Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship

Author Topic: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship  (Read 35159 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline nike

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 44
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #40 on: February 20, 2008, 12:28:34 AM »
The Constitution admittedly has a few defects and blemishes, but it still seems a hell of a lot better than the system we have now. -- Robert Anton Wilson

Offline Info_Trafficker

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 367
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #41 on: February 20, 2008, 12:51:54 AM »
its his religion
"Condemnation without investigation is the highest form of ignorance."-Albert Einstein.

Offline xereau

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,246
  • Thread Killer
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #42 on: February 22, 2008, 08:45:28 AM »
My latest peice of satirical artwork.  Enjoy!

Government is the Entertainment Division of the military-industrial complex. --  Frank Zappa

Offline Harpakhrad11

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 335
    • From Pictures to Portraits
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #43 on: February 22, 2008, 02:13:58 PM »

Offline yanaar

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,066
  • Freedom
    • Yanaar
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #44 on: March 02, 2008, 01:56:07 PM »
In Native American lore, the owl appears when there has been a death.  Specifically, owl only appears if the death has been of a medicine man/woman, or shaman, or other person beloved and protected by Great Spirit.  Owl does not announce the Death in advance, but appears at the precise time that the death has occurred.

The Cremation of Care Ceremony is a very expensive dog and pony show.  In ancient times, this ceremony (and it's derivatives) had real power.  That was before the participants were drunk and drooling in lust.  It takes years of discipline to become a shaman, black or white.  That bunch of hoo-haas at the Grove don't know anything about self-discipline.  Most of them couldn't even make a track team.  There is no real occult power there... only worse... the illlusion of occult power believed in by the participants.

I rented a cabin next to the Grove in Monte Rio from 1993 thru 1996.  I had a chance to meet and talk with many locals (I was part of the battle against Pacific Lumber at the time.)  According to (many) of the locals... things at the Grove are serioulsy pathological.  Human sacrifices and pedophilia?  Yes... worse than we can know. 
"The man who dies wealthy dies in disgrace." 
Chaucer

Offline Red7Paladin

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,175
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #45 on: March 02, 2008, 04:52:05 PM »
is no real occult power there... only worse... the illlusion of occult power believed in by the participants.

Absent any firsthand knowledge and experience of the specific rituals held there, I find that difficult to believe. 

By the way, the owl is a symbol of death in the Middle East, an evil omen.  I was told this personally by Middle Easterners.

And Lilith is actually mentioned in the Bible once, in Isaiah 34:14.  The Hebrew "Lilith" (literally "of the night") is translated as "screech owl" in the King James Version.

It's true that there is no real evidence for Molech ever having been represented by an owl in antiquity.  However, the Illuminati consistently seek to represent Lucifer in male and female forms simultaneously.

Offline yanaar

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,066
  • Freedom
    • Yanaar
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #46 on: March 02, 2008, 05:22:31 PM »
Absent any firsthand knowledge and experience of the specific rituals held there, I find that difficult to believe.

It's impossible to believe.  I hate to believe it, and didn't believe it until the stories were simply coming from too many people, many who have been or were still employed at the Grove. 
"The man who dies wealthy dies in disgrace." 
Chaucer

Offline trixi1

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,891
  • He is watching. Smile because Jesus is Lord.
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #47 on: March 02, 2008, 05:38:07 PM »
In Native American lore, the owl appears when there has been a death.  Specifically, owl only appears if the death has been of a medicine man/woman, or shaman, or other person beloved and protected by Great Spirit.  Owl does not announce the Death in advance, but appears at the precise time that the death has occurred.

The Cremation of Care Ceremony is a very expensive dog and pony show.  In ancient times, this ceremony (and it's derivatives) had real power.  That was before the participants were drunk and drooling in lust.  It takes years of discipline to become a shaman, black or white.  That bunch of hoo-haas at the Grove don't know anything about self-discipline. 

The whole point of this ritual is 'the invitation of death and the spirit from whence it comes' -- namely the Spirit of Satan and the offering to him. It has no relevance as to the meaning from any other society, previous folklore or legend.

If they give the ritual power and significance, then they feed off of the energy that they exchange between themselves and Satan himself.
John 3:16 teaches us: "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth on him should not perish, but have everlasting life."

John 14:6 says:  "I am the way the truth and the life; NO MAN cometh unto the Father BUT BY ME."

Offline Red7Paladin

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,175
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #48 on: March 02, 2008, 07:06:57 PM »
Absent any firsthand knowledge and experience of the specific rituals held there, I find that difficult to believe.

It's impossible to believe.  I hate to believe it, and didn't believe it until the stories were simply coming from too many people, many who have been or were still employed at the Grove. 


I was referring to your statement that the Bohemian Grove rituals have no real occult power.

Offline la Resistance

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 286
  • Agent (of Change)
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #49 on: March 04, 2008, 09:20:36 AM »
Hey, Bohemian Grove... It's simple, really... It's the religion of the Caananites. Have a gander at Judges, Chapter Six V. 25; The alter of Baal-Molech is set in a grove. That specific name, and the specific use of the name in the modern Bohemian Grove, draws a pretty strong connection.

So I guess... If the Grove were to "accidentally" catch alight, and if the altar or statue were to "accidentally" burn down along with the forest; they'd probably just construct another altar, but it sure would be novel if someone ended up chucking some sand in the all-seeing eye. If we can tear down their high places, we can help break them.

That might be something to remember if we ever lose the "Info-" section of the "Infowar".

And hey, go easy on the owls. God made them as beautiful birds. It's the sick world that turned them into a symbol of evil. But I like otters better, so if it comes down to picking on owls or otters, go with the owls.
There's more to hope for than you might think.

Offline menace

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,839
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #50 on: March 08, 2008, 10:18:18 AM »
From the book  Mingled Yarn : sketches on various subjects , by Edwards, Henry.
1883.

MID-SUMMER "HIGH JINKS,"

CELEBRATED SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1878, IN THE RED WOODS OF
MARIN CO., CAL.

INVITATION.

" If thou art worn, and hard beset
With sorrows that thou wouldst forget ;
If thou wouldst read a lesson that will keep
Thy heart from fainting, and thy soul from sleep,
Go to the woods and hills ! "



BOHEMIAN CLUB ROOMS, )



June 6, 1878.
FRIEND AND BROTHER :


                        The crust in which the selfish struggle of our life too often enwraps our better nature, and which, year by year, gathers more and more closely around us, concealing by its gross shadow the light that is within, needs sometimes a kindly touch for its removal ; and where can we seek for such tender ministration, as at the hand of our mother, Nature ?

                     The glorious old woods invite us with their freshness to shake off our sorrow with the city s dust, and to enter their grand and solemn cathedral, where the song of the birds and the ripple of the waters shall make such music as will inspire and give hope to the sinking soul ! Come, then, and make merry ; come, with every fibre strung to its highest pitch, and with your heart prepared for enjoyment ; come, and for a time scatter to the winds the cares of life, and bury in thewaters of oblivion every sorrow !

                  Come, for the sake of him who pens these lines, who will soon be divided from you by the width of the continent, and who longs to carry with him from the land of his love a crowning recollection of the many happy hours passed among " good friends and true."

HENRY EDWARDS,

Sire.
ADDRESS.

                After many weeks of pleasant suspense, the hour we have looked forward to has arrived, and we meet to-night to hold high festival among the towering giants of these glorious woods. And where can a more fitting hall be chosen, in which to pledge each other in good fellowship, and to extend the kindly greetings which help humanity upon its way?


            Around and about us are the witnesses of the greatest boon that Heaven can give to man, the constant, faithful evidences of that all-pervading beauty which exists only in the rolling hills, with their ever- changing verdure; the pure, the perfect trees ; and beneath them their attendant spirits, the sweet and lovely flowers. Amidst the groves, in which the altars of " God s first temples " sent up their incense to the awaiting throne ; away from the clangor of tongues, the restless rush of greed, and the ever-repel ling influence of the city s throng, we come to cast off the material elements of our being, to lift ourselves a little higher in the plane of existence, and to taste for a brief period of those delights which well up from the fountain of happiness, whose springs the country alone can supply. Here, in the depth of an almost primeval forest, we feel at once the littleness and the grandeur of our lives. By contrast with the whirl of streets, and the crushing excitement by which most of us are impelled, we are led, by the " peace and holy rest " which here prevail, to pause and ask a question of the better thought within : " Why do we miss the bounties which are so lavishly displayed around us, and which may be had but for the asking? Why do we choose the rougher and more dangerous path, when one of safety and of beauty lies ever before our eyes?" The question can receive but one reply. It is, that the love of wealth has overgrown every true instinct of our being, and that the search for riches is the only one in which the eager, restless spirit of this so-called progressive age finds its fitting exercise. And yet, could all men be animated by the same love of relaxation and enjoyment of Nature s beauties, the world would move as steadily as before, and the needs of life be equally well supplied. Can one of us for a moment doubt that he is better for a closer contact like this with all that is fresh and fair upon the earth s surface, with the waving woods, the almost holy flowers ; with the trickling dew-drop, and the rustling wind ; with the clearer starlight, and the more cloudless radiance of the sun ? No, there is no man here, who after this slight embrace from the arms of his divine mother, will not return to his daily routine with a fresher heart and brain, and with a tenderer and sweeter feeling for his fellows. I sometimes reverence those men of old who, away from the ever-restless crowd of cities, wandered in silent solitude to the mountain s side or the forests depth, and shut themselves up to commune with their own hearts and the irrepressible beauty which was so liberally spread before them. Such a life may be in some sense narrow and contracted ; it may not touch the highest aims of which our being is capable, but it is surely as pure, as noble, and as useful, as the constant battle for wealth, fought upon the ignoble fields of selfishness and wrong. The trouble of this age is that it is too feverish too much given to the whirl and worry of life, and too little inclined to rejoice in the blessings of a holiday time !

                                       " Work, work, work,
                                Till the brain begins to swim."

                  seems to be the motto of the race to-day, and the wearied spirit finds not the repose it needs until the hour comes which casts over it the benison of an eternal rest. What abject folly ! What utter want of sense ! The cry of Nature echoes everywhere through her numberless retreats : " Come, ye hungry ones ; come and partake of the feast I spread before you. Come, ye who are athirst, and drink of the fountain of perpetual peace ! " And the wayfarers turn a deaf ear, and pass along to their early graves, wrapt in the mantle of selfishness and greed of gain, allowing no ray of beauty from the light above to penetrate the darkness of their souls. Will it be for ever thus, and will men always lose their way in the journey over the clearly marked pathway of life ? I think not so. As year by year rolls on, it seems to me as if content will be more readily found ; as if the struggles for existence will be less and less protracted ; as if the necessities of life will be more readily within the reach of all, and the glamour of gold be less and less attractive to men s eyes ! A millenium like this is no poet s dream ; it needs but the earnest thought and work of earnest minds in every civilized land, and that perseverance which, while it urges forward a good deed, stimulates by its influence and its example. The want of rest and healthy, hopeful, cheerful enjoyment is the great want of the world to-day, and perhaps in this country, more than in any other, is this want apparent. It is the evil which is de stroying the lives of the people, the cruel cancer which is eating at their very vitals, wasting their energies, and poisoning the life-blood of the race ! The teacher who will boldly proclaim this truth, and set before those who come within the scope of his influence the foul and demoralizing effect of this hideous wrong, will earn for himself not only a death less fame, but the enduring gratitude of the ages.

                   In more than one sense it is " good for us to be here." If we cannot claim for these solitudes the fame of classic ground ; if we cannot people these leafy glades with a Rosalind and a Touchstone; if we can see not in our fancythe band which followed the bold outlaw, Robin Hood, or hear Fitz-James s bugle call, we yet can mark around us upon every side the changes which have been wrought by the mighty convulsions of the past, and in the spirit of the glorious master, learn by contemplation to

                 " Find tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, Sermons in stones, and good in every thing." To myself, this occasion is fraught with the deep est interest, for I feel that it is the last on which I may meet with many of you, at least under circum stances like the present, and it seems to be one of those special passages in life which mark a sudden and abiding change, as the milestones which pro claim the distances in life s journey appear to us the more rapidly as we approach its close. Nearly six years of delightful association are fast drawing to an end, and the curtain is about to descend upon the pleasant pictures of the past.

     I am thankful in my own heart that my last remembrance of our many happy gatherings will be connected with this lovely spot, and with the beauty which is everywhere around us. This experience is indeed a source to me of the deepest gratification, and away in a distant home, in the years that are to come, this scene will often recur to my memory, enshrined in the all-enfolding charm which belongs to the vanished hours. I must, however, own, that in the midst of the merri ment which I trust is in your hearts there is a tone of sweet sadness in mine, for the severance of ties which have bound me so closely to you all cannot but bring with it a sensation of sorrow, and the wrench which tears me from the association which I have so long been privileged to enjoy, bears its own sense of pain. I cannot but remember, also, that since we first met together and founded the insti tution which has in so short a time become one of the influential societies of our young State, many of our comrades have gonedown in the battle of life, leaving their places unoccupied, and only the recollection of their loving hearts to comfort and console. As those who have laid down their burdens and gone " to their long home " pass in shadowy re view before me you see with me the ranks as they wander by, and hear the murmur of their unspoken voices " blessings and peace to all."

     There is no need to breathe their names they will dwell in your minds for aye, for they were linked to you by bonds which even the bolt of the destroyer had not power to shatter. Nor do I deem it idle to believe that they linger near us to-night full of the enjoy ment which this assemblage brings laughing when we laugh, saddening when we are sad. Oh, no ! for as we cast ourselves, as we do to-night, away from the grinding cares of life, and with the tender love of children approach the bosom of our universal mother, we bring nearer and ever nearer to us the life which is beyond, and moving within the sphere of a higher influence, summon about us the love, the watchfulness, and the deathless affection which have " gone before."

Offline menace

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,839
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #51 on: May 16, 2008, 01:47:14 PM »
Chaffee E. Hall (1888-1969), initiated into the Club August 1, 1928. Hall was another prominent business attorney in the Bay Area. Hall was the founder of Hallcrest Vineyards, a winemaking pioneer in the Santa Cruz Mountains. Hall was additionally a Dean of the University of California and a member of Isle of Aves Camp at Bohemian Grove.

Stanley Morrison (1892-1955), initiated into the Club December 23, 1937. He was a Bohemian Club Faculty Member from Stanford. Morrison was a Yale Grad and Harvard Law School degreed. At Harvard Law School, Morrison was elected Editor of the Law Review. Morrison was a law clerk for Oliver Wendell Holmes. A lawyer with McCutchen, Olney, Mannon, and Green, Morrison joined Stanford’s law faculty in 1924.

Maynard A. Amerine (1911-1998), initiated into the Club April 27, 1939. A Faculty Member of the Club from U.C. Davis. Amerine continues to be a driving force behind today’s California Wine industry. He was the Chairman of U.C. Davis’ Viticulture and Enology Department and the author or co-author of nearly 400 items. His research revolutionized the wine business. Vinophiles know and revere this man and owe him a debt of gratitude.


James M. Mannon, Jr. (d. 1943), initiated into the Club July 18, 1921. Mannon was a member of The Isle of Aves, Earl Warren’s Camp at Bohemian Grove. Mannon was director of American National Bank, and a corporate lawyer who argued before the Supreme Court. He was a partner in the law firm of McCutchen, Olney, Mannon and Greene.

Eustace Cullinan (1876-1962), initiated into the Bohemian Club December 1, 1904. Cullinan, a noted lawyer who argued before the Supreme Court, was listed in American Catholic’s Who’s Who. He was an alternate delegate to the Southern Californian RNC in 1920. He was a friend of Fremont Older, the editor of the San Francisco Call as well as Hiram Johnson, Governor of California. Cullinan was Editorial Writer for the Bulletin. His role in passing the Water and Power Act is mentioned in Upton Sinclair’s The Goose Step A Study of American Education. Cullinan was a member of Hillcrest Camp at Bohemian Grove. He was the Bohemian Club’s Vice President from 1938-40 and the Club’s President from 1940-42.

Lieutenant General Harold L. George (1893-1986) helped plan the air war against Germany as assistant chief of staff for war plans of the Air Staff. He was the leader of the Air Transport Command, and later Air Force representative of the military staff of the United Nations. After retiring from active duty in December of 1946, George became President of Peruvian International Airways in Lima, Peru until 1948 â??when he joined Hughes Aircraft Company of Culver City, California, as Vice President and General Manager, resigning September 30, 1953. Shortly thereafter he was appointed Senior Vice President and Director of Ramo-Wooldridge Corporation of Los Angeles, California, a company engaged in advanced electronic and guided missile research and development.

Elected to the City Council of Beverly Hills, California, in April 1952, two years later General George was elected Mayor of Beverly Hills  http://www.atalink.org/hallfame/george.html

George Johnson, a Regular member of the Bohemian Club was initiated June 23, 1938. He died in 1985.

Loren R.Yank Chandler (1895-?), a Regular member of the Bohemian Club who was initiated August 31, 1933. He was the Dean of the Stanford Medical School from 1933-1953. Ray Lyman Wilbur hired him.

Lowell Thomas (1892-1981) was a Regular Professional member who was initiated June 26, 1940. A Radio Hall of Famer, Lowell Thomas was a man ahead of his time: the first roving newscaster, a film maker through the 1920s, a radio presenter in the 1930s, an adventurer who wrote more than 50 books, he was heralded as the father of 'Cinerama'.

http://www.pbs.org/lawrenceofarabia/players/thomas.html

Herbert Hoover Jr (1903-1969), a Non-Resident Member who was initiated June 18, 1937. A graduate of Stanford, he was the Under-Secretary of State from 1954-1957 and was a distinguished geologist, inventor, and diplomat.

Fred G. Clark (1890-1973), a Non-Resident Member from New York City who was initiated May 18, 1942. He was the President of Fred G. Clark Co., the Conewango Refining Co. of Pennsylvania, founder of the American Economic Foundation, founder of The Crusaders, host of Wake Up, America! on NBC Blue Network from 1940-6, author, and a Grove photographer who was considered my best photographer by his friend Herbert Hoover.

Charles Kellogg Field (1873-1948), an Honorary Life member of the Bohemian Club who was initiated August 21, 1895. His was the first graduating class of Stanford. The included In Memoriam by Herbert Hoover and Fred W. Pabst credits him with being .the moving spirit in the development of the Cremation of Care from its crude beginning to its present inspiring form In 1914 he became a co-owner and editor of Sunset Magazine. Aco- founder of Cave Man camp, an author and poet who wrote the libretto of the first Grove Play, the 1906 Grove Play substitute, and the 1910 Grove Play after which his camp was named.  As Cheerio Field hosted a popular radio show in the 1930s.

Clarence Buddington Kelland (1881-1964), a Regular Professional Member who was initiated February 11, 1946. Author of the libretto for the 1949 Grove Play, in addition to his dozens of novels, his writing appeared in the Saturday Evening Post. In 1941 Kelland became the head of the Republican National Committeeâ??s publicity department.

Edgar Rickard (1874-1951), a Non Resident member who was initiated February 4, 1904. In 1905 he launched a magazine with his friend Herbert Hoover to promote their mining interests and from that time on he was Hoover's right hand man. He was President of the Androscoggin Water Power Co., Belgo-American Trading Co., Hazard Wire Rope Co., Hazeltine Corp., Latour Corp., and the Pejepscot Paper Co. He was the Vice President of Erie & St. Lawrence Corp., Intercontinental Development Corp, and Pitney Bowes Co. He was the Chairman of Wood Fibre Board Corp., the Honorary Secretary for the Commission for the Relief of Belgium, Director of the Hoover Institution, and Administrator of the Belgian-American Educational Fund. In 1909 as Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover gave Rickard Hazeltine radio patents that were worth a million dollars at the time.

Paul C. Smith, a Regular member who was initiated April 14, 1936. Smith was the Executive Editor and Manager of the San Francisco Chronicle from 1937-1951, a job he received from George T. Cameron. He died in 1975.

Ray Lyman Wilbur (1875-1949), an Honorary member who was initiated September 13, 1916. Wilbur was the 3rd President of Stanford from 1916-1943, and Hoovers Secretary of the Interior. As Warren G. Hardings Personal Physician he was present at Hardingâ??s death bed. From 1911-1916 he was Dean of Stanford Universitys School of Medicine. From 1943-1949 he was the Chancellor of Stanford.

Herbert Hoover (1874-1964), an Honorary member who was initiated March 18, 1913. As an ex-President of the United States and co-founder of Cave Man camp, Hoover invited anyone he felt like to the Grove. Hoover, like Field, was a member of the pioneer class at Stanford. One of Hoovers main contributions to Bohemia was giving annual Lakeside Talks at the Grove.

Allan Hoover (1907-1993)--from looking at other Allan Hoover signatures we believe this is his, albeit very sloppy probably due to being inebriated with the beauty of Bohemian Grove. A wealthy California rancher and Hoover Foundations promoter, Allan, one of Herbert Hoovers sons, was a Regular member who was initiated February 5, 1934.

George T. Cameron, a Regular member who was initiated February 14, 1907. Cameron was the son-in-law of M.H. de Young, the co-founder of the San Francisco Chronicle. After de Youngs death Cameron ran the San Francisco Chronicle. He died in 1955.

Arthur A. Curtice was the Chairman of General Motors, another Hoover pal and guest at the Grove.

Lucius Boomer, a Non Resident member who was initiated December 6, 1927. Boomer the hotel tycoon was President of the Waldorf Astoria and founder of the Cornell University School of Hotel Management. He died in 1947.

Jeremiah Milbank (1887-1972), a Non Resident Member who was initiated May 9, 1949. Milbank helped his friend Herbert Hoover develop the Boys and Girls Clubs of America into a strong organization, which he became the Chairman of. He was a Director of Chase Manhattan Bank and a wealthy New York financier. The Milbanks have married into the Rockefeller family.

Offline Batavian

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Re: Bohemian Grove Moloch Worship
« Reply #52 on: July 28, 2015, 05:22:23 PM »
Quote from ancient Dutch text:
'...said the priest; but tell us what means the owl that always sits upon your head, is that light-shunning animal a sign of your clear vision? No, answered Hellenia; he reminds me that there are people on earth who, like him, have their homes in churches and holes, who go about in the twilight, not, like him, to deliver us from mice and other plagues, but to invent tricks to steal away the knowledge of other people, in order to take advantage of them, to make slaves of them, and to suck their blood like leeches.' (Translate)