Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September

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Happy Labor Day  

The first Monday in September was made a national holiday by an act of Congress, with the bill signed into law by President Grover Cleveland on 28 June 1894. Why? http://www.answers.com/topic/labor-days

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Labor_Day
The first Labor Day in the United States was celebrated on September 5, 1882 in New York City.[1]

In the aftermath of the deaths of a number of workers at the hands of the US military and US Marshals during the 1894 Pullman Strike, President Grover Cleveland put reconciliation with Labor as a top political priority. Fearing further conflict, legislation making Labor Day a national holiday was rushed through Congress unanimously and signed into law a mere six days after the end of the strike., [2] Cleveland was also concerned that aligning a US labor holiday with existing international May Day celebrations would stir up negative emotions linked to the Haymarket Affair .

[3] All 50 U.S. states have made Labor Day a state holiday.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haymarket_affair

The Haymarket affair (also known as the Haymarket massacre or Haymarket riot) was a demonstration and unrest that took place on Tuesday May 4, 1886, at the Haymarket Square[3] in Chicago.

It began as a rally in support of striking workers. An unknown person threw a bomb at police as they dispersed the public meeting. The bomb blast and ensuing gunfire resulted in the deaths of eight police officers, mostly from friendly fire, and an unknown number of civilians.[4][5] In the internationally publicized legal proceedings that followed, eight anarchists were tried for murder. Four men were convicted and executed, and one committed suicide in prison, although the prosecution conceded none of the defendants had thrown the bomb.

http://www.slate.com/id/2106168/
...
For a while, Labor Day had stiff competition from May 1.

In 1884, the American Federation of Organized Trades and Labor Unions declared that, by May 1, 1886, the eight-hour workday should be in effect across the land. When legislators and employers failed to comply in time, the result was a general strike and the bloody Haymarket Riot in Chicago, which caused the deaths of eight police officers and led to the hangings of four labor activists.

Though May 1 became an important day for Socialists and Communists, state governments and less radical labor leaders feared that the date was too emotionally charged.

In 1894, after President Grover Cleveland ordered the brutal suppression of the Pullman Strike, he realized that he had to do something to curry favor with the labor movement, which viewed him with contempt.

Worried that a May 1 holiday would encourage rabble-rousing in commemoration of the Haymarket Riot, he followed the lead of several states and made the first Monday in September a federal holiday in honor of the workingman.

The political maneuver didn't achieve its desired effect, however: Cleveland lost the Democratic Party's 1896 presidential nomination to William Jennings Bryan.

Social Security - A social umbrella established to placate and prevent a majority of citizens in the 1930's from a repeat of the rioting against the monopoly robber barons of the 1890's- and early 1900's.  

[ The rich can easily live (and thrive) through programmed sow-reap, boom-bust economies the average citizen dependent on Corporations for employment, bankrupts and starves. If they think they can handle citizens in other ways, then a social safety net will not be required. Back to the Good 'ol days? ]

American Architecture: A History - Google Books Resultby Leland M. Roth - 2003 - Architecture - 608 pages

The Pullman riot, and the unyielding and oppressive paternalism that caused it, produced a social stigma that soon was attached to every company town


http://www.workablepeace.org/pdfs/pullman.pdf
The Company Town Breaks Down: The Pullman Strike of 1894
...
In 1860, half of Americans were self-employed as farmers and artisans. By 1900, two-thirds were employed by others.
...
Railroad Strikes of the Great Depression of 1893-98:

The Pullman strike in 1894 was the last and greatest of all these conflicts. At its peak, it spread beyond the Pullman Factory in Chicago to stop most of the railroads in the country, and involved more than 500,000 railroad workers in 26 states.

When it was over more than thirty people were killed, the leaders of the American Railway Union were in jail, the Pullman Palace Railway car company was almost bankrupt, and the U.S. Government had intervened decisively for the railrod owners and against the railroad workers.

The outcome of the strike was a major setback to labor unions in America.

It took nearly fourty years and another Great Depression for the labor unions to gain the political and economic influence they had struggled for in the Pullman Stike.

http://encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/1029.html

The most famous and farreaching labor conflict in a period of severe economic depression and social unrest, the Pullman Strike began May 11, 1894, with a walkout by Pullman Palace Car Company factory workers after negotiations over declining wages failed.

These workers appealed for support to the American Railway Union (ARU), which argued unsuccessfully for arbitration. On June 20, the ARU gave notice that beginning June 26 its membership would no longer work trains that included Pullman cars.

The boycott, although centered in Chicago, crippled railroad traffic nationwide, until the federal government intervened in early July, first with a comprehensive injunction essentially forbidding all boycott activity and then by dispatching regular soldiers to Chicago and elsewhere.
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While the use of an injunction for such purposes, upheld by the Supreme Court in 1895, was a setback for unionism, and while most public sentiment was against the boycott, George Pullman attracted broad criticism and his workers wide sympathy

http://www.lib.niu.edu/1994/ihy941208.html
The Pullman Strike  - Martina Brendel  - Ogden Elementary School, Chicago

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Pullman created Pullman City to house his employees. It was on a three-thousand-acre tract located south of Chicago in the area of 114th Street and Cottage Grove. His workers were required to live in Pullman City. They were also expected to accept cuts in pay and not criticize workloads. Pullman charged money for use of the library. Clergy had to pay rent to use the church. "He wasn't a man to let you pray for free," it was claimed in The Call, a socialist newspaper.
...
Attorney General Richard Olney supported the General Managers Association because he believed that the railroads had the right to do things their way, and if the workers disagreed with the treatment they were receiving, they could quit.

On June 29, 1894, Debs went to Blue Island and asked the railroad workers there if they would support the strike. The railroad workers there felt they were being discriminated against. Angry railroad workers in Blue Island began destroying the yards and burning anything that was flammable. Attorney General Olney requested President Cleveland to send federal troops into Chicago to break the strike.

On July 2, 1894, Olney obtained an injunction from a federal court saying that the strike was illegal. When the strikers did not return to work the next day, President Cleveland sent federal troops into Chicago. This enraged strikers, and rioters began stopping trains, smashing switches, and, again, setting fire to anything that would burn.

On July 7, another mob stopped soldiers escorting a train through the downtown Chicago area. Many people were killed or wounded from bullets.
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On July 10, 1894, Debs and three other union leaders were arrested for interferring with U.S. mail. They were released within a few hours, but Debs realized that continuing the strike would be a lost cause because of the federal troops.
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Shortly before Pullman died in 1897, he requested that his grave be lined in concrete to keep looters from robbing him.


http://libcom.org/history/1892-the-homestead-strike
1892: The Homestead strike

An account of a militant strike of steel workers of the Carnegie company in the US defending their union against the bosses, the police and hired armed mercenaries.

The Robber Baron Andrew Carnegie precipitated the Homestead Strike of 1892 with his attack against the standard of living of the workers and his bid to break the union representing the highest skilled workers. Carnegie announced his intention to impose an 18 percent pay cut and issued a statement saying that the real issue was whether the Homestead steel workers would be union or non-union. He ordered a 12 foot high fence to be built around the plant – 3 miles in length – with 3 inch holes at shoulder height every 25 feet, signalling preparation for an armed fight with the workers. At the same time Carnegie hired the notorious Pinkerton company to provide armed thugs for the upcoming struggle. An ultimatum was issued for workers to accept the wage cut by June 24th or face mass layoffs.

The workers did not take these provocations lightly. They were not about to abandon the union and submit to Carnegie’s dictates without a fight. The Amalgamated Union, which represented the skilled workers, about 750 of the plant’s 3,800 employees, established an Advisory Committee, comprised of five delegates from each lodge, to coordinate the struggle against Carnegie’s attacks. A mass meeting of 3,000 workers from all categories, union and non-union voted overwhelmingly to strike.

The Advisory Committee took responsibility for organising an elaborate network to track the company’s manoeuvres, to monitor the possibility of an anticipated transport of Pinkerton goons by river boat from Pittsburgh. Workers rented their own vessel to patrol the river. Every road within a five mile radius of Homestead was blockaded, and a thousand strikers patrolled the river banks for ten miles. The Committee assumed virtual control of the town, assuming authority over the water, gas, and electricity facilities, shutting down the saloons, maintaining order and proclaiming ad hoc laws. An attempt by the county sheriff to move against the strikers fell flat on its face when he proved unable to raise a posse. The workers offered the sheriff a tour of the plant and promised to guarantee the security of the facility from any trespassers. Sympathy for the strikers was high.

On July 5th a steam whistle sounded the alarm at 4am.Two barges transporting more than 300 Pinkertons left Pittsburgh. By the time the thugs arrived at Homestead, 10,000 armed strikers and their supporters were gathered to "greet" them. An armed confrontation erupted. Thirty workers were wounded, and three killed in the early fighting. Armed proletarians from nearby towns rushed to the scene to reinforce their class brothers. The shoot-out continued throughout the day. Finally the demoralised Pinkertons, trapped in debilitating heat on the barges, outnumbered and outgunned, mutinied against their superiors.

Most were not regular agents, but reservists who had been recruited under false pretences; they were prepared to do some bullying, intimidating and terrorising, but did not have the stomach to confront armed, organised class resistance. Once the Pinkertons surrendered, the workers debated what to do with their despised prisoners.

Angered by the casualties inflicted by the Pinkertons – a total of 40 wounded, 9 killed - some wanted to execute the thugs, but the Committee reasoned that a mass execution would be used against the strikers by the bosses. Instead the Pinkertons were forced to run a gauntlet. In the end the casualties suffered by the Pinkertons were 20 shot, seven killed and 300 injured running the gauntlet.

In retaliation for the deaths of strikers, a young Russian anarchist called Alexander Berkman attempted to assassinate the Carnegie boss Henry Clay Frick. He shot Frick three times and stabbed him with a poison-tipped dagger, but Frick remarkably survived. Berkman was subsequently imprisoned for 14 years.

The strike continued for four months. Eventually federal troops were brought in to crush the struggle, and 160 strikers were arrested and charged with murder and assault.

But the bosses’ repressive apparatus could not find a jury anywhere in the Pittsburgh region that would convict a single striker. All were acquitted. Hugh O’Donnell, one of the strike leaders, was first charged with treason. Following his acquittal on those charges, he was immediately rearrested and tried for murder. And following acquittal on that charge, he was rearrested and tried for assault – again successfully beating back the state's prosecution.

However, despite beating back the criminal charges, the strike morale was broken, and the union driven out. Throughout the country workers were sympathetic to the struggle at Homestead, and needless to say, the spokesmen of the capitalist class were furious. Strikers were referred to as a "mob."

The New York Times granted that the company had provoked the battle, nevertheless maintained solidarity with its class brother and insisted that the obligation of the state was "to enforce law and order at Homestead, to quell the mob, to put the property of the Carnegie Steel Company in possession its owners and to protect their lawful rights."

Despite ending in defeat, Homestead was an important moment in the history of class struggle in America. What happened at Homestead was not a riot. It was organised class violence, consciously controlled by the workers, as part of the struggle. Homestead demonstrated clearly the capacity of workers to organise their struggles, to resist the attacks of the capitalist class, to achieve an active solidarity in struggle, to organise their own power to rival that of the local state apparatus during the struggle, to organise class violence and exercise it judiciously.

http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/dep1893.htm
The Depression of 1893-1898

It is clear that the U.S. went through a severe economic depression during the period of 1893 to 1898, but the statistical apparatus did not exist at the time to precisely document it. Much after the fact the economist Simon Kuznets estimated the national income accounts for the period. The figures are shown below:
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A financial panic occured in 1893 starting with the financial failure of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad in January, followed by the National Cordage Co. in May.

A string of railroad failures continued in 1893 with the Erie Railroad going under in July, Northern Pacific in August, Union Pacific in October and finally the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad in December.

As has happened in other times some politicians went on record stating that the American economy was in a high state of prosperity just before the financial panic began and 500 banks and 16,000 businesses declared bankruptcy.

http://eh.net/encyclopedia/article/whitten.panic.1893
The Depression of 1893

The Depression of 1893 was one of the worst in American history with the unemployment rate exceeding ten percent for half a decade. This article describes economic developments in the decades leading up to the depression; the performance of the economy during the 1890s; domestic and international causes of the depression; and political and social responses to the depression.

The Depression of 1893 can be seen as a watershed event in American history. It was accompanied by violent strikes, the climax of the Populist and free silver political crusades, the creation of a new political balance, the continuing transformation of the country's economy, major changes in national policy, and far-reaching social and intellectual developments. Business contraction shaped the decade that ushered out the nineteenth century.
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The unemployment rate exceeded ten percent for five or six consecutive years. The only other time this occurred in the history of the US economy was during the Great Depression of the 1930s.
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Timing and Depth of the Depression
The National Bureau of Economic Research estimates that the economic contraction began in January 1893 and continued until June 1894. The economy then grew until December 1895, but it was then hit by a second recession that lasted until June 1897.
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Throughout the country few families were self-sufficient, most relied on selling their output or labor in the market -- unlike those living in the country one hundred years earlier

America is becoming one big company town:

http://dscholar.humboldt.edu:8080/dspace/bitstream/2148/59/1/Clark.pdf  
http://humboldt-dspace.calstate.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/2148/59/Clark.pdf?sequence=1

related:

Wealth Disparities in U.S. Approaching 1920's Levels  

Food stamp use hit record 40.8m in May----We are in Recovery?

It's Now Public: After Health Care, Obama Intends to Dismantle Social Security

Obama will create or save 3.5 million jobs in two years- 30 Million Unemployed

***Derivatives as a method of counterfeiting and destruction of the currency  
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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http://www.dol.gov/oasam/programs/history/coalstrike.htm
The Coal Strike of 1902 – Turning Point in U.S. Policy

On Friday, October 3, 1902, President Theodore Roosevelt called a precedent-shattering meeting at the temporary White House at 22 Lafayette Place, Washington, D.C. A great strike in the anthracite coal fields of Pennsylvania threatened a coal famine.

The President feared "untold misery . . . with the certainty of riots which might develop into social war."1

Although he had no legal right to intervene, he sent telegrams to both sides summoning them to Washington to discuss the problem.
...
Here and there a ray of neutrality broke through the anti labor atmosphere. Congress established a Bureau of Labor in 1884, which was the forerunner of the present Department of Labor, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, and Bureau of Labor Statistics.

In 1886, Cleveland asked Congress to "engraft" on the Bureau of Labor a commission to prevent major strikes.

In 1888, Congress passed a law aimed at promoting industrial peace in the railroad industry. After the Pullman strike, U.S. Commissioner of Labor Carroll D. Wright headed a group which made a colorless but honest report of the dispute.

One recommendation provided the basis for the Erdman Act of 1898, under which the Commissioner of Labor and the Chairman of the Interstate Commerce Commission tried to mediate railroad strikes.

The law had not yet been applied when a new Federal policy erupted from the industrial warfare in the coalfields in 1900 and 1902.7

The groundwork for the 1900 anthracite coal strike was laid by the unexpected results of strikes in the bituminous or soft coalfields in 1897.

A depression in 1893 forced down wages and, according to a Pennsylvania legislative committee, many miners lived "like sheep in shambles." A spontaneous uprising had forced many mine owners to sign a contract with the United Mine Workers. Both sides struck a bonanza as operators raised both wages and prices. Coal companies prospered, and union membership soared from 10,000 to 115,000

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Strike_of_1902
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In the end, however, the rhetoric of both sides made little difference to the Commission, which split the difference between mineworkers and mine owners. The miners asked for 20% wage increases, and most were given a 10% increase. The miners had asked for an eight-hour day and were awarded a nine-hour day instead of the standard ten hours then prevailing. While the operators refused to recognize the United Mine Workers, they were required to agree to a six-man arbitration board, made up of equal numbers of labor and management representatives, with the power to settle labor disputes. Mitchell considered that de facto recognition and called it a victory.


So while the Federal Reserve is being Setup  - December 23, 1913:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludlow_Massacre

The Ludlow Massacre refers to the violent deaths of 19 people[1]:
during an attack by the Colorado National Guard on a tent colony of 1,200 striking coal miners and their families at Ludlow, Colorado on April 20, 1914.

The deaths occurred after a day-long fight between strikers and the Guard.

Two women and eleven children were asphyxiated and burned to death.

Three union leaders and two strikers were killed by gunfire, along with one child, one passer-by, and one National Guardsman. In response, the miners armed themselves and attacked dozens of mines, destroying property and engaging in several skirmishes with the Colorado National Guard.

This was the deadliest incident in the 14-month 1913-1914 southern Colorado Coal Strike. The strike was organized by the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA) against coal mining companies in Colorado.

The three largest companies involved were the Rockefeller family-owned Colorado Fuel & Iron Company (CF&I), the Rocky Mountain Fuel Company (RMF), and the Victor-American Fuel Company (VAF). Ludlow, located 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Trinidad, Colorado, is now a ghost town. The massacre site is owned by the UMWA, which erected a granite monument in memory of the miners and their families who died that day.[
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Many colliers resided in company towns, in which all land, real estate, and amenities were owned by the mine operator, and which were expressly designed to inculcate loyalty and squelch dissent
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Historian Philip S. Foner has described company towns as "feudal domain, with the company acting as lord and master. ... The 'law' consisted of the company rules. Curfews were imposed. Company guards-brutal thugs armed with machine guns and rifles loaded with soft-point bullets-would not admit any 'suspicious' stranger into the camp and would not permit any miner to leave." What more, miners who raised the ire of the company were liable to find themselves and their families summarily evicted from their homes
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Several popular songs have been written and recorded about the events at Ludlow. Among them is "Ludlow Massacre" by American folk singer Woody Guthrie, and "The Monument (Lest We Forget)" by Irish musician Andy Irvine

http://www.wvculture.org/history/minewars.html
West Virginia's Mine Wars
Compiled by the West Virginia State Archives
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Between 1890 and 1912, West Virginia had a higher mine death rate than any other state. West Virginia was the site of numerous deadly coal mining accidents, including the nation's worst coal disaster.

On December 6, 1907, an explosion at a mine owned by the Fairmont Coal Company in Monongah, Marion County, killed 361. One historian has suggested that during World War I, a U.S. soldier had a better statistical chance of surviving in battle than did a West Virginian working in the coal mines
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By 1912, the union had lost control of much of the Kanawha- New River Coalfield. That year, UMWA miners on Paint Creek in Kanawha County demanded wages equal to those of other area mines. The operators rejected the wage increase and miners walked off the job on April 18, beginning one of the most violent strikes in the nation's history. Miners along nearby Cabin Creek, having previously lost their union, joined the Paint Creek strikers and demanded:

the right to organize
recognition of their constitutional rights to free speech and assembly
an end to blacklisting union organizers
alternatives to company stores
an end to the practice of using mine guards
prohibition of cribbing
installation of scales at all mines for accurately weighing coal
unions be allowed to hire their own checkweighmen to make sure the companies' checkweighmen were not cheating the miners.

When the strike began, operators brought in mine guards from the Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency to evict miners and their families from company houses. The evicted miners set up tent colonies and lived in other makeshift housing. The mine guards' primary responsibility was to break the strike by making the lives of the miners as uncomfortable as possible.
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Both sides committed violent acts, the most notorious of which occurred on the night of February 7, 1913.

An armored train, nicknamed the "Bull Moose Special," led by coal operator Quin Morton and Kanawha County Sheriff Bonner Hill, rolled through a miners' tent colony at Holly Grove on Paint Creek. Mine guards opened fire from the train, killing striker Cesco Estep. After the incident, Morton supposedly wanted to "go back and give them another round." Hill and others talked him out of it. In retaliation, miners attacked a mine guard encampment at Mucklow, present Gallagher.

In a battle which lasted several hours, at least sixteen people died, mostly mine guards.

http://www.powells.com/biblio/61-9780822954262-1
Thunder in the Mountains: The West Virginia Mine War, 1920-21
by Lon Savage

The West Virginia mine war of 1920-21, a major civil insurrection of unusual brutality on both sides, even by the standards of the coal fields, involved thousands of union and nonunion miners, state and private police, militia, and federal troops.  Before it was over, three West Virginia counties were in open rebellion, much of the state was under military rule, and bombers of the U.S. Army Air Corps had been dispatched against striking miners
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Much neglected in historical accounts [ America has always been happy place without citizen violence ] , Thunder in the Mountains is the only available book-length account of the crisis in American industrial relations and governance that occured during the West Virginia mine war of 1920-21.  


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Matewan

The Battle of Matewan (also known as the Matewan Massacre) was a shootout in the town of Matewan, West Virginia in Mingo County on May 19, 1920 between local miners and the Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency.
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The ensuing gun battle left seven detectives and four townspeople dead, including Felts and Testerman. This tragedy, along with events such as the Ludlow Massacre in Colorado six years earlier, marked an important turning point in the battle for miners’ rights.
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The union sent its top organizers, including the famous Mary Harris "Mother" Jones.[1] Roughly 3000 men signed the union’s roster in the Spring of 1920. They signed their union cards at the community church, something that they knew could cost them their jobs, and in many cases their homes. The coal companies controlled many aspects of the miners' lives. [2] Stone Mountain Coal Corporation fought back with mass firings, harassment, and evictions. [3]
...
When the charges against Hatfield, and 22 other people, for the murder of Albert Felts were dismissed, Baldwin-Felts detectives assassinated Hatfield and his deputy Ed Chambers on August 1, 1921, on the steps of the McDowell County Courthouse located in Welch, West Virginia.[5].

Of those defendants whose charges were not dismissed, all were acquitted. Less than a month later, miners from the state gathered in Charleston. They were even more determined to organize the southern coal fields, and began the march to Logan County. Thousands of miners joined them along the way, culminating in what was to become known as the Battle of Blair Mountain.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Blair_Mountain

The Battle of Blair Mountain was the largest open class war in US history, and was the second largest overall armed insurrection next to the Civil War.

For five days in late August and early September 1921, in Logan County, West Virginia, between 10,000 and 15,000 coal miners confronted an army backed by coal operators in an effort to unionize the southwestern West Virginia coalfields. Their struggle ended only after approximately one million rounds were fired,[1] and the US Army intervened by presidential order.
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Private planes were hired to drop homemade bombs on the miners. On orders from the famous General Billy Mitchell, Army bombers from Maryland were also used to disperse the miners, a rare example of Air Power being used by the federal government against US citizens. A combination of gas and explosive bombs left over from the fighting in World War I were dropped in several locations near the towns of Jeffery, Sharples and Blair
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Following the battle, 985 miners were indicted for "murder, conspiracy to commit murder, accessory to murder, and treason against the State of West Virginia". Though some were acquitted by sympathetic juries, many were also imprisoned for a number of years, though they were paroled in 1925. It would be Bill Blizzard's trial where the unexploded bomb was used as evidence of the government and companies' brutality, and ultimately resulted in his acquittal.

Short term, the battle seemed to be an overwhelming victory for management, and UMWA membership plummeted from more than 50,000 miners to approximately 10,000 over the next several years. Not until 1935 did the UMW fully organize in southern West Virginia, after the election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.




Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2010, 12:25:10 PM »

http://explorepahistory.com/displayimage.php?imgId=1-2-D26
"Mother" Mary Harris Jones urging on steel workers during the 1919 Steel Strike.

Credit: Library of Congress

In 1919, Mary Harris Jones, now in her eighties, rallied steel workers to vote "yes" on a nationwide strike against the steel corporations. Traveling through Pennsylvania steel towns up and down the Monongahela River, she was frequently arrested for speaking to workers. Asked by a Pittsburgh judge if she had a permit to speak on the streets, she replied "Yes, sir, I had a permit." When he growled "Who issued it?" she shot back "Patrick Henry; Thomas Jefferson; John Adams!"

http://www.aflcio.org/splash_laborday2010.cfm

This Labor Day, the AFL-CIO is calling for policies that will help us build broadly shared prosperity and for the election of people who support:
Putting America to work immediately.
Building a middle-class economy.
Restoring job quality and quality of life.
Protecting Main Street, not Wall Street


| ----

Despite the anti-socialist talk that we hear today, one hundred years ago, whatever a "socialist was" at that time, people like "Mother Jones" were the people who were doing something to improve worker conditions...

http://www.aflcio.org/aboutus/history/history/jones.cfm

Typically clad in a black dress, her face framed by a lace collar and black hat, the barely five-foot tall Mother Jones was a fearless fighter for workers’ rights—once labeled "the most dangerous woman in America" by a U.S. district attorney. Mary Harris "Mother" Jones rose to prominence as a fiery orator and fearless organizer for the Mine Workers during the first two decades of the 20th century. Her voice had great carrying power. Her energy and passion inspired men half her age into action and compelled their wives and daughters to join in the struggle. If that didn’t work, she would embarrass men to action.  "I have been in jail more than once and I expect to go again. If you are too cowardly to fight, I will fight," she told them.

Mother Jones’ organizing methods were unique for her time. She welcomed African American workers and involved women and children in strikes. She organized miners’ wives into teams armed with mops and brooms to guard the mines against scabs. She staged parades with children carrying signs that read, "We Want to Go to School and Not to the Mines."
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Tragedy struck Mary again when she lost everything in the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. After the fire, Mary began to travel across the country. The nation was undergoing dramatic change, and industrialization was changing the nature of work. She moved from town to town in support of workers’ struggles. In Kansas City, she did advance work for a group of unemployed men who marched on Washington, D.C. to demand jobs. In Birmingham, Ala., she helped black and white miners during a nationwide coal strike. Mary organized a massive show of support for Eugene Debs, the leader of the American Railway Union, after he served a six-month prison sentence for defying a court order not to disrupt railroad traffic in support of striking Pullman workers.

A Mother to Millions of Working Men and Women

In June 1897, after Mary addressed the railway union convention, she began to be referred to as "Mother" by the men of the union. The name stuck. That summer, when the 9,000-member Mine Workers called a nationwide strike of bituminous (soft coal) miners and tens of thousands of miners laid down their tools, Mary arrived in Pittsburgh to assist them. She became "Mother Jones" to millions of working men and women across the country for her efforts on behalf of the miners.

Mother Jones was so effective the Mine Workers sent her into the coalfields to sign up miners with the union. She agitated in the anthracite fields of eastern Pennsylvania, the company towns of West Virginia and the harsh coal camps of Colorado. Nearly anywhere coal miners, textile workers or steelworkers were fighting to organize a union, Mother Jones was there.  

She was banished from more towns and was held incommunicado in more jails in more states than any other union leader of the time. In 1912, she was even charged with a capital offense by a military tribunal in West Virginia and held under house arrest for weeks until popular outrage and national attention forced the governor to release her.

Mother Jones was deeply affected by the "machine-gun massacre" in Ludlow, Colo., when National Guardsmen raided a tent colony of striking miners and their families, killing 20 people—mostly women and children. She traveled across the country, telling the story, and testified before the U.S. Congress.  

In addition to miners, Mother Jones also was very concerned about child workers. During a silk strike in Philadelphia, 100,000 workers—including 16,000 children—left their jobs over a demand that their workweek be cut from 60 to 55 hours. To attract attention to the cause of abolishing child labor, in 1903, she led a children’s march of 100 children from the textile mills of Philadelphia to New York City "to show the New York millionaires our grievances." She led the children all the way to President Theodore Roosevelt’s Long Island home.

In her 80s, Mother Jones settled down near Washington, D.C., in 1921 but continued to travel across the country. In 1924, although unable to hold a pen between her fingers, she made her last strike appearance in Chicago in support of striking dressmakers, hundreds of whom were arrested and black-listed during their ill-fated four month-long struggle. She died at the age of 94 in Silver Spring, Md., and was buried in the Union Miners Cemetery in Mount Olive, Ill.

http://motherjones.com/politics/2001/05/mother-jones-woman
Mother Jones: The Woman  By Elliot J. Gorn  May 2001

Mary Harris Jones, this magazine's namesake, crafted a persona that made her a legend among working people. So why is so little about her remembered today?

Upton Sinclair knew Mother Jones. The author of the best-selling exposé of the meatpacking industry, The Jungle, even made her a character in one of his novels, a lightly fictionalized work called The Coal War, which chronicled the bloody Colorado coal strike of 1913-14: "There broke out a storm of applause which swelled into a tumult as a little woman came forward on the platform. She was wrinkled and old, dressed in black, looking like somebody's grandmother; she was, in truth, the grandmother of hundreds of thousands of miners."
...

 "All over the country she had roamed," Sinclair concluded, "and wherever she went, the flame of protest had leaped up in the hearts of men; her story was a veritable Odyssey of revolt."

When Sinclair wrote these words, Mother Jones was one of the most famous women in America. Articles about her regularly appeared in magazines and newspapers, and for many working Americans, she had achieved legendary, even iconic, status. Yet the woman for whom Mother Jones magazine is named is scarcely known any longer.

Some might recognize her name, know something about her activism on behalf of working people, or even recall her famous war cry: "Pray for the dead, and fight like hell for the living." But few remember much about Mother Jones, who battled corporate presidents and politicians, who went to jail repeatedly for organizing workers, and who converted tens of thousands of Americans to the labor movement and the left.

As I worked on a recent biography of Mother Jones, however, I came to appreciate her significance for our own times. With dramatic speeches and street theater, she organized workers, women, and minorities, drawing public attention to their hardships and giving them a voice. Mary Jones' greatest achievement may have been creating the persona of Mother Jones.
...
Mary Jones was an aging, poor, widowed Irish immigrant, nearly as dispossessed as an American could be. She had survived plague, famine, and fire, only to confront a lonely old age.

But then she invented Mother Jones. Or, to put it more precisely, she began to play a role that she and her followers made up as they went along. By 1900, no one called her Mary, but always Mother; she wore antique black dresses in public, and she began exaggerating her age.
...
Yet by casting herself as the mother of downtrodden people everywhere, Mary Jones went where she pleased, spoke out on the great issues of her day, and did so with sharp irreverence (she referred to John D. Rockefeller as "Oily John" and Governor William Glasscock of West Virginia as "Crystal Peter"). Paradoxically, by embracing the very role of family matriarch that restricted most women, Mother Jones shattered the limits that confined her.

For a quarter of a century, she roamed America, the Johnny Appleseed of activists. She literally had no permanent residence. "My address is like my shoes," she told a congressional committee. "It travels with me wherever I go." She was paid a stipend by the United Mine Workers and, for a few years, by the Socialist Party.
...
The rock of Mother Jones' faith was her conviction that working Americans acting together must free themselves from poverty and powerlessness. She believed in the need for citizens of a democracy to participate in public affairs. Working families, Mother Jones argued, possessed vast, untapped powers to fight the corporations that bound them to starvation wages and the corrupt politicians who did the businessmen's bidding
...
She offers a vivid reminder of what remains among the most underacknowledged issues of our day: that America is a class-driven society, where the wealthy have grown obscenely rich as working people have fallen further behind.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #3 on: September 05, 2010, 04:06:15 PM »
Downloadable References on the "Robber Baron" Trust's of the 1900's:

1900 - Who rules America?: Facts and figures regarding the four hundred trusts

The Battle of 1900: An official hand-book for every American citizen

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilded_Age
The Gilded Age is most famous for the creation of a modern industrial economy.

During the 1870's and 1880's, the U.S. economy grew at the fastest rate in its history, with real wages, wealth, GDP, and capital formation all increasing rapidly. A national transportation and communication network was created, the corporation became the dominant form of business organization, and a managerial revolution transformed business operations. By the beginning of the 20th century, per capita income and industrial production in the United States led the world. The businessmen of the Second Industrial Revolution created industrial towns and cities in the Northeast with new factories, and hired an ethnically diverse industrial working class, many of them new immigrants from Europe.

The super-rich industrialists and financiers such as Cornelius Vanderbilt, John D. Rockefeller, Andrew W. Mellon, Andrew Carnegie, Henry Flagler, J.P. Morgan and the prominent Astor family were attacked as "robber barons" by critics, who believed they cheated to get their money and lorded it over the common people.

There was a small, growing labor union movement led especially by Samuel Gompers, head of the American Federation of Labor (AFL) after 1886.

Gilded Age politics, called the Third Party System, featured very close contests between the Republicans and Democrats, and, occasionally, third parties.

Nearly all the eligible men were political partisans and voter turnout often exceeded 90% in some states [ The dead and others voted twice] .[1]

The wealth of the period is highlighted by the American upper class' opulence, but also by the rise of American philanthropy
(referred to by Andrew Carnegie as the "Gospel of Wealth") that used private money to endow thousands of colleges, hospitals, museums, academies, schools, opera houses, public libraries, symphony orchestras, and charities.
John D. Rockefeller, for example, donated over $500 million to various charities, slightly over half his entire net worth [not quite true  - he had a net worth of over 2 Billion dollars].

The Beaux-Arts architectural idiom of the era clothed public buildings in Neo-Renaissance architecture.

The end of the Gilded Age coincided with the Panic of 1893, a deep depression.
The depression lasted until 1897 and marked a major political realignment in the election of 1896.

After that came the Progressive Era.

Labor unions
Craft-oriented labor unions grew strong in the Northeast after 1870.

One critical strike was the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, lasting 45 days and attended by violent attacks on railroad property until President Rutherford B. Hayes sent in federal troops.

In 1886, the Knights of Labor tried to unite both unskilled and skilled workers, but grew so fast it could not manage its affairs. The failure of the Great Southwest Railroad Strike of 1886 and popular revulsion against the killing of police in the Haymarket Square Riot caused the collapse of support for the Knights.

The final major strike of the late 1800s was the Pullman Strike which was an effort to shut down the national railroad system in the face of federal court injunctions to desist. The strike was led by the upstart American Railway Union (a few months old) led by Eugene V. Debs, and collapsed totally.[15] These failures left the union field to the established railroad brotherhoods and the new American Federation of Labor, headed by Samuel Gompers. Gompers wanted better deals for his members, not revolution, and his AFL unions gained strength steadily down to 1919.[16]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Railroad_Strike_of_1877
...
1873 saw a significant economic depression in Europe. The effects of this downturn reached the United States on September 18 with the failure of banking firm Jay Cooke and Company. As Cooke was the country’s top investment banker, the principal backer of the Northern Pacific Railroad as well as a prime investor in other railroads, and as the company which had handled most of the government’s wartime loans, its failure was catastrophic.

In response, the U.S. economy sputtered and then collapsed. Shortly after Cooke’s demise, the New York Stock Exchange closed for 10 days, credit dried up, foreclosures and factory closings became common.

Of the country's 364 railroads, 89 went bankrupt, over 18,000 businesses failed between 1873 and 1875.[citation needed] Unemployment reached 14 percent by 1876, while workers who kept their jobs were employed for a mere six months out of the year and suffered a 45% cut in their wages to approximately one dollar per day.[1] This economic cataclysm is now referred to as the Panic of 1873.
...
In the wake of the Panic of 1873, a bitter antagonism between workers and the leaders of industry developed. By 1877, 10% wage cuts, distrust of capitalists and poor working conditions led to a number of railroad strikes that prevented the trains from moving. This antagonism lingered well after the depression ended in 1878-79, eventually erupting into the labor unrest that marked the following decades and that eventually led to the birth of labor unions in the United States.


Maryland National Guard Sixth Regiment fighting its way through Baltimore, Maryland, 20 July 1877
...
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania became the site of the worst violence. Thomas Alexander Scott of the Pennsylvania Railroad, often considered one of the first robber barons, suggested that the strikers should be given "a rifle diet for a few days and see how they like that kind of bread."
...
The mayor of Chicago, Monroe Heath, asked for five thousand vigilantes to help restore order (they were partially successful), and shortly thereafter the National Guard and federal troops arrived.
On July 25, violence between police and the mob erupted with events reaching a peak the following day. These blood-soaked confrontations between police and enraged mobs occurred at the Halsted Street viaduct, at nearby 16th Street, at Halsted and 12th, and on Canal Street. The headline of the Chicago Times screamed, "Terrors Reign, The Streets of Chicago Given Over to Howling Mobs of Thieves and Cutthroats."[5] Order was finally restored, however, with the deaths of nearly 20 men and boys, the wounding of scores more, and the loss of property valued in the millions of dollars.

The 1877 Shamokin Uprising occurred on July 25, when 1000 men and boys, many of them coal miners, marched to the Reading Railroad Depot in Shamokin, Pennsylvania. They looted the depot when the town announced it would only pay them $1/day for emergency public employment. The mayor, who owned coal mines, formed a vigilate group that killed 2 out of 14 civilian shooting casualties.

The Great Railroad Strike of 1877 began to lose momentum when President Hayes sent federal troops from city to city. These troops suppressed strike after strike, until at last, approximately 45 days after it had started, the Great Railroad Strike of 1877 was over.
...
Impact on future labor relations
After the Great Railroad Strike of 1877, union organizers planned for their next battles while politicians and business leaders took steps to ensure that such chaos could not reoccur. Many states enacted conspiracy statutes. States formed new militia units, and National Guard armories were constructed in a number of cities.

For workers and employers alike, the strikes had shown the power of workers in combination to challenge the status quo. They were driven, as a Pittsburgh state militiaman, who was ordered to break the 1877 strike, pointed out, by “one spirit and one purpose among them–that they were justified in resorting to any means to break down the power of the corporations.”

Thus, in the wake of the strike, unions became better organized and the number of strikes increased. In the 1880s there were nearly ten thousand strikes and lockouts and in 1886 nearly 700,000 workers went on strike. As is to be expected, business leaders took a more rigid stance against the unions. Nonetheless, and possibly because of the more rigid stance, the labor movement continued to grow.




|-----
Remember Joan Baez and her singing Joe Hill at Woodstock?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joe_Hill
Joan Baez's Woodstock performance of "Joe Hill" in 1969 is one of the best known recordings

http://www.enotes.com/contemporary-musicians/baez-joan-biography
Baez, Joan
...
Part of her income from performing and recording went to found the Institute for the Study of Nonviolence (now called the Resource Center for Nonviolence) in Carmel Valley, California. Her social activism also led to her support for the civil rights movement and its concurrent voting rights protests, as well as anti-war events around the world. She was arrested and jailed for non-violent protests of the Vietnam-era draft, as was her husband, David Harris, who spent much of their marriage in jail. Her focus throughout her life has been on nonviolent protest as a means of ending wars, war-related industries and national budgets, and discrimination. She has worked through Amnesty International since 1972 and Humanitas since its founding in 1979.

http://www.aflcio.org/aboutus/history/history/hill.cfm
Joe Hill (1879 - 1915) - A songwriter, itinerant laborer, and union organizer

Joe Hill became famous around the world after a Utah court convicted him of murder. Even before the international campaign to have his conviction reversed, however, Joe Hill was well known in hobo jungles, on picket lines and at workers' rallies as the author of popular labor songs and as an Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) agitator. Thanks in large part to his songs and to his stirring, well—publicized call to his fellow workers on the eve of his execution—"Don't waste time mourning, organize!"—Hill became, and he has remained, the best—known IWW martyr and labor folk hero.
...
1911, he was in Tijuana, Mexico, part of an army of several hundred wandering hoboes and radicals who sought to overthrow the Mexican dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz, seize Baja California, emancipate the working class and declare industrial freedom. (The invasion lasted six months before internal dissension and a large detachment of better—trained Mexican troops drove the last 100 rebels back across the border.)

In 1912, Hill apparently was active in a "Free Speech" coalition of Wobblies, socialists, single taxers, suffragists and AFL members in San Diego that protested a police decision to close the downtown area to street meetings. He also put in an appearance at a railroad construction crew strike in British Columbia, writing several songs before returning to San Pedro, where he lent musical support to a strike of Italian dockworkers.

The San Pedro dockworkers' strike led to Hill's first recorded encounter with the police, who arrested him in June 1913 and held him for 30 days on a charge of vagrancy because, he said later, he was "a little too active to suit the chief of the burg" during the strike.

On Jan. 10, 1914, Hill knocked on the door of a Salt Lake City doctor at 11:30 p.m. asking to be treated for a gunshot wound he said was inflicted by an angry husband who had accused Hill of insulting his wife. Earlier that evening, in another part of town, a grocer and his son had been killed. One of the assailants was wounded in the chest by the younger victim before he died. Hill's injury therefore tied him to the incident. The uncertain testimony of two eyewitnesses and the lack of any corroboration of Hill's alibi convinced a local jury of Hill's guilt, even though neither witness was able to identify Hill conclusively and the gun used in the murders was never recovered.

The campaign to exonerate Hill began two months before the trial and continued up to and even beyond his execution by firing squad on Nov. 19, 1915. His supporters included the socially prominent daughter of a former Mormon church president, labor radicals, activists and sympathizers including AFL President Samuel Gompers, the Swedish minister to the United States and even President Woodrow Wilson.

The Utah Supreme Court, however, refused to overturn the verdict and the Utah Board of Pardons refused to commute Hill's sentence. The board declared its willingness to hear testimony from the woman's husband in a closed session, but Hill refused to identify his alleged assailant, insisting that to do so would harm the reputation of the lady.

Hill became more famous in death than he had been in life. To Bill Haywood, the former president of the Western Federation of Miners and the best-known leader of the IWW, Hill wrote: "Goodbye Bill: I die like a true rebel. Don't waste any time mourning, organize! It is a hundred miles from here to Wyoming. Could you arrange to have my body hauled to the state line to be buried? I don't want to be found dead in Utah." Apparently he did die like a rebel. A member of the firing squad at his execution claimed that the command to "Fire!" had come from Hill himself.

After a brief service in Salt Lake City, Hill's body was sent to Chicago, where thousands of mourners heard Hill's "Rebel Girl" sung for the first time, listened to hours of speeches and then walked behind his casket to Graceland Cemetery, where the body was cremated and the ashes mailed to IWW locals in every state but Utah as well as to supporters in every inhabited continent on the globe. According to one of Hill's Wobbly-songwriter colleagues, Ralph Chaplin (who wrote the words to "Solidarity Forever," among other songs), all the envelopes were opened on May 1, 1916, and their contents scattered to the winds, in accordance with Hill's last wishes, expressed in a poem written on the eve of his death:

My body? Ah, if I could choose,
I would to ashes it reduce,
And let the merry breezes blow
My dust to where some fading flowers grow.

Perhaps some fading flowers then
Would come to life and bloom again.
This is my last and final will.
Good luck to you.



Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2010, 01:08:13 AM »
http://www.economicpopulist.org/content/exploitation-inc-david-rockefeller-and-adventures-global-finance
EXPLOITATION, INC.: David Rockefeller and Adventures in Global Finance
James Woolley , 08/08/2010

...
http://www.cobar.org/index.cfm/ID/581/dpwfp/Historical-Foreward-and-Bibliography/
Known, paradoxically, as the Progressive Era, the years between 1890 and 1914 were marked by a deepening gulf between the wealthy who owned and ran the giant corporations and the largely immigrant workers.  Believing it took all the risks, privileged ownership saw no reason for Business to share the wealth.  Labor, on the other hand, maintained that without workers there would be no wealth.  
...
Colorado Fuel and Iron Company (CF&I), based in Pueblo.  Founded in 1880 by John Osgood, CF&I produced 75 percent of Colorado’s coal by 1892.  It became the largest coal mining, iron ore mining, and steel manufacturing enterprise in the West, earning Pueblo the nickname “Pittsburgh of the West.”  

In 1903, CF&I was acquired by the Rockefeller corporate empire.    
...
Now the history of the Rockefeller empire is replete with murder and mayhem; after all, that is how John D. Rockefeller acquired his fortune: through fraud, deception, blowing up competitors’ refineries (those Rockefellers almost have a genetic predisposition against actual competition), murdering striking workers and a host of other atrocities.

Probably the very first historic drive-by shooting in America can be linked to the Rockefellers. When the miners went on strike at a Rockefeller-owned mining company at Ludlow, Colorado, earlier in the 20th century, it was Rockefeller-financed thugs who drove through the mining camp, spraying the miners’ tents and houses with gunfire. (Please see photo below.)


http://www.cobar.org/index.cfm/ID/581/dpwfp/Historical-Foreward-and-Bibliography/

The 1913 exodus of 12,232 coal miners and their families from every coal camp in the southern Colorado coal fields began what was to become one of this nation’s most important, long-lasting and violent strikes


Ludlow Ruins

Later, state militiamen would be brought in to randomly shoot at the camp from a nearby hilltop, officially killing 27 men, women and children.

This would later become known as the Ludlow Massacre. The unofficial number of fatalities was considerably higher as a number of the dead had been removed during nightfall by the Rockefeller thugs in order to keep that “official” body count low.

One seriously doubts it is simply a morbid coincidence that the street address of one of their companies, Rockit Solutions, is located at 333 Ludlow Street.

From their web site: …a wholly-owned subsidiary of Rockefeller & Co., Inc., provides the leading wealth data aggregation and reporting solution for single-family and multi-family offices, high net worth individuals and financial institutions.

Most egregiously, during and in the aftermath of those horrendous events members of the Rockefeller family were vocal in their support of that barbaric slaughter!

The Rockefellers have stridently promoted, both financially and politically, any and all wars and any other military ventures from which they would profit. (Chronic war mongers, war profiteers and death profiteers!)

During World War II and the Nazi occupation of France, almost every foreign-owned bank in Paris was shut down, save for the Chase bank.

They had replaced the American bank manager with a Swiss neutral, and thus were allowed to remain open, and turn over the depositor records to the Nazi command as later indicated in a 1945 U.S. Treasury Department report.

During the ‘50s and ‘60s, the Rockefeller family, spearheaded by David Rockefeller, and through their Chase Bank, heavily and successfully lobbied for and promoted the removal of tariffs and trade restrictions.

With their subsequent removal, the profits of the Rockefeller multinationals were greatly increased.

They also formed the Council of the Americas to promote legislation which would ultimately be known as N.A.F.T.A.

...

http://www.cobar.org/index.cfm/ID/581/dpwfp/Historical-Foreward-and-Bibliography/
...
One of the more unappreciated consequences of the Ludlow Massacre is its role in making public relations a priority for Big Business.  

Shortly after the Massacre, John D. Rockefeller hired Ivy L. Lee, publicist for the Pennsylvania Railroad, to mount a nation pro-management publicity campaign intended to rehabilitate his image.  Weekly bulletins entitled “Facts Concerning the Struggle in Colorado for Industrial Freedom” were circulated to a carefully prepared mailing list of congressmen, governors, editors, journalists, college presidents, professional leaders and ministers.  

Lee toured the Colorado coal fields to better understand the audience he needed to win over.  Rockefeller himself toured the coal fields in September, 1915.  Lee’s spin-doctoring, Rockefeller’s coal field visits and expanded post-Massacre philanthropic efforts transformed Rockefeller from the “most hated man in American” in 1915 to one of the most respected in 1920.  

Not only did Ludlow become a significant event in labor history, but it spurred the birth of professional corporate public relations.

Ludlow, Public Memory, and Official History
...
As to the folk history passed down from generation to generation, the history of Ludlow is pro-Union.  The Guard’s role in starting the shooting on April 20th is emphasized.  Over time, the number of atrocities against the colonists the day of the Massacre increases.  More casualties in the conflict are counted over time, suggesting, for example, that additional bodies were moved from Ludlow during the three days that elapsed between the Guard’s closing of the burned camp and the arrival of Red Cross relief workers.

The official history on the subject of labor struggles is largely silent, not so much because powerful interests dominate the writing of history, but because it is often a case of the struggle being subconsciously ignored.  The United States today tends to think of itself as a classless society.  Except for a few people who are very rich or very poor, we are all “middle-class.”  Cultural leaders in the United States, including those who produce and represent history, come from the ranks of middle-class professionals.  Thus, events that bear a resemblance to class warfare or even draw attention to the existence of classes do not easily square with America’s ideology of classlessness.



Nearly every newspaper and magazine in the country covered the story, with pro- and anti-company editorials run side-by-side.  The New York Times carried so much news that the index of articles for three months amounted to six pages in small print.  Rockefeller was scathingly censured in the press and demonized in the eyes of the American public by such prominent progressives as Upton Sinclair and John Reed.  Even The Wall Street Journal, after a wait of several days following the massacre, observed that a “reign of terror” existed in southern Colorado

Grim cartoons ran in both the mainstream press and socialist publications.  John Sloan’s cover drawing for The Masses showed a miner, a dead baby in his arms and dead wife at his feet, returning gunfire at Ludlow.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #5 on: September 06, 2010, 01:51:20 PM »
The Grange Movement

History of the Grange movement; or, The farmer's war against monopolies - Edward Winslow Martin - 1874

TO THE FARMERS OF THE UNITED STATES, THE STRONG-ARMED, TRUE-HEARTED HOPE OF THE REPUBLIC, NOW, AS IN THE PAST, THE FIRST TO RISE AGAINST OPPRESSION AND WRONG, THE AUTHOR DEDICATES THIS BOOK AS A TOKEN OF HIS SYMPATHY WITH THEM IN THEIR SUFFERINGS, AND HIS ADMIRATION OF THE HEROIC BATTLE THEY ARE WAGING FOR THE OPPRESSED OF THE WHOLE COUNTRY.
...

It has long been evident to earnest thinkers that the farmers of the United States are the most cruelly oppressed class of our community. In these pages the writer has sought to set forth these wrongs, and to plead the cause of the farmer, in the hope of awakening the general public to a realization of the case.

History of the Grange Movement: Or the Farmers' War Against Monopolies - By Edward W Martin

http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa;idno=AJC3502

History of the grange movement: or, The farmer's war against monopolies: being a full and authentic account of the struggles of the American farmers against the extortions of the railroad companies. With a history of the rise and progress of the order of Patrons of husbandry, its objects, present condition and prospects. To which is added sketches of the leading grangers./ By Edward Winslow Martin


http://www.lib.niu.edu/2000/ihy000228.html
Post-Civil War Agrarian Discontent and the Granger Movement
...
A national depression set in during 1873, heightening farmers' problems further. A sense of weariness and dreariness had already developed and by the time of this depression, it was ubiquitous. Farmers, weary of their continual problems, established socio-economic organizations.

One of them was the Grange. Oliver Kelley in Minnesota established the Grange officially known as the Patrons of Husbandry in 1867.

In 1868 the Grange movement spread to Illinois. Although the Grange's constitution prohibited political action, individual participation in third-party movements was not restrained. The Grange acted as a socio-economic group for farmers and their families, trying to help them in all possible ways. Grange meetings, often held in township halls, were a chance for men and women to get together and socialize.

In the Grange, farmers were able to organize against their main adversary, the railroads. Major railroads in Illinois were the root of farmers' problems, despite the fact that farmers had funded the major railroads in the 1850s.

The railroads often did not reveal critical information necessary to farmers, such as the amount of grain in storage. "Speculation was rampant, and attempts to corner the grain market were another source of rural discontent," according to historian Robert Howard. Speculative trading was the result.

Since the major railroads controlled the fourteen grain elevators in Chicago, they thought that such information could be kept secret. Railroads also cheated in weighing crops. During the depression, railroads cut back services, angering all. In addition to this, railroads often charged more per ton for short trips than for long ones. They also commonly favored important political officers, and allowed them to travel across the nation for little or almost nothing. It was the purpose of the many Granges in Illinois to rectify this predicament through legislation.

The Grange is revered as a railroad reformer, and it indeed deserved such a title. Probably one of the earliest victories in the Grange influence on the railroads occurred in 1870 when the Grange won a constitutional amendment that allowed state control over railroads.

In 1871 the state legislature fixed a constant rate for freight and passenger trains. The Grange also encouraged passage of the Granger Laws, a code of rules by which railroads had to abide.

Granger Laws regulated the charge for grain elevators and created the Illinois Railroad Commission. Angered by the Grange's active role in their affairs, major railroads sued the Grange in court, fighting them all the way to the United States Supreme Court.

The high court ruled in favor of the Grange in that case and several others. Though these victories in railroad regulation were landmark victories for the Grange, effective legislation of the railroads did not come until the early twentieth century.

After the 1870s the political influence of the Grange diminished, and it became a social club. Succeeding this decade, many Granges in Illinois collapsed due to bad management. Other farmer organizations formed in place of it, such as the National Farmers' Alliance.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Happy Labor Day... Made In China....
« Reply #6 on: September 06, 2010, 05:36:55 PM »

Offline Mr Grinch

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #7 on: September 06, 2010, 06:10:53 PM »
Webster Tarpley did a fairly comprehensive historical overview of the origin of labor day on his Saturday show, whether you agree with his conclusions or not his info is golden....

Sat hrs 1 and 2
http://archives2010.gcnlive.com/Archives2010/sep10/WorldCrisis/0904101.mp3

http://archives2010.gcnlive.com/Archives2010/sep10/WorldCrisis/0904102.mp3
The History Of Political Correctness or: Why have things gotten so crazy?

Common sense is not so common.

I do not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it.
Voltaire

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2010, 12:33:14 AM »
Webster Tarpley did a fairly comprehensive historical overview of the origin of labor day on his Saturday show, whether you agree with his conclusions or not his info is golden....

Sat hrs 1 and 2
http://archives2010.gcnlive.com/Archives2010/sep10/WorldCrisis/0904101.mp3

http://archives2010.gcnlive.com/Archives2010/sep10/WorldCrisis/0904102.mp3

Excellent and his info really rounds out this thread. However he didn't mention Rockefeller once! Oh well, he did covered alot of ground.

America is based on being reasonable, "the common good", a protective commonwealth. These modern feudalistic lords have been at war with this concept since the formation of the country.  With the leverage of capital, they hammer the citizen into a serf.


For example:  CONSTITUTION OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. Notice Corporations, Trusts, Foundations, Banks ARE NOT INDIVIDUALS . Yet we have a supreme court which is giving them  more than equal protection and treated as if they were living breathing immortals. "Free" markets without commonwealth results in a slave market.

http://www.mass.gov/legis/const.htm

PREAMBLE.

The end of the institution, maintenance, and administration of government, is to secure the existence of the body politic, to protect it, and to furnish the individuals who compose it with the power of enjoying in safety and tranquillity their natural rights, and the blessings of life: and whenever these great objects are not obtained, the people have a right to alter the government, and to take measures necessary for their safety, prosperity and happiness.

Notice the word, Prosperity
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day... Made In China....
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2010, 12:51:09 AM »
The problem with the picture is it shows the workers as being employed. It should show a blown out steel mill with the two guys out on the street bumming for change.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2011, 06:23:36 PM »
Bump for 2011 - Also AJ mentioned some of these strikes on his show this week...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline donnay

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2011, 06:25:57 PM »
Bump!  Excellent information!
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
"To be normal, to drink Coca-Cola and eat Kentucky Fried Chicken is to be in a conspiracy against yourself."
"People that don't want to make waves sit in stagnant waters."

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2012, 12:46:27 PM »
Bump for Labor Day 2012 and  the long term unemployed
.
http://www.shadowstats.com/alternate_data/unemployment-charts


The seasonally-adjusted SGS Alternate Unemployment Rate reflects current unemployment reporting methodology adjusted for SGS-estimated long-term discouraged workers, who were defined out of official existence in 1994. That estimate is added to the BLS estimate of U-6 unemployment, which includes short-term discouraged workers.
 
The U-3 unemployment rate is the monthly headline number. The U-6 unemployment rate is the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) broadest unemployment measure, including short-term discouraged and other marginally-attached workers as well as those forced to work part-time because they cannot find full-time employment.

| - - - -

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/07/06/the-long-term-unemployed-arent-going-away-but-their-benefits-are/
The long-term unemployed aren’t going away. But their benefits are.

http://money.cnn.com/2012/06/11/news/economy/long-term-unemployment/index.htm
NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- The national unemployment rate has fallen from its recession highs, but Americans who have been out of work for six months or more are still having trouble finding work.

The numbers are staggering. The ranks of the long-term unemployed swelled last month from 5.1 million to 5.4 million, and those individuals now account for 42.8% of the unemployed.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2012, 12:50:21 PM »
http://www.progress.org/2003/fold315.htm

Make Labor Day Real: Untax Wages!

by Fred E. Foldvary
The Progress Report
2003

In the United States, the holiday honoring workers is Labor Day, which falls on the first Monday in September. This year, 2003, Labor Day is September 1. Elsewhere in the world, May 1 is a common labor holiday.

Why is labor so celebrated, and why is labor not really honored? Why is labor feted in form, but little honored in substance? Why do those who decry the oppression of labor fail to advocate the reform that would best benefit labor?

Labor union leaders want legislation requiring workers in particular industries to be union members. They want the state to enforce picket lines and strikes. They seek laws mandating minimum wages, double pay for overtime work, pay for parental leave, and unemployment insurance. But the one law they do not call for is the abolition of taxes on wages.

Those who fancy themselves to be "progressive" complain about the flight of jobs to foreign countries. They criticize the government for high unemployment. They rally against sweatshop labor. They blame corporations for the exploitation of labor. But I never hear them call for the elimination of taxes on wages.

The single most important reform that labor would benefit from is to have wages free of all taxes. That includes not just income taxes on wages earned but also the taxation of wages when they are spent; value-added and sales taxes are just as much takings from wages as taxes on income. If you have to pay $10 to be in a room, it does not matter whether you have to pay the $10 when you enter or leave the room. The bottom line is that you have paid $10.

Governments all over the world tax labor heavily. It is as though labor were some kind of crime or evil that has to be punished. Taxing wages does not just reduce the take-home pay of the worker. Part of the cost is also borne by the employer. If the supply of labor were completely fixed and rigid, labor would bear all the tax. But in fact, with higher wages, more people want to work. So employers cannot arbitrarily lower the wage offer; they will not get enough labor if the wage they offer is too low. So some of the tax on labor is paid by employers as higher labor costs. They must offer somewhat higher wages to get the labor they need.

The cost of taxes on wages is shared by the employer and the employee. There is a tax wedge between the cost of labor to the employer and the net wage kept by the worker. Labor is made more expensive while workers have lower after-tax wages. With higher labor costs, there is less employment, less production, less investment, less growth, and more poverty.

The wage tax is the source of almost all the evil that befalls labor. The self-employed also must pay a wage tax. A self-employed worker implicitly pays himself a wage out of his profit, since if he were employed by another, he would earn that wage. The opportunity cost, the best wage foregone by not working for someone else, is the wage that a self-employed worker pays himself. Taxes on wages create a barrier to self-employment, reducing the options of workers who work for companies. It is easier for a boss to exploit labor if the workers cannot easily quit and be self-employed. Barriers to self-employment skew power to employers.

Besides the obvious, explicit taxes on wage, there are also hidden taxes that are substantial even if not apparent. Out of his wage the worker must pay rent for his dwelling. Land values and site rents get pumped up because the financing for public works come from wages rather than land rent. A worker-tenant gets implicitly taxed again when he pays a higher rental for his dwelling because his landlord is being subsidized in the form of higher land rent.

But that's not the end of it. The rent subsidy to landowners incites them to buy more land, and speculative demand adds to the user demand. Land prices get driven up so high the worker must live far from work in the urban fringes and then commute long distances. The worker is taxed again. We have taxed-again workers, taxed again and again and again.

Taxes on wages are not just bad economics. The wage tax is a moral evil. A worker has a moral right to his own body, time, skills, and life. If not, he is a slave. Therefore, a worker has a moral right to the products and earnings of his labor. The taxation of wages is therefore an evil theft of his labor.

The majority of the people in all countries are workers. The best policy for workers to elevate wages, reduce unemployment, increase worker security, and improve labor conditions is to eliminate taxes on wages. The ultimate resources are land and labor, so the ultimate tax is on land and labor. If taxes there must be, to untax labor, we must shift all taxation to land rent.

Why is it that we see unions and progressives demand more money wages from employers, but not the shift of taxes from wages to rent? Why is the wrath of labor directed to their employers and not to their government representatives who tax their wages away?

If taxation were shifted from wages to rent, there would be a loss of land value to the owners of the most valuable real estate, commercial and industrial land. To protect their interests, the landed interests indoctrinate the masses to think that the conflict is between labor and capital. They tuck land into capital and mask rent in profits and interest. Faced with high housing costs, people seek subsidies, which further pump up land values at the expense of wages.

But labor advocates can't see beyond the immediate appearances, the companies which hire workers. They don't look beyond treatments of effects. They can't be bothered to investigate ultimate causes.

If we want to be honest, we should change "Labor Day" to "Landowner Day," because labor policy benefits land owning instead of labor, and labor leaders do little to change this. Have a happy Landowner Day!
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Offline chris jones

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2012, 01:15:46 PM »
 Landowners day.
Geo:The wage tax is a moral evil. A worker has a moral right to his own body, time, skills, and life. If not, he is a slave. Therefore, a worker has a moral right to the products and earnings of his labor. The taxation of wages is therefore an evil theft of his labor.
Amen.
Any rights the working man have USA has been paid for in blood and guts.


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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #15 on: August 19, 2012, 03:31:00 PM »
Quote
Several popular songs have been written and recorded about the events at Ludlow. Among them is "Ludlow Massacre" by American folk singer Woody Guthrie, and "The Monument (Lest We Forget)" by Irish musician Andy Irvine

YouTube - Woody Guthrie - Ludlow Massacre

http://www.woodyguthrie.org/Lyrics/Ludlow_Massacre.htm
Ludlow Massacre
Words and Music by Woody Guthrie

It was early springtime when the strike was on,
They drove us miners out of doors,
Out from the houses that the Company owned,
We moved into tents up at old Ludlow.

I was worried bad about my children,
Soldiers guarding the railroad bridge,
Every once in a while a bullet would fly,
Kick up gravel under my feet.

We were so afraid you would kill our children,
We dug us a cave that was seven foot deep,
Carried our young ones and pregnant women
Down inside the cave to sleep.

That very night your soldiers waited,
Until all us miners were asleep,
You snuck around our little tent town,
Soaked our tents with your kerosene.

You struck a match and in the blaze that started,
You pulled the triggers of your gatling guns,
I made a run for the children but the fire wall stopped me.
Thirteen children died from your guns.

I carried my blanket to a wire fence corner,
Watched the fire till the blaze died down,
I helped some people drag their belongings,
While your bullets killed us all around.

I never will forget the look on the faces
Of the men and women that awful day,
When we stood around to preach their funerals,
And lay the corpses of the dead away.

We told the Colorado Governor to call the President,
Tell him to call off his National Guard,
But the National Guard belonged to the Governor,
So he didn't try so very hard.

Our women from Trinidad they hauled some potatoes,
Up to Walsenburg in a little cart,
They sold their potatoes and brought some guns back,
And they put a gun in every hand.

The state soldiers jumped us in a wire fence corners,
They did not know we had these guns,
And the Red-neck Miners mowed down these troopers,
You should have seen those poor boys run.

We took some cement and walled that cave up,
Where you killed these thirteen children inside,
I said, "God bless the Mine Workers' Union,"
And then I hung my head and cried.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
© Copyright 1958 (renewed) by Woody Guthrie Publications, Inc.

Woody Guthrie at 100

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #16 on: August 31, 2012, 12:26:30 PM »
http://abcnews.go.com/Business/labor-day-2012-biggest-layoff-announcements/story?id=17114901
Labor Day 2012: 8 Biggest Layoff Announcements
...
While many companies quietly and slowly reduce headcount, here are some of the biggest layoff announcements this year that crossed news headlines, according to Challenger, Gray and Christmas.
...

Hewlett Packard Co.
27,000 cuts


Technology company Hewlett-Packard announced in May that it expects "approximately 27,000 employees to exit the company, or 8.0 percent of its workforce, as of Oct. 31, 2011, by the end of fiscal year 2014."
 ...
American Airlines
10,000 cuts


American Airlines, which filed for bankruptcy in November, had initially announced in February that it would elimiate 13,000 positions in a restructuring process, but it has since narrowed those cuts to 10,000.
...

PepsiCo
8,700

...
Food and beverage company PepsiCo announced a number of strategic changes in February, such as increasing advertising by $500 to $600 million this year and reducing headcount by 8,700 across 30 countries. The reduction represents about 3 percent of its global workforce and less than 2 percent domestically.
...

Food Lion
4,900


In January grocer Food Lion, owned by Delhaize America, based in Salisbury, N.C., announced 4,900 employees were exiting the company, some related to the closure of 113 Food Lion stores. The company has about 74,000 total employees.
...

Procter & Gamble
3,000


Last year, consumer products company Procter & Gamble announced plans to reduce its global non-manufacturing enrollment by 10 percent, or about 5,700 roles, over two years ending June 30, 2013.
 
In February, the company said it planned to cut 1,600 jobs of the 5,700 by June. The company has reduced 3,000 roles to date, a company spokeswoman told ABC News
...

Old Country Buffet Inc. (Buffets Inc.)
3,000

 
In January, Buffets Inc., the owners of Old Country Buffett and HomeTown Buffet, said it was filing for bankruptcy and it planned to close 81 restaurants nationwide, which Challenger, Gray and Christmas estimates is leading to a cut of 3,000 positions
...

Albertsons (Nevada & California)
2,500

 
In June, grocer Albertsons announced it was laying off up to 2,500 workers in California and Nevada beginning that month.
...

Best Buy Co. Inc.
2,400

In July, electronics retailer Best Buy announced it was laying off 2,400 workers, including 600 Geek Squad (aka tech support) representatives
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #17 on: August 31, 2012, 01:31:15 PM »
I love this false left right  - Robert Reich - CFR - Tri-Lat - Rhodes Scholar telling us what we already know is wrong with labor in the US....

http://www.jeremiahproject.com/newworldorder/nworder06.html

The Council on Foregin Relations was founded on July 29, 1921 in New York City by Col. Edward Madell House, chief adviser to President Woodrow Wilson. The founders included many of those who had been at the signing of the Treaty of Versailles after World War I, including Colonel Edward House and Walter Lippmann.

Finances for the CFR came from the same players that set up the Federal Reserve System in America: J.P. Morgan; John D. Rockefeller; Bernard Baruch; Paul Warburg; Otto Kahn; and Jacob Schiff. Through its membership, meetings, and studies, it has been called the most powerful agent of United States foreign policy outside the State Department.

[ see also Chatham House - Royal institute of Foreiegn Affairs - RAII - Also JP Morgan handled Rothschilds  manipulation/banking in the US... ]
The CFR's Study No. 7, published November 25, 1959, openly declared its true purpose: "...building a New International Order [which] must be responsive to world aspirations for peace, [and] for social and economic change...an international order [code for world government]...including states labeling themselves as 'Socialist.'"

One could safely say that a nutshell descriptor of the CFR is "to bring about a New World Order through the manipulation of U.S. foreign policy and relations and through international economic interdependence."
....

Many of its own members admit the CFR goal is to subvert the democratic process. CFR member and Judge Advocate General of the US Navy Admiral Chester Ward writes "The main purpose of the (CFR) is promoting the disarmament of US sovereignty and national dependence and submergence into and all powerful, one world government.".
...

CFR Membership Roster

The roster of CFR members is thoroughly impressive - so are the power groups who have representatives in it. Its current membership, all 2905 of them, is like reading a "who's who" of the elite politicians, media, financiers, businessmen, and educators.

Nearly every U.S. President since its inception has been a CFR member including: George Bush, Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, Richard Nixon, John F. Kennedy, Dwight Eisenhower, and Herbert Hoover.
...

From the CFR comes 90% of the people in the State Department and key positions in the Executive Branch
...
Robert Reich: former Secretary of Labor (also TC and Rhodes scholar)
...

Dr. Carroll Quigley wrote in "Tragedy and Hope", "The chief problem of American political life …has been how to make the two Congressional parties more national and international. The argument that the two parties should represent opposed ideals and policies, one, perhaps, of the Right and the other of the Left, is a foolish idea acceptable only to doctrinaire and academic thinkers. Instead, the two parties should be almost identical, so that the American people can 'throw the rascals out' at any election without leading to any profound or extensive shifts in policy."
...
The CFR's Annual Report in 1974 says the project for the CFR in the '80's will be "The management of the International economy, global poverty, environment and the new "common"... the oceans, the seabeds, and space, and interstate violence, including arms control. What they are saying is "The management of your money, your land, your groceries, and your guns."
...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Vo5CZvD3-QM


Invisible Empire: A New World Order Defined


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-reich/inequality-us-economy_b_1846119.html
Labor Day 2012 and the Election of 2012: It's Inequality, Stupid - Robert Reich
Posted: 08/31/2012

The most troubling economic trend facing America this Labor Day weekend is the increasing concentration of income, wealth, and political power at the very top -- among a handful of extraordinarily wealthy people -- and the steady decline of the great American middle class.

Inequality in America is at record levels. The 400 richest Americans now have more wealth than the bottom 150 million of us put together.

Republicans claim the rich are job creators. Nothing could be further from the truth. In order to create jobs, businesses need customers. But the rich spend only a small fraction of what they earn. They park most of it wherever around the world they can get the highest return.

The real job creators are the vast middle class, whose spending drives the economy and creates jobs.

But as the middle class's share of total income continues to drop, it cannot spend as much as before. Nor can most Americans borrow as they did before the crash of 2008 -- borrowing that temporarily masked their declining purchasing power.

As a result, businesses are reluctant to hire. This is the main reason why the recovery has been so anemic.

As wealth and income rise to the top, moreover, so does political power. The rich are able to entrench themselves by lowering their taxes, gaining special tax breaks (such as the "carried interest" loophole allowing private equity and hedge fund managers to treat their incomes as capital gains), and ensuring a steady flow of corporate welfare to their businesses (special breaks for oil and gas, big agriculture, big insurance, Big Pharma, and, of course, Wall Street).

http://www.newswithviews.com/Monteith/stanley116.htm
THE SECRET CABAL
PART 17
By Dr. Stanley Monteith
June 29, 2011
NewsWithViews.com

...
Robert Reich understands the current power structure of the U.S. because he was a Rhodes Scholar. He is a member of the CFR, and he was Secretary of Labor during the Clinton Administration. Robert Reich's January 7, 1999, article in USA Today states:

"The dirty little secret is that both houses of Congress have become irrelevant . . . in case you hadn't noticed, America's domestic policy is now being run by Alan Greenspan and the Federal Reserve Board. . . Congress is out of the loop. Every so often, some senators or house members politely ask Greenspan to visit and talk about the economy . . . Then he goes back down to the Fed and runs the country. . . . America's foreign policy is being run by the IMF (Int'l Monetary Fund) . . . and when the president decides to go to war, he no longer needs a declaration of war from Congress."[11]

I believe Robert Reich is correct. The FED is a privately owned central bank. They set the interest rate, they regulate the money supply, they control the U.S. economy, and they precipitated the current economic turmoil. How does the BOD control the federal government? They fund "cooperative politicians," and reward them when they retire.
...

http://politicalvelcraft.org/2012/02/08/where-is-americas-money-going-to-the-top-1-who-is-the-top-1-democrat-robert-reich-admits-money-is-being-funneled-out-of-the-usa/
Robert Reich Admits Money Is Being Funneled Out Of The USA To The World’s Richest 1%
February 8, 2012 by Volubrjotr
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=hpSdKZm1D2A
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #18 on: August 31, 2012, 07:00:21 PM »
Robert Reich Admits Money Is Being Funneled Out Of The USA To The World’s Richest 1%

Thanks in part to Wall Street puppet, Barack Obama.

-------------------------------

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=16488

Obama's Big Sellout
The president has packed his economic team with Wall Street insiders

by Matt Taibbi



Global Research, December 10, 2009
Rolling Stone - 2009-12-09

The president has packed his economic team with Wall Street insiders intent on turning the bailout into an all-out giveaway

Barack Obama ran for president as a man of the people, standing up to Wall Street as the global economy melted down in that fateful fall of 2008. He pushed a tax plan to soak the rich, ripped NAFTA for hurting the middle class and tore into John McCain for supporting a bankruptcy bill that sided with wealthy bankers "at the expense of hardworking Americans."

Obama may not have run to the left of Samuel Gompers or Cesar Chavez, but it's not like you saw him on the campaign trail flanked by bankers from Citigroup and Goldman Sachs. What inspired supporters who pushed him to his historic win was the sense that a genuine outsider was finally breaking into an exclusive club, that walls were being torn down, that things were, for lack of a better or more specific term, changing.

Then he got elected.

What's taken place in the year since Obama won the presidency has turned out to be one of the most dramatic political about-faces in our history. Elected in the midst of a crushing economic crisis brought on by a decade of orgiastic deregulation and unchecked greed, Obama had a clear mandate to rein in Wall Street and remake the entire structure of the American economy.

What he did instead was ship even his most marginally progressive campaign advisers off to various bureaucratic Siberias, while packing the key economic positions in his White House with the very people who caused the crisis in the first place. This new team of bubble-fattened ex-bankers and laissez-faire intellectuals then proceeded to sell us all out, instituting a massive, trickle-up bailout and systematically gutting regulatory reform from the inside.

[Continued…]

-------------------------------

Yet Reich continues to openly shill for Obama. That means he's knowingly deceiving the very economically disenfranchised people he pretends to care so much about.

A professional Judas goat, if ever there was one.
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
http://www.monetary.org
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=203330.0

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #19 on: September 07, 2012, 06:25:29 PM »


http://www.pineconearchive.com/120907-1.html
Eastwood says his convention appearance was 'mission accomplished'
By PAUL MILLER
Published: September 7, 2012

AFTER A week as topic No. 1 in American politics, former Carmel Mayor Clint Eastwood said the outpouring of criticism from left-wing reporters and liberal politicians after his appearance at the Republican National Convention last Thursday night, followed by an avalanche of support on Twitter and in the blogosphere, is all the proof anybody needs that his 12-minute discourse achieved exactly what he intended it to.

“President Obama is the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people,” Eastwood told The Pine Cone this week. “Romney and Ryan would do a much better job running the country, and that’s what everybody needs to know. I may have irritated a lot of the lefties, but I was aiming for people in the middle.”

Breaking his silence

For five days after he thrilled or horrified the nation by talking to an empty chair representing Obama on the night Mitt Romney accepted the Republican nomination for president, Eastwood remained silent while pundits and critics debated whether his remarks, and the rambling way he made them, had helped or hurt Romney’s chances of winning in November.

But in a wide-ranging interview with The Pine Cone Tuesday from his home in Pebble Beach, he said he had conveyed the messages he wanted to convey, and that the spontaneous nature of his presentation was intentional, too.

“I had three points I wanted to make,” Eastwood said. “That not everybody in Hollywood is on the left, that Obama has broken a lot of the promises he made when he took office, and that the people should feel free to get rid of any politician who’s not doing a good job. But I didn’t make up my mind exactly what I was going to say until I said it.”

Eastwood’s appearance at the convention came after a personal request from Romney in August, soon after Eastwood endorsed the former Massachusetts governor at a fundraiser in Sun Valley, Idaho. But it was finalized only in the last week before the convention, along with an agreement to build suspense by keeping it secret until the last moment.

Meanwhile, Romney’s campaign aides asked for details about what Eastwood would say to the convention.

“They vet most of the people, but I told them, ‘You can’t do that with me, because I don’t know what I’m going to say,’” Eastwood recalled.

...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #20 on: September 02, 2013, 01:26:16 PM »
bump for history...

BookTV - 2013 Eagle Forum Collegians Summit: Greg Autry, "Death by China: Confronting the Dragon - A Global Call to Action"
Greg Autry
About the Program

From the 20th annual Eagle Forum Collegians Summit, Greg Autry discusses his book, Death by China: Confronting the Dragon - A Global Call to Action.  
The program is hosted by the Heritage Foundation in Washington, D.C.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #21 on: September 02, 2013, 02:45:14 PM »
Record 88,921,000 Americans ‘not in labor force’

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/08/28/Labor-Participation-Rate-Hits-34-Year-Low
Labor Participation Rate Hits 34-Year Low
by Wynton Hall  29 Aug 2013, 7:28 AM PDT

The percentage of Americans who have a job or are looking for one, known as the labor force participation rate (LFPR), has plunged to a 34-year low, according to a new report from staffing company Express Employment Professionals.


...
"Following the Great Recession, we've entered into the Great Shift," says Express Employment Professionals CEO Bob Funk, who previously served as chairman of the Kansas City Federal Reserve Bank. "This is a period defined by the Boomer retirement, Millennial frustration, and growing reliance on government programs. All indicators suggest this shift is not sustainable."

The New York Times reported on the study and suggested that "another cause [of the Great Shift] may be the rise in the number of workers on disability."

A record 8,733,461 people now receive disability benefits, a figure greater than the population of New York City.

Today, nearly 90 million Americans are no longer in the labor force.

http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/27/explaining-the-labor-force-dropouts/?ref=us&_r=1&
http://nation.foxnews.com/2013/08/15/study-more-americans-disability-live-nyc
http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.a.htm

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http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2013-09-01/news/bs-md-ci-labor-day-20130901_1_minimum-wage-baltimore-teachers-union-labor-day
Congregations focus on living wages as part of Labor Day initiative
Robert Wideman, a maintenance mechanic at McDonalds Corp.,… (Patrick T. Fallon / Getty…)
September 01, 2013|By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun



Robert Wideman, a maintenance mechanic at McDonalds Corp., shines the shoes of a Ronald McDonald statue outside of a restaurant while protesting with fast-food workers and supporters organized by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Thursday, Aug. 29, 2013. Fast-food workers in 50 U.S. cities plan to walk off the job today, ratcheting up pressure on the industry to raise wages and demanding the right to wages of $15 an hour, more than double the federal minimum of $7.25.

An immigrant Ivory Coast worker told a West Baltimore church congregation Sunday what it's like to make $11.50 an hour washing dishes at a food concession at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport — and struggle to make ends meet.

"I try to do the best to raise my son," said Dezi Kodiane, a Cherry Hill resident who was a guest speaker at Metropolitan United Methodist Church in Lafayette Square. He appeared as part of an effort by Interfaith Worker Justice of Maryland to connect low wage workers with religious congregations.


http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-ticker/mcdonald-share-billions-profits-fast-food-workers-labor-134659802.html


McDonald’s Should Share Billions in Profits With Fast Food Workers: Labor Organizer..
By Bernice Napach | Daily Ticker – Thu, Aug 29, 2013 9:46 AM EDT

When 250,000 people marched on the National Mall 50 years ago they demanded among other things a hike in the minimum wage from $1.25 to $2 an hour. Today thousands of fast food workers are holding a one-day strike in cities across the country, demanding a wage of $15 an hour. That's equivalent to the $2 an hour protestors called for in 1963, after adjusting for inflation.

Organizers report that workers have walked off their jobs in 60 U.S. cities today, including New York City where 500 striking workers took over a McDonald's at 5th Avenue near 34th Street, and the Empire State Building.

In addition to a $15-an-hour wage, protestors want the right to form a union without intimidation or retaliation from their employer.

...

http://www.ideastream.org/news/feature/bank-of-america-announces-huge-layoff-in-northeast-ohio
Bank of America Announces 1000+ Layoffs in Northeast Ohio
Thursday, August 29, 2013 at 5:35 PM

On the eve of the Labor Day weekend, Bank of America has notified about 1000 workers in Beachwood they'll be losing their jobs at the end of October. ideastream's Bill Rice reports.
 
A Bank of America spokesperson says many of the employees at its Beachwood call center were hired to handle the huge volume of mortgage delinquencies that peaked in 2011 - a result of the mortgage crisis that ushered in the Great Recession.  Many others others were needed to field the increased inquiries into refinancing that stemmed from historically low interest rates.  Now the rates are going back up, and delinquencies are only a third of what they were at the peak

Ned Hill, an economist at Cleveland State University, says the layoffs are certainly disappointing but not totally unexpected. 

Hill:  “The banking industry right now is going through contraction because of its inability to earn revenue.  They’re really paying attention to costs.  Call centers in particular are being consolidated all over the country.”
...


http://www.sfgate.com/business/bottomline/article/A-brutal-Labor-Day-for-some-ex-Nummi-workers-4780318.php
A brutal Labor Day for some ex-Nummi workers
Andrew S. Ross
Updated 9:18 am, Monday, September 2, 2013

At her last job, which lasted for 18 years, Deborah Arroyo never had to work on Labor Day. She had full-time regular shifts, good pay - $30 an hour - health insurance, union protection.

Now Arroyo would be only too happy to be working on the labor holiday created by Congress and President Grover Cleveland in 1894. Having searched fruitlessly for re-employment for the past 3 1/2 years, she'd snap up a job without the benefits and pay she was accustomed to.

Her savings are gone, as is her 18-year marriage to a co-worker who was also laid off, and she relies on her adult children to help pay the bills. "I'm way, way in debt," she said. Arroyo is one of the 4,700 workers who lost their jobs when New United Motor Manufacturing Inc. closed its doors in Fremont in March 2010. Thousands more working for the plant's suppliers were thrown on the unemployment rolls, and numerous suppliers went out of business. All told 25,000 mostly Bay Area residents are estimated to have been impacted by the closure.

Like millions of other Americans, thousands of ex-Nummi workers have yet to find a place in the very different, post-recession economy. "It used to be a worker's world. Now it's an employer's world," said Teresa Rodriguez, an employment recruiter who has counseled several hundred ex-Nummi employees, explaining the difficulties they face.
...
Those fortunate enough to find work are making considerably less than they used to - an average of $19.70 per hour, which is not bad by today's standards. Some - managers, electricians or those with a college education - are making more. Many are making way below $19.70 an hour, judging by a list of filled jobs in a July report from the investment board - drivers, sales workers, janitors, stock clerks. It's hard to imagine that those who didn't enroll have done much better.

http://www.theday.com/article/20130826/BIZ02/130829733/1069
Blumenthal explores ‘ripple effect’ in Norwich of Electric Boat layoffs
By Lee Howard 
Publication: theday.com
Published 08/26/2013 12:00 AM

Norwich — U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal said Monday that the Navy’s decision to scrap repair work on two nuclear submarines is only a “temporary blip” as the shipyard gears up for the manufacture of new a class of missile-firing subs.

His comments came as he toured a local metal-fabrication plant with ties to Electric Boat.

EB expects to lay off up to 500 shipyard employees over the next few months, according to the union that represents the workers. The layoffs were largely related to the federal government’s decision to forgo repairs on the badly damaged USS Miami and to have the submarine USS Springfield repaired by workers from the Portsmouth Navy Shipyard in Kittery, Maine, who will do the work at the Naval Submarine Base in Groton.

Blumenthal, D-Conn., visited Collins & Jewell Co. in the Norwich Industrial Park to call attention to what he termed the “ripple effect” of Navy decisions to take work from EB. While EB gets most of the attention when lost opportunities result in layoffs, he said, many small manufacturers such as Collins & Jewell also feel the effects
...

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/jobless-claims-edge-still-point-123212667.html
Gauge of U.S. layoffs falls to pre-recession level
Reuters – Thu, Aug 8, 2013 10:28 AM EDT.
By Jason Lange

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A gauge of the trend in layoffs of American workers fell last week to its lowest since before the 2007-09 recession, a hopeful sign for the U.S. economy.

The four-week average of new claims for state jobless benefits dropped to 335,500, the Labor Department said on Thursday. The reading has not been that low since November 2007, just before the United States fell into a calamitous recession.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline madasheck

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #22 on: September 02, 2013, 05:15:50 PM »
Bump-I want to be able to find this easily again.
Clamabat ille miser se civem esse Romanum...cum imploraret saepius usurparetque nomen civitatis, crux-crux, inquam-infelici et aerumnoso, qui numquam istam pestem viderat, comparabatur. ~Cicero, Verrine Orations

Offline OpenSight

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2013, 08:29:12 PM »
Wow. A veritable plethora of information. Thanks for the history lesson.

Based on what I see here, it seems to me that Labor Day should actually be called Labor UNION Day. Which begs the question, (and I'm sure it's an old debate), do Labor Unions truly protect workers from unfair labor practices (ie. against the "evil corporate robber barons"), or are they merely an extension of the Progressive, Socialist arm of the New World Order?

How can they justify their outspoken message of merely "exercising their constitutional rights of free speech and to peaceably assemble", while simultaneously requiring membership as a prerequisite for employment in specific occupations.

Never been a union guy, and just curious. Anyone with insight, please help me out here.
Reality is real, existence exists.

Offline Freebird100

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #24 on: September 03, 2013, 06:26:50 AM »
Wow. A veritable plethora of information. Thanks for the history lesson.

Based on what I see here, it seems to me that Labor Day should actually be called Labor UNION Day. Which begs the question, (and I'm sure it's an old debate), do Labor Unions truly protect workers from unfair labor practices (ie. against the "evil corporate robber barons"), or are they merely an extension of the Progressive, Socialist arm of the New World Order?

How can they justify their outspoken message of merely "exercising their constitutional rights of free speech and to peaceably assemble", while simultaneously requiring membership as a prerequisite for employment in specific occupations.

Never been a union guy, and just curious. Anyone with insight, please help me out here.
Maybe you'd be happier with the way things were 100 years ago?
"The two enemies of the people are criminals and government, so let us tie the second down with the chains of the Constitution so the second will not become the legalized version of the first."

Thomas Jefferson

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2014, 10:57:56 AM »
bump for the American Success story of un-employment ...

http://robotswillstealyourjob.tumblr.com/post/48210312400/robots-are-taking-our-jobs-and-we-will-take-their
Robots Are Taking Our Jobs, And We Will Take Their Money


US labor participation is at its lowest since 1979.

The greatest puzzle and challenge in our current economy is how stocks and profits have soared to record highs while jobs continue to sputter. US labor participation is at its lowest level in over three decades, and shrinking. Even for Americans at the peak working ages of 25-54, we’re down to levels not seen since 1984, before women finished entering the workforce. Our employment-to-population ratio is also near three-decade lows. Nearly four years into the official recovery, labor participation continues to drop, a development never seen since statistics began. A new chapter of our economy is opening up that is the greatest story of our labor force since women started working outside the home. Yet this story, the story of why employment today is different than it used to be, is largely going untold.



Corporate profits are surging exponentially, despite — or due to — falling employment. Outsourcing used to get the blame for job loss. But outsourcing, to quote GE’s CEO, is"yesterday’s model." Today’s model for reducing labor costs is automation. The clearest sign could be Chinese mega-factory Foxconn replacing its Chinese workers with one million robots. While I’m an optimist about technology, it’s important to recognize that automation is replacing middle-class workers, and those workers are taking pay cuts, part-time work and skill downgrades, rather than moving upward as we saw in the industrial revolution.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #26 on: August 30, 2014, 06:25:40 PM »
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ann-brenoff/labor-day-employment_b_5697875.html

7 Reasons Why I'm Not Celebrating This Labor Day
 Ann Brenoff Senior Writer, The Huffington Post
 Posted:  08/28/2014 8:14 am EDT


You know how some people get a case of the blues around the winter holidays? Well, I feel that way around Labor Day

...

Here's what being laid off taught me and why I think many mid-lifers may still not be celebrating this Labor Day:

Job security is just a myth.
When I entered the work force, you had a job for life. Sure, you made moves to advance your career but that was generally accomplished by staying within the same company. When people retired at 65, the company threw big parties for them and gave them gold watches to thank them for their 40+ years of service. Loyalty to your company was a given and the company rewarded that loyalty with annual raises, end-of-year-bonuses and even turkeys at Thanksgiving. One of the tasks of the personnel office was to send flowers to your wife in the hospital after she gave birth.

That all ended in the years leading up to the recession. As companies focused more on the bottom line, they began to refer to workers as "assets" and when times got tough, they looked at which "assets" to cut. "Do more with less," "Get rid of the fat," and "leaner and meaner" were the propaganda slogans that sent chills down workers' spines.

Older workers quickly read the writing on the wall: Those with higher salaries were led into the gas chambers first while corporate lawyers dangled "don't sue us if you hope to get a dime in severance" agreements in front of our stunned faces.

We signed. All of us did. I still question how this coerced agreement signed under duress was legal and not protested. Why didn't the ACLU jump in to protect workers from the slaughter? But everyone who could have done something about it instead turned deaf, dumb, and blind.

And the result is that what we are now left with is a workplace culture riddled with insecurity and restlessness. When people are afraid of losing their jobs, they strive to be compliant, not creative. Toeing the line has replaced pushing the envelope. And company loyalty went the way of the Thanksgiving turkey -- killed, roasted, and gobbled up while CEOs belched all the way to the bank.

Older workers stay out-of-work the longest.
 This has been long-documented, but we can regurgitate it here for the millennial disbelievers.

According to AARP's analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics, on average, workers age 55 and up remain unemployed for 45.6 weeks, compared with 34.7 weeks for workers younger than 55.

Sara Rix, senior strategic policy adviser with AARP's Public Policy Institute, notes that recent research says many of these unemployed people "will never become re-employed."

While we can safely claim that all generations were hurt by the recession, only one group has the least amount of time to mitigate the recession's financial impact -- and that group is older workers. If you lost your job in the mid-2000's, you likely also lost your nest egg. And you can't actually rebuild it unless you find a job, which isn't happening for many. Time is running out.

Age discrimination is real.
 Certain stereotypes exist about older workers -- we can't keep up technologically, we will spend all day reminiscing about the good old days, we don't fit in to the current office culture.

These stereotypes are at the root of the discrimination. I'd also throw in the fact that employers want to hire the cheapest workers possible, and that's less experienced folks.

But even the Washington Post is guilty of age discrimination. In an ad seeking a social media manager, the paper said it was looking for someone with the "ability to explain to those twice your age what Reddit or Snapchat or Whisper or Fark is." I can explain those things to you and I'm 64. And then there was the Seattle Star, which ran an ad saying it was seeking someone "young." The publisher was unapologetic when it was suggested that this was discrimination against older people. "So sue me. Sheesh," he said. Can you imagine the outrage if he had written "white" for "young?"

Older unemployed workers have gone underground, and in doing so, have become invisible.
 Older workers are the infrastructure of the so-called gig economy. They jump from one freelance and/or part-time job to the next. They work under contracts that don't pay them when they get sick or offer them health insurance. Vacations? They are on their own.

Having been part of this group for two years, I salute these people. They are a creative lot who have figured out how to stay afloat, if only barely. They get their teeth fixed using Groupon coupons, they shop at thrift stores for their kids' back-to-school clothes, and they make quilts to sell on Etsy to keep the lights turned on. Some have taken in rent-paying roommates to help cover the mortgage. They barter and exchange services; some times in a pinch, they ask for money. But somehow, each month, they find a way.

What's truly unfortunate is that we've stopped counting them as unemployed. If they don't collect unemployment benefits, they don't exist -- even though we all know dozens of people in this situation. This is why "unemployment" stats for older workers are lower than the national numbers.

Just don't kid yourself: There will come a day when each and every one of these workers will no longer be able to exist on this tightrope. They are already calling it the silver tsunami and it's headed toward taxpayers.

"Get retrained" is easier said than done.
 No one is arguing that today's jobs don't require a different skills set than jobs of old. But have you seen a lot of retraining programs underway in your city? Me neither. Community colleges have borne the brunt of older workers trying to learn new tricks.

My standard advice to every out-of-work mid-lifer is this: Go into healthcare. With the population aging and the need for health services growing, it would seem like a natural place to be.

The question no one has a good answer for is: What do you live on while you are busy getting retrained? It's not like we can push the pause button on our living expenses while we figure things out. And forget government help. The government has offered very little in the way of retraining programs, let alone figured out how to help people stay afloat while they are being retrained.

Which leaves the old turning our hobbies into businesses. While many midlifers try their hand at entrepreneurial ventures, the wash-out rate is high. Entrepreneur magazine reports that first-time entrepreneurs have only an 18 percent chance of succeeding in taking their companies public. Bottom line: Just because you like to cook, it doesn't mean you should open a restaurant.

Experience is worth less, if not altogether worthless.
 I remember when I was looking for my first job and every place I applied wanted someone with experience. We've come a full 180 on this. Experience -- probably because it comes with a higher price tag -- is less desirable a qualification. Experience won't get you far in today's jobs market.

The big news this year is that Google, AT&T, and MetLife and about 250 other employers signed a pledge to "recognize the value of experienced workers." I'm still left stammering that these major employers needed a pledge to actually do this.

Older workers tend to bomb interviews.
This, of course, assumes you even get an interview. But ask anyone over 50 who has had one what it's like and the stories all start to sound the same. "The guy asked me a question and then just kept texting away while I was answering." "I wore a great 'interview' outfit and he wore jeans; it was awkward." "It was like we were speaking different languages."

Times have changed in the personnel office. Not only aren't they sending anyone flowers in the hospital, they are also checking out your digital footprint -- googling you, reading your LinkedIn profile, checking what you posted on social media sites. The guy may be texting while you are speaking, but just remember that older workers aren't the only ones who have taken a beating in the past decade: Manners may have too.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #27 on: September 01, 2014, 12:20:14 PM »
a couple of interesting articles ... Interesting the Atlantic recounts how the public and former labor force has laid dog like a dying dog. Interesting how there are no fights over immigration lowering wages , I guess the dumbing down and floride in the water worked. Wage slavery is alive and well in America:

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/09/when-labor-day-meant-something/379307/
When Labor Day Meant Something

Remembering the radical past of a day now devoted to picnics and back-to-school sales
Chad BroughtonSep 1 2014, 7:25 AM ET

Labor Day online specials at Walmart this year “celebrate hard work with big savings.” For brick-and-mortar shoppers near my home in Chicago, several Walmart stores are open all 24 hours of Labor Day. Remember, this is a company so famously anti-union that it shut down a Canadian store rather than countenance the union its workers had just voted in. The fact that Walmart “celebrates” Labor Day should draw laughter, derision, or at least a few eye-rolls.

But it doesn’t—or at least not many. Somewhere along the line, Labor Day lost its meaning. Today the holiday stands for little more than the end of summer and the start of school, weekend-long sales, and maybe a barbecue or parade. It is no longer political. Many politicians and commentators do their best to avoid any mention of organized labor when observing the holiday, maybe giving an obligatory nod to that abstract entity, “the American Worker.”

Labor Day, though, was meant to honor not just the individual worker, but what workers accomplish together through activism and organizing. Indeed, Labor Day in the 1880s, its first decade, was in many cities more like a general strike—often with the waving red flag of socialism and radical speakers critiquing capitalism—than a leisurely day off. So to really talk about this holiday, we have to talk about those-which-must-not-be-named: unions and the labor movement.

The labor movement fought for fair wages and to improve working conditions, as is well known, but it was its political efforts that did nothing less than transform American society. Organized labor was critical in the fight against child labor and for the eight-hour workday and the New Deal, which gave us Social Security and unemployment insurance. Union workers sacrificed in America’s historic production effort in World War II and pushed for Great Society legislation in the 1960s.

....


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History of the two Labor days: May and September

http://www.popularresistance.org/the-true-story-of-labor-day-debunking-the-myth/
The True Story Of Labor Day: Debunking The Myth
By Eugene E. Ruyle, www.peaceandfreedom.org
August 31st, 2014

Author’s note: these remarks were put together from various sources. A longer article with citations is available on request from the author at cuyleruyle – at – mac.com.

Labor Day and May Day: Two Workers’ Holidays

As we enter the Labor Day weekend, many on the left will repeat the myth that Labor Day has no historical significance and is simply a “gift” from capitalist politicians to break up the international solidarity of American workers by providing an alternative to May Day. For many years, I accepted this myth, even while marching with my union comrades in the annual Labor Day Parades in Wilmington, California. Then I learned that the first Labor Day was in 1882, four years BEFORE Haymarket and eight years BEFORE the first international May Day in 1890. How, then, could it have originated as an alternative to May Day? A little historical research revealed a much different, and more complex.
...
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #28 on: September 06, 2015, 03:12:57 PM »
bump for another sad UN-labor day ... another yearly win for the NWO

http://www.truthrevolt.org/news/labor-day-jobs-report-record-number-out-work-force
Labor Day Jobs Report: Record Number Out of Work Force
9.4.2015

The Obama economy continues its record-breaking streak. The latest Bureau of Labor Statistics jobs report found that 94,031,000 Americans are now out of the labor force, a new high.

According to BLS' August report, the number of Americans out of the labor force increased by 261,000 since July, from 93.77 million out in July to 94. 03 million in August.

The labor force participation rate in August held steady at just under 63 percent, where it has roughly been all year. That number is a 38-year low, as CNS News notes.

The rising number of those out of the labor force is in part attributable to retiring baby-boomers  [ ie FORCED OUT for early retirement! ] , but another troubling trend is a lower percentage of younger workers entering the workforce.

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also see:

http://cis.org/all-employment-growth-since-2000-went-to-immigrants
All Employment Growth Since 2000 Went to Immigrants
Number of U.S.-born not working grew by 17 million
By Karen Zeigler, Steven A. Camarota  June 2014

Government data show that since 2000 all of the net gain in the number of working-age (16 to 65) people holding a job has gone to immigrants (legal and illegal). This is remarkable given that native-born Americans accounted for two-thirds of the growth in the total working-age population. Though there has been some recovery from the Great Recession, there were still fewer working-age natives holding a job in the first quarter of 2014 than in 2000, while the number of immigrants with a job was 5.7 million above the 2000 level.

All of the net increase in employment went to immigrants in the last 14 years partly because, even before the Great Recession, immigrants were gaining a disproportionate share of jobs relative to their share of population growth. In addition, natives' losses were somewhat greater during the recession and immigrants have recovered more quickly from it. With 58 million working-age natives not working, the Schumer-Rubio bill (S.744) and similar House measures that would substantially increase the number of foreign workers allowed in the country seem out of touch with the realities of the U.S. labor market.

Three conclusions can be drawn from this analysis:

•First, the long-term decline in the employment for natives across age and education levels is a clear indication that there is no general labor shortage, which is a primary justification for the large increases in immigration (skilled and unskilled) in the Schumer-Rubio bill and similar House proposals.

•Second, the decline in work among the native-born over the last 14 years of high immigration is consistent with research showing that immigration reduces employment for natives.

•Third, the trends since 2000 challenge the argument that immigration on balance increases job opportunities for natives. Over 17 million immigrants arrived in the country in the last 14 years, yet native employment has deteriorated significantly.

Among the findings:
The total number of working-age (16 to 65) immigrants (legal and illegal) holding a job increased 5.7 million from the first quarter of 2000 to the first quarter of 2014, while declining 127,000 for natives.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Happy Labor Day... Made In China....
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2016, 11:41:36 AM »
bump
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #30 on: September 02, 2016, 11:57:34 AM »
http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/susan-jones/
94,391,000 Not In Labor Force; Labor Force Participation Stuck at 62.8%
By Susan Jones | September 2, 2016 | 8:43 AM EDT

(CNSNews.com) - Following Thursday's report of manufacturing weakness, the Obama administration on Friday released the August employment numbers, showing little or no improvement from the prior month.

94,391,000 Americans were not in the labor force in August, 58,000 more than July's 94,333,000; and the labor force participation rate was stuck at 62.8 percent, just where it was in July, the Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Friday.

It was one year ago, in September 2015, that the labor force participation rate dropped to 62.4 percent, its lowest point since 1977.
(The best it’s been since Barack Obama took office is 65.8 percent in February 2009, the month after Obama was sworn in amid a recession.)

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http://www.bls.gov/opub/btn/volume-4/people-who-are-not-in-the-labor-force-why-arent-they-working.htm
People who are not in the labor force: why aren't they working?
By Steven F. Hipple

People who are neither working nor looking for work are counted as “not in the labor force,” according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Since 2000, the percentage of people in this group has increased. Data from the Current Population Survey (CPS) and its Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) provide some insight into why people are not in the labor force.

The ASEC is conducted in the months of February through April and includes questions about work and other activities in the previous calendar year. For example, data collected in 2015 are for the 2014 calendar year, and data collected in 2005 are for the 2004 calendar year.1 In the ASEC, people who did not work at all in the previous year are asked to give the main reason they did not work.

Interviewers categorize survey participants’ verbatim responses into the following categories:
1 ill health or disabled; retired;
2 home responsibilities; going to school; could not find work;
3 and other reasons.
...

In 2014, 87.4 million people 16 years and older neither worked nor looked for work at any time during the year. (See table 1.)

Of this group, 38.5 million people reported retirement as the main reason for not working


[ well most people who are currently unemployable due to the economy and long term unemployed, are just going to say they are retired ! It's just too embarrassing to say anything else ...
. [/color]

About 16.3 million people were ill or had a disability, and 16.0 million were attending school.

Another 13.5 million people cited home responsibilities as the main reason for not working in 2014, and 3.1 million individuals gave “other reasons.”
...
 The percentage not in the labor force also rose for both men and women 25 to 54 years, and nearly all reasons cited recorded an increase.

Typical bs from the govt. :
This Beyond the Numbers article was prepared by Steven F. Hipple, Economist in the Office of Employment and Unemployment Statistics, Email:hipple.steve@bls.gov, Telephone: (202) 691-6344.

Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #31 on: September 02, 2016, 06:53:57 PM »
http://jtslegal.com/dont-get-caught-with-a-prostitute-this-labor-day-weekend/
   

Don’t Get Caught with a Prostitute This Labor Day Weekend

Posted by Law Office of Justin T. Surginer


As Labor Day approaches, many people will plan parties with friends to relax and enjoy the holiday. For some, the weekend might include drinking, cookouts and outdoor activities. All of these things are fine as long as they remain within the scope of the law.

As with any celebration or party, it’s sometimes easy to let things get out of hand. Someone might have one too many drinks and begin to suffer a lack of judgment. In an inebriated state, they might make choices that they wouldn’t otherwise consider. This is why it’s important to plan ahead to avoid any legal consequences and to keep the Labor Day weekend safe and free of trouble.

Solicitation Is a Crime

Don't Get Caught with a Prostitute This Labor Day Weekend

When someone is caught up in a party atmosphere, they may want to push their celebration to a new level by hiring a prostitute. This is a bad idea for several important reasons
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Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #32 on: September 03, 2016, 09:51:50 AM »
President Kennedy's last Labor Day Address ....

http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ws/?pid=9386
339 - Labor Day Statement by the President.
September 2, 1963

ON THIS Labor Day of 1963--the third within the period of my administration-this Nation once again salutes the role of labor in our national life.

The history of the United States is in vital respects the history of labor. Free men and women, working for a better life for themselves and their children, settled a continent, built a society, and created and diffused an abundance hitherto unknown to history. Free men and women, affirming their dignity as individuals and asserting their rights as human beings, developed a philosophy of democratic liberty which holds out hope for oppressed peoples across the world. In commemorating the role of labor, we honor the most essential traditions in American life.

We honor too the contributions of labor to the strength and safety of our Nation. America's capacity for leadership in the world depends on the character of our society at home; and, in a turbulent and uncertain world, our leadership would falter unless our domestic society is robust and progressive. The labor movement in the United States has made an indispensable contribution both to the vigor of our democracy and to the advancement of the ideals of freedom around the earth.

We can take satisfaction on this Labor Day in the health and energy of our national society. The events of this year have shown a quickening of democratic spirit and vitality among our people. We can take satisfaction too in the continued steady gain in living standards. The Nation's income, output, and employment have reached new heights. More than 70 million men and women are working in our factories, on our farms, and in our shops and services. The average factory wage is at an all-time high of more than $100 a week. Prices have remained relatively stable, so the larger paycheck means a real increase in purchasing power for the average American family.

Yet our achievements, notable as they are, must not distract us from the things we have yet to achieve. If satisfaction with the status quo had been the American way, we would still be 13 small colonies straggling along the Atlantic coast. I urge all Americans, on this Labor Day, to consider what we can do as individuals and as a nation to move speedily ahead on four major fronts.

First, we must accelerate our effort against unemployment and for the expansion of jobs and opportunity. In spite of our prevailing prosperity, 4 1/2 million of our fellow citizens cannot find useful employment. While automation increases productivity and output, it also renders jobs and skills obsolete. While new industries emerge, old industries decline. While most of the country shows a high degree of economic activity, some areas have failed to share in the general recovery. And, while our economy continues to grow, it must grow even faster in the future if it is to provide for the 2 1/2 million new persons entering the labor market every year. To combat unemployment, we need to pass the tax bill recently approved by the House Ways and Means Committee and thereby provide general stimulus to the economy. This bill will benefit every family, every business, and every area of our country. We need, in addition, to continue and enlarge the measures designed to help the communities, industries, and individuals bypassed by prosperity to help themselves and to increase their contributions to our society.

Second, we must accelerate our effort to strengthen our educational system. As our economy becomes increasingly complex, education becomes increasingly the key to employment. The fewer grades our boys and girls complete, the greater the probability that they will not find jobs. Inadequate schooling, inadequate training, inadequate skills--these are major obstacles to employment and a fruitful life. Dropping out of school today may well destroy a person's entire future. I hope that the Congress will enact legislation to strengthen the Nation's educational system; and I ask all parents, for the sake of the future, their children's and the Nation's to have their children return to school this fall.

Third, we must accelerate our effort to offer constructive opportunities to our young people. Our youth are our national future. Today one out of every four persons in the labor force between 16 and 21 is out of school and out of work. The persistence of unemployment and of juvenile delinquency is a sign of our society's failure to enlist the full energy and talent of our young men and women in positive tasks and purposes. The Youth Conservation Corps and the Home Town Youth Corps seem to me especially promising ways of improving both the skills of our young people and their contribution to the general welfare.

Fourth, we must accelerate our effort to achieve equal rights for all our citizens--in employment, in education, and voting, and in all sectors of our national activity. This year, I believe, will go down as one of the turning points in the history of American labor. Foremost among the rights of labor is the right to equality of opportunity; and these recent months, 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, have seen the decisive recognition by the major part of our society that all our citizens are entitled to full membership in the national community. The gains of 1963 will never be reversed. They lay a solid foundation for the progress we must continue to make in the months and years to come. We can take satisfaction on this Labor Day that 1963 marks a long step forward toward assuring all Americans the opportunities for life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness pledged by our forefathers in the Declaration of Independence.

As we make progress in these four areas, we make progress toward improving both the strength of our national society and the quality of our national life. We demonstrate to the world that a free society provides men and women the best chance for decent and fulfilled lives. Most of all, we demonstrate to ourselves that our society is vital, that our purpose is steadfast, and that our determination to fulfill the promise of American life for all Americans is unconquerable. Let this be our solemn resolve on Labor Day 1963.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2016, 12:36:51 PM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fy-uhxiXcE
Ronald Reagan Advertisement: "It's Morning Again in America"
Published on Nov 15, 2012

The Ronald Reagan Collection http://www.reagan-paintings.com
It's morning again in America. Today more men and women will go to work than ever before in our country's history. With interest rates at about half the record highs of 1980, nearly 2,000 families today will buy new homes, more than at any time in the past four years. This afternoon 6,500 young men and women will be married, and with inflation at less than half of what it was just four years ago, they can look forward with confidence to the future. It's morning again in America, and under the leadership of President Reagan, our country is prouder and stronger and better. Why would we ever want to return to where we were less than four short years ago?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morning_in_America
"Prouder, Stronger, Better", commonly referred to by the name "Morning in America", is a 1984 political campaign television commercial, known for its opening line, "It's morning again in America." The ad was part of the U.S. presidential campaign of Republican Party candidate Ronald Reagan.

 It featured a montage of images of Americans going to work, and a calm, optimistic narration that suggested the improvements to the U.S. economy since his 1980 election were due to Reagan's policies.

It asked voters why they would want to return to the pre-Reagan policies of Democrats like his opponent Walter Mondale, who had served as the Vice President under Reagan's immediate predecessor Jimmy Carter.

The phrase "It's morning again in America" is used both as a literal statement (people are shown going to work as they would in the morning), and as a metaphor for renewal.

http://tangsirisatian-reagan.blogspot.com/2010/02/election.html

1980 - Reagan wanted change! "Government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem." His campaign issues included: lower taxes, decreased in the federal spending to help rebuild the economy. He promised to produce more domestic energy sources, and increase pay and benefits to the military to encourage military service. His solution to defeating communism was to strengthen America’s relationship with its allies. He also promised to stop the discrimination against women.

Reagan’s chance of becoming president was very high, since his main opponent Jimmy Carter was known as one of the most ineffective president. Reagan’s chance came during the national televised debate when he stated: If America was better 4 years ago, then they should choose Carter, but if America wanted change, then they should choose him. This became his campaign, “Are you better off than you were 4 years ago?” The people of America wanted change and it became obvious who was going to win this election.



1984 - Reagan ran again with the campaign slogan “It’s Morning Again in America”. This time he faced no opposition aside from Walter Mondale. He easily won this election in a landslide with a popular vote of 54.4 million votes and 525 electoral votes versus Mondale's 13 electoral votes and a popular vote of 37.5 million.
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eVecpn3DUHc
Ronald Reagan We Are Americans
Published on May 26, 2013

How we miss Ronald Reagan...
Check out the new book "Impeachable Offenses" by Aaron Klein about our current unpatriotic president Mr. BH Obama

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P3hY1eagq88
Reagan Warned Us About Obama
Uploaded on May 22, 2011

How Reagan summed up Obama in the first 5 minutes of a speech over 40 years ago.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

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Re: Happy Labor Day - The History of Labor Day the First Monday in September
« Reply #34 on: September 03, 2017, 01:47:36 PM »
bump ... 2017
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5