Windows operating systems, was used to steal usernames, passwords and other private personal and financial information, US officials said. "The seizure of the Coreflood servers and Internet domain names is expected to prevent criminals from using Coreflood or computers infected by Coreflood for their nefarious purposes," US attorney David Fein said. "These actions to mitigate the threat posed by the Coreflood botnet are the first of their kind in the United States and reflect our commitment to being creative and proactive in making the Internet more secure," said Shawn Henry of the FBI's Criminal, Cyber, Response and Services Branch. In July of last year, US, Spanish and Slovenian law enforcement authorities announced the arrest of the suspected creator of the "Mariposa Botnet," which may have infected as many as eight million to 12 million computers around the world.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline attietewd

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LOL That's what I meant to say Dig  ;D
“Thus, condemnation will never come to those who are in Christ Jesus…”

Offline Overcast

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It's a bit of a leap to conclude that ALL identity theft is driven by the US government just because this incident might have been, IF the claims of one man accused of a crime are true.

It's like saying if the assassination of JFK really was a government conspiracy then ALL people shot with guns were shot at the order of the US government.

That wasn't my subject line however.. I just re-post the article titles..

Of course, that being said - where there is one bad apple, you will most certainly find many more.
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

Offline chris jones

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 Give the fact this man was employed or contacted by Secret Service he was controlled ,under supervison and with constant suvellance. Does that appear to be a rational conslusion.
If so, it suprises me this federal agency had no idea whatsoever this man he hacked 130 million debit and credit card.  Is this a 3 bags full??
 Its become SOP to disregard the so called (negligence ?) of our Goverments lackeys. This reminds me of 911 in a way, NORAD was negligent, the FAA, the DOD, the Pentagon, the DIA, the FBI, the CIA, etc etc.

Offline attietewd

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Give the fact this man was employed or contacted by Secret Service he was controlled ,under supervison and with constant suvellance. Does that appear to be a rational conslusion.
If so, it suprises me this federal agency had no idea whatsoever this man he hacked 130 million debit and credit card.  Is this a 3 bags full??
 Its become SOP to disregard the so called (negligence ?) of our Goverments lackeys. This reminds me of 911 in a way, NORAD was negligent, the FAA, the DOD, the Pentagon, the DIA, the FBI, the CIA, etc etc.

Yeah, exactly, but we should let the government control every aspect of our lives because they are so much better qualified...........NOT   Why is this not obvious to the people who are running out to get government mandated vaccines for themselves and loved ones?  I know I know. 
“Thus, condemnation will never come to those who are in Christ Jesus…”

Offline Overcast

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Yeah, exactly, but we should let the government control every aspect of our lives because they are so much better qualified...........NOT   Why is this not obvious to the people who are running out to get government mandated vaccines for themselves and loved ones?  I know I know.  

In the 70's and more so the 80's - cash was demonized in popular media significantly.

There were a lot of shows about muggers, bank robbers, and such: (Death Wish, Dirty Harry, And Justice for All, I could list a ton).

It was WELL hyped in the 80's at how 'credit cards' were the 'future' - and how you couldn't get 'robbed' in the streets if you had one, since liability only went so far.

There was continued hype about how 'dangerous' the streets were, yadda, yadda. I clearly remember that.

It worked - not only were credit cards easier to a degree, but at the time; they did offer that protection. The credit companies were quick to prevent or squelch credit card theft at all.

Now - it's all you hear about.. How easy 'identity theft' is. Why? Credit Cards.

Try to steal my credit card number - just try.    ....
You can't - I don't have one.

I have a pre-paid one. I put cash on it if I need to. I have no debit card linked to my primary bank account. You have to walk in there or write a fraudulent check to get funds, either way is a much higher risk than a credit card. Forging a check can go past 'identity theft' by far when you consider forgery charges and such.

Soon, it will be pushed upon us how we need 'biometrics' to secure out money. We'll not only need some electronic chip in a wallet, arm, or forehead - we'll need to authenticate that with fingerprints or some other unique biometric data.

Then - as they said in the 80's - 'your money will be secure'.

No thanks, give me cash. It's funny, but using cash makes me a minority anymore, but I happily get to comment how 'in reality' cash is SO MUCH FASTER than a card.

Few weeks ago a lady in front of me was apologizing for taking so long... Her first card was declined, the second card gave the teller some odd error that the manager was trying to figure out. I only had a couple small items, but I had cash. I'm patient - the wait doesn't bother me, I'm happy to be alive most days... but I commented to her as a waved a $50 - well, at least I know this won't be declined.

She gave me a funny look and said, 'you know, you're right about that'.

:)

Credit Cards exist for one reason - to make the Credit Card companies profits. They can only profit if they are getting 'more cash' from the consumer. I like how many people tout the 'rewards' - like the credit card companies are some god-sent financial helpers who give away freebies, lol.

Quote
Gonzalez, 29, admitted last year that he and accomplices hacked into TJX, Office Max, Dave & Busters, Heartland Payment Systems and other companies to steal more than 130 million credit and debit card numbers

.... didn't get mine pal. :)

Want my cash, you gotta get it in person... and even then, I can't say I'd care if all my bills are paid for the month. Cash is just a means to an end.
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

Offline Dig

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Guess what...the secret service just stole all your children's personal informatiion via the purposefully hackable Sony Videogame Network.

77 Million people's private information has been assimilated to the Secret Service's bio-identity data warehouse operations. Whenever they need to extort anyone, they got all the information. Watch the movies "The Serpeant" with Henry Fonda and "The Kremlin Letter" to see how the CIA does this on a regular basis.


Secret Service False Flag Operation Raids Sony Videogame Network
http://online.wsj.com/article
By NICK WINGFIELD, IAN SHERR and BEN WORTHEN APRIL 27, 2011

A hacker stole the names, birth dates and possibly credit-card numbers for 77 million people who play online videogames through Sony Corp.'s PlayStation console, in what could rank among the biggest data breaches in history. A week after taking down its PlayStation Network, Sony said its popular online network had been hacked, affecting 77 million users. Dow Jones Newswire's Ian Sherr explains to Stacey Delo what data was at risk. Sony, whose gaming network has been offline for six days, disclosed Tuesday that an "illegal and unauthorized intrusion" between April 17 and April 19 resulted in the loss of a significant amount of personal information that could be used in identity theft. The PlayStation Network is used by owners of the company's game machine to play against one another, chat online and watch movies streamed over the Internet. Sony warned users the intruders may have accessed billing addresses, purchase histories and account information for their children.  Fueled by fast Internet connections, online-gaming services have become global social hubs for tens of millions of people who spend hours competing and cooperating on fantasy quests, combat missions and other activities. People across the globe pay monthly fees to play online-computer games like "World of Warcraft." Most titles for the PlayStation 3 and Microsoft Corp. Xbox 360 have online components.  Sony warned members of its PlayStation Network and a related entertainment service called Qriocity to closely watch their credit card statements for unauthorized charges. It also told members to be on guard against email, telephone and postal scams aided by the lost personal information. "While there is no evidence at this time that credit card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility," Sony said in a blog post.

The PlayStation Network, meanwhile, remains out of commission, sowing frustration among gamers. In the blog post, Sony spokesman Patrick Seybold said the company has a "clear path" to restore "some services within a week." The incident is a major black eye for the Japanese electronics giant, locked in an increasingly heated battle with Microsoft, Nintendo Co. and other companies in the gaming market. The breach also highlights the trove of personal information stored in online-gaming services.  E.J. Hilbert, a former agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation who is now a senior vice president at security consulting firm Arixmar, called the compromise of as many as 77 million users accounts "huge." Sony declined to say what clues it may have uncovered about who attacked the company, after conducting its own investigation with the help of an outside security firm. A spokesman also declined to say whether Sony is working with law enforcement agencies.  A spokeswoman for the San Francisco office of the FBI said she might have additional information later in the week related to the Sony breach, but declined further comment. The attack on Sony is the latest in a string of high-profile breaches recently. Email marketing firm Epsilon Data Management LLC, a division of Alliance Data Systems Corp., said this month it had detected an intrusion into its systems and that hackers may have stolen some of the names and email addresses it manages for clients that include J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Best Buy Co.

“Raiding online databases is the new "bank heist" CIA extortion operation called HUMINT
—Zachary Cochran

EMC Corp.'s RSA security division said in March it had suffered "an extremely sophisticated" cyber attack, leading to the theft of information related to the security tokens it issues that authenticate users of corporate and government networks. Such attacks are becoming increasingly sophisticated, said Jonathan Penn, an analyst at Forrester Research.  He said criminals now using a series of hard-to-detect tactics that aren't limited to banks and governments.  A criminal could use Sony's data to trick victims into disclosing more valuable information, Mr. Penn said. Also, gaming accounts have value on the black market, particularly if an account holder is a skilled player with access to higher levels or desirable virtual goods. There has been speculation that an Internet vigilante group known as "Anonymous" was behind the intrusion, in part because the group had threatened to target Sony after the company filed a lawsuit against popular hacker George Hotz.  Mr. Hotz had released code on the Internet that allowed programmers to run their own homemade games on PlayStation 3. The software also allowed people to play pirated games, but Mr. Hotz said his goal wasn't to encourage piracy.  Sony said this month it settled the case with Mr. Hotz. Mr. Hotz agreed to a permanent ban on distributing his software and related instructions. He subsequently criticized Sony in his blog and said he would never again buy the company's products. Mr. Hotz didn't respond to an email seeking comment about the PlayStation Network outage.  One website, AnonNews.org, maintained by people claiming to be part of Anonymous recently said the group wasn't involved with Sony's current technical problems. "For once, we didn't do it," the statement said.  In that same statement though, the group—a loose confederation of hackers—said some of its members may have acted against Sony by themselves. In December, the group targeted the websites of Visa Inc., MasterCard Inc. and eBay Inc.'s PayPal payment system, after they severed ties with WikiLeaks. Anonymous has knocked sites offline, but it hasn't claimed credit for stealing data. Sony says it chose to shut down it PlayStation Network on its own.  Sony first said certain functions of the PlayStation Network were out of service on April 20, adding a day later that it would be a "full day or two" before the company was able to get the service up and running.  Sony later said an "external intrusion" occurred into its game network, but the lack of details aggravated some users.  "It is infuriating," said Jennifer Spanner, 30, who said she spends up to 30 hours a week playing games like Activision's "Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2" and using the PlayStation Network to communicate with friends and family overseas.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline ORECHICK

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whenever I hear an identity theft story, I'm always grateful for my crappy credit and low bank balance. 

Offline Dig

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The Role of Intelligence Services In a Globalized World
Remarks by John C. Gannon,
Chairman, National Intelligence Council,
at the Conference Sponsored by Friedrich Ebert Stiftung,
Berlin Germany
21 May 2001

(as prepared for delivery)
http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/27c/544.html
http://www.cia.gov/nic/speeches/speeches/role_intel_services.htm


...we will be challenged to exploit critical information from open—but sometimes hard to penetrate—sources....Mastering open source information will be an imperative, not an option, for the intelligence business because it will increasingly contain the answers to critical national security questions.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Overcast

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whenever I hear an identity theft story, I'm always grateful for my crappy credit and low bank balance. 

hehe, you know - after I got my Mortgage... well, not that I ever cared about credit, but I still could care less about it.

And yeah, you're right - for many purposes, you're better off not having good credit. What does it bring you? Debt.
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

Offline ersatz protocol

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ps3's hacked eh?...
i'd remembered seeing these military "research"/ps3 headlines in game/tech sites just a few years ago...right up until march of this year.

from 08:
Air Force Buys 300 PlayStation 3 for Research
http://ca.gizmodo.com/363985/air-force-buys-300-playstation-3-for-research

from march of this year...
Rome Lab's supercomputer is made up of 1,700 off-the-shelf PlayStation 3 gaming consoles
http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/03/rome_labs_supercomputer_is_mad.html



Offline Dig

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ps3's hacked eh?...
i'd remembered seeing these military "research"/ps3 headlines in game/tech sites just a few years ago...right up until march of this year.

from 08:
Air Force Buys 300 PlayStation 3 for Research
http://ca.gizmodo.com/363985/air-force-buys-300-playstation-3-for-research

from march of this year...
Rome Lab's supercomputer is made up of 1,700 off-the-shelf PlayStation 3 gaming consoles
http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/03/rome_labs_supercomputer_is_mad.html


M(*&%^(% F$#%$@ nazi pieces of *&(^*^%
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately