Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich

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Offline Geolibertarian

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Joyce McMillan: Myth of undeserving poor revisited
« Reply #40 on: April 06, 2013, 10:54:19 AM »
http://www.scotsman.com/news/joyce-mcmillan-myth-of-undeserving-poor-revisited-1-2878384

Joyce McMillan: Myth of undeserving poor revisited


Visits to food banks have become increasingly necessary for many. Picture: Gett

By JOYCE MCMILLAN
Scotsman.com
Friday 5 April 2013

THE politics of ‘us’ and ‘them’ have pushed us backwards in time to join the heartless Victorians, writes Joyce McMillan.

Let us now praise famous women: or one not-so-famous woman, in the shape of Helen Goodman, Labour MP for Bishop Auckland.

For during the last parliamentary recess, while other MP’s went skiing, Helen Goodman decided to have a go at living on the “generous” state benefits provided to typical women of her own age – Helen is 55 – who are either unemployed, or have had to give up work through ill health.

After setting aside small sums to cover energy bills, water rates and the new “bedroom tax”, Helen had £18 a week left for food.

After seven days of trying to survive on this, she found herself exhausted, cold, hungry, waking up ravenous during the night, and unable to imagine how anyone living on such a diet could possibly work up the energy to even look for a job in the current tough market, never mind also working 30 hours a week, unpaid, on “job experience”.

Worst of all, by the last day of the week she had nothing left to eat at all. And if you think she must have been strangely incompetent to end up in such a situation, then try asking some of the 200,000 people in the UK who last year sought help from charitable food banks just how easy it is, in low-income Britain, to run out of money for food, if you want to keep a roof over your head.

Nor are food-bank users all unemployed. Increasingly, they include Britain’s army of “working poor”, people who are paid so little that they cannot meet the basic costs of living.

Now, of course, as soon as anyone points out the misery experienced by millions on these rock-bottom incomes, the letters pages and comment strands fill up with messages which are both full of bossy advice, and utterly bereft of real empathy.

“Buck up!” cry those voices. “Make soup! Get a vegetable box! Give up biscuits and crisps, and don’t you dare have a drink!”

Then there are those who simply deny that such cases are typical. They prefer the image – all the easier to promote, after this week’s shocking Philpott manslaughter case in Derby – of the benefit “scrounger” with multiple partners and a dozen children, lolling around in some publicly-funded mansion, even though in fact such cases are vanishingly rare, and account for a negligible proportion of benefit spending.

Those who repeat these arguments, though – and they are legion, across Britain – had better beware. For whether they are in the majority or not, they are beginning to sound exactly, and in detail, like the great right-wing bourgeoisie of the Victorian and Edwardian age; those generations of heartless and economically illiterate buffoons pitilessly satirised by great English writers from Dickens to JB Priestley, whose view of the poor was – and is – always the same.

In the first place, they say, the poor are exaggerating their plight. In the second place, their plight is all their own fault, and could be remedied by a little thrift and ingenuity. And in the third place, they have too many children; so many that the only answer is to punish the children along with their parents, in order to remove the “perverse incentives” that led to their birth.

[Continued...]
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline jofortruth

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #41 on: April 06, 2013, 11:14:56 AM »
The problem now is that EVERYONE IS BEING MADE POOR by the criminal actions of the NWO globalists who are presently redistributing the wealth (some of which made it legitimately).

So, do you think that should be allowed?  If you don't like poverty, then I would think not!

It makes no sense that IN THE NAME OF POVERTY (helping the poor), everyone is made poor. That is lunacy!

Then the very guys who are doing this then get to be the bosses of us all after looting and pillaging their entire lives. They are criminals, they are not HELPERS OF THE POOR!

Please address this issue! It's how they are doing it that shows they have zero credibility. You don't take from Peter to pay Paul and think you are doing something good.

 ::)
Don't believe me. Look it up yourself!

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2013, 11:22:49 AM »
The problem now is that EVERYONE IS BEING MADE POOR by the criminal actions of the NWO globalists.

So, do you think that should be allowed?  If you don't like poverty, then I would think not!

It makes no sense that IN THE NAME OF POVERTY (helping the poor), everyone is made poor. That is lunacy!

If you can ever get your knee to stop jerking, would you please point out where I advocated making "everyone" poor as a "solution" to poverty? Or will you admit you're erecting a straw man in place of my clearly stated views on the matter?

Quote
Please address this issue!

I have addressed it:

     http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=160459.0 (How do we eliminate the paradox of poverty & privation amid plenty & abundance?)

     http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=161315.0 (Bureaucracy-Ridden Welfare System vs. Guaranteed Income)

Please think before reacting from now on!  ::)
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline jofortruth

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #43 on: April 06, 2013, 11:31:46 AM »
If you can ever get your knee to stop jerking, would you please point out where I advocated making everyone poor as a "solution" to poverty? Or will you admit you're erecting a straw man in place of my clearly stated views on the matter?

I have addressed it:

     http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=160459.0 (How do we eliminate the paradox of poverty & privation amid plenty & abundance?)

     [url]http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=161315.0] (Bureaucracy-Ridden Welfare System vs. Guaranteed Income)

Please think before reacting from now on!  ::)

Geo,

Thx for the link giving the other side of the story. This thread alone could be misleading for people on the subject of POVERTY (Obama's pet project along with bankers). Now new readers of this forum have both sides of the issue.

My comments were intended to give people a total story on this issue because so many think REDISTRIBUTION OF WEALTH is ok. WHAT OBAMA AND THE BANKERS ARE DOING IS WRONG!

Heads up readers. Look at the other link and investigate this issue for yourself! Bringing the whole world down to help the poor is not legitimate! BUT THAT IS WHAT IS BEING DONE TO AMERICA FROM WITHIN THE HALLS OF CONGRESS AND THE WHITE HOUSE WITH THE HELP OF THEIR GLOBALIST BUDDIES (INCLUDING THE UN) WORLDWIDE, NAMELY IN CENTRAL BANKING!

YOU DON'T HELP THE POOR BY LOOTING AND DESTROYING THEIR COUNTRIES WITH ENDLESS WARS AND EVERY MANNER OF CRIMINAL FINANCIAL ACTS. YET THIS IS WHAT IS BEING DONE! OH, AND THIS IS ALSO HAPPENING IN AMERICA! NOW IT'S AMERICA'S TURN TO BE LOOTED BY THE SAME THUGS WHO HAVE DONE IT WORLDWIDE FOR A VERY LONG TIME.

WELCOME TO THE NWO WHERE EVERYONE IS POOR!
Don't believe me. Look it up yourself!

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #44 on: April 06, 2013, 11:52:58 AM »
Geo,

Thx for the link giving the other side of the story. This thread alone could be misleading for people on the subject of POVERTY (Obama's pet project along with bankers).

Except for two articles in my second post, this thread doesn't even mention Obama, so it's misleading only to those who, instead of merely "reading" something, prefer to read into it.

Quote
Now new readers of this forum have both sides of the issue.

Again, this thread doesn't address either side of the "solution" issue, so if certain people are made uncomfortable by the articles I've posted, then perhaps it's a simple case of their feeling guilty for having openly engaged in the morally bankrupt sport of blaming the victim despite knowing it was wrong.

Quote
My comments were intended to give people a total story on this issue because so many think REDISTRIBUTION OF WEALTH is ok.

The problem is that, whenever someone calls for eliminating the privileges (see this, this and this) that allowed the super-rich to become super-rich in the first place at the unjust expense of the lower and middle classes, that someone is usually bombarded with hysterical accusations of "class envy!" and of wanting to "redistribute wealth." Yet those accusations are Pavlovian responses, not rational ones. And if you dig beneath the surface of those Pavlovian responses, you'll find a deeply-ingrained class bias. Until people realize they've been conditioned by ruling-class parasities to have this bias, they'll continue "policing each other" whenever anyone points out who our common enemy is. So I created this thread to draw attention to this conditioning in the hopes it would help people break out of it on their own.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline jofortruth

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #45 on: April 06, 2013, 12:06:16 PM »
Well, Obama has admitted he believes in "Wealth Redistribution", and then you see what he is doing and that is exactly it. It doesn't matter whether he is referenced in your thread or not. It is being done!

http://z4.invisionfree.com/The_Great_Deception/index.php?showtopic=6049&st=0#entry4927677

Since this is happening, and very real, maybe it should be mentioned.

Also, I support poor people. Some of my relatives are poor. What i object to is a bunch of rich guys pretending to help the poor, when what they are really doing is destroying all classes as they bring in their utopian NWO, where they will rule in the end. It's the deception and lies that are at issue here!

If these RICH guys really respected the poor (WHICH THEY DON'T) they would just give all their own money to them and live like the rest of us. But you will never see them do that. Thus, they are big fat hypocrites and liars on this subject and many more.



Don't believe me. Look it up yourself!

EvadingGrid

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #46 on: April 06, 2013, 02:04:26 PM »
I'm going to list some people I've got know very well....
I'm also asking "What have all these people got in common ?"

(1) sporting world champions
(2) medal winning olympic athletes
(3) CEO of mega brands listed on stock markets
(4) authors
(5) computer wizzard inventors

Besides me knowing these people rather well, being on first name terns, knowing where they keep the sugar .. that sort of familiarity, can you guess what these people have in common, that is fundamentally different to the Elites such as the RottenChilds ?

Care to take a guess ?



Offline Secretthoughts

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Re: The lies we tell ourselves: ending comfortable myths about poverty
« Reply #47 on: April 30, 2013, 10:18:27 PM »
http://www.taxresearch.org.uk/Blog/2013/03/03/the-lies-we-tell-ourselves-ending-comfortable-myths-about-poverty/

The lies we tell ourselves: ending comfortable myths about poverty

by Richard Murphy
Tax Research UK
March 3, 2013

A coalition of the Baptist Union of Great Britain, the Methodist Church, the Church of Scotland and the United Reformed Church issued a report last week challenging the language used and stories told about poverty in the UK, not least amongst church members.  The report, entitled ‘The lies we tell ourselves: ending comfortable myths about poverty‘ is timely, appropriate and reminder of what the role of churches is. It is their duty to have a bias to the poor.

The report concentrates on six myths about poverty. As they say, the myths challenged are not a comprehensive list but were chosen because of their prominence in public debate, and their widespread acceptance. I think they’re powerful enough to share in full from their executive summary:

Myth 1: ‘They’ are lazy and don’t want to work.

The most commonly cited cause of child poverty by churchgoers and the general public alike is that “their parents don’t want to work”. Yet the majority of children in poverty are from working households. In work poverty is now more common than out of work poverty. It is readily accepted that across the country there are families in which three generations have never worked. Examples of such families have not been found, and the evidence suggests it is unlikely we ever will. How did we come to believe these things?

Myth 2: ‘They’ are addicted to drink and drugs.

Churchgoers and the wider public cite addiction as the second most common cause of child poverty. While addiction is devastating for the families and communities touched by it, fewer than 4% of benefit claimants report any form of addiction. How did we come to believe this is such a big factor in the lives of the 13 million people who live in poverty in the UK today?

Myth 3: ’They’ are not really poor – they just don’t manage their money properly.

Nearly 60% of the UK population agrees that the poor could cope if only they handled their money properly. The experience of living on a low income is one of constant struggle to manage limited resources, with small events having serious consequences. Statistics show that the poorest spend their money carefully, limiting themselves to the essentials. How did we come to believe that poverty was caused by profligacy?

Myth 4: ‘They’ are on the fiddle

Over 80% of the UK population believe that “large numbers falsely claim benefits”. Benefit fraud has decreased to historically low levels – the kind of levels that the tax system can only dream of. Less than 0.9% of the welfare budget is lost to fraud. The fact is that if everyone claimed and was paid correctly, the welfare system would cost around £18 billion more. So how did we come to see welfare claimants as fraudulent scroungers?

Myth 5: ‘They’ have an easy life

Over half the British public believes benefits are too high and churchgoers tend to agree. Government ministers speak of families opting for benefits as a lifestyle choice. Yet we know that benefits do not meet minimum income standards. They have halved in value relative to average incomes over the last 30 years. We know the ill and the unemployed are the people least satisfied and happy with life. Why have we come to believe that large numbers of families would choose this a lifestyle?

Myth 6: ‘They’ caused the deficit.

The proportion of our tax bills spent on welfare has remained stable for the last 20 years. It is ridiculous to argue, as some have, that increasing welfare spending is responsible for the current deficit. Public debt is a problem but why is it being laid at the feet of the poorest?

[Continued...]

  you could say all those things about the rich.

1) they don't want to work
2) they're usually addicted to drugs
3)they caused the deficit,
4) they have an easy life
and on and on.

    Anyone who knows anything knows the Federal Reserve and it's masonic agents are very careful about who they make rich.  Just look at all your big globalist corporations, all the managers follow masonic orders.

    the temples of Freemasonry are merely a physical manifestation of something from the spirutal realm, the unseen world.  They do not necessarily need to meet in masonic lodges to carry out their schemes, but it's nice for recruiting non-demons into their ranks to be used.

Offline chris jones

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #48 on: May 01, 2013, 09:24:41 PM »
 What would the elites do if suddenly they were pennyless and in debt with the only solution being as one of the peons, working for a living.
 The wall street collapse: Wall Street Crash , 1929, or Black Tuesday.   
     The super sucklings who didn't get the heads up ( ignored by the overlords) jumped out their windows of Wall Street.. SUICIDED
"Watch out for jumpers" was a daily phrase,  people were very concerned when walking down wall street they wouldn't have one land on top of em.
      These parasites will not be content untill this nations blood is sucked dry, they want it all.
                                       Sorry Geo, went off the map a tad.
   
     
     
     

     

Offline Constitutionary

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #49 on: May 02, 2013, 01:47:38 PM »
You know what's weird is that even when you lay it all out of how the recession is allthe banks' fault people still look at you funny.

There's never the hatred or animosity of say the KKK, a pedophile, a perv, it is like a Robocop Directive 4 with the general public to shut down and not ever get mad at banks.

Offline chris jones

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #50 on: May 02, 2013, 10:16:35 PM »
 We the peons of this nation pay taxes, go to wars, obey the law, in fact the great majority are legitimate working class citizens.
 We beleive in our constitution, is that a crime. In general most folks have been raised with a deep and unbending loyalty to our goverment/ Nation.
  The key is not the beleifs, they are to be admired. The down side is the lack of abiltiy or basic desire to admit there is a problem with our regime. Sadly, we are in the midst of perpetual war and domestic debt unheard of historically. Americans  have been sacrificing life in limb based on faulty information ( lies), our nation is responsibe for invasions, genocide and torture under the orders of the commander and chief ( the overlords) without congressional approval. So much for representative democracy and a Gov for and by the people. (now however they lay blame on the peons).
 As a child and young man I too was brainwshed, dipped, a societys child upon entering adulthood due to severe and unaviodable circumstances I came to the realization, this nation was controlled with a group powerfull group, that in effect, they had infected/ penetrated our system of goverment.
 I suggest the faces who may attempt to insult and degrade us were to spend days visiting, the National Cemetarys, Veterans Hospitols, meet with the victims of the invasions genocide and torture Iraq Etc,  to uinvestigae the supcorps who have estalbished international manufacturing , , To walk the streets and visit the homeless, to chat with the AL'qs and the US paid Mersenaray forces. To meet with the troppers and get their oppinions.                To search for their souls. 

I know, they don't give a twit, but It is a dream I have, "to emphasize", just a dream.             BUT  G.C-  They don't care..

Offline Constitutionary

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Re: World's richest woman says poor should have less fun, work harder
« Reply #51 on: June 24, 2013, 07:42:10 AM »


What would happen if fat-@$$ had to earn her billions....    >:(

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #52 on: July 12, 2013, 08:34:30 AM »
Which Is Greater: Full Time Jobs Or Americans On Food Assistance And Disability?
11 July 2013
, by Tyler Durden (Zero Hedge)
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2013-07-11/which-greater-full-time-jobs-or-americans-food-assistance-and-disability

Over the past week there has been some speculation whether the number of Americans who receive food assistance and/or are on disability, outnumber full-time employed workers in the US.

Here is the answer:

- There are 116 million Americans with full-time jobs according to the BLS (source), which includes 21.9 million government workers.

So far so good. Now the flip side showing how many Americans are reliant on the USDA's Food and Nutrition Services program or on Disability payments, i.e., food assistance in some form:

- There are 47.5 million Americans on Foodstamps
- There are 30.4 million Americans participating in the National School Lunch Program
- There are 13.2 million Americans participating in the School Breakfast Program
- There are 8.6 million Americans participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition – Women, Infants and Children program Participants
- There are 3.4 million Americans participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program and the Food Donation Program
- There are 0.6 million Americans participating in the Commodity Supplemental Food Program
- There are 0.1 million Americans participating in the Food Donation Program
- There are 8.6 million Americans on Disability
- For a grand total of 112.5 million Americans on Food assistance.

End result: there are 3.5 million more Americans with full-time jobs than there are Americans who are reliant on the government for their daily bread: a tiny 3% delta.




What this means for the country, we will let readers decide.

The above is notable because Congress just passed a Farm Bill without consideration for Foodstamps funding. From Reuters:

The Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives defied a White House veto threat and passed a farm bill on Thursday that expands the taxpayer-subsidized crop insurance system but omitted food stamps for the poor.

Lawmakers passed the 608-page bill, unveiled by Republican leaders late on Wednesday night, on a 216-208, party-line vote after two hours of debate in which no amendments were allowed.

Republican leaders said food stamps, traditionally part of the farm bill, would be handled later and that, for now, they needed a way to start negotiations with the Senate over a compromise bill.

Democrats said the real intent of the action was to isolate food stamps for large cuts in funding.

House Speaker John Boehner declined to say if leaders would allow a vote on a farm bill with larger food stamp spending than his party liked. "We'll get to that later," he told reporters.

Massachusetts Democrat Jim McGovern said he believed conservatives were promised a chance to strive for deeper cuts to food stamps in upcoming legislation.

The defeated earlier version of the farm bill would have ended benefits for 2 million people, or about 4% of recipients.

"A vote for this bill is a vote to end nutrition programs in America," said Rose DeLauro, a Connecticut Democrat.


Surely not even Congress is stupid enough to not realize that if the free meals of 47.5 million Americans are taken away, the consequences would be severe.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #53 on: July 12, 2013, 08:52:09 AM »
http://www.prisonplanet.com/stealing-from-social-security-to-pay-for-wars-and-bailouts.html

Stealing from Social Security to Pay for Wars and Bailouts

Paul Craig Roberts
Prisonplanet.com
March 10, 2011

The American Empire is failing. A number of its puppet rulers are being overthrown by popular protests, and the almighty dollar will not even buy one Swiss franc, one Canadian dollar, or one Australian dollar. Despite the sovereign debt problem that threatens EU members Greece, Ireland, Spain, and Portugal, it requires $1.38 dollars to buy one euro, a new currency that was issued at parity with the US dollar.

The US dollar’s value is likely to fall further in terms of other currencies, because nothing is being done about the US budget and trade deficits. Obama’s budget, if passed, doesn’t reduce the deficit over the next ten years by enough to cover the projected deficit in the FY 2012 budget.

Indeed, the deficits are likely to be substantially larger than forecast. The military/security complex, about which President Eisenhower warned Americans a half century ago, is more powerful than ever and shows no inclination to halt the wars for US hegemony.

The cost of these wars is enormous. The US media, being good servants for the government, only reports the out-of-pocket or current cost of the wars, which is only about one-third of the real cost. The current cost leaves out the cost of life-long care for the wounded and maimed, the cost of life-long military pensions of those who fought in the wars, the replacement costs of the destroyed equipment, the opportunity cost of the resources wasted in war, and other costs. The true cost of America’s illegal Iraq invasion, which was based entirely on lies, fabrications and deceptions, is at least $3,000 billion according to economist Joseph Stiglitz and budget expert Linda Bilmes.

The same for the Afghan war, which is ongoing. If the Afghan war lasts as long as the Pentagon says it needs to, the cost will be a multiple of the cost of the Iraq war.

There is not enough non-military discretionary spending in the budget to cover the cost of the wars even if every dollar is cut. As long as the $1,200 billion ($1.2 trillion) annual budget for the military/security complex is off limits, nothing can be done about the U.S. budget deficit except to renege on obligations to the elderly, confiscate private assets, or print enough money to inflate away all debts.

The other great contribution to the US deficit is the offshoring of production for US markets. This practice has enriched corporate management, large shareholders, and Wall Street, but it has eroded the tax base, and thereby tax collections, of local, state, and federal government, halted the growth of real income for everyone but the rich, and disrupted the lives of those Americans whose jobs were sent abroad. When short-term and long-term discouraged workers are added to the U.3 measure of unemployment, the U.S. has an unemployment rate of 22%. A country with more than one-fourth of its work force unemployed has a shrunken tax base and feeble consumer purchasing power.

To put it bluntly, the $3 trillion cost of the Iraq war, as computed by Joseph Stiglitz and Linda Bilmes, is 20% of the size of the U.S. economy in 2010. In other words, the Iraq war alone cost Americans one-fifth of the year’s gross domestic product. Instead of investing the resources, which would have produced income and jobs growth and solvency for state and local governments, the US government wasted the equivalent of 20% of the production of the economy in 2010 in blowing up infrastructure and people in foreign lands. The US government spent a huge sum of money committing war crimes, while millions of Americans were thrown out of their jobs and foreclosed out of their homes.

The bought-and-paid-for Congress had no qualms about unlimited funding for war, but used the resulting “debt crisis” to refuse help to American citizens who were out of work and out of their homes.

The obvious conclusion is that “our” government does not represent us.

The US government remains a champion of offshoring, which it calls “globalism.” According to the US government and its shills among “free market” economists, destroying American manufacturing and the tax bases of cities, states, and the federal government by moving US jobs and GDP offshore is “good for the economy.” It is “free trade.”

It is the same sort of “good” that the US government brings to Iraq and Afghanistan by invading those countries and destroying lives, homes and infrastructures. Destruction is good. That’s the way our government and its shills see things. In America destruction is done with jobs offshoring, financial deregulation, and fraudulent financial instruments. In Iraq and Afghanistan (and now Pakistan) is it done with bombs and drones.

Where is all this leading?

It is leading to the destruction of Social Security and Medicare.

Republicans have convinced a large percentage of voters that America is in trouble, not because it wastes 20% of the annual budget on wars of aggression and Homeland Security porn-scanners, but because of the poor and retirees.

[Continued...]

------------------------------

Something to keep in mind as you read the following:

-- "The budget [by Senator Rand Paul] provides two years of war funding, at the President’s requested levels."

-- "The food stamp program and the child nutrition program" (cut)

-- "The Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program" (eliminate)

-- "Affordable Housing Program" (eliminate)

Source: http://web.archive.org/web/20120523011347/http://campaignforliberty.com/materials/RandBudget.pdf
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #54 on: July 12, 2013, 08:53:40 AM »
http://www.globalresearch.ca/with-record-number-of-americans-falling-into-poverty-senator-rand-paul-says-the-poor-are-getting-rich/26689

With Record Number Of Americans Falling Into Poverty, Senator Rand Paul Says The Poor Are Getting Rich

by Tanya Somanader



Global Research, September 20, 2011
thinkprogress.org  

Census data revealed today that a record 46.2 million Americans were living in poverty in 2010. But in an aptly-timed hearing entitled “Is Poverty A Death Sentence,” Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) flat out rejected the idea that poverty in the U.S is worrisome. As the Ranking Member of the Senate Health subcommittee, Paul offered a dissertation-length statement on how the correlation between poverty and death is only found in the Third World and to claim such a connection within the U.S. is nothing more than “socialism” and “tyranny.”

Stating that “poor children today are healthier than middle-class adults a generation ago,” he even blamed the poor for their own health problems, suggesting “behavioral factors” like a higher incidence of smoking, obesity, or weak family support structures as the only correlation between poverty and health.

Citing the deficit as a primary priority, Paul questioned whether federal low-income programs are “creating unnecessary and unhealthy dependence on government.” He unequivocally declared that “poverty is not a state of permanence” and that “the rich are getting richer, but the poor are getting richer even faster.”

PAUL: We also need to understand that poverty is not a state of permanence. When you look at people in the bottom 5th of the economic ladder — those at the bottom — only 5 percent are there after 16 years. People move up, the American dream does exist…The rich are getting richer, but the poor are getting richer even faster.

Watch it: http://thinkprogress.org/economy/2011/09/13/318259/with-record-number-of-americans-falling-into-poverty-rand-paul-says-the-poor-are-getting-rich/

Summing up his thesis, Paul said, “Rather than bemoan or belabor something [poverty] that is really truly something that is overwhelmingly being treated in our country, we should maybe give more credit to the American system, the American dream, and give credit to what capitalism has done to eradicate poverty in this country.”

First of all, the notion that the poor are getting richer faster than the rich requires an impressive level of ignorance. Currently, income inequality in the United States is greater than that of Pakistan and Ethiopia and higher than at any other time since the Great Depression. Indeed, thanks to exceedingly low tax rates, the rich are getting richer, with the richest one percent earning nearly 25 percent of the total income [.pdf] in the country.

Meanwhile, nearly one in three middle-class Americans is slipping down the income ladder as an adult. And with stagnant wages and the purchasing power of the minimum wage at a 51-year low, it’s hard to see how suddenly “the poor are getting richer faster.”

What’s more, Paul’s overwhelming deluge of pseudo-evidence to downplay the connection between poverty and poor health cannot shake incontrovertible facts. As the American Journal of Public Health found, deaths resulting from poverty, income inequality, and low social support each totaled more than homicide deaths in 2000.

Paul’s claim that Americans now have a greater life expectancy still doesn’t change the fact that low-income individuals can expect to live a shorter life due to poverty. Indeed, a report released at the hearing noted that “this is the first time in our history that children born in certain parts of the United States can expect to live shorter lives than their parents’ generation.”
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #55 on: July 12, 2013, 09:16:35 AM »
More than four years ago Webster Tarpley chastised the economic right-wingers in the Republican Party for stupidly "helping" Wall Street puppet Barack Obama politically by giving him "left cover":

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZdHEkm7DoY

Yet here they are today, not only still doing it, but doing so with a vengeance.  ::)

Now does everyone see what I meant when I wrote the following?

As they say, a picture speaks a thousand words. And although I generally support limited government and free enterprise (I'm a Georgist on economic matters, not a Marxist), I nevertheless think the following image accurately reflects both the corporate monstrosity that laughingly passes for "capitalism" these days and the plutocracy that laughingly passes for "democracy."



And as Max Hirsch correctly points out, if the "original" privileges were simply eliminated, then socioeconomic conditions would so improve that there would soon thereafter cease to be a widely perceived need for all of the bureaucracy-ridden additional ones -- at which point they could be easily and gracefully phased out of existence and replaced with a Guaranteed Income (see this).

Thus, the difference between progressive libertarians and royal libertarians is that the latter want to start abolishing privileges at the bottom of the power pyramid and work their way upward (and even then only to a point),
whereas the former want to start at the top and work their way downward.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #56 on: July 12, 2013, 09:59:40 AM »
Since I've already given a word of advice to mainline, "pro-choice" Democrats, I'd now like to give one to mainline, "pro-life" Republicans: if you want to maintain the moral high ground on this issue, you won't criticize abortion apologists for suggesting that human beings are the moral equivalent of animals, and then, in the very next breath, do the same thing yourselves by equating food stamp outlays either with the feeding of "stray animals" or with the process by which farmers used to "domesticate" wild pigs by offering them free food.

------------------------------------

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article35079.htm

The New Crime of Eating While Homeless

By outlawing dumpster diving, Houston is making life impossible for the most vulnerable.

By Jim Hightower

May 26, 2013 "Information Clearing House" -"Other Words" -- Whenever one of our cities gets a star turn as host of some super-sparkly event, such as a national political gathering or the Super Bowl, its first move is to tidy up — by having the police sweep homeless people into jail, out of town, or under some rug.

But Houston’s tidy-uppers aren’t waiting for a world-class event to rationalize going after homeless down-and-outers. They’ve preemptively outlawed the “crime” of dumpster diving in the Texan city.



In March, James Kelly, a 44-year-old Navy veteran, was passing through Houston on his way to connect with family in California. Homeless, destitute, and hungry, he chose to check out the dining delicacies in a trash bin near City Hall. Spotted by police, Kelly was promptly charged with “disturbing the contents of a garbage can in the [central] business district.” Seriously.

“I was just basically looking for something to eat,” he told the Houston Chronicle. But, unbeknownst to both this indigent tourist and the great majority of Houston’s generally generous citizens, an ordinance dating way back to 1942 says that “molesting garbage containers” is illegal.

Also, in 2012, city officials made it a crime for any group to hand out food to the needy in the downtown area without first getting a permit. It’s a cold use of legal authority to chase the homeless away to…well, anywhere else.

Such laws are part of an effort throughout the country to criminalize what some call “homeless behavior.” And, sure enough, when hungry, the behavioral tendency of a homeless human is to seek a bite of nourishment, often in such dining spots as dumpsters. The homeless behavior that Houston has outlawed, then, is eating.

[Continued...]

------------------------------------

If you cheerlead the wasting of hundreds of billions in tax dollars every year on imperialist wars of aggression overseas (which invariably result in, among other things, the slaughter of innocent children), and then wax indignant about the comparative crumbs being spent on food stamps here at home, then you're not a "conservative," but rather a self-obsessed sociopath and a flaming hypocrite!

http://www.webofdebt.com/articles/fiscal_responsibility.php
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #57 on: July 12, 2013, 08:24:25 PM »
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #58 on: July 12, 2013, 08:51:41 PM »
You know I hope that all these 100+ million Americans who are now jobless and homeless vote for Ventura for President.

It was like 60 million that got Obama re-elected and 40 million that went to Romney.

I know the elections are rigged but Americans got to stop being so damn stupid from a generation ago.

A generation ago people had a HS education and were more than able to provide for their families with good paying jobs.  Now we have all kinds of higher education people working 2 and 3 part-time jobs to make ends meet.

Every day I thank God that despite this bad economy that I am being allowed to train and prepare for my dream-job in aerodynamics.  The thing that gets me is that the peon jobs that people are in now....  did they sit there as kids and say I want me a job at McDonalds for the rest of my life or working at a retail store making 50 cents above minimum wage.

I can't understand why there isn't more outrage among the intelligentasia of America regarding the neo-feudalization of the economy.

Must be all the sodium fluoride or something.

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #59 on: July 13, 2013, 12:30:13 PM »
You know I hope that all these 100+ million Americans who are now jobless and homeless vote for Ventura for President.

We can't vote our way out of this mess for precisely the reason you allude to later in your post: our so-called "elections" are rigged, and will remain so until the reform measures outlined in the following thread are implemented.

     http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=81509.0 (Election Reform)

As I've been saying for years in this forum, the only hope of effecting meaningful change is for a critical mass of people to unite across both party and ideological lines behind an agreed-upon policy agenda for the purpose of exerting non-stop pressure on Congress to implement that agenda:

     http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=198869.0 (Points of agreement = massive grassroots coalition)
     http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=162212.0 (We Must Stop Being In Perpetual Reaction Mode)

Quote
A generation ago people had a HS education and were more than able to provide for their families with good paying jobs.  Now we have all kinds of higher education people working 2 and 3 part-time jobs to make ends meet.

It's called economic warfare. Ruling-class oligarchs are simply doing to this country what they've done to numerous Third World nations over the years, just at a slower rate of speed -- the old "slow boil" treatment.

http://www.economichitman.com

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gm2qEjny2aM (Economic Hit Men: Paid Professionals who Cheat Countries Out of Trillions)
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Unemployed Workers Still Far Outnumber Job Openings in Every Major Sector
« Reply #60 on: July 17, 2013, 02:57:29 PM »
Whenever you hear a smug individual wax self-righteous about how the vast majority of all those who've grown "dependent" upon such things as food stamps and unemployment benefits are entirely (or at least primarily) to blame for their own jobless- or underemployed-induced poverty, keep in mind the following:

-------------------------------

http://www.epi.org/publication/unemployed-workers-outnumber-job-openings/

Unemployed Workers Still Far Outnumber Job Openings in Every Major Sector

By Heidi Shierholz
Economic Policy Institute
June 11, 2013

The Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey (JOLTS) released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed job openings falling by 118,000 in April to 3.8 million. Job openings have improved very little over the last year and remain very depressed. In 2007, there were 4.5 million job openings each month, so April’s level of 3.8 million is more than 16 percent below its prerecession level.

The job openings data are extremely useful for diagnosing what’s behind our sustained high unemployment. In today’s economy, unemployed workers far outnumber job openings in every sector, as shown in Figure A. This demonstrates that the main problem in the labor market is a broad-based lack of demand for workers—and not, as is often claimed, available workers lacking the skills needed for the sectors with job openings.

In particular, there have recently been stories (for example, here) of worker shortages in construction. While there may be some construction firms in some places that cannot find the workers they need, the data show that this is in no way a prevalent phenomenon—unemployed construction workers outnumber job openings in construction by nearly 12-to-1. In construction as well as in every major industry, it is work that our labor market lacks, not the right workers.



Hires increased in April by almost 200,000 to 4.4 million, but this was just a partial reversal of a drop in March. Hires are no higher than they were last spring and remain nearly 15 percent below their average 2007 level.

Layoffs held roughly steady in April (-33,000). Layoffs are not currently the primary concern in the labor market, having been at prerecession levels since early 2011 (at around 1.7 million layoffs per month). However, given the lack of hiring, the consequences for workers of being laid off are far worse now than before the recession began; workers are far less likely to find a new job within a reasonable timeframe, particularly one that pays as much as the job they lost.

Voluntary quits increased by 152,000 in April. More voluntary quits generally signals good news in the labor market, since it means workers are seeing stronger outside job opportunities. However, April’s increase was just a partial reversal of a drop in March. Voluntary quits are still very depressed, at 22 percent below their 2007 level.

In April, the number of job seekers, which fell by 83,000 from March, stood at 11.7 million (unemployment data are from the Current Population Survey and can be found here). However, given the drop in job openings, the “job-seekers ratio”—the ratio of unemployed workers to job openings— increased in April to 3.1-to-1 from a revised 3.0-to-1 in March.

[Continued...]
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Miami Considers Jailing Homeless People For Eating, Sleeping In Public
« Reply #61 on: July 17, 2013, 03:16:39 PM »
Absolutely disgusting...

-------------------------------

http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2013/07/16/2307891/miami-criminalize-homelessness/

Miami Considers Jailing Homeless People For Eating, Sleeping In Public

By Scott Keyes
ThinkProgress
July 16, 2013

Being poor could soon be a crime in the city of Miami.

As though life weren’t already difficult enough for people who can’t afford regular housing, they could soon find themselves thrown in jail and their possessions confiscated if they’re caught engaging in certain everyday activities in public.

Before the late 1990s, Miami police frequently arrested homeless people for such “crimes” as sleeping on park benches, eating on sidewalks, or congregating in public places.

But in 1998, the city of Miami came to a landmark agreement, known as Pottinger v. City of Miami, whereby police officers were instructed not to arrest homeless people they caught committing minor “quality of life” offenses, but instead offer them a bed in a nearby homeless shelter. This new emphasis on providing homeless people with housing has been remarkably successful. In the 15 years since Pottinger, the number of people living on the streets has dropped from approximately 6,000 to 351, largely due to more shelters and support.

Despite the program’s success, one Miami City Commissioner wants to back out of the deal and resume arresting homeless people for living on the streets.

[Continued...]

-------------------------------
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #62 on: July 19, 2013, 11:40:55 AM »
Since blame-the-victim-firster, Ethan A. Huff, is waxing indignant about the recipients of social welfare for the obvious divide-and-rule purpose of fomenting tension between the lower and middle classes so as to divert attention from the far -- almost infinitely -- greater degree of economic parasitism being engaged in by the recipients of corporate welfare (which Huff, of course, conveniently fails to even acknowledge, let alone denounce), I thought I'd bump this thread.

“That’s the way the ruling class operates in any society: they try to divide the rest of the people. They keep the lower and the middle classes fighting with each other, so that they, the rich, can run off with all the f**king money.

"Fairly simple thing; happens to work.

"You know, anything different, that’s what they’re gonna talk about: race, religion, ethic and national backgrounds, jobs, income, education, social status, sexuality -- anything they can do [to] keep us fighting with each other, so that they can keep going to the bank."



"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Scapegoating the Poor
« Reply #63 on: July 19, 2013, 04:27:11 PM »
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2013/06/22/1217917/-Scapegoating-the-Poor#

Scapegoating the Poor

by joelal
Daily Kos
June 21, 2013

I recently read a Facebook post that asked what facet of today's life would be the most difficult to explain to someone from the Fifties. The typical responses from folks, predictably, had something to do with the sweeping technological changes that have occurred. And to be sure, the idea of having iPads, social media and even microwave ovens would be inconceivable to people who lived in a world where television sets were tuned to 'Uncle Miltie' every week. Overlooked, however, among the answers was today's political mood, which I believe has taken an almost unrecognizable shift to the right during the last six decades.

You might be scratching your head at this moment wondering how I can justify such a claim. After all, longstanding racism with segregated schools and unfair voting practices remained the norm during the Fifties. The decade also produced unbridled Cold War paranoia that climaxed with the Communist witch hunts conducted by Senator Joseph McCarthy. It was also a time of enormous conformity where mainstream society frowned upon overt individualistic expression and thought.

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ITRIb25noo (1950's Conformity)

Nevertheless, as seemingly unenlightened as the Fifties were, today's political climate tops those times in dysfunctional obstinacy and downright cruelty.

The clear distinction between then and now is how the general attitude about poverty has shifted away from benign ignorance to contempt. Being poor today has become a crime literally in some instances. After performing an internet news search using the words 'being poor is a crime', I came across several stories, all dated within the last month. The most recent one reveals how two Texas teenage boys had to perform community service for school tardiness, which came about because their families couldn't afford to buy a working car to get them to school on time.

Moreover, it seems that in many American cities, local businesses and governments have begun a 'get-tough approach' with the homeless, encouraging police to issue more frequent arrests for heinous crimes like sleeping in public, loitering, littering and public urination. It seems wickedly peculiar that many people in the wealthiest country in the world treat its stray animals better than their fellow citizens who are down-and-out.
       
This intolerance of the poor is becoming increasingly reflected in government policies aimed at battling the so-called 'debt' crisis as many right-wingers politicos have decided to preach the claim that entitlement programs have transformed the U.S. into a nation of takers. In the name of austerity, governments at the federal, state and local level have gone out of their way to slash programs aimed specifically at helping the poor while leaving corporate welfare policies intact. While providing unnecessary tax breaks for defense contractors and massive subsidies to wealthy farmers, our political leaders seem to be competing to see who can introduce the most callous measures that ensure that the poor endure a disproportionate share of sacrifice. This reality couldn't have been more evident than on Thursday when some conservative congressional lawmakers rejected this year's farm bill because its proposed $20-billion-dollar food stamp funding cut DIDN'T GO FAR ENOUGH! Until recently, Congress routinely passed farm bills, which are considered bipartisan pieces of pork.

Such blatant inhumanity wasn't evident back during 1950s. Yes, some conservatives called for rolling back the New Deal. But, most Republicans, including President Eisenhower, decided to continue carrying out most of FDR's popular and effective programs. In fact, Ike helped initiate several new, large-scale public works programs including the Interstate Highway System.

This is not to say that America embraced the poor during this relatively affluent period. As a political issue, poverty didn't really take on any emphasis until the next decade when Lyndon Johnson initiated the 'Great Society' and the 'War on Poverty'. Nevertheless, neglecting the poor is quite a far cry from demonizing and punishing them.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #64 on: July 23, 2013, 10:27:42 AM »
More than four years ago Webster Tarpley chastised the economic right-wingers in the Republican Party for stupidly "helping" Wall Street puppet Barack Obama politically by giving him "left cover":

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SZdHEkm7DoY

Yet here they are today, not only still doing it, but doing so with a vengeance.  ::)

For a vivid illustration of how Wall Street Democrats are afforded this "left cover," watch the following video:

     http://inequality.org/park-avenue-money-power-american-dream/
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Who's to blame for the middle class struggle?
« Reply #65 on: July 24, 2013, 09:39:16 AM »
http://money.cnn.com/2013/04/18/news/economy/middle-class-poor/index.html

Who's to blame for the middle class struggle?

By Tami Luhby
CNNMoney
April 18, 2013


The number of people on food stamps and other public
assistance programs has surged in recent years. That angers
some in the middle class.


The middle class is feeling squeezed, and they have plenty of blame to throw around. Some are very quick to point the finger at the poor. In fact, they were more resentful of the poor than the rich, big business and government.

That sentiment comes through clearly in many of the emails and comments CNNMoney has received in response to articles about middle class struggles.

Marty Slover, 53, gets annoyed when he sees people living in subsidized housing that's nicer than what he can afford on his middle school teacher's salary. The Illinois resident added that he doesn't mind giving a helping hand to those who truly need it, but he's frustrated by those who could work but choose not to, especially when his taxes are funding their sloth.

"It's easy to get assistance and once you do, it's a way of life," said Slover, who says he has to watch every dollar. "We're working, working, paying all of these taxes and they are getting the benefits."

Another reader wrote that "we, middle class people, see people in the grocery stores buying things that we cannot afford, having phones that we cannot afford, and getting health care coverage that we lack ... all from money that is taken away from me."

Of course, not all middle class Americans think the poor are to blame for their own economic situation.

[Continued...]
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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The Charitable-Industrial Complex
« Reply #66 on: July 28, 2013, 05:25:33 AM »
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/07/27/opinion/the-charitable-industrial-complex.html?_r=0

The Charitable-Industrial Complex

By Peter Buffett
The New York Times
July 26, 2013



I HAD spent much of my life writing music for commercials, film and television and knew little about the world of philanthropy as practiced by the very wealthy until what I call the big bang happened in 2006. That year, my father, Warren Buffett, made good on his commitment to give nearly all of his accumulated wealth back to society. In addition to making several large donations, he added generously to the three foundations that my parents had created years earlier, one for each of their children to run.

Early on in our philanthropic journey, my wife and I became aware of something I started to call Philanthropic Colonialism. I noticed that a donor had the urge to “save the day” in some fashion. People (including me) who had very little knowledge of a particular place would think that they could solve a local problem. Whether it involved farming methods, education practices, job training or business development, over and over I would hear people discuss transplanting what worked in one setting directly into another with little regard for culture, geography or societal norms.

Often the results of our decisions had unintended consequences; distributing condoms to stop the spread of AIDS in a brothel area ended up creating a higher price for unprotected sex.

But now I think something even more damaging is going on.

Because of who my father is, I’ve been able to occupy some seats I never expected to sit in. Inside any important philanthropy meeting, you witness heads of state meeting with investment managers and corporate leaders. All are searching for answers with their right hand to problems that others in the room have created with their left. There are plenty of statistics that tell us that inequality is continually rising. At the same time, according to the Urban Institute, the nonprofit sector has been steadily growing. Between 2001 and 2011, the number of nonprofits increased 25 percent. Their growth rate now exceeds that of both the business and government sectors. It’s a massive business, with approximately $316 billion given away in 2012 in the United States alone and more than 9.4 million employed.

Philanthropy has become the “it” vehicle to level the playing field and has generated a growing number of gatherings, workshops and affinity groups.

As more lives and communities are destroyed by the system that creates vast amounts of wealth for the few, the more heroic it sounds to “give back.” It’s what I would call “conscience laundering” — feeling better about accumulating more than any one person could possibly need to live on by sprinkling a little around as an act of charity.

But this just keeps the existing structure of inequality in place. The rich sleep better at night, while others get just enough to keep the pot from boiling over. Nearly every time someone feels better by doing good, on the other side of the world (or street), someone else is further locked into a system that will not allow the true flourishing of his or her nature or the opportunity to live a joyful and fulfilled life.

And with more business-minded folks getting into the act, business principles are trumpeted as an important element to add to the philanthropic sector. I now hear people ask, “what’s the R.O.I.?” when it comes to alleviating human suffering, as if return on investment were the only measure of success. Microlending and financial literacy (now I’m going to upset people who are wonderful folks and a few dear friends) — what is this really about? People will certainly learn how to integrate into our system of debt and repayment with interest. People will rise above making $2 a day to enter our world of goods and services so they can buy more. But doesn’t all this just feed the beast?

I’m really not calling for an end to capitalism; I’m calling for humanism.

Often I hear people say, “if only they had what we have” (clean water, access to health products and free markets, better education, safer living conditions). Yes, these are all important. But no “charitable” (I hate that word) intervention can solve any of these issues. It can only kick the can down the road.

[Continued...]
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: The Charitable-Industrial Complex
« Reply #67 on: July 28, 2013, 05:26:23 AM »
"In speaking of the practical measures for the improvement of the condition of labor which your Holiness suggests, I have not mentioned what you place much stress upon — charity. But there is nothing practical in such recommendations as a cure for poverty, nor will any one so consider them. If it were possible for the giving of alms to abolish poverty there would be no poverty in Christendom.

"Charity is indeed a noble and beautiful virtue, grateful to man and approved by God. But charity must be built on justice. It cannot supersede justice.

"What is wrong with the condition of labor through the Christian world is that labor is robbed. And while you justify the continuance of that robbery it is idle to urge charity. To do so — to commend charity as a substitute for justice, is indeed something akin in essence to those heresies, condemned by your predecessors, that taught that the gospel had superseded the law, and that the love of God exempted men from moral obligations.

"All that charity can do where injustice exists is here and there to mollify somewhat the effects of injustice. It cannot cure them. Nor is even what little it can do to mollify the effects of injustice without evil. For what may be called the superimposed, and in this sense, secondary virtues, work evil where the fundamental or primary virtues are absent. Thus sobriety is a virtue and diligence is a virtue. But a sober and diligent thief is all the more dangerous. Thus patience is a virtue. But patience under wrong is the condoning of wrong. Thus it is a virtue to seek knowledge and to endeavor to cultivate the mental powers. But the wicked man becomes more capable of evil by reason of his intelligence. Devils we always think of as intelligent.

"And thus that pseudo-charity that discards and denies justice works evil. On the one side, it demoralizes its recipients, outraging that human dignity which as you say 'God himself treats with reverence,' and turning into beggars and paupers men who to become self-supporting, self-respecting citizens need only the restitution of what God has given them. On the other side, it acts as an anodyne to the consciences of those who are living on the robbery of their fellows, and fosters that moral delusion and spiritual pride that Christ doubtless had in mind when he said it was easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter the Kingdom of Heaven. For it leads men steeped in injustice, and using their money and their influence to bolster up injustice, to think that in giving alms they are doing something more than their duty toward man and deserve to be very well thought of by God, and in a vague way to attribute to their own goodness what really belongs to God’s goodness. For consider: Who is the All-Provider? Who is it that as you say, 'owes to man a storehouse that shall never fail,' and which 'he finds only in the inexhaustible fertility of the earth.' Is it not God? And when, therefore, men, deprived of the bounty of their God, are made dependent on the bounty of their fellow-creatures, are not these creatures, as it were, put in the place of God, to take credit to themselves for paying obligations that you yourself say God owes?

"But worse perhaps than all else is the way in which this substituting of vague injunctions to charity for the clear-cut demands of justice opens an easy means for the professed teachers of the Christian religion of all branches and communions to placate Mammon while persuading themselves that they are serving God. Had the English clergy not subordinated the teaching of justice to the teaching of charity — to go no further in illustrating a principle of which the whole history of Christendom from Constantine’s time to our own is witness — the Tudor tyranny would never have arisen, and the separation of the church been averted; had the clergy of France never substituted charity for justice, the monstrous iniquities of the ancient régime would never have brought the horrors of the Great Revolution; and in my own country had those who should have preached justice not satisfied themselves with preaching kindness, chattel slavery could never have demanded the holocaust of our civil war.

"No, your Holiness; as faith without works is dead, as men cannot give to God his due while denying to their fellows the rights he gave them, so charity unsupported by justice can do nothing to solve the problem of the existing condition of labor."

-- Henry George, The Condition of Labor, pp. 92-95
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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4 Out of 5 Americans Face Joblessness, Poverty
« Reply #68 on: August 12, 2013, 12:07:36 PM »
http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/08/4-out-of-5-americans-face-joblessness-poverty.html

4 Out of 5 Americans Face Joblessness, Poverty

Rampant Inequality – Which Destroys Economies – Skyrockets to the Highest Levels In History

by Washington's Blog
August 2, 2013

Associated Press reports that around 80 percent of all Americans deal with joblessness, near poverty, or reliance on welfare at some point in their lives.

AP notes that inequality is going through the roof:

An increasingly globalized U.S. economy, the widening gap between rich and poor and loss of good-paying manufacturing jobs [are the likely] reasons for the trend.

***

The risks of poverty also have been increasing in recent decades, particularly among people ages 35-55, coinciding with widening income inequality.

The U.S. compares very poorly to most other Western industrialized nations:



Washington may pay lip service to reducing inequality. But – as we will show below – bad government policy is largely responsible.

The Hard Facts of Inequality

A who’s-who’s of prominent economists in government and academia have all said that runaway inequality can cause financial crises.

Extreme inequality helped cause the Great Depression, the current financial crisis … and the fall of the Roman Empire.

But inequality in America today is actually twice as bad as in ancient Rome, worse than it was in in Tsarist Russia, Gilded Age America, modern Egypt, Tunisia or Yemen, many banana republics in Latin America, and worse than experienced by slaves in 1774 colonial America.

Inequality has grown steadily worse:







It is worse under Obama than under Bush.

A recent study shows that the richest Americans captured more than 100% of all recent income gains. And see this.

There are 2 economies: one for the rich, and the other for everyone else.

[Continued...]

---------------------------



"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Ed Asner's Animated Short on how the Top 1% screwed the Bottom 99%
« Reply #69 on: August 12, 2013, 03:21:32 PM »
I hadn't seen the following video clip until today. It is literally dumbed down to the level of a children's fairy-tale, and, consequently and unsurprisingly, is simplistic to the point of being misleading. (It's not "who" you tax, but what you tax!)

For that reason I normally wouldn't even give something like this attention. But since it was animated by Ed Asner -- a repeated guest on Alex's show, including just last month -- I thought I'd post it here. Even if you don't entirely agree with it, you have to admit it is, if nothing else, an effective tool for stimulating discussion of this issue -- certainly more so than some dry, lengthy, jargon-laced essay by an obscure blogger or long-winded academic:

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6ZsXrzF8Cc
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Fox's Shameless Misrepresentation Of SNAP Recipients
« Reply #70 on: August 16, 2013, 09:24:57 AM »
For years I've been imploring the Austrian- and Chicago School-dominated "Right" to stop arrogantly and mindlessly blaming the poor for their own poverty, and to stop waxing hysterical about the figurative speck that's in the collective eye of social welfare recipients while directing only a small fraction (if even that much) of that same moral outrage at the comparative 20-ft beam that's in the collective eye of the recipients of corporate welfare (Wall Street mega-banks, derivatives speculators and war profiteers, of course, being among the top recipients).

Why?

Because (as I pointed out earlier in this thread) all this does is give "left cover" to the corporate fascist agenda of Wall Street Democrats like Barack Obama, Jim Himes and Nancy Pelosi, thereby strengthening them politically.

Unfortunately, and much to the giddy delight of Obama and the left-wing reactionaries who serve him, demonizing food stamp recipients all day -- and painting tens of millions of struggling Americans with the same stereotypical brush -- is apparently so much fun, and so perversely intoxicating to the ego, that right-wing reactionaries simply can't help themselves. They just can't resist giving Wall Street Democrats still more convenient foil against which to define themselves in the eyes of the bottom "47%."

The following is merely the latest example of this disgraceful, self-discrediting and ultimately self-defeating trend...

-----------------------------------

http://mediamatters.org/blog/2013/08/09/foxs-shameless-misrepresentation-of-snap-recipi/195338

Fox's Shameless Misrepresentation Of SNAP Recipients

Baier: "When A Safety Net Becomes A Hammock"

Samantha Wyatt
Media Matters
August 9, 2013

In an attempt to make a surfing freeloader the face of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients, a Fox News special profiled Jason Greenslate, "a blissfully jobless California surfer" who has taken advantage of SNAP benefits. In reality, Greenslate bears no resemblance to the overwhelming majority of SNAP recipients, many of whom are elderly, children, or rely on the program for a short time while looking for work.

Prior to its August 9 airing, Fox News hyped the special, "The Great Food Stamp Binge," on Fox News Insider, FoxNews.com, and several of its daytime shows. Each preview focused on Jason Greenslate, a freeloading surfer who Fox correspondent John Roberts interviewed in Southern California. FoxNews.com described Greenslate at length in an article that teased the "new documentary":

    The Fox News Reporting documentary profiles, among others, a California surfer and aspiring musician named Jason Greenslate. Greenslate shows how he supports his beach-bum lifestyle with food stamps, while dismissing the idea of holding down a regular, steady job.

    "It's not that I don't want a job, I don't want a boss. I don't want someone telling me what to do.  I'm gonna live my own life," Greenslate tells Fox News' John Roberts. "This is the way I want to live. And I don't really see anything changing. I got the card. It's $200. That's it."

As promised, "The Great Food Stamp Binge" labeled Greenslate "the new face of food stamps," devoting two full segments to his lifestyle in a shameless attempt to characterize SNAP recipients as freeloaders.



According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service, the fraud and waste rate in SNAP is roughly 1 percent, contrary to recent Fox claims that the program is rife with fraud.

Unlike Greenslate, 41 percent of food stamp recipients live "in a household with earnings," and use SNAP benefits to supplement their primary source of income. Furthermore, the USDA reports that most food stamp recipients stay in the program for only a short period of time:

    Half of all new SNAP participants received benefits for 10 months or less in the mid 2000s, up from 8 months in the early 2000s. Single parent families and elderly individuals tended to stay in the program longer than did working poor individuals, childless adults without disabilities, and noncitizens. Seventy-four percent of new participants left the program within two years. This is an increase from 71 percent in the early 1990s.

Fox's attempt to demonize food stamp recipients as a caricature of willful dependency ignores the fact that SNAP kept 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2011, many of whom are children or the elderly. Unlike Greenslate, the majority of these individuals relied on the program not because of laziness, but necessity.

[Continued...]

-----------------------------------
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #71 on: August 16, 2013, 10:25:04 AM »
If anyone that posts thinks $200.00 is alot of money ...go to a grocery store and try to feed a family of three for an entire month for $200.00 dollars. The poor do not effect the middle class near as much as the greedy Corporations that are the so called "job" creaters who are not near as much interested in creating jobs as they are in laying off the higher wage earners so that they can then save that money to pay for their CEO's bonuses.

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #72 on: August 16, 2013, 10:37:39 AM »
^ The central problem comes from the top of the food chain.
Power elite can never have enough and monopolize endlessly.
Western history tells the same tale over and over again.

Middle class are successful in spite of the system.
We could do better if they weren't the one's financing the Empire to such an extent.
Economic growth is mitigated when the middle tier has less cash money to put in circulation.

People lucky enough to make 100,000 approach 50% in taxes which makes it almost not worth it.
"Thanks to technological progress,
Big Brother can now be almost as omnipresent as God."

- Aldous Huxley

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #73 on: August 16, 2013, 11:04:56 AM »
People lucky enough to make 100,000 approaching 50% in taxes which makes it almost not worth it.

Yes and no. It depends on how that money is made. If it's made by owning and operating, say, a bicycle factory, then yes. But if it's made in real estate speculation, then no, because most if not all of those taxes are usually "clawed back" over time via publicly-generated land gains:

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ZkfmY1PMng (Ricardo's Law ~ The Great Tax Clawback Scam)

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL3n59wC8kk (Real Estate 4 Ransom)

That's one of those dirty little secrets about our anti-Georgist economic system that Austrians and Keynesians alike -- despite being supposed "opposites" -- are united in wanting both wage-earners and small business owners to remain blissfully ignorant of.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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America's Poor Are Demonized To Justify Huge Cuts in Gov't Prgrams
« Reply #74 on: August 16, 2013, 11:14:09 AM »
http://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/greg-kaufmann-american-poverty

Greg Kaufman: America's Poor Are Demonized To Justify Huge Cuts in Gov't Prgrams

By Bill Moyers, Greg Kaufmann
AlterNet
June 28, 2013

In the following interview with Bill Moyers, Greg Kaufmann, poverty correspondent for The Nation, says the poor in America are stereotyped and demonized in an effort to justify huge cuts in food stamps and other crucial programs for low-income Americans.

“People are working and they’re not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities, pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare… if you’re not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they’re going to need help getting food,” Kaufmann tells Moyers. “There are a lot of corporations that want to be involved in the fight against hunger. The best thing they can do is get on board for fair wages.”

The following is the transcript of an interview that originally appeared on BillMoyers.com:

***

Bill Moyers: Food stamps were at the core of the monster farm bill that went down to defeat in the House of Representatives last week. That bill would have cut food stamps by some $20 billion over 10 years, but that was too little for House Republicans and too much for House Democrats, although Senate Democrats had already agreed to cuts of more than $4 billion.

Here to talk about food stamps and the farm bill is a journalist whose beat is hunger, politics, and policy. Greg Kaufmann is poverty correspondent for “The Nation” magazine and a contributor to our website, BillMoyers.com. He’s also an advisor to the Economic Hardship Reporting Project, founded by journalist Barbara Ehrenreich and the Institute for Policy Studies. Greg Kaufman, welcome.

Greg Kaufmann: Great to be with you, Bill.

Bill Moyers: There are almost 48 million people using food stamps a day, and over recent years that’s a 70 percent increase. What does your own reporting tell you about why?

Greg Kaufmann: Well, the biggest reason, I think, is the proliferation of low-wage work. People are working and they're not getting paid enough to feed their families, pay their utilities and pay for their housing, pay for the healthcare. We had 28 percent of workers in 2011 made wages that were less than the poverty line. Poverty wages.

Fifty percent of the jobs in this country make less than $34,000 a year. Twenty-five percent make less than the poverty line for a family of four, which is $23,000 a year. So, if you're not paying people enough to pay for the basics, they're going to need help getting food.

And food stamps expanded because we went through the greatest the worst recession since the Great Depression. And it did what it's supposed to do. And now, you know, mostly Republicans are saying, "Why are there so many people on food stamps?" You know, they're claiming the recession's over, but we know that most people on food stamps are, if they're getting work, it's low-wage work that doesn't pay enough to pay for food.

Bill Moyers: The farm bill that failed in Congress last week would've spent $743.9 billion on food stamps and nutrition over the next ten years. Republicans wanted to cut that by some $20 billion over the same period, ten years. Given that we're spending $75 to $78 billion a year now on food stamps, do they have a case?

Greg Kaufmann: Well, look, do they make a point that we’re spending too much? I mean, if they're comfortable saying two million people should be thrown off food stamps, 200,000 low-income children should not have access to meals, to their meals in school. Hey, they can make that argument all they want. I think it's out of sync with the values of this country.

Bill Moyers: Here is what Representative Steve King of Iowa said in the debate on the floor at the time the farm bill was up for consideration. Quote, "When we see the expansion of the dependency class in America, and you add this to the 79 other means-tested welfare programs that we have in the United States, each time you add another brick to that wall it's a barrier to people that might go out and succeed." What does your own reporting find?

Greg Kaufmann: Boy, I wish he would take a look at this great study done just in November of 2012, that was released. Dr. Hilary Hoynes at the University of California Davis and her colleagues looked at this issue of self-reliance and food stamps.

They looked at the rollout of food stamps county by county and adults who were born between 1956 and '81 who were born in disadvantaged families defined as parents not having a high school diploma. And they looked at those people in their adult outcomes who had had access to food stamps when they were young or even in utero.

And they found that the adults, all the adults had significant reductions in metabolic illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity, high blood pressure. And even more remarkable to me was women in particular had higher earnings, higher income, higher education attainment and less reliance on welfare assistance in general.

All these years these guys have been saying it's promoting dependence, and it's been building self-reliance. I wish that the congressman from Iowa would take a look at that study.

Bill Moyers: You watched the debate over the farm bill. You followed it very closely. What did you-- summarize it for me. What was going on there?

Greg Kaufmann: You know, with some exceptions of people who are committed to telling the truth, we heard that this was about the deficit. But food stamps, over the next ten years, are projected to be 1.7 percent of federal spending according to the Congressional Budget Office. We heard this was about fraud, but less than one cent on the dollar of food stamp spending is lost to fraud, less than one cent on the dollar.

And we heard fraud from the chairwoman Senator Stabenow, Democratic chairwoman of the Senate Agriculture Committee. We heard a lot about this was, you know, rural districts versus urban districts and welfare on the back of farmers. But you know what? The truth is Food Research and Action Center has shown that the percentage of households in rural districts participating in food stamps is the same as the percentage of households in urban districts.

So my big takeaway is that if we don't insist on a fact-based discussion, these are the kinds of absurdities that we're going to hear. And we're going to get bad bills. You mentioned the House bill, but even the Democratic bill started with $4 billion in cuts. Senator Gillibrand had a good amendment, restoring those cuts which she would pay for by reducing the profit that the government guarantees to crop insurance companies. They guarantee a 14 percent profit. She said, "Let's do 12 percent and not do the food stamp cuts." Makes sense. Was trounced by Democrats who didn't want to stand up to the chairwoman and maybe lose their projects in the final farm bill.

Bill Moyers: And they weren't eager to stand up to agribusiness, either, were they? The big factory farms? Weren’t there still a lot of subsidies in that bill for big farms?

Greg Kaufmann: Yeah, what we saw in A Place at the Table in terms of the agribusiness subsidies was consistent in this farm bill, too. And if you look at the donations and I think some other reporters have done this and I know the Environment Working Group has worked on this if you look at the political contributions in the House ag committees to both Democrats and Republicans, and those businesses are giving big bucks to those campaigns.

Bill Moyers: What's the one most important thing you'd like for us to know about the issue as it plays out in Congress? What's going on up there when they're debating the farm bill and food stamps?

Greg Kaufmann: Well, they're catering to the most powerful interests, just like seems like with pretty much all legislation. You mentioned the agribusiness interests, the crop insurance interests. We aren't talking about hunger and what does it mean in this country to commit to ending hunger.

Bill Moyers: Why did you take this beat on as a commitment?

Greg Kaufmann: Well, on a personal level, I think I had worked for a Boys and Girls Club in Ohio for a few years and got to know so many of the families there didn't know what to expect. But all the things I've been describing about how hard people work, I mean, that was the first thing that hit me, how hard they work two jobs, how they hard they work to arrange child care, how hard they work to get their kids to a safe place. And I got tired of sort of annual articles on poverty -- not at “The Nation,” “The Nation” has always been committed to covering it.

But when the new poverty statistics would come out, you'd see screaming headlines, "Record Poverty," oh my god, poverty, poverty. Very few of the articles actually interviewed people who were in poverty. You know, the fact that over one in three Americans, over 100 million Americans are living at just twice the poverty level, so just—

Bill Moyers: Which is about what?

Greg Kaufmann: Less than $36,000 for a family of three. That's crazy. I mean, because we have poverty defined at, you know, at such a low level, $18,000 for a family of three. But really, if you think about poverty as access to the basics that we, that everybody needs food, housing, healthcare, a decent job, you know, education, you know, we know it takes a lot more than that.

Bill Moyers: What's your own sense of why this is the case, this vast inequality in a country as rich as ours? I mean, what does this say to you, the richest 400 people on the “Forbes” list made more from the stock market gains last year than the total amount of the food, housing and education budgets combined. I mean, the Walmart corporation made $17 billion last year, $17 billion.

Greg Kaufmann: Right.

Bill Moyers: Paying its workers so little, they have to use government programs to get by. In other words taxpayers are subsidizing Walmart's--

Greg Kaufmann: Right.

Bill Moyers: —low-income jobs.

Greg Kaufmann: Yeah. I mean, I think not having organized labor plays a huge role in that, the declining unionization rate. I think, yeah, I mean, Walmart's a great example. Paying employees, helping them sign up for food stamps. I mean, I'm glad that people can get food stamps but, like, why not just pay a wage? I mean, there are a lot of corporations that are, you know, want to be involved in the fight against hunger. And the best thing they can do is get on board for fair wages.

So, yeah, I think there has been turning away from real people and what they're experiencing in this country. That's why I was so disappointed as crazy as the House farm bill was, the fact that the Democrats started with a $4.1 billion cut almost made me angrier, because they're supposed to be the party that's in touch with people's real experiences.

Bill Moyers: What do you mean?

Greg Kaufmann: Well, like, why aren't they talking about that food stamps create nine dollars of economic activity for every five dollars in spending? Why aren't they talking about what Dr. Chilton talks about, the benefits socially, emotionally, cognitively, physically that's documented for children, and we care so much about children and what that means for their future opportunities. I mean, the Democrats are supposed to be connected to the experiences of ordinary Americans. And when you start with this defensive wimpy posture of, "Oh, okay, we'll cut this much," instead of fighting for what you believe in, we're in trouble.

[Continued...]
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Food Bank CEO Responds to a Fox News Attack on Food Stamps
« Reply #75 on: August 16, 2013, 05:43:03 PM »
http://www.texasobserver.org/food-bank-ceo-responds-to-a-fox-news-attack-on-food-stamps/

Food Bank CEO Responds to a Fox News Attack on Food Stamps

by Ian Dille
The Texas Observer
August 13, 2013


Screen grab from "Fox News Reporting: The Great
Food Stamp Binge."


Given the Republican rumblings in Congress, Celia Cole, the CEO of the Texas Food Bank Network, figured it was only a matter of time before Fox News launched an attack on SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program better known as food stamps.

This summer, House Republicans held up a bipartisan Senate Farm Bill with demands for $40 billion in cuts to the food stamps program, as well as work and drug testing requirements for beneficiaries. (A previous bill with only $20 billion in cuts failed in June because they were deemed not deep enough.) The ethos espoused by House bill backers is that the best way to help the poor and hungry is to let them help themselves. Legislators also cited misuse and fraud as pressing concerns.

Then, on Friday, Fox News aired a special report titled “The Great Food Stamp Binge.” The network inferred that the dramatic rise in food stamp recipients, from 28 million to 47 million since 2008, was a result of the Obama administration’s welfare society and an affront to American self-reliance and mettle. The surge in people on food stamps, the special argued, has nothing to do with our crappy economy and the working poor who need help buying food for their families. Instead Fox posited that it could be a conspiracy to grow the size of government.

Fox interviewed an unemployed beach bum and aspiring rock star in La Jolla, California who bought a lobster with a SNAP card. The special also pointed to a social worker acting on behalf of the USDA who’s allegedly tearing down “mountain pride” in Appalachia—the mindset that families should tighten their belt straps (literally) before relying on government help—by getting residents in Ashe County, North Carolina to use SNAP funds on seeds for their gardens, a sort of gateway drug to wider food stamp usage. The Fox special was catnip for conservative bloggers and live bait for other media outlets.

“Normally we don’t justify these kinds of reports with a response,” Cole told the Observer. But in this case, Cole said, the Texas Food Bank Network felt compelled to address the misinformation. “Too many people judge the poor without ever walking in their shoes,” she said. The Fox special, she added, failed to interview anyone suffering from poverty and lack of access to nutritious food.

“The truth is that one in seven Americans do receive SNAP because one in seven Americans live at or below the poverty level,” Cole stated in a press release on Monday. “SNAP is also one of the most efficient and effective government programs with program error and fraud at historic lows. Less than four percent of benefits are issued in error.”

Moreover, the food stamps program doesn’t serve as a long-term form of dependency for most recipients, Cole said in a follow-up interview. The average participant receives benefits for 19 months, and new applicants typically receive benefits for just nine months. Cole said the program is correlative to people’s income—when it drops, they go on food stamps, and when it rises again, they go off the program.

[Continued...]
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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http://www.policymic.com/articles/59213/fox-news-blatantly-lies-about-food-stamps-in-this-ridiculous-faux-documentary

Fox News Blatantly Lies About Food Stamps in This Ridiculous Faux-Documentary

by Shana Mansbach
PolicyMic
August 12, 2013

Fox News and a handful of other conservative outlets attempted to rile up their audiences this week when they reported on Jason Greenslate, San Diego beach bum and supposed Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) abuser. Greenslate, interviewed as part of a Fox documentary entitled The Great Food Stamp Binge, is quoted as bragging about his lackadaisical lifestyle, full of lobster dinners and shameless flirting, all while living on the government's tab. It was an underhanded gambit, designed to whip up anti-food-stamp fervor, and a quick look into the details shows that it wildly misrepresents the plight of needy Americans.

Fox alleges that the SNAP program is full of examples like Greenslate, who are content with living off handouts from the government. In reality, 76% of households receiving SNAP benefits include children, the elderly, and disabled individuals. 91% of benefits are paid out to families living at or below the federal poverty line ($19,530 for a family of three). Finally, the average SNAP household has a gross monthly income of $744, with countable resources (such as a bank account) of only $331. Clearly, the overwhelming majority of food stamp beneficiaries are not free riders or idle individuals, as Fox would have its audience believe.

Watch part of the documentary below:

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgSLYZBNNng

The news stories go on to argue that food stamp participation has increased about 13% since 2008, costing taxpayers millions. What they fail to acknowledge is that this increase follows the Great Recession of 2009 in which the number of unemployed Americans grew by 94% from 2007 to 2011. SNAP is designed to be responsive to changes in need; the number of beneficiaries will rise in times of financial hardship and fall in times of economic prosperity. As the economy begins its slow recovery, SNAP enrollment growth has already slowed and is predicted to fall beginning 2015. And as the non-partisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has repeatedly stressed, SNAP does not contribute to the nation's long-term budget problems.

Given these statistics, Greenslate's story seems to be a significant anomaly. Looking closer, however, we see that it's simply the result of bad reporting. Greenslate is depicted as living a highly luxurious lifestyle — on a typical day, he’ll "wake up, go down to the beach, hang out with my friends, hit on some chicks, start drinking" — but the numbers don't add up. He reports receiving benefits of $200 a month, which works out to $6.66 a day, or $2.22. And since that the cost of living in San Diego is the ninth highest in the nation, it seems highly improbable that Greenslate is really living the life he says he is based on food stamps alone.

This sensationalized story represents a dishonest attempt to portray food stamp recipients as lazy and deceitful. It distracts from the serious plights of the 78 million Americans who don't have secure access to food. SNAP has been invaluable, keeping 4.7 million people out of poverty in 2011, but the reality is that it doesn't go far enough. The average monthly benefit provides a paltry $1.50 per meal, and nearly one third of food-insecure individuals are not eligible for any federal food assistance at all. Before demonizing the needy, Fox and its affiliates should start looking at the numbers and get the story right.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

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http://www.monetary.org
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“There’s class warfare, all right, but it's my class, the rich class, that’s making war, and we’re winning.”

-- Warren Buffet, New York Times, November 26, 2006


http://truth-out.org/news/item/18252-gops-additional-snap-cuts-would-increase-hardship-in-areas-with-high-unemployment

GOP's Additional SNAP Cuts Would Increase Hardship in Areas With High Unemployment

By Ed Bolen, Dottie Rosenbaum and Robert Greenstein, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
Truthout
August 18, 2013


Members of the House exit the Capitol Building after a House vote on a
farm bill, in Washington, July 11, 2013. (Photo: Christopher Gregory /
The New York Times)


Shortly before Congress adjourned for its August recess, House Republican leaders disclosed that they plan to move a bill in early September that doubles — to $40 billion over ten years — their proposed cuts to SNAP (the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly food stamps) and immediately cuts 2-4 million more low-income individuals from the program.[1]   The new cuts come primarily from eliminating waivers that states can use, during periods of high unemployment, to ease the severity of a harsh rule that limits SNAP to three months of benefits out of every three years for people aged 18 to 50 who aren’t raising minor children and are unemployed, regardless of how hard they are looking for work.

Under the new House Republican proposal, if such individuals can’t find at least a half-time job, they will summarily be thrown off the program after three months — irrespective of how high local unemployment is.  The individuals in question are among the poorest people in the United States.  SNAP program data show their average income is just 22 percent of the poverty line, about $2,500 a year for a single individual.  For most of them, SNAP is the only state or federal income assistance available.  On average they will receive about $160 a month in SNAP benefits in fiscal year 2014.

The individuals at risk of losing basic food assistance are a diverse group.  More than 40 percent are women.  One-third are over age 40.  Among those who report their race, about half are white, a third are African American, and a tenth are Hispanic.  Half have a high school diploma or GED, and another fifth have some college education.  They live in all areas of the country, and among those for whom metropolitan status is available, about 40 percent live in urban areas, 40 percent in suburban areas, and 20 percent in rural areas.

As a result of the proposed cuts, many of these individuals would fall deeper into destitution.  Some would likely experience hunger as well as homelessness; money spent on food isn’t available to pay the rent, and with income this low, it can be very difficult to do both.

The new cuts would come on top of the $20 billion in cuts in the farm bill that the House Agriculture Committee approved on May 15.  Congressional Budget Office estimates show those cuts would throw nearly 2 million other low-income people off SNAP, primarily working families and elderly individuals, and reduce benefits for hundreds of thousands of others.[2]

The cuts would also come on top of an across-the-board SNAP benefit cut for all participants — including the 22 million children receiving SNAP — which will take effect on November 1 when a temporary provision of the 2009 Recovery Act ends.

[Continued...]

---------------------------------

Keep the above in mind as you read the articles on "job-seekers ratio" at the following link:

     http://www.epi.org/types/economic-indicators/jolts-picture/

Now does everyone see why the Republican reactionaries at FOX tried so desperately and shamelessly to make that San Diego beach bum the poster child of food stamp recipients?

That's why it's called "propaganda," folks! It's the same guilt-by-association technique that the political ruling class has been employing for years to demonize both the 9/11 truth movement and anti-NWO movement. Yet even people informed enough to know better fell hook, line and sinker for it anyway.

FOX is to the banker-owned Republican Party what MSNBC is to the banker-owned Democratic Party -- an unofficial yet blatantly obvious public relations arm. Neither is a legitimate "news" organization. That's the bottom line.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Food Stamp Cuts Would Deny Benefits To At Least 4 Million: CBPP
« Reply #78 on: August 20, 2013, 12:24:48 PM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/19/food-stamp-cuts_n_3780362.html

Food Stamp Cuts Would Deny Benefits To At Least 4 Million: CBPP

By Arthur Delaney
The Huffington Post
August 19, 2013

WASHINGTON -- A Republican proposal to cut food stamp spending by 5 percent would eliminate benefits for as many as 6 million Americans, according to an analysis by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a liberal D.C. think tank.

Republicans have said the forthcoming measure, which will combine stricter eligibility standards with new work requirements, will reduce Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program spending by $40 billion over 10 years.

"House Republican leaders haven’t formally released the language of their plan, but the information they have made available makes clear that the proposal will be very harsh, denying SNAP to at least four million to six million low-income people, including some of the nation’s poorest adults, as well as many low-income children, seniors, and families that work for low wages," the CBPP's Dottie Rosenbaum, Stacy Dean, and Robert Greenstein said in a report published Monday.

A key part of the new legislation would stop states from waiving SNAP's work requirements for able-bodied childless adults, something more than 45 states currently do because of high unemployment. Working-age Americans without kids would have to either work 20 hours a week or engage in "work activities" that could include training or volunteering.

"The House will consider common-sense measures, such as work requirements and job training requirements for able-bodied adults without children receiving assistance, that enjoy broad public support," Doug Heye, a spokesman for House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.), said in an email on Monday.

The Center on Budget claims it's inaccurate to say the forthcoming proposal includes work requirements. "In reality, they would terminate basic food assistance to people who would take any job or job training opportunity offered but cannot find one; the proposal doesn’t require states to provide jobs or job training and includes no added funds for these activities," the report's authors said.

[Continued...]
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

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Re: Blaming the poor for the crimes of the rich
« Reply #79 on: August 21, 2013, 04:28:02 PM »
BILL BLACK: FBI Partners with Banks and Blames Mortgage Fraud on Poor Borrowers

     http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mgR7bl_n5Gc

21 August 2013, TheRealNews
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0