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Author Topic: Arkansas Fema Camps ...  (Read 4252 times)
TRY
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« on: March 08, 2011, 08:15:35 AM »

-ARKANSAS-

Ft. Chaffee (near Fort Smith, Arkansas) - Has new runway for aircraft, new camp facility with cap of 40,000 prisoners Pine Bluff Arsenal - This location also is the repository for B-Z nerve agent, which causes sleepiness, dizziness, stupor; admitted use is for civilian control. Jerome - Chicot/Drew Counties - site of WWII Japanese camps Rohwer - Descha County - site of WWII Japanese camps Blythville AFB - Closed airbase now being used as camp. New wooden barracks have been constructed at this location. Classic decorations - guard towers, barbed wire, high fences. Berryville - FEMA facility located east of Eureka Springs off Hwy. 62. Omaha - Northeast of Berryville near Missouri state line, on Hwy 65 south of old wood processing plant. Possible crematory facility.

http://www.apfn.org/APFN/camps.htm
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agentbluescreen
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« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2011, 08:53:44 AM »

-ARKANSAS-

Ft. Chaffee (near Fort Smith, Arkansas) - Has new runway for aircraft, new camp facility with cap of 40,000 prisoners Pine Bluff Arsenal - This location also is the repository for B-Z nerve agent, which causes sleepiness, dizziness, stupor; admitted use is for civilian control. Jerome -


I realize the Cobazon "Nation" loophole, but isn't chemical warfare (and stockpiling)  totally illegal by treaty?
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« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2011, 03:36:00 PM »

The Pine Bluff Arsenal 

PBA Arsenal Serving the needs of the joint warfighter and the citizen, a full spectrum logistics center...

www.pba.army.mil/

***restricted site...

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...Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA) was one of nine Army installations in the United States that stored chemical weapons. The arsenal's chemical weapons stockiple consisted of various munitions and ton containers, containing GB or VX nerve agents or HD blister agent. The chemical weapons originally stored at the arsenal consist of various munitions and ton containers, containing GB or VX nerve agents or mustard blister agent. The Army designed the Pine Bluff Chemical Agent Disposal Facility (PBCDF) to destroy this chemical weapons stockpile, comprising approximately 12 percent of the nation’s original chemical weapons, in November 2010. This marked the end of nearly seven decades of chemical weapons storage at the Arsenal. The facility and storage area are undergoing closure operations in accordance with strict internal policies and procedures and federal laws and regulations...

http://www.cma.army.mil/pinebluff.aspx

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...Pine Bluff Arsenal located in Southeast Arkansas, is 35 miles Southeast of Little Rock and 8 miles Northwest of the City of Pine Bluff. PBA is bordered on the East by the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System and on the West by the Union Pacific Railroad and U.S. Highway 65, making it directly accessible by rail, road, or waterway. The City of Pine Bluff boasts on of the busiest ports on the Arkansas River and serves as a transportation hub for the regional railroads. PBA is located 35 miles south of the Little Rock National Airport, and 40 miles from Little Rock Air Force Base...

...PBA is 8 1/2 miles long by 2 3/4 miles wide and covers 14,944 acres. It includes 952 buildings which provide 3.3 million square feet of floor space, including storage bunkers. It also has 42 miles of railroad track and 2 million square yards of roads and paved surfaces. Overall employment as of the end of FY96 included 886 Arsenal civilian employees, 128 civilians employed by tenant activities, and a total of 59 military personnel. Payroll for FY96 was $44,334,685...

!!!Currently, it manufactures chemical, smoke, riot control, incendiary, and pyrotechnic mixes and munitions. Limited production facilities also are used to manufacture chemical defense items such as clothing and protective masks. Pine Bluff is the only active site at which white phosphorous-filled weapons are loaded.!!!

...The Pine Bluff Chemical Activity maintains its stockpile on 431 acres of land is located in the northwestern portion of Pine Bluff Arsenal...

http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/facility/pine_bluff.htm

***read entire article...

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Chemical Weapons Convention

...The Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC) is an arms control agreement which outlaws the production, stockpiling and use of chemical weapons. Its full name is the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on their Destruction. The agreement is administered by the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), which is an independent organization based in The Hague, Netherlands...

...The main obligation under the convention is the prohibition of use and production of chemical weapons, as well as the destruction of all chemical weapons. The destruction activities are verified by the OPCW. As of July 2010, circa 60% of the (declared) stockpile of chemical weapons has thus been destroyed. The convention also has provisions for systematic evaluation of chemical and military plants, as well as for investigations of allegations of use and production of chemical weapons based on intelligence of other state parties...

...As of August 2010, 188 states are party to the CWC, and another two countries have signed but not yet ratified the convention...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_Weapons_Convention

***read it all... 
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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2011, 04:20:56 PM »

Fear of Fema

...Another reputed current or future detention camp is at Fort Chaffee, Ark. The former Army base was transferred to the Arkansas Army National Guard in 1997 and is now a training facility. In recent years, chunks of the base’s land have been forfeited for redevelopment. Even so, the conspiracy theorists believe Fort Chafee has a new runway and a new camp facility that can hold 40,000 prisoners...

...“It’s kind of a laugh,” said Capt. Chris Heathscott, state public affairs officer for the Arkansas National Guard. A maximum of 7,000 soldiers can train at Fort Chafee, which couldn’t possibly accommodate 40,000 people, Heathscott said. There is no new camp, although some of the base’s old barracks were remodeled for use by soldiers and by Hurricane Katrina evacuees temporarily housed there...

http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/intelligence-report/browse-all-issues/2010/spring/fear-of-fema

***read entire article...

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THE U.S. ARMY MILITARY HISTORY INSTITUTE
 
Fort Chaffee: Operation “New Arrivals”
 
...November 2001...

...Spanning only nine months, from April to December 1975, the records of Fort Chaffee: Operation “New Arrivals” document the efforts made to welcome the refugees, in-process them medically and administratively, screen them for residence, match them with sponsors, and process them out of the reception centers. Procedural operations and attitudes toward the refugees are revealed in Public Affairs Office news releases, briefings, camp newspapers, and area newspaper clippings...

http://ghsweb.k12.ar.us/fort/newarrivals.htm
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http://ghsweb.k12.ar.us/fort/chaffee.htm
-

Air Guard opens $8.3 million building at Fort Smith base

...feb 23 2011...

...According to the Arkansas National Guard, the $8.3 million project is one of only 10 projects within the Air National Guard to be funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The 24,200-square-foot Base Operation Support building will house the Civil Engineering Squadron for the base...

...Energy-saving features incorporated into the building include solar water heating, geothermal heating and cooling and rain water retention for use in the bathroom areas...

...Anderson thanked community leaders in the Fort Smith area for banding together in 2005 to save the base from the BRAC closure list. He said more than $30 million has been invested in the base since the BRAC closure recommendation was overturned...

...Part of the new operation includes a new access road onto Phoenix Avenue. The access on the north side of the base was required for the construction project to meet anti terrorism force protection and unified facilities criteria. The new gate will be limited to commercial deliveries and will not be used for personnel or visitor access, according to previous Air Guard statements...

http://m.thecitywire.com/20386/show/19c96dcfcb612eece2f19ff89d5f5c95&t=db8e3cbf1b7871c06a74a097e61eed8e

***more to come...
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« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2011, 05:13:01 PM »

ugh i remember them talking about this a while back.
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« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2011, 06:25:05 PM »

...Two camps were selected and built in the Arkansas Delta, one at Rohwer in Desha County and the other at Jerome in sections of Chicot and Drew counties. Operating from October 1942 to November 1945, both camps eventually incarcerated nearly 16,000 Japanese Americans. This was the largest influx and incarceration of any racial or ethnic group in the state’s history. One of the sites, Rohwer, is on the National Register of Historic Places...

...Each camp was approximately 10,000 acres, including 500 acres of tarpapered, A-framed buildings arranged into numbered blocks. All were partially surrounded by barbed wire or heavily wooded areas with guard towers situated at strategic areas and guarded by a small military contingent. Each block was designed to accommodate around 250 people residing in fourteen residential barracks with each barrack (20'x120') divided into four to six apartments. Each block also consisted of a mess hall, a recreational barrack, a laundry building, and a building for a communal latrine. The residential buildings were without plumbing or running water, and the buildings were heated during the winter months by wood stoves. The camps also had an administrative section segregated from the rest of the buildings, a military police section, a hospital section, a warehouse and factory section, a residential section of barracks for WRA personnel, barracks for schools (kindergarten through twelfth grade), and auxiliary buildings for such things as canteens, motion pictures, gymnasiums, motor pools, and fire stations. Both camps were immense, sprawling cities that were two of the largest agricultural communities in Arkansas. During the construction phase of the incarceration camps, more than 5,000 workers were employed to clear hundreds of acres of land, to build more than 1,200 barrack-type buildings, and to lay miles of gravel-laden roads. The cost to the federal government alone in 1942–43 was $9,503,905...

...Though the state had little use for them, some Japanese Americans found that the federal government wanted them. The same month that Arkansas’s government passed the Alien Land Act, the U.S. Army initiated a forced loyalty and draft program targeting Japanese-American prisoners; this program pulled 326 youth from the Rohwer and Jerome camps. Those of age for military service were often conflicted when it came to the possibility of serving. Some were eager for the opportunity to prove themselves to the country of their birth, while others were resentful of being asked to sacrifice their time, and possibly their lives, on behalf of the country that had imprisoned them without cause...

http://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=2273

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Diagram of the Rohwer Internment Camp

...U.S. Government Data, 1943...

...Attached is a black and white plan depicting the "Rohwer Relocation Center", which was located in Desha County, Arkansas. The plan clearly illustrates how the residential huts were to be placed in addition to the churches, shops and schools...

http://www.oldmagazinearticles.com/pdf/Internment%20Diagram.pdf

***I wander of/if any current status?...
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« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2011, 06:59:02 PM »

admittedly this is my no way zone. I will rush the guard, kick the general, be defiant in all ways whatever it would take to be done away with.  if at all possible even before I arrive there.  I will not summit to that.

   Okay with that said, what is the best way to NOT let this happen ? Cannot call our congressman they deny it anyway.
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4And I say unto you my friends, Be not afraid of them that kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do.
 5But I will forewarn you whom ye shall fear: Fear him, which after he hath killed hath power to cast into hell; yea, I say unto you, Fear him
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