Flax Oil

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Offline Kaz

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Flax Oil
« on: September 10, 2010, 09:27:40 am »

While the majority of research on flax appears to be positive in nature, it is important to read between the lines of these studies. Some other studies do not support the trend that flax oil is good for consumption. Through his research at the University of Virginia Medical School the respected Dr Charles Myer found that flax oil increased the growth of prostate cancer cells by 300% leading Dr Myers and associates to proclaim flax oil to be the most powerfu stimulant they know for prostrate cancer.

This of course is in direct contrast to studies that have shown flax oil to be a strong immune stimulant and thus helpful for cancer. Because a substance stimulate the immune system it does not mean it is good for it. A healthy substance is more likely to enhance immunity or support immunity, not stimulate it.

Viruses and other interfering organisms tend to stimulate immune response. Therfore, the language used in scientific studies is not always what it means nor for that matter what it seems. Another example that shows up in studiesis where flax oil proved to be effective in lowering total body choleterol, but there are two types of choleterol one bad and one good. Flax oil was shown to have lowered both, this is not a good thing but looks like it is the way it has been presented.

Another study in Denmark compared the effects of cod liver oil and flax oil on the EPA content of the blood fats. After one week, the cod liver oil showed a tenfold increase in the EPA content and the flax oil only insignificant increases.

Science from once source can be used to refute science from another source, especially in the field of nutrition. A case point is the ongoing soy debate. Both sides use scientific studies to back their causes and for the person with little experience in how scientific studies can be bought by large corporations it can be very confusing. How many consumers will ever be privvy to the knowledge that Proctor & Gamble (Iams/Eukanuba) - Crest toothpaste - actually paid for negative studies on fluoride?

Like Soy, Flax has rapidly been gaining ground as the next 'greatest thing' you can do for your health. And agin like soy, much of the scientific research on flax and flax oil comes from similar sources, 'agenda driven' science funded by speacial interest groups intent on saturating the market place with products that are easilt mass produced and marketed with inflated prices. Much of the reseach on flax oil (the oil extracted from linseed) is focused on the high amounts of what are called Omega 3 fatty acids.

Omega 3 fatty acids (alpha linolenic acid) are essential fatty acids that cannot be made by the body and therefore must be provided by the diet. The essentia; fatty acid precursors are converted into the body to EPA and DHA, both of which are supportive of hormone-like substances known as prostoglandins which are vital to the regulation of metabolism and other regulatory functions. Refining and hydrogenation destroy the vital omega 3 oils leaving modern day consumers with high omega 6 fatty acids.

Some health practitioners believe flax and flax oil to be the ultimate pancea for many problems. Other feel the tiny seed is simpy another 'band aid' approach to health and it would be wise to seek a more reliable source. Omega 3 fats are readily available in fish oil and, unlike flax oil, is readily converted to a usable form. Fish along with wild and naturaly raised livestock and free range eggs have been traditional sources of Omega 3 for thousands of years.

There are several commonly expressed opinions and statements from both researchers and lay people pertaining to the historical relevance of flax. These ideas are used to support the notion that consuming flax is beneficial to health.

''Flax has been used for thousands of years in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China and other places throughout the world''
''Flax oil was used in Egypyt since the time of the Pharaohs''
''Flax was once a staple food of the Roman empire''

These and many other statements along with the latest scientific research is enough to convince even the most sceptical that we are missing out on something if we are not consuming flax in some form or another.

Whilst it is true that flax has been in use by ancient cultures for thousands of years and was used throughout the world in textile manufacturing, as a base for paint and for preserving wood it was not a priviple food for any culture. Evidence does exist however to show it has been used as a supplemental food when traditional foods were scarce due to adverse climate conditions and other destabilising influences on some cultures but primarily the great civilisations of antiquity reaped the benefits of the flax plant which defined their cultures in great style through clothing and art, Paint and ink.

As a food, flax may have been used as a last resort in time of famine, as in the case in Ethiopia and a few other places during drought when grain crops were comprimised. More recently, in the last few hundred years or so, ground flax. boiled in water, was used an an internal remedy for colds, coughs and urinary irritation as well as a medicinal poultice applied externally for boils and abscesses. Therfore, while flax seed does have limited use as a food in recent history flax oil on the other hand has no historical use as a food.

From 'Food in Antiquity' a survey of the diet of early peoples.

;; ... in Mesoptamia and Egypt, though, it may have been more valued as a textile material than for iys oil potential. In Europe however the picture is different.

Flax was grown in Neolithic Spain, Holland and England, and the Swiss prehistoric lake dwellings have yieldd seeds from the begining of the third millenium BC. A sort of linssed cake was found at Robenhousen...' This 'sort of linseed cake' is certainly not a cake made from linseeds and does not mean it was used as a food. Pressing seeds into balls is a common raditional method of oil extraction. The comressing of seeds into a rounded shape was a way of preparing seeds for grinding by hand with a rock to extract the oil which could then be used to cure wood, leather or rope and for mixing to form a highly absorbant and dying paint.

Eating whole flax seeds pressed into a patty of some sort would cause serious digestive distress and is not something any intelligent prehistoric human being would do more than once, if that. So these cakes were certainly not a food. Neither was the oil used for consumption because it is highly unstable and traditional people did not have refridgerators needed to prevent the fast rate of rancidity flax oil goes through when exposed to oxygen.

Carbonised flax together with Camaline seed have been found at a Roman Iron age site in Denmark. Both of these seeds yield a high oil content and it seems as if they were grown together for this purpose. At the same time in Denmark was found what resembleda 'cake' of poppy seeds. also suspected to be another source of oil. None of these oil producing plants can be said to have any great significance as a food.

While these seeds were grown for their oil it is highly unlikely the oil was consumed as a food as they are of a highly unstable nature for consumption by crude of extraction. Many scientific studies on Omega 3 fatty acids are used by proponents of flax oil to encourage the belief that flax oil, because of its extensive use in paint and other industrial uses somehow means it was also consumed as a food. This couldn't be further from the truth.

If current science is correct when it stresses the importance of eating raw unheated flax oil because it cannot withstand the temperatures of cooking, or that flax oil should be refridgerated to prevent rapid dterioration, or that a certain chemical in flax seed can only be neutralised through cooking or processing of some sort, one would be hard pressed to believe that the ancient Chinese, Inddians and Egyptians with thousands of years of wise traditions in food and medicine unwittingly created health hazards for themselves by cooking their food with flax oil or eating flax seeds.

Additionally there is no reason to believe they would consider consuming raw, and such foul tasting oil when other tasty fats and oils were prevalent and essential worldwide staple foods. Storing and preserving flax oil was not an option. The only evidence for the use of flax oil is for purposes other than consumption.

Historical evdence is always subject to interpretation and when modern scientific methods are applied to the evidence we find that there is little reason to consume it due to its harmful qualities when not properly handled.

A quick read on the can of Linseed oil (interesting how for industrial purposes its called Linseed but to make it more acceptable for 'consumption' it is called flax) ..linseed oil found in your local hardware shop describes the way liseed oil (flax) heats as it dries and how deeply it penertrates wood. This is in reference to applying the oil in order to preserve it. The can also says '100% linseed oil ' Danger Harmful if swallowed'.

Solvent extraction for commercial linseed oil removes much of the antioxidants that encourage rancidity thus helping to stabilise the polyunsaturated fatty acids. However when these fatty acids are not protected they produce gummy plastic-like residues called polymers, toxic sibstances which have destabilising effects on cell walls as they cause blood cells to clump together. Modern 'food grade' flax oil is now said to be cold pressed, a term that according to most experts simply does not exist since some heat is generated through the grinding of seeds, especially hard seeds like flax. Any heating or exposure to air of this highly unstable plant oil causes oxidation which in turn leads to high free radical production.

The lignans found in flax oil should be another concern. Lignans are steroid-like compounds which are not as healthy as we have been lead to believe, especially at the levels found in Flax and soy (soy was also once touted as a wonder food) Sesamin, a lignan witha strong antioxisant founsdin sesame seeds or the lignans found in vegetables, nuts and grains are different from the toxic lignans found in flax. There are over 450 known types of plant lignans with a little research can reveal some interesting yet disturbing information.

Lignans are often described as potent 'naturally occuring' substances with many toxic side effects. One could argue that many plants consumed have varying degrees of toxic side effect due to lignans. True, but due to cooking these are greatly reduced for humans. Flax is recognised as being the highest source of lignans, upto 100 times more than other sources. This is something literature promoted as a good thing. When lignans are converted in the body to mammailian lignans they has eostrogen-like effects and antieostrogen-like effects. In turn these compounds are similar to those found in soy found to be so harmful.

Then there are the antinutrients linatine and cyanogenic glucosides found in flax. Linatine is a vitamin B6 antogonist. Flax oil also contains a cyanide containing glucoside called linamarin. This substance releases hydrogen cyanide under moist and acidic conditions (so definately NOT a good supplement to be feeding a raw fed dog who stomach is highly acidic) Normally when processed Normally when processed with chemical solvents and high temperatures the enzyme linse is destroyed but this is not the case with the cold/expeller pressed flax oil or raw seeds. The oils are in the seed for protection and to store energy for the germination of the seed. To defend the seeds from the animals that may eat them, the oil blocks the digestive enzymes in the animals stomachs.

It is currently suggested that 1 -2 tablespoons of flax oil can be usd daily if at all. Why the limitations? The suggestions to not apply to coconut oil olive oil or animal fats all of which have been used abundantly throughout the ancient world and up to the present.

Many vegans, raw fooder's and vegetarians rely on flax oil as their primary source of omega 3's, these same people tend to avoid saturated fats which are the important factor in converting EFA's, whilst at the same time these people comsume trans fats, known to inhibit the conversion process of EFA's in the form of hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils in margarines and other foods.

Many traditional foods such as sardines, fish in general, free range egg pasture raised meat contain omega 3. Okay flax oil contains as much as 60% omega 3 whilst sardine oil contains half as much but the whole food is eaten not just the oil. No natural food that is eaten contains the level of omega 3 found in flax oil which is a good reason to question the use of this highly perishable oil. Flax oil as a supplement is an isolated ingredient.

Holkham Linseed Paints boast ''...made from 100% linseed oil ...we use no added solvents

Allergy to linseed was one of the first food allergies described in modern literture Black 1930 tingling and burming of lipsand tongue, swollen tongue and throat vomiting conjunctivitis, urticaria. Lezaun et al described anaphylaxis after the consumption of multigrain bread intestinal abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhoea, urticaria, acute dyspnea, pruritis, sneezing, nasal obstruction general malise. Alonso et al anaphylactic reaction after 1 tablespoon of oil ocular pruritis, urticaria, nausea and vomiting ....

The crop is grown for the seed oil which is used as machine oil and in the manufacture of paints, varnishes and linoleum, the residue after crushing being used in food for pets and livestock, the stems of the plant are used in the preperation of products in the paper and textile industries.

Offline Femacamper

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2010, 11:31:20 am »
It appears whole flaxseeds is a better way to go than flaxseed oil. It seems to counteract the negative effects on those prone to prostate cancer.
http://www.diseaseproof.com/archives/cat-prostate-cancer.html

Offline Kaz

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2010, 11:48:26 am »
Not that I would be interested in even the flaxseed, but have you any idea how the antinutrients/toxins are removed from the flax seeds?

Offline Femacamper

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2010, 12:26:37 pm »
Most, but not all, antinutrients are destroyed or reduced by cooking. Soaking and leaching are necessary to reduce some antinutrients, particulalry in some varieties of bean and other legumes. Soaking and sprouting seeds also reduces phytates. Soybeans, for example, contain a contain a 'tryptophane inhibiter' that interferes with the absorbtion of the amino acid 'tryptophane'. The inhibitor can be neutralized both by cooking and by sprouting (the sprouted root must be 3 to 4 inches long for this to be largely complete).

A very low percentage of the starches in some seeds 'resist' being digested ( up to 7%  for wheat, and oats and 20% for baked beans) These undigested starches are fermented by the microflora of the colon, producing variable quantities of gas.

Guided by the practices of recent African gatherer-hunters, it seems likely our African ancestors mainly dealt with anti-nutritional factors by roasting the seeds. Sometimes they were soaked as well, either before or after roasting (and grinding). These are classic techniques that we use even today when preparing legumes; although westerners rarely roast any other than peanut seeds, and occasionally soya seeds.

Eating a lot of nuts and seeds does not agree with some people. Even those without specific nut allergies. Nuts have a lot of the amino acid arginine which can encourage viral outbreaks. The other really important thing to mention is the enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients contained in most nuts and seeds. I cover this in more detail in my “Why soak nuts and grains” page. But just briefly – nuts and seeds contain inherent toxic inhibitors that protect the plant from germination and destruction until the ideal conditions are present. It is not until they get wet and there is sufficient moisture that they germinate, ensuring their survival. This natural protective phenomenon is a wonderful thing for the survival of the nuts and seeds. But if not neutralized before consumption by humans, it can really wreak havoc in our digestive systems if consumed in vast amounts. Have you ever noticed after eating a lot of nuts and seeds that you have a horrible stomach ache? These toxic substances that protect nuts and seeds from destruction from insects and microbes act as enzyme inhibitors, interfering with the natural human digestive process and spells bad news for our health if we get too greedy without soaking them!

Another problematic component contained in only some nuts is the presence of phytates. Phytic acid inhibits the absorption of iron, calcium, copper, zinc and magnesium, which makes it a very undesirable little pain if not properly eradicated. That is where soaking comes to the rescue! Soaking raw nuts and seeds in warm salted water increases the nutritional content making the nutrients more potent and readily available; and neutralizes the enzyme inhibitors making them much easier to digest. If you are saving the nuts and seeds for later use you will need to dehydrate or sprout and dry them. However, if you are using them in smoothies and soups you can just soak and rinse. I do it all the time. If I am preparing almond milk, cashew milk or macadamia milk for smoothies our soups, I just soak, rinse, blend and chow.

Always purchase raw nuts and seeds from a health food store or online source with a high turnover to ensure maximum freshness and quality. Whole nuts that have not been shelled have the longest shelf life. Look for shells without cracks and holes that do not rattle when shaken. Shelled nuts are most widely available. Always purchase nuts that are full and plump without any shriveling. I always purchase whole shelled nuts instead of nut pieces. These have an even shorted shelf life. I prefer to use my food processor and chop them up myself or grind them as I need them. The fat content and the delicate nature of the raw fats and oils makes nuts and seeds highly susceptible to rancidity. Always store them in a sealed glass container in the fridge and consume within a few months. Alternatively, freeze them in sealed containers for use later. Always soak, dehydrate or sprout them before consumption in order to make them the most easily digestible.

charrington

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2010, 03:24:22 pm »
Not that I would be interested in even the flaxseed, but have you any idea how the antinutrients/toxins are removed from the flax seeds?
It has some of the same issues as Soy --

Phytoestrogen food sources
Phytoestrogen content (mcg/100g aprox. 4 ounces)

Flax seed > 379,380
Soy beans > 103,920

Uncontrolled estrogen - develops in to cancers in men. Very similar effect as BPA (bisphenol a).

Offline iclozm

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2010, 03:44:00 pm »
It has some of the same issues as Soy --

Phytoestrogen food sources
Phytoestrogen content (mcg/100g aprox. 4 ounces)

Flax seed > 379,380
Soy beans > 103,920

Uncontrolled estrogen - develops in to cancers in men. Very similar effect as BPA (bisphenol a).

You're comparing apples and oranges. The phytoestrogens in Flax are called lignans, and the phytoestrogens in soy are called isoflavones.

I would argue that the lignans in flax are conditionally essential for managing some excess estrogen as it blocks specific types of estrogens as there are many types such as estrones, estradiols, etc. I'd consider it conditionally essential for men who are on testoserone therapy for that matter.

If you look at the Gerson Therapy, a natural method for curing cancer discovered in 1928 by Dr. Max Gerson, flax in fact was a major contributor to the suppression and reversal of the malignancy of cells, along with proper liver care.

Flax IMHO is the superior source of Omega 3,6 in 2:1 ratio. The body, unless it has a rare lipid disorder, can use those 2 essential fats to create the rest of the polyunsaturated fats that the body requires for optimal health. But do not denature this fat by putting it around any heat.
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Offline iclozm

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2010, 03:46:28 pm »
While the majority of research on flax appears to be positive in nature, it is important to read between the lines of these studies. Some other studies do not support the trend that flax oil is good for consumption. Through his research at the University of Virginia Medical School the respected Dr Charles Myer found that flax oil increased the growth of prostate cancer cells by 300% leading Dr Myers and associates to proclaim flax oil to be the most powerfu stimulant they know for prostrate cancer.

This of course is in direct contrast to studies that have shown flax oil to be a strong immune stimulant and thus helpful for cancer. Because a substance stimulate the immune system it does not mean it is good for it. A healthy substance is more likely to enhance immunity or support immunity, not stimulate it.

Viruses and other interfering organisms tend to stimulate immune response. Therfore, the language used in scientific studies is not always what it means nor for that matter what it seems. Another example that shows up in studiesis where flax oil proved to be effective in lowering total body choleterol, but there are two types of choleterol one bad and one good. Flax oil was shown to have lowered both, this is not a good thing but looks like it is the way it has been presented.

Another study in Denmark compared the effects of cod liver oil and flax oil on the EPA content of the blood fats. After one week, the cod liver oil showed a tenfold increase in the EPA content and the flax oil only insignificant increases.

Science from once source can be used to refute science from another source, especially in the field of nutrition. A case point is the ongoing soy debate. Both sides use scientific studies to back their causes and for the person with little experience in how scientific studies can be bought by large corporations it can be very confusing. How many consumers will ever be privvy to the knowledge that Proctor & Gamble (Iams/Eukanuba) - Crest toothpaste - actually paid for negative studies on fluoride?

Like Soy, Flax has rapidly been gaining ground as the next 'greatest thing' you can do for your health. And agin like soy, much of the scientific research on flax and flax oil comes from similar sources, 'agenda driven' science funded by speacial interest groups intent on saturating the market place with products that are easilt mass produced and marketed with inflated prices. Much of the reseach on flax oil (the oil extracted from linseed) is focused on the high amounts of what are called Omega 3 fatty acids.

Omega 3 fatty acids (alpha linolenic acid) are essential fatty acids that cannot be made by the body and therefore must be provided by the diet. The essentia; fatty acid precursors are converted into the body to EPA and DHA, both of which are supportive of hormone-like substances known as prostoglandins which are vital to the regulation of metabolism and other regulatory functions. Refining and hydrogenation destroy the vital omega 3 oils leaving modern day consumers with high omega 6 fatty acids.

Some health practitioners believe flax and flax oil to be the ultimate pancea for many problems. Other feel the tiny seed is simpy another 'band aid' approach to health and it would be wise to seek a more reliable source. Omega 3 fats are readily available in fish oil and, unlike flax oil, is readily converted to a usable form. Fish along with wild and naturaly raised livestock and free range eggs have been traditional sources of Omega 3 for thousands of years.

There are several commonly expressed opinions and statements from both researchers and lay people pertaining to the historical relevance of flax. These ideas are used to support the notion that consuming flax is beneficial to health.

''Flax has been used for thousands of years in Egypt, Mesopotamia, China and other places throughout the world''
''Flax oil was used in Egypyt since the time of the Pharaohs''
''Flax was once a staple food of the Roman empire''

These and many other statements along with the latest scientific research is enough to convince even the most sceptical that we are missing out on something if we are not consuming flax in some form or another.

Whilst it is true that flax has been in use by ancient cultures for thousands of years and was used throughout the world in textile manufacturing, as a base for paint and for preserving wood it was not a priviple food for any culture. Evidence does exist however to show it has been used as a supplemental food when traditional foods were scarce due to adverse climate conditions and other destabilising influences on some cultures but primarily the great civilisations of antiquity reaped the benefits of the flax plant which defined their cultures in great style through clothing and art, Paint and ink.

As a food, flax may have been used as a last resort in time of famine, as in the case in Ethiopia and a few other places during drought when grain crops were comprimised. More recently, in the last few hundred years or so, ground flax. boiled in water, was used an an internal remedy for colds, coughs and urinary irritation as well as a medicinal poultice applied externally for boils and abscesses. Therfore, while flax seed does have limited use as a food in recent history flax oil on the other hand has no historical use as a food.

From 'Food in Antiquity' a survey of the diet of early peoples.

;; ... in Mesoptamia and Egypt, though, it may have been more valued as a textile material than for iys oil potential. In Europe however the picture is different.

Flax was grown in Neolithic Spain, Holland and England, and the Swiss prehistoric lake dwellings have yieldd seeds from the begining of the third millenium BC. A sort of linssed cake was found at Robenhousen...' This 'sort of linseed cake' is certainly not a cake made from linseeds and does not mean it was used as a food. Pressing seeds into balls is a common raditional method of oil extraction. The comressing of seeds into a rounded shape was a way of preparing seeds for grinding by hand with a rock to extract the oil which could then be used to cure wood, leather or rope and for mixing to form a highly absorbant and dying paint.

Eating whole flax seeds pressed into a patty of some sort would cause serious digestive distress and is not something any intelligent prehistoric human being would do more than once, if that. So these cakes were certainly not a food. Neither was the oil used for consumption because it is highly unstable and traditional people did not have refridgerators needed to prevent the fast rate of rancidity flax oil goes through when exposed to oxygen.

Carbonised flax together with Camaline seed have been found at a Roman Iron age site in Denmark. Both of these seeds yield a high oil content and it seems as if they were grown together for this purpose. At the same time in Denmark was found what resembleda 'cake' of poppy seeds. also suspected to be another source of oil. None of these oil producing plants can be said to have any great significance as a food.

While these seeds were grown for their oil it is highly unlikely the oil was consumed as a food as they are of a highly unstable nature for consumption by crude of extraction. Many scientific studies on Omega 3 fatty acids are used by proponents of flax oil to encourage the belief that flax oil, because of its extensive use in paint and other industrial uses somehow means it was also consumed as a food. This couldn't be further from the truth.

If current science is correct when it stresses the importance of eating raw unheated flax oil because it cannot withstand the temperatures of cooking, or that flax oil should be refridgerated to prevent rapid dterioration, or that a certain chemical in flax seed can only be neutralised through cooking or processing of some sort, one would be hard pressed to believe that the ancient Chinese, Inddians and Egyptians with thousands of years of wise traditions in food and medicine unwittingly created health hazards for themselves by cooking their food with flax oil or eating flax seeds.

Additionally there is no reason to believe they would consider consuming raw, and such foul tasting oil when other tasty fats and oils were prevalent and essential worldwide staple foods. Storing and preserving flax oil was not an option. The only evidence for the use of flax oil is for purposes other than consumption.

Historical evdence is always subject to interpretation and when modern scientific methods are applied to the evidence we find that there is little reason to consume it due to its harmful qualities when not properly handled.

A quick read on the can of Linseed oil (interesting how for industrial purposes its called Linseed but to make it more acceptable for 'consumption' it is called flax) ..linseed oil found in your local hardware shop describes the way liseed oil (flax) heats as it dries and how deeply it penertrates wood. This is in reference to applying the oil in order to preserve it. The can also says '100% linseed oil ' Danger Harmful if swallowed'.

Solvent extraction for commercial linseed oil removes much of the antioxidants that encourage rancidity thus helping to stabilise the polyunsaturated fatty acids. However when these fatty acids are not protected they produce gummy plastic-like residues called polymers, toxic sibstances which have destabilising effects on cell walls as they cause blood cells to clump together. Modern 'food grade' flax oil is now said to be cold pressed, a term that according to most experts simply does not exist since some heat is generated through the grinding of seeds, especially hard seeds like flax. Any heating or exposure to air of this highly unstable plant oil causes oxidation which in turn leads to high free radical production.

The lignans found in flax oil should be another concern. Lignans are steroid-like compounds which are not as healthy as we have been lead to believe, especially at the levels found in Flax and soy (soy was also once touted as a wonder food) Sesamin, a lignan witha strong antioxisant founsdin sesame seeds or the lignans found in vegetables, nuts and grains are different from the toxic lignans found in flax. There are over 450 known types of plant lignans with a little research can reveal some interesting yet disturbing information.

Lignans are often described as potent 'naturally occuring' substances with many toxic side effects. One could argue that many plants consumed have varying degrees of toxic side effect due to lignans. True, but due to cooking these are greatly reduced for humans. Flax is recognised as being the highest source of lignans, upto 100 times more than other sources. This is something literature promoted as a good thing. When lignans are converted in the body to mammailian lignans they has eostrogen-like effects and antieostrogen-like effects. In turn these compounds are similar to those found in soy found to be so harmful.

Then there are the antinutrients linatine and cyanogenic glucosides found in flax. Linatine is a vitamin B6 antogonist. Flax oil also contains a cyanide containing glucoside called linamarin. This substance releases hydrogen cyanide under moist and acidic conditions (so definately NOT a good supplement to be feeding a raw fed dog who stomach is highly acidic) Normally when processed Normally when processed with chemical solvents and high temperatures the enzyme linse is destroyed but this is not the case with the cold/expeller pressed flax oil or raw seeds. The oils are in the seed for protection and to store energy for the germination of the seed. To defend the seeds from the animals that may eat them, the oil blocks the digestive enzymes in the animals stomachs.

It is currently suggested that 1 -2 tablespoons of flax oil can be usd daily if at all. Why the limitations? The suggestions to not apply to coconut oil olive oil or animal fats all of which have been used abundantly throughout the ancient world and up to the present.

Many vegans, raw fooder's and vegetarians rely on flax oil as their primary source of omega 3's, these same people tend to avoid saturated fats which are the important factor in converting EFA's, whilst at the same time these people comsume trans fats, known to inhibit the conversion process of EFA's in the form of hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils in margarines and other foods.

Many traditional foods such as sardines, fish in general, free range egg pasture raised meat contain omega 3. Okay flax oil contains as much as 60% omega 3 whilst sardine oil contains half as much but the whole food is eaten not just the oil. No natural food that is eaten contains the level of omega 3 found in flax oil which is a good reason to question the use of this highly perishable oil. Flax oil as a supplement is an isolated ingredient.

Holkham Linseed Paints boast ''...made from 100% linseed oil ...we use no added solvents

Allergy to linseed was one of the first food allergies described in modern literture Black 1930 tingling and burming of lipsand tongue, swollen tongue and throat vomiting conjunctivitis, urticaria. Lezaun et al described anaphylaxis after the consumption of multigrain bread intestinal abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhoea, urticaria, acute dyspnea, pruritis, sneezing, nasal obstruction general malise. Alonso et al anaphylactic reaction after 1 tablespoon of oil ocular pruritis, urticaria, nausea and vomiting ....

The crop is grown for the seed oil which is used as machine oil and in the manufacture of paints, varnishes and linoleum, the residue after crushing being used in food for pets and livestock, the stems of the plant are used in the preperation of products in the paper and textile industries.

Gerson Therapy has cured prostate cancer and other cancers since 1928 and Flax is the preferred EFA for supplementation. The ACS and AMA would do anything to suppress this therapy's success as it would deplete the pocketbooks of hospitals and pharmaceutical companies.
"The status quo is rationalized by a complacent majority, which refuses to see the obvious: that the state is nothing but an illusion created by a minority to live at others' expense." Dr. Jesus Huerta De Soto

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http://chrisyuhas.wordpress.com

Offline donnay

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2010, 04:46:18 pm »
I am not a big fan of Flaxseed oil.  I am, however, a big fan of (wild caught) cod liver oil, in order to get my Omega-3's. 

http://ezinearticles.com/?Risks-and-Benefits-of-Cod-Liver-Oil&id=466735

Omega-3 Fatty Acids/Benefits of Cod Liver Oil

"Omega-3s are essential to human health, cannot be produced inside the body, and so, must be obtained from food or through supplementation. The best know source of omega-3 fatty acids is fish. Some fish contain more omega 3s than others.

There are two types of omega-3 fatty acids that have been identified as essential for human health. They are Docosahexaenoic Acid or DHA and Eicosapentaenoic Acid or EPA. These are found primarily in fish. The body can convert another omega-3 fatty acid, known as Alpha-linolenic acid or ALA, to DHA and EPA, but the process is relatively inefficient. It is believed that one would have to consume a great deal of ALA in order to get the health benefits provided by DHA and EPA.

The omega-3 found in flax seed oil is ALA. And some believe that flax seed oil can provide cod liver oil benefits, without the risks, but this is debatable. Although there are no risks associated with flax seed oil, it is unknown if ALA provides the same health benefits as DHA and EPA."


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Offline iclozm

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2010, 05:06:14 pm »
Humans can convert ALA (Omega 3) to EPA, DHA which are other types of Omega 3. That Ezine Article has some false statements in it.

Even though he sells his own brand of Flax Oil his references are on studies on Flax Oil not his oil.

http://udoerasmus.com/articles/udo/fish_oil.htm
"The status quo is rationalized by a complacent majority, which refuses to see the obvious: that the state is nothing but an illusion created by a minority to live at others' expense." Dr. Jesus Huerta De Soto

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Offline iclozm

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2010, 05:09:31 pm »
List of Omega 3 fatty acids as there is not only one type...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omega-3_fatty_acid#List_of_n.E2.88.923_fatty_acids
"The status quo is rationalized by a complacent majority, which refuses to see the obvious: that the state is nothing but an illusion created by a minority to live at others' expense." Dr. Jesus Huerta De Soto

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Offline donnay

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2010, 05:13:25 pm »
Humans can convert ALA (Omega 3) to EPA, DHA which are other types of Omega 3. That Ezine Article has some false statements in it.

Even though he sells his own brand of Flax Oil his references are on studies on Flax Oil not his oil.

http://udoerasmus.com/articles/udo/fish_oil.htm

How so?  ALA is converted but the benefits are not well documented as well as the Cod Liver Oil can give, along with Vitamin A and D, Flaxseed oil cannot.
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

Offline iclozm

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2010, 05:22:21 pm »
How so?

I read that wrong. It is saying that ALA can be converted. I'll retract that comment. My apologies.

However, your link has absolutely no references to any trials conducted by anyone whatsoever. That's an opinion article. That's like taking Alex's Obama Deception pointing out the players doing the research, taking pictures of Bilderber attendee's in Virginia, and taking it at face value which is good because it's documented and researched. Or just type in Obama Deception Debunked and all you have is opinion articles. Which would you believe?
"The status quo is rationalized by a complacent majority, which refuses to see the obvious: that the state is nothing but an illusion created by a minority to live at others' expense." Dr. Jesus Huerta De Soto

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Offline donnay

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2010, 05:28:53 pm »
I read that wrong. It is saying that ALA can be converted. I'll retract that comment. My apologies.

However, your link has absolutely no references to any trials conducted by anyone whatsoever. That's an opinion article. That's like taking Alex's Obama Deception pointing out the players doing the research, taking pictures of Bilderber attendee's in Virginia, and taking it at face value which is good because it's documented and researched. Or just type in Obama Deception Debunked and all you have is opinion articles. Which would you believe?

No worries...and my apologies for no links.  I understand what you are saying, here is a better article to break it all down for you.

http://products.mercola.com/faq/cod-liver-fish-oil.htm
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

charrington

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2010, 05:50:47 pm »
You're comparing apples and oranges. The phytoestrogens in Flax are called lignans, and the phytoestrogens in soy are called isoflavones.

I would argue that the lignans in flax are conditionally essential for managing some excess estrogen as it blocks specific types of estrogens as there are many types such as estrones, estradiols, etc. I'd consider it conditionally essential for men who are on testoserone therapy for that matter.

If you look at the Gerson Therapy, a natural method for curing cancer discovered in 1928 by Dr. Max Gerson, flax in fact was a major contributor to the suppression and reversal of the malignancy of cells, along with proper liver care.

Flax IMHO is the superior source of Omega 3,6 in 2:1 ratio. The body, unless it has a rare lipid disorder, can use those 2 essential fats to create the rest of the polyunsaturated fats that the body requires for optimal health. But do not denature this fat by putting it around any heat.

It doesn't matter what they are called - they end up producing estrogen -- and actually men need progesterone to balance testosterone if they don't have it guess what it turns into? So no you wouldn't want as a man to continue to use flax -

  Phytoestrogen data source:
Thompson, L. U., Boucher, B. A., Lui, Z., Cotterchio, M., and Kreiger, N. 2006. Phytoestrogen content of foods consumed in Canada, including isoflavones, lignans and coumestan. Nutrition and Cancer, 54(2), 184-201.

Additional references:
Cassidy A. Potential risks and benefits of phytoestrogen-rich diets.Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 2003 Mar;73(2):120-6.

Ganry O. Phytoestrogens and prostate cancer risk. Prev Med. 2005 Jul;41(1):1-6.

This falls under another misnomer of the FDA -

Round about 8-9 years ago when the bad news about soy was being found out by researchers. These results were slowly leaking out to the public despite agribusiness pressure to the contrary. The major soy growers (Monsanto, and ADM), knowing they had to do something to support their major cash crop, directly and indirectly sponsored “counter-research” to show that soy was good for all the things the real research was finding soy to be bad for.

Due to the inexhaustible funds available to these two, especially Monsanto, their research got a lot more press and air time than the results finding that soy was bad. In statistics, research designed to prove a particular point is called a “self-fulfilling prophecy” in other words the findings are invalid from the get go! Statistics also teaches that no matter how well thought out and done, research findings that do not match observed reality are also invalid. In medicine, clinical experience is the “observed Reality”.

We come to today: in new research meant to find an estrogen replacement for the soy isoflavones that are, as the research reviewers put it, “falling out of favor”, flax and its effects on uterine fibroids are being looked at. Lately, flax has been coming under fire as a source of xenoestrogen and a potential driver of fibroid growth.

This has arisen from the fact that many women who have given up all soy products, most beans, have moved away from farm fields and golf courses (where pesticide and organophosphate fertilizers are used) in order to lower their xenoestrogen exposure and consumption still have their fibroids growing. Some of these women have been put on the drug Lupron and are making no hormones of any type of their own yet their fibroids continue to grow.

The one common factor these gals had was the fact that they were all taking flax oil as a dietary supplement. No one had told them that the lignans from flax are estrogenic! In most all of these cases when the women stopped eating the flax their fibroids stopped growing! This is the clinical experience. This is the observed reality.

Now we look at the flax growing/ selling company research: One meta study ( a review of studies already done), finds that the lignans from flax are a very mild estrogen and will likely act as estrogen blockers in estrogen sensitive tissues and prevent the occurrence of such things as Fibrocystic Breast Disease, Uterine Fibroids, Endometriosis and Ovarian Cysts. Déjà vu:

does anyone remember the study where the isoflavones of soy were said to do the same thing! It turned out not to be so, to the point where the likes of Mayo Clinic now advise their breast cancer survivors to never again eat soy products of any type for fear that it will restart their cancer!

New research showed that women with heightened urinary excretion levels of dietary flax lignans have a lowered incidence of fibroids. The spin is that the more lignans you eat and get rid of, the lower your chances of making your fibroids bigger.

Does that make sense to you? This “explanation” of the study results are about as big a spin as former president Clinton not classifying his affair with Monica as a sexual act. When read through, what the study does show is that the gals who got rid of the lignans most had the least growth in their fibroids! SOOO, what if you did not eat the fax and its lignans at all?



By MedHeadlines • Mar 8th, 2008 • Category: Breast Cancer, Cancer, Diet, FDA, Family, Lifestyle, Medical Research, Obesity, Prevention, Women's Health

A new study published in the March issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention demonstrates that women who have a recurrence of breast cancer have almost twice as much estrogen in their blood than those without a recurrence despite treatment with anti-estrogen drugs.

The study’s findings point to the possibility that high levels of estrogen contribute to a recurrence of breast cancer in the same fashion as they contribute to the initial development of the disease. “While this makes sense, there have been only a few small studies that have looked at the link between sex hormones in the blood and cancer recurrence,” said Cheryl L. Rock, Ph.D., the lead author of the study. “This is the largest study to date and the only one to have included women taking agents such as tamoxifen to reduce estrogen’s effect on cancer growth” she added.

The study’s results suggest the need for women who have been treated for breast cancer to do as much as they can to reduce the amount of estrogen in their bodies, such as maintaining a high level of regular exercise and keeping the weight down.

Study participants were taken from a larger dietary intervention trial, Women’s Healthy Eating and Living Study (WHEL), which evaluated 3,088 women who were previously treated for early stage breast cancer, but were cancer-free when they entered the study. Participants in WHEL were randomly divided into 2 groups, one eating normal healthy diet as recommended by the FDA guidelines, and the second group following diet high in fruits, vegetables, and fiber. After a seven year follow up, both groups showed the same rate of breast cancer recurrence. Researchers therefore determined that a normal diet following FDA guidelines is adequate.

The current case-control study involved WHEL participants, 153 of whom were cancer-free and 153 with cancer recurrence. Women were matched for body size, age, ethnicity, tumor size and chemotherapy. Researchers analyzed the levels of estradiol and testosterone, both protein-bound and free.

It was determined that increased levels of estradiol, protein-bound and free-circulating, were associated with significantly higher incidence of breast cancer recurrence. It was also found that women with cancer recurrence, had more than twice the amount of estradiol as compared to those who remained cancer-free. No association was found between breast cancer recurrence and the levels of SHBG and testosterone.

The study was funded by The Walton Family Foundation, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institutes of Health.


Source: American Association for Cancer Research.

But then hey -- there's a whole new world of alt medicine that actually has things that work far better than what we've been told all these years.

Offline iclozm

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Re: Flax Oil
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2010, 07:49:17 pm »
Not all estrogens are bad. If you're too low, you can lower immune function and have very uncomfortable joint issues.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estrogen#Steroidal
"The status quo is rationalized by a complacent majority, which refuses to see the obvious: that the state is nothing but an illusion created by a minority to live at others' expense." Dr. Jesus Huerta De Soto

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