Suggested Reading (Fiction)

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Offline Brocke

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Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« on: January 19, 2011, 05:10:58 PM »
This thread is for little known or often forgotten books, stories, plays, screenplays and the like.

We all know, or should know, the primary non-fiction resources of liberty and individual freedom - The Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, The Bill of Rights, Common Sense, et al.

This thread is for fiction with themes of freedom and the struggle for liberty. There is no point in posting the well known classics like 1984, A brave New World or Atlas Shrugged, these are well discussed in other threads on the forum.

Please try to keep to the format that I have used regarding text an images and don't be offended if I reformat your post.

Again, this is for fiction not for religious texts or biographies.

Thanks.  :)


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #1 on: January 19, 2011, 05:11:10 PM »
This Perfect Day (1966)
By Ira Levin



Most of Levin's other works are primarily acts of great story- telling, avoiding any great pronouncements about the basic state of the human race in general. But his novel, This Perfect Day, is a radical departure. It has often been compared with Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, and George Orwell's 1984. It is not as frightening as his other works, but it is his most brilliant.


Ira Levin's 'This Perfect Day' synopsis and review by Jeff Riggenbach
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ev5DhVV0UlA

This Perfect Day
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Perfect_Day

Ira Levin (August 27, 1929 – November 12, 2007)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ira_Levin


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2011, 06:57:06 PM »

An Enemy of the People (original Norwegian title: En folkefiende)
a 1882 play by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen.



An Enemy of the People addresses the irrational tendencies of the masses, and the hypocritical and corrupt nature of the political system that they support. It is the story of one brave man's struggle to do the right thing and speak the truth in the face of extreme social intolerance. The play's protagonist, Dr Stockmann, represents the playwright's own voice. Upon completion of the play, Ibsen wrote to his publisher in Copenhagen : "I am still uncertain as to whether I should call it a comedy or a straight drama. It may [have] many traits of comedy, but it also is based on a serious idea."

Dr. Thomas Stockmann is a popular citizen of a small coastal town in Norway. The town has recently invested a large amount of public and private money towards the development of baths, a project led by Dr. Stockmann and his brother, Peter Stockmann, the Mayor. The town is expecting a surge in tourism and prosperity from the new baths, said to be of great medicinal value, and as such, the baths are a source of great local pride. However, just as the baths are proving successful, Dr. Stockmann discovers that waste products from the town's tannery are contaminating the waters, causing serious illness amongst the tourists. He expects this important discovery to be his greatest achievement, and promptly sends a detailed report to the Mayor, which includes a proposed solution which would come at a considerable cost to the town.

It was also made into a movie of the same name in 1978, starring Steve McQueen.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075993/



That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #3 on: January 19, 2011, 07:24:03 PM »

Night Chills

by Dean Koontz



The novel concerns a plot by an emotionally disturbed scientist, a corrupt U.S. Army officer, and a wealthy businessman to brainwash the residents of an isolated New England town through a chemical added to the town's water supply and techniques related to subliminal advertising.

Published in paperback by Fawcett in 1976, NIGHT CHILLS is one of Koontz's earliest novels and perhaps one of his best. It can be somewhat difficult reading at times. The first few chapters bounce back and forth in time like a Tarantino movie, and although Koontz clearly delineates the date in which the chapter takes place, it can still be tough to keep up. Also, some of the violence is terribly shocking. A boy is brutally murdered, and a main heavy commits several rapes. I wouldn't describe the rapes as overly violent or brutal in the conventional sense of the words, but the perpetrator's motivations and method of rape give the acts an appalling sleaze factor that actually works in the story's favor. Rapists don't have to be depicted as drooling madmen, as they usually are in popular fiction. The way Koontz does it in NIGHT CHILLS is infinitely more chilling.

Wealthy Leonard Dawson, influential General Klinger, and scientist Ogden Salsbury concoct a truly sinister plot to take over the world using subliminal hypnosis. Koontz provides a lengthy reference list of technical articles and studies that supposedly back up his seemingly outrageous plot, giving it more plausibility and, hence, making it scarier. By drugging America's water supply, Salsbury believes he can turn anyone who drinks it into his puppet, who will do anything he asks them to, including murder and suicide. As the ultimate test of his experiment, he transforms a small Maine town, Black River, population 400, into his zombies.

Note from Brocke:
Back in the early nineties I was researching fluoride and beginning to wake up. As I was reading more and more on fluorine chemistry and it's effects on the brain I remembered a novel that I had read many years before called Night Chills by Dean R Koontz. I took the time to reread the book, which I still had in my collection, and I was astonished at how accurately it described the effects of fluoride on the brain and how it could be used as a form of mind control. There were technical references included in the back of the book and it was obvious that Mr Koontz had researched the science behind his story very thoroughly.

I wrote a letter (this was before email remember) to Dean Koontz asking him if he knew about fluoride and how it could be used in mind control. Several months later I received a reply. He said that he was unaware of the effects of fluoride that I had described and thanked me for my letter. I still wonder if he really did know or not.


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #4 on: January 19, 2011, 07:41:26 PM »
When it comes to "fiction," does it get any more imaginative than the following book?




http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4069714733894389451
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline Brocke

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #5 on: January 19, 2011, 07:54:10 PM »
When it comes to "fiction," does it get any more imaginative than the following book?

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4069714733894389451

True! But it's hardly based on truth or Libertarian ideas.  :D


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Brocke

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2011, 08:26:59 PM »
Disposable People
by Marshall Goldberg MD & Kenneth Kay



Consolvo's Ulceration - a disease more horrifying than the Black Plague - was raging out of control. The leaders of the country thought they could confine the deadly epidemic to the remote area of the Southwest where it started. But they were wrong. When they finally ran out of volunteers for a vaccination program that had killed almost as many people as the disease itself, the government began to think the unthinkable.

Disposable People is about a killer disease called Consolvo’s Ulceration that has mysteriously appeared in New Mexico and is spreading like wildfire amongst the population. It gives victims a nasty& painful death and resists all attempts made to treat it. The President is facing a catastrophe on a national scale so he gets a medical team together with far-ranging powers in order to try to get the epidemic under control.

The disease is killing roughly 20% of the population in the areas it has hit and is obviously making life very difficult for those who live with starvation and other diseases becoming a very real risk. The President selects a go-getting doctor called Noah Blanchard to be his epidemic czar and gives him the task of trying to defeat the disease by all means necessary. After battling to get out of plague stricken New Mexico Dr Blanchard must press ahead and try to find a cure or vaccination against this virulent plague before the President has to take increasingly desperate measures to keep the disease from consuming the entire United States.

ISBN-13: 9780505515742
ISBN-10: 0505515741
Publication Date: 10/1985


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Tsul777

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #7 on: January 19, 2011, 09:24:23 PM »
The Last Canadian
William C. Heine (1974)



The President had fled the White House. Now safely concealed in a secret war room - a shelter safe against everything but a direct hit by an atomic bomb, its air thoroughly washed and filtered, its communications systems locally and remotely controlled - the President sat watching his country die.

A virulent and deadly disease had spread across the American continent, homo sapiens had become an endangered species. Gene Arnprior had survived the lethal virus, but could he survive the sinister society it had created?

I AM POLITICALLY AGNOSTIC AND PROUD OF IT - John Tsul

Offline supressedminds

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2011, 05:29:48 PM »
I'll Suggest  "Steeling the Mind of America, Volume II (Steeling the Mind of America)"

and  "Val Valerian - Matrix Series"     --- Matrix series is a must read!


MATRIX IV

VALDAMAR VALERIAN - The Equivideum -- Paradigms and Dimensions of Human
Evolution and Consciousness -1100 P. - 1994

Matrix IV presents a functional basis from which to evaluate everything you believe, think, read, who you are and where you think you and everyone else are going--not trying to convince you of anything, but presenting material that will profoundly affect your life. The book covers: mind, awareness, sacred geometry, the geometry of consciousness; perception and the brain; human history (past & future), spiritual thought & more. Matrix IV brings to light information that is so suppressed-that it is sure to be one of the most dangerous books ever written - dangerous in terms of it's freeing power over the human soul and its ability to assist the reader to explore life and move forward. For those of you who thought the previous Matrix works were great,

 Matrix IV outdoes them all. Through the vast knowledge in this book, the reader will be able to evaluate all other literature, self-help programs, and control paradigms with crystal-clear awareness. The book features the Flower of Life paradigm, with it's unique approach to consciousness and sacred geometry. It pays special attention to Terrance McKenna's theory of fractalization of history and the time-wave equations of Peter Meyer, with a wide range of time-wave graphs covering 1993-2012.

Also featured, the work of mathematician / climatologist Iben Browning relative to earth's future; the interpretations of Lemesurier on the future of the human species based on the structure of the Pyramid of Giza; group studies (5000 + people) on future life projection into the next millennium (1990-2500 A.D.); the work of Robert Monroe and what he found relative to the period after 3000 A.D., describing dimensional realities of entrapment, why it occurs, and how to avoid it; and a variety of charts and diagrams on : evaluation of literature, levels of consciousness and existence, levels of energy transfer; synchronicity and quantum relationships, and the physics behind non-causality. Also discussed : unified -field theory and Tachyon- Delton - Muon physics. The book discusses the paradigm of the Maya and even integrates McKenna's time-wave work into a series of graphs amplifying the Mayan linear paradigm, including historical descriptions and info. relative to Hopi and other American Indian tribes. Matrix IV covers dimensional shifting; polar shifting and dimensional interface; Includes material which essentially provides you the reader with the biological, psychological, and spiritual keys to the physical universe and beyond. Includes an anthology of Eastern and Western adeptship materials.

Get the truth out, join the underground network at
www.suppressedminds.com

Offline MichaelRupkalvis

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"Alexander Dolgun's Story: An American in the Gulag."
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2011, 11:36:52 PM »
Written by Patrick Watson
During a walk one day in Moscow, NYC-born twenty-two-year old employee of the American Embassy in Moscow, Alexander Dolgun, was kidnapped and taken to "the Lubyanka prison, headquarters of the MGB." Initially, thinking what a great tale he'd have to tell (having seen the inside of such a famous place), knowing he hadn't committed a crime, he was unafraid, maybe even a little bit...excited. But it wasn't long before he was imprisoned, interrogated, tortured, and sentenced under (p 19) "Article 58, sections 6, 8, 10, etc. of the Soviet Criminal Code...espionage, political terrorism, anti-Soviet propaganda, etc., etc." to imprisonment in a forced labor camp. By the time of the "thaw," when many prisoners were released including Dolgun, he had spent eight year of his life in forced labor camps. Twenty-three long years passed from the day of his kidnapping until he was able to again set foot on American soil. After his release from prison, he met Solzhenitsyn, who interviewed him while writing The Gulag Archipelago. He was especially interested in Dolgun because (p 348) "he had never...met a sane survivor of Sukhanovka." Like Solzhenitsyn, Dolgun had an amazing memory and was able to recall minute details of much of his imprisonment. Forced to stay up for days at a time with little or no sleep during his interrogation sessions, he was beaten, sent to solitary confinement, and tortured for not signing a document stating that he had committed illegal acts. He proudly writes of his ability to survive without signing anything incriminating anyone else (although some of his acquaintances did succumbed to the pressure). When he finally was released, he found out that his mother, also picked up, tortured, and imprisoned, went mad due to her experience. Not long after their reunion, she was sent to a psychiatric hospital with the diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. She remained there for the rest of her life. There were very few Americans in the GULAG. At times, he was able to use that fact to his advantage, although others were wary of him, believing he must have been a spy.

He recounts the experience of being transported to and between prisons, interactions and friendships with other prisoners, the day to day drudgery of trying to stay alive under horrendous conditions which involved trying to meet ridiculously high work quotas for extremely strenuous jobs while in a constant state of starvation and often, sickness. Fortunately, he was able to work in the prison hospital at times as a feldsher (even performing minor surgery). He also did his share of hard labor, but was ingenious enough to get extra food by secretly doing sideline work like by making metal spoons. Dolgun's story is one of many wonderfully tragic memoirs about an often-overlooked issue: Stalin's forced labor camps.

Offline addseo1118

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2015, 06:02:07 AM »
This forum is so great. I have so enjoyed with this forum. Thanks for nice articles.

Offline Brocke

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2017, 01:30:17 AM »
Who Needs Men?
Edmund Cooper



Rura Alexandra, Madam Exterminator, had recently graduated into a 25th century world where men had become biologically less important, where women could reproduce as they wished by cloning and parthenogenesis.

Her task was simple - in theory, if not in practice: to wipe out the last few thousand men who had taken refuge in the Highlands of Scotland.
But an ambush near Lock Lomond led to rape, and the killing of her fellow-exterminators. And Diarmid MacDiarmid, the last remaining rebel chieftain, proved too much of a fascination.


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Al Bundy

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Re: Suggested Reading (Fiction)
« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2017, 06:53:42 AM »
Federico Andahazi "El príncipe" ("The prince" )

In front of an acclaiming multitude at the plaza, the father of the nation climbs up the main balcony banister and jumps. But before reaching the ground, he flights and disappears. This is the beginning of this novel about the excesses of power and the manipulation of popular will. This is the story of Wari, the devil, a leader born in the middle of a mountain who conquest the people fervor and governs with a promise of false prosperity. When the ruler retires with his Machiavellian consultant to enjoy the benefits of his power and to wait a better moment to his plans, everybody asks where is he hidden and what is he thinking up for his coming back.
Situated in an apocalyptic scenario that makes us remember films like Blade Runner, The prince shows us characters and situations that range from hyperrealism to fantastic excess, leaving place to clever humor.
Federico Andahazi, one of the new values of Latin American literature since The anatomist, proves his skill with his new work. A great novel in which the author gets a very especial mix of politic satire and allegoric tales to face us with a real and cruel actual matter.