Bill Gates' Mosquito-Borne Virus is Attacking Horses In Australia?

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Offline KiwiClare

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Bill Gates was looking at using mosquito as vectors.  Refer:  http://www.infowars.com/bill-gates-funds-approval-of-gm-mosquitoes-to-combat-dengue/


Mosquito Borne Virus Attacking Horses In Australia
http://www.abc.net.au/rural/news/content/201103/s3160136.htm


Also refer:
http://www.abc.net.au/rural/news/content/201103/s3163126.htm?site=riverland


Scroll down the page at the link to see original article:

Insect Borne Virus Attacking Horses
http://www.annwnpark.com.au/news.htm

Unfortunately I write this article from personal experience & the following in an account & history of our experience with the virus. 2 weeks ago 279 Monza was struck down with a mystery Neurological Virus that caused her to tremor uncontrollably, her  face became paralysed & this spread to her swallowing reflex, she showed severe ataxia, sensitivity to touch & sound along with changes to both her vocal patterns &  the carriage of her ears.

The most worrying of all – yes on top of the above, was her off side eye ball protruding from the socket.
My immediate thought was Tetanus – however, being vaccinated it was a long shot & she was also not displaying the classical tetanus symptom of the third eyelid coming over the eye.

Mind you, up until her top lip & face became paralysed she was still eating & drinking everything & even when her whole face became paralysed & she could not swallow, she still wanted to eat. Needless to say it was terribly distressing to feel so powerless to help her. Monza spent a week at the veterinary hospital in Dubbo NSW where she was give strong medication intravenously to reduce the swelling of her brain.
Reports & tests are now showing this is a possible mosquito borne virus (or midges) similar to the one that attacked cattle in 2010, called Bovine Ephemeral Fever OR BEF, for which there is a vaccine.

At present there is no equine vaccine & therefore veterinarian’s can only treat the symptoms. Many horses have unfortunately succumb to the virus & have been lost, however, it is believed by the veterinarians treating these cases that these horses have died because of their symptoms.
Meaning:  because the horses become paralysed, they cannot eat or drink & can die from dehydration or starvation on top of the ataxia which can cause them to have an injury. I would urge all members to be vigilant & check your horses daily & keep them covered. It’s very subtle....but VERY quick to unfold.

Monza first presented with a stranger vocal pattern around Tuesday March 1, 2011. By this I mean she was more vocal then normal & the pattern/tone was quite odd to listen to. Next came the sensitivity to touch & sound & then came the tremors & ataxia & finally by Saturday March 5, 2011 the paralysation coupled with the ears lopping backwards & a higher stepping gait in front (like she was stepping over things)

Recovery was just as fast. She showed improvement within 12 – 24 hours of treatment It is still unclear if she will have any long term effects, but so far, things are looking up & at this point I would like to thank Dr Ross Pedrana from Dubbo Equine Hospital for his the fast action & wonderful help, so much appreciated Ross!
 Simmon Kalanj - Annwn Park Stud
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To be believable, we must be credible,
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Offline KiwiClare

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Re: Bill Gates' Mosquito-Borne Virus is Attacking Horses In Australia
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2011, 11:49:25 PM »
http://www.horsecouncil.org.au/

On their front page...no date on itc:
Arbovirus infections in horses
• The wet spring and summer have resulted in an increased risk of insect borne virus or ‘arbovirus' infections in horses.
• Horses are a 'dead-end' host for mosquito-borne arbovirus infections, which means that a horse is not a source of new infection for people or other horses.
• Veterinarians in Victoria, NSW and South Australia are reporting increased numbers of horses with two distinct disease syndromes:
o Muscle and joint soreness
o Nervous signs
• Reports of horses with nervous signs have originated from:
o along the Murray River in Victoria
o the south eastern region of South Australia
o various locations  in NSW, including west of the Great Divide, from Mungindi in the north to the Murray River, and a significant cluster in the Hawkesbury Valley west of Sydney and also the Upper Hunter Valley.
• Some horses have been severely affected. Most horses with clinical signs recover over several weeks with good husbandry and veterinary care; however, as of 30 March 2011, of the 100 cases in NSW, around 15 have died or have had to be euthanased for animal welfare reasons.
• Laboratory testing of samples from the horses with soreness indicates that most infections are probably due to Alphavirus infections including Ross River virus.
• Laboratory testing of samples from horses with unusual nervous signs suggests that a majority of cases are due to infection with one or more viruses belonging to the Flavivirus group of viruses that includes viruses like Murray Valley encephalitis virus and Kunjin virus. Testing of samples to date has ruled out Japanese encephalitis virus.
• Hendra virus infection has been ruled out from all four states (QLD, NSW, VIC and SA)
• Necropsies are taking place on infected dead horses to determine the cause of these infections.
• It is important that veterinarians and any assistants take stringent precautions when performing necropsies on horses showing neurological clinical signs. Great care should be exercised when handling brain and spinal cord tissue and appropriate personal protective equipment should be utilised as part of a risk management approach to personal safety.   
• There has been no increased incidence of muscle/joint soreness or nervous signs in horses reported in Queensland.
• Horse owners are urged to reduce the exposure of their animals to insect bites, in particular, mosquitoes.
o This can be done by using registered repellent products to reduce insect bites, and through other measures including rugging and the use of fly masks.
• Horses suffering from these arboviruses commonly display clinical signs including, but not limited to:
o a reluctance to walk
o a stiff gait
o ataxia (uncoordinated)
o depression
o tremors.
• Owners who notice that their horses display unusual signs should immediately contact their private veterinarian.
• Situation updates and more local information is available on each state's Department of Primary Industries website:
www.dpi.nsw.gov.au
www.dpi.vic.gov.au
www.pir.sa.gov.au
www.deedi.qld.gov.au
To be persuasive, we must be believable,
To be believable, we must be credible,
To be credible, we must be truthful.
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Offline KiwiClare

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Re: Bill Gates' Mosquito-Borne Virus is Attacking Horses In Australia
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2011, 12:11:01 AM »

Sick horses spark mozzie virus warning
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/03/11/3161282.htm


Posted Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:27am AEDT

    * Map: Ballarat 3350

A Ballarat veterinarian says it will be difficult to prevent further cases of neurological diseases in horses in the Ballarat area.

The Department of Primary Industries has received a large number of reports of sick horses near Ballarat and along the Murray River.

Dr Ian Fulton from the Ballarat Equine Clinic says he suspects the horses are suffering from Ross River virus or Murray Valley encephalitis, which are spread by mosquitoes.

He says owners should try to prevent their horses being bitten by mosquitoes.

"It's very difficult because we can't control the mosquito population, it's due to all the rain we've had, but I think from a horse owner's point of view, the use of insect repellents and the use of protective rugs can reduce the incidence of horses being bitten," he said.

Tags: animals, veterinary-medicine, ross-river-fever, ballarat-3350
To be persuasive, we must be believable,
To be believable, we must be credible,
To be credible, we must be truthful.
- Edward R. Murrow