Foul Play: Another Nuclear Scientist 'Allegedly Suicided'

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Offline Catalina

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Foul Play: Another Nuclear Scientist 'Allegedly Suicided'
« on: March 29, 2011, 01:59:16 PM »
http://www.taosnews.com/articles/2011/03/25/news/doc4d89fe140def4712475469.txt

Taos County Sheriff’s Office stated Tuesday (March 22) that they have identified the body found in the Río Grande Gorge last Friday (March 18) as belonging to a nuclear scientist from Washington state. Undersheriff Ed Romero said that Rodger Lynn Dickey, 56, died after he jumped from the  Gorge Bridge. Dickey, a scientist working on contract with Sandía Laboratory, was originally from Richland, Wash.

“He’d been working in New Mexico for a while,” Romero said. “He did leave a note, but it does not specifically give his intentions.”

Romero said that a vendor setting up at the bridge for the day called the police when Dickey’s rental car was found parked in the middle of the bridge in the westbound lane.


Here is a little background on Rodger Dickey:


Mr. Dickey is a senior nuclear engineer with over 30 years of experience in support of the design, construction, start-up, and operation of commercial and government nuclear facilities. His expertise is in nuclear safety programmatic assessment, regulatory compliance, hazard assessment, safety analysis, and safety basis documentation. He has completed project tasks in nuclear engineering design and application, nuclear waste management, project management, and risk management. His technical support experience includes nuclear facility licensing, radiation protection and health.


Obituary http://obits.abqjournal.com/obits/show/214758
Spare no cost for truth's sake, neither depart from it for any gain. -Proverbs 23:23

Bestow not the gifts that God has given you to get worldly riches. -Proverbs 23:4

Offline chris jones

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Re: Foul Play: Another Nuclear Scientist 'Allegedly Suicided'
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2011, 02:57:22 PM »
 Sketchy..
But after reading his obituary one item stood out:He espoused the philosophies of the University's founder, Thomas Jefferson.
  Seems to me thats like wearing a peace symbol to the Pentagon. 

Offline Catalina

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Re: Foul Play: Another Nuclear Scientist 'Allegedly Suicided'
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2011, 03:42:58 PM »
First the microbiologists for phase 1 (anthrax + gulf war 2)  --- remember over 30 microbiologists were murdered, suicided, disappeared between 1990-2004 (i think). just google "murdered microbiologists"
Now the nuclear experts must go in order for phase 2 to work (energy choke + nuclear sabotage via EQ ---> one world governance)

=(

88 Dead Scientist And Microbiologists http://www.christianmediadaily.com/index.php?page=/microb

See.... http://www.apfn.org/apfn/scientists.htm
Spare no cost for truth's sake, neither depart from it for any gain. -Proverbs 23:23

Bestow not the gifts that God has given you to get worldly riches. -Proverbs 23:4

Offline Dig

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Re: Foul Play: Another Nuclear Scientist 'Allegedly Suicided'
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2011, 02:29:36 AM »
You all want to see the type of person who builds nuclear reactors in foreign lands...

**Top Canadian Nuke/Military Officer videotaped the rape, torture, and murder of victims

Top Canadian military official charged with murder http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/02/08/AR2010020802325_pf.html
By ROB GILLIES
The Associated Press
Monday, February 8, 2010; 8:47 PM

TORONTO -- The commander of Canada's largest Air Force base, who once flew dignitaries around the country, has been charged with first-degree murder in the deaths of two women Ontario Provincial Police Det. Insp. Chris Nicholas said Monday that Col. Russell Williams, 46, was also charged in the sexual assaults of two other women. Williams was arrested Sunday in Ottawa. The charges left Canada's military in a state of shock. Williams, a 23-year military veteran, was appointed as the base commander of Canadian Forces Base Trenton in Trenton, Ontario last July. Trenton is Canada's busiest Air Force base and is providing logistical support for Canada's missions in Haiti and Afghanistan as well as support for the Vancouver Winter Games. Williams is charged with the first-degree murder of Jessica Lloyd, 27, of a Belleville, Ontario, resident whose body was found earlier Monday, and Marie Comeau, a 38-year-old corporal found dead in her Brighton, Ontario, home in November. Authorities said Williams came to the attention of police during a roadside canvas on Feb. 4, six days after Lloyd was deemed missing. Williams is also charged with forcible confinement, breaking and entering and sexual assault after two women were sexually assaulted during two separate home invasions in the Tweed, Ontario area in September of 2009. "We're shocked by the connection that has been made with a leader in our Air Force," Maj. Gen. Yvan Blondin, the direct commander of Williams, said in Trenton. "It obviously is no longer possible for the commander to remain in his position." Blondin said he didn't know him personally but said Williams was an elite pilot and considered a "shining bright star."

Williams was photographed last month with Defense Minister Peter MacKay and Canada's top general during an inspection of a Canadian aircraft that was on its way to support relief efforts in Haiti. Lieutenant-General Andre Deschamps, Canada's Air Force chief, said the Air Force is fully supporting civilian police. He called it a difficult period but said the Air Force would provide support for personnel at Trenton. Dan Dugas, a spokesman for MacKay, called the charges serious but said MacKay will not comment. Police descended on Williams' Ottawa home on Sunday and police cars remained posted there Monday evening. Williams' Defense Department biography said he is married. Williams once served as a Challenger aircraft pilot who transported VIPs. The Air Force declined to say who he flew but the Challenger regularly flies cabinet ministers and the governor general, Canada's ceremonial head of sate. A spokesman for Prime Minister Stephen Harper said he didn't believe Williams flew Harper. Between December 2005 and June 2006, Williams was the commanding officer for Camp Mirage, the secretive Canadian Forces forward logistics base that is not officially acknowledged by the government or military but has been widely reported to be near Dubai. "We are certainly tracking the movements of where this man has been over the past several years and we're continuing with our investigation," Nicholas said. Williams walked into a courthouse in Belleville, Ontario on Monday in hand and leg shackles, wearing a blue prison-issue jumpsuit. The judge imposed a publication ban on other details. He was held in custody and will appear in court by video on Feb. 18.

Here's an extremely bizarre twist on this story. Bernardo and his wife, Karla Homolka, are two of Canada's most notorious rape and killing machines...
--------------------
Col. Williams tied to Bernardo
Colonel and serial killer 'partied', police say

By JOE WARMINGTON AND DON PEAT, QMI Agency
Last Updated: 12th February 2010, 7:05am
http://www.ottawasun.com/news/canada/2010/02/11/12845796.html
They were pals.
..

It's not so surprising when one realizes that most serial-killers are (1) created for purposes of black-world statecraft, and (2) do not act alone.

Read the book Programmed to Kill: The Politics of Serial Murder by David McGowan (Lincoln, Neb.: iUniverse, Inc., 2004). The book concerns high-level child prostitution, pedophile and snuff-film rings, drug networks, intergenerational occultism, ritualistic human sacrifice, and the organizations behind the phenomena of serial murder. These are intelligence operations used to compromise politicians, businessmen, academics, media personalities, etc.; used for assassination; and used to create a more totalitarian society by inducing societal fear via mayhem. It's thoroughly documented with major-media news articles and government records. The book is definitely one of the most important works ever written in terms of understanding the world we live in.

Below you can read reviews of the book:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0595326404

Below you can download the blook:

http://www.megaupload.com/?d=WGMNDND9
http://depositfiles.com/en/files/34eyjq755

And see also my below post:

"Documentation on Elitist Child Sex-Slavery, Snuff Films and Occultism," James Redford, September 3, 2007 http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=4468

So Russel Williams was known as Russ Sovka until he left university... after his stint at the allegedly abuse-plagued Upper Canada College.

-----------------

By 1980, Russ was in Toronto, enrolled as a boarding student at Upper Canada College, a tony private boys school that caters to the city's elite. The school, founded in 1829, has produced six lieutenant-governors, seven chief justices and three premiers. Another 24 have been named Rhodes Scholars, 10 are Olympic medallists and 40 have been inducted into the Order of Canada. Modelled on the British public school, UCC regularly faced accusations of racial bias and sexism until the 1970s, when it began to recruit students from visible minorities and offer assistance to the less affluent. Beginning in 1998, allegations of sexual abuse by teachers began surfacing, including some that occurred while Russ Sovka was at the school. A number led to criminal convictions.
-----------------
http://www.vancouversun.com/technology/Accused+killer+early+years+instability+privilege/2558189/story.html
Accused killer's early years a mix of instability, privilege
By Don Butler, Ottawa CitizenFebruary 12, 2010

OTTAWA — If the experiences of our formative years mould our character as adults, what are we to make of the life of Col. Russell Williams? For the "bright, shining star" of the Canadian Forces, now facing devastating charges of murder and sexual assault, that life was a blend of instability and privilege, alternately exotic and mundane. It was a life of shifting identities and high achievement, one that improbably coupled a very public career with intense personal privacy. No wonder Random House has already announced the fall release of a book on his life.

Born in 1963, Williams was not yet five when his British parents left the English Midlands for a new life in one of Canada's most remarkable communities. Deep River, carved out of the eastern Ontario wilderness 180 kilometres northwest of Ottawa by the federal government in 1945, was an offshoot of Canada's entry into the nuclear age. Built to accommodate the families of scientists and technicians who worked at the nearby Chalk River Nuclear Research Laboratories, the planned town was like no other in the country. A 1958 story in Maclean's magazine by a young Peter C. Newman described Deep River as a "utopian attempt to create a happy environment where all is ordered for the best." An affluent, intellectual oasis plunked down in a rural area where most struggled to make a living, it had one of the country's highest ratios of PhDs per capita — 130 in a population of 5,000 in 1971.

Crime and unemployment were all but unknown. Local stores stocked caviar and designer-copy clothes. The Strand Theatre screened the best French, Italian, Swedish and Russian films. To overcome their boredom and isolation, residents threw themselves into planned fun. Nearly 70 clubs offered outlets for everything from glass blowing to fencing. The town's yacht, golf and curling clubs were most popular, each with hundreds of members. Though seemingly idyllic, this life was oppressive to some. It was, they felt, too perfect and regimented. "The children are growing up in an artificial atmosphere — and it isn't only the children," one resident told Newman. Some say Deep River was a repressed society, with sharp class divisions imported by its many British residents. Marital stress was common. Williams landed in this insular community when his father took a job as a metallurgist in Chalk River. With his mother and younger brother, Harvey, they lived in a duplex purchased in March 1968. David Ross, 55, who grew up in Deep River, remembers Williams' father — his first name was Cedric, but he went by his second name, David — as a very proper, handsome man who resembled Robert Redford. His wife, Christine, a physiotherapist, was tall with a good figure and long dark hair — "the best-looking woman in Deep River," according to Robert Hosbons, a metallurgist who moved to the town from Britain in 1967. They settled into their new home, joining the Deep River Yacht & Tennis Club, where David raced sailboats and his wife played tennis. It's unclear what role, if any, the atmosphere of Deep River played, but it didn't take long for the Williams' marriage to collapse. The couple split in May 1970, and Christine transferred ownership of the family home to her husband. David Williams stayed on in Deep River for another 10 months. But his wife and her two sons moved to Scarborough, Ont., where she married an eminent nuclear scientist, Jerry Sovka. One of three sons of Czech immigrants, Sovka grew up on farms in Alberta, but spurned agriculture and the lure of oil for the emerging science of nuclear technology. Sovka accepted a scholarship from the University of Birmingham in England, where it's believed he first met Christine Williams. Afterward, he returned to take a job with Atomic Energy Canada Ltd., and helped design early Candu nuclear plants. With divorce and remarriage came new identities. His mother began to be known by her second name, Nonie, and Williams adopted his stepfather's surname. Henceforth, he would be known as Russ Sovka. The family settled into a house near the Scarborough Bluffs, overlooking Lake Ontario. For Russ Sovka, it was a period of relative stability. He delivered the Globe and Mail and learned to play the piano, and later the trumpet. Music, especially jazz, was a passion, and he excelled at it. In his first year at Birchmount Park Collegiate in Scarborough, he played trumpet in the junior, intermediate and senior bands. A yearbook picture from 1978 shows a handsome youth with longish hair swept left-to-right across his forehead. By the late 1970s, Jerry Sovka was on the move again, this time to South Korea, where he spent four years overseeing the construction of a Candu reactor. If Russ accompanied the family to South Korea, he didn't stay for long. By 1980, Russ was in Toronto, enrolled as a boarding student at Upper Canada College, a tony private boys school that caters to the city's elite. The school, founded in 1829, has produced six lieutenant-governors, seven chief justices and three premiers. Another 24 have been named Rhodes Scholars, 10 are Olympic medallists and 40 have been inducted into the Order of Canada. Modelled on the British public school, UCC regularly faced accusations of racial bias and sexism until the 1970s, when it began to recruit students from visible minorities and offer assistance to the less affluent. Beginning in 1998, allegations of sexual abuse by teachers began surfacing, including some that occurred while Russ Sovka was at the school. A number led to criminal convictions. By all accounts, Russ Sovka did well at UCC. He's remembered as a hard-working, diligent student, though not one with a particularly high profile. In his final year, he was elected a prefect in his boarding house, Wedd's. Music remained his greatest passion, and he played trumpet in the school band. His graduation message in the 1982 UCC yearbook quoted Louis Armstrong: "If you have to ask what jazz is, you'll never know." After high school, young Sovka studied politics and economics at the University of Toronto's Scarborough campus. He also took flying lessons at Buttonville Airport, north of the city. After graduating from university in 1987, Sovka reverted to his birth name of Williams and enrolled in the Canadian Armed Forces. It was perhaps a surprising choice for a university graduate whose parents were both professionals. But Williams was a natural flyer; so accomplished, in fact, that after earning his wings in 1990, his first job was instructing pilots in CT-134 Beech Musketeer aircraft at the Forces' flying school in Portage la Prairie, Man. It was there that he met and married his wife, Mary Elizabeth Harriman, in 1991. Harriman is now the respected associate director of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. In the Armed Forces, Williams' career trajectory was relentlessly upward. In the 1990s, there were postings to 434 Combat Squadron in Shearwater, N.S., and 412 Transport Squadron in Ottawa, where passengers on his CC144 Challenger jet included the prime minister and governor general. He and his wife bought a house in the community of Orleans, near Ottawa, where they lived for about 15 years before moving to a house in the capital city's central Westboro area last December. Neighbours in Orleans share the general astonishment at Williams' arrest. He and his wife were "an absolutely fantastic and wonderful couple," said Shirley Fraser, who met them when they first moved to the area. "I would suspect the Pope before I would suspect Russ," declared George White, another neighbour. By 1999, Williams had been promoted to major and spent four years in the offices of the Director General Military Careers, where he served as the multi-engine pilot career manager. Life, it seemed, was good. But life can be fickle, as well. In 2001, his mother divorced her second husband, sparking a rift in the family that continues to fester. Williams' brother, Harvey, now a doctor in Bowmanville, Ont., said the divorce led Williams to cut ties with his mother and brother. The two reached out a couple of years ago, hoping to repair the family rift, but have had only minimal contact with Williams since. In 2003, Williams spent a year in Kingston, earning a master of defence studies from the Royal Military College. His 55-page master's thesis supported pre-emptive war in Iraq, arguing that it can be "an effective tool for building lasting world peace." By then, he had clearly been selected for rapid advancement. "He was what we call a streamer," said a ranking military officer who didn't want to be named. "He was getting groomed, fast-tracked." After spending a year at Royal Military College, Williams was promoted to lieutenant-colonel and appointed commanding officer of 437 Transport Squadron in Trenton. In 2005, he served six months as commanding officer, theatre support element, at Camp Mirage, a secretive Canadian Forces base in the desert south of Dubai. The logistics base, whose very existence the Canadian Forces won't confirm, supports Canadian Forces operations in Afghanistan. Around this time, Williams and his wife bought a second home, a bungalow on the shores of Lake Stuco near Tweed, Ont., a sleepy community about 40 kilometres north of Belleville. The two sexual assaults that Williams is charged with occurred last fall in houses on the same lake. In both cases, the attacker broke into the houses in the dead of night, blindfolded and tied his victims naked to chairs, then assaulted and photographed them. Meanwhile, Williams' career continued to advance. After three years at the directorate of air requirements, he spent the early months of last year learning French at the Canadian Forces language school in Gatineau, Que. — a sure sign of someone ticketed for a position in the most senior ranks. That assessment was confirmed when, in July 2009, Williams was appointed commander of 8 Wing at Canadian Forces Base Trenton, Canada's largest airbase with 3,500 military and civilian staff. He had risen so far and so fast because he was an impressive soldier, dedicated, hard-working and intelligent. Yet he did so while revealing surprisingly little of himself. "A hard guy to get to know," Quinte West Mayor John Williams told the National Post. The mayor met weekly with Williams after his appointment at CFB Trenton. "He was very much reserved. He just wasn't a person you would feel warm about." Police say that after his arrest on Sunday, Williams told them where they could find incriminating evidence in his Ottawa home. On Monday, he led police to the body of Jessica Lloyd, one of two women he's accused of killing.

With files from Kristy Nease, Citizen staff, and Adrian Humphreys, National Post © Copyright (c) Canwest News Service
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately