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Author Topic: How to PERMANENTLY Delete your Facebook Account  (Read 24886 times)
Satyagraha
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« on: August 05, 2010, 03:12:35 AM »

I posted this in another thread, but it may be useful for anyone who wishes to remove their 'node' in the network-centric-warfare database, and try to maintain some semblance of privacy. Your facebook account is not even CLOSE to privacy protection - it's your personal billboard in Times Square with all of your information. 

Remember, the NWO's definition of "privacy" is that you're only allowed to keep some of your information private. Privacy is now defined as what the NWO thinks it should be (e.g, whatever the hell they want to keep private will be private, or not.) There IS NO PRIVACY when you are part of Facebook. Period.

So to delete it....

To permanently delete your Facebook account, and any database files with your information, go to this website:

http://www.mydigitallife.info/2010/05/19/how-to-remove-and-delete-facebook-account-and-profile-permanently/

It's important to note that "Deactivate my account" will NOT remove your information. To clear out your personal information you must use the procedure outlined at the link above.



And ALSO, don't go to facebook for the 14-day period before your account is actually DELETED --- because logging in, or responding to someone else's facebook account message, or adding a friend, or being added as a friend will REACTIVATE your account automatically.

They don't want you to delete your account, so you have to be careful to avoid that sticky spiders silk floating out there waiting to reel you back into the fold. 

Report: Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Doesn’t Believe In Privacy

By Eliot Van Buskirk  April 28, 2010  |  1:47 pm  |  Categories: People, Social Media



http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/04/report-facebook-ceo-mark-zuckerberg-doesnt-believe-in-privacy/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wired%2Findex+%28Wired%3A+Index+3+%28Top+Stories+2%29%29&utm_content=Google+Feedfetcher

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appears to have been outed as not caring one whit about your privacy — a jarring admission, considering how much of our personal data Facebook owns, not to mention its plans to become the web’s central repository for our preferences and predilections.

Also interesting is how this came about: Not in a proper article, but in a tweet by Nick Bilton, lead technology blogger for the The New York Times‘ Bits Blog, based on a conversation he says was “off the record” and which he may have confused with “not for attribution.”

“Off record chat w/ Facebook employee,” begins Bilton’s fateful tweet. “Me: How does Zuck feel about privacy? Response: [laughter] He doesn’t believe in it.”

Ouch.

Zuckerberg’s apparent disregard for your privacy is probably not reason enough to delete your Facebook account. But we wouldn’t recommend posting anything there that you wouldn’t want marketers, legal authorities, governments (or your mother) to see, especially as Facebook continues to push more and more of users’ information public and even into the hands of other companies, leaving the onus on users to figure out its Rubik’s Cube-esque privacy controls.

Facebook has been on a relentless request over the past six months to become the center of identity and connections online. The site unilaterally decided last December that much of a user’s profile information, including the names of all their friends and the things they were “fans” of, would be public information — no exceptions or opt-outs allowed.

Zuckerberg defended the change — largely intended to keep up with the publicness of Twitter, saying that people’s notions of privacy were changing. He took no responsibility for being the one to drag many Facebook users into the net’s public sphere.

Then last week at its f8 conference, Facebook announced it was sending user profile information in bulk to companies like Yelp, Pandora and Microsoft. Thus, when users show up at those sites while logged in to Facebook, they see personalized versions of the those services (unless the user opts out of each site, somewhere deep in the bowels of Facebook’s privacy control center). On Tuesday, four Senators asked the company to only push data to third-parties if users agree to it, a so-called “opt-in” that social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and Google Buzz eschew since it radically cuts down on participation and thus revenues.

Facebook is also pushing a “Like” button, which lets sites put little Facebook buttons on anything from blog entries to T-shirts in web stores.

Clicking that button sends that information to Facebook, which publishes it as part of what it calls the Open Graph, linking your identity to things you choose online. That information, in turn, is shared with whatever sites Facebook chooses to share it with — and to the sites you’ve allowed to access your profile.

It’s an ambitious attempt to rewrite the web as a socially linked network. But many see Facebook’s move as trying to colonize the rest of the web, and keep all this valuable information in its data silos, in order to become a force on the web that rivals Google.

So it’s no laughing matter that the head of Facebook appears not to care about privacy. (We asked Facebook to clarify Zuckerberg’s privacy stance but have yet to hear back.)

For his part, Bilton fired off a number of salvos defending his understanding of the the ground rules which governed the conversation he had. “‘Off record’ means there is no attribution to who it is but conversation can be used in story. ‘On background’ means I can not repeat it,” wrote Bilton. He took over the Times‘ technology blog in the last few months, after a long stint working with its technology-development team.

Unfortunately, he’s wrong about the definitions.

“‘Off the record’ restricts the reporter from using the information the source is about to deliver,” reads NYU’s Journalism Handbook, in one definition of the phrase. “If the reporter can confirm the information with another source who doesn’t insist on speaking off the record (whether that means he agreed to talking on the record, on background, or not for attribution), he can publish it.” “On background” usually means that information can be used, but can’t be attributed to a specific person.

Bilton later responded to our request for clarification, saying, “My source said it was OK to quote them, just not say who they are.” So apparently, this Facebook employee wanted this information to get out, for whatever reason.

Now, the die has been cast: The world knows that a Facebook employee thinks his CEO “doesn’t believe in” privacy, which should scare the bejesus out of anyone with a Facebook account — and that encompasses just about everyone reading this now.

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~ Thomas Paine, A Dissertation on the First Principles of Government, 1795
feeditup
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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2010, 03:40:08 AM »

Thanks for the info . But why not use there own tool agenst them most people have over 100 friends just blow your facebook up with a video a day even if you get one friend to look at it . thats one more person that might wake up . And one should not fear there traking that is what they want you to do  LIVE IN FEAR . ONE SHOULD NOT FEAR ANY MAN NOR HIDE FROM THEM . and do you realy think they wont find you even if you run.  But yes deleting your facebook might be a good idea its bin on my mind for about 5 mounths and atlest i know how to do it now . Thanks man
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Satyagraha
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« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2010, 03:47:03 AM »

Thanks for the info . But why not use there own tool agenst them most people have over 100 friends just blow your facebook up with a video a day even if you get one friend to look at it . thats one more person that might wake up . And one should not fear there traking that is what they want you to do  LIVE IN FEAR . ONE SHOULD NOT FEAR ANY MAN NOR HIDE FROM THEM . and do you realy think they wont find you even if you run.  But yes deleting your facebook might be a good idea its bin on my mind for about 5 mounths and atlest i know how to do it now . Thanks man

You certainly can use Facebook to post videos to try to wake people up -- Alex Jones has a facebook account for that purpose. It's up to you - and certainly one way you can 'use their tools against them'. The important thing is that people are aware of the fact that your personal account information is not private; and will not be kept private - so if they don't like that aspect of it, it's ok to delete your account.

Protecting your privacy is not "running away". It's common sense.
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"He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself."

~ Thomas Paine, A Dissertation on the First Principles of Government, 1795
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« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2010, 06:14:00 AM »

You certainly don't have to use your real info either.  For that matter don't.  Create an extra email account to use in hotmail and only put out there info you don't mind having out there.  I post daily videos, multiple times a day.  I just had a cousin of mine go, "Chemtrails? Huh?...I should watch the news more ofteh, eh?" 
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Letsbereal
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« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2010, 06:17:23 AM »

I do nothing with facebook but only use it to log on certain sites (If you wonna download a PDF from Scribd for example) or comment on certain websites.
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« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2010, 07:41:47 AM »

Pilikia,

Thanks for the information...I just scrubbed my account.   Cool
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« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2010, 08:07:59 AM »

Am I glad I never joined FacerecognitionBook.  Grin
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« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2010, 12:19:39 PM »

Good info!
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Don't believe me. Look it up yourself!

The Great Deception - Forum/Library - My Research
http://z4.invisionfree.com/The_Great_Deception/index.php?showforum=110
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« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2010, 12:25:48 PM »

But why not use there own tool agenst them
or, everybody starts 10 fake facebook pages and feeds the beast inaccurate info. Whatll the NSA algorithms tell em after that mess?...nothin.
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« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2010, 12:27:47 PM »

I would have to say i made my facebook just for the movement. I would hope others do the same  Wink
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« Reply #10 on: August 06, 2010, 06:56:19 PM »

ITS MORE IMPORTANT TO PUT YOUR FACE BOOK INFORMATION BACK ONLINE WITH FAKE DATA MAKING IT HARDER TO DETERMINE ASPECTS OF YOU... AKA SAY YOU LIKE COOKING AND BACKSTREET BOYS AND WEIRD NONSENSICAL STUFF
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Satyagraha
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« Reply #11 on: August 06, 2010, 10:43:52 PM »

ITS MORE IMPORTANT TO PUT YOUR FACE BOOK INFORMATION BACK ONLINE WITH FAKE DATA MAKING IT HARDER TO DETERMINE ASPECTS OF YOU... AKA SAY YOU LIKE COOKING AND BACKSTREET BOYS AND WEIRD NONSENSICAL STUFF

Except for the fact that it will be cross-referenced in the database with your extremely high rate of 'take-out' food purchases and those Megadeth downloads you bought on iTunes. Wink
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"He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself."

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« Reply #12 on: August 07, 2010, 12:37:27 AM »

Except for the fact that it will be cross-referenced in the database with your extremely high rate of 'take-out' food purchases and those Megadeth downloads you bought on iTunes. Wink

indeed. our internet activity is tracked via IP/MAC address. The NWO gathers just as much info from forums like this, as it does from social networking sites. The social networking sites just make data mining "easier" for the NWO.....because the user enters all his personal data and creates activity on the account.
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Satyagraha
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« Reply #13 on: August 07, 2010, 07:02:28 AM »

indeed. our internet activity is tracked via IP/MAC address. The NWO gathers just as much info from forums like this, as it does from social networking sites. The social networking sites just make data mining "easier" for the NWO.....because the user enters all his personal data and creates activity on the account.

The social network sites do the work of 'connecting the dots'. Your aunt Irma, your old school friend Bill, your fellow patriots, your 'guild' members from World of Warcraft - all are conveniently drawn together in your network 'node' automatically via the social networking sites. These are extremely important dots to connect for "total information awareness" - and will help to formulate your predicted behavior when presented with different 'events'. They are primarily concerned with PREDICTING behavior. That's the key to knowing when and how to implement social changes, because it will allow them to prepare beforehand for any possible resistance.

IARPA plans new supersmart computer for Total Information Awareness

The New Thought Police:
The NSA Wants to Know How You Think—
Maybe Even What You Think
by James Bamford

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/spyfactory/police.html


The National Security Agency (NSA) is developing a tool that George Orwell's Thought Police might have found useful: an artificial intelligence system designed to gain insight into what people are thinking.

With the entire Internet and thousands of databases for a brain, the device will be able to respond almost instantaneously to complex questions posed by intelligence analysts. As more and more data is collected—through phone calls, credit card receipts, social networks like Facebook and MySpace, GPS tracks, cell phone geolocation, Internet searches, Amazon book purchases, even E-Z Pass toll records—it may one day be possible to know not just where people are and what they are doing, but what and how they think.

The system is so potentially intrusive that at least one researcher has quit, citing concerns over the dangers in placing such a powerful weapon in the hands of a top-secret agency with little accountability.

Getting Aquaint

Known as Aquaint, which stands for "Advanced QUestion Answering for INTelligence," the project was run for many years by John Prange, an NSA scientist at the Advanced Research and Development Activity. Headquartered in Room 12A69 in the NSA's Research and Engineering Building at 1 National Business Park, ARDA was set up by the agency to serve as a sort of intelligence community DARPA, the place where former Reagan national security advisor John Poindexter's infamous Total Information Awareness project was born. [Editor's note: TIA was a short-lived project founded in 2002 to apply information technology to counter terrorist and other threats to national security.] Later named the Disruptive Technology Office, ARDA has now morphed into the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA).

A sort of national laboratory for eavesdropping and other spycraft, IARPA will move into its new 120,000-square-foot home in 2009. The building will be part of the new M Square Research Park in College Park, Maryland. A mammoth two million-square-foot, 128-acre complex, it is operated in collaboration with the University of Maryland. "Their budget is classified, but I understand it's very well funded," said Brian Darmody, the University of Maryland's assistant vice president of research and economic development, referring to IARPA. "They'll be in their own building here, and they're going to grow. Their mission is expanding."

If IARPA is the spy world's DARPA, Aquaint may be the reincarnation of Poindexter's TIA. After a briefing by NSA Director Michael Hayden, Vice President Dick Cheney, and CIA Director George Tenet of some of the NSA's data mining programs in July 2003, Senator Jay Rockefeller IV, the vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, wrote a concerned letter to Cheney. "As I reflected on the meeting today," he said, "John Poindexter's TIA project sprung to mind, exacerbating my concern regarding the direction the administration is moving with regard to security, technology, and surveillance."
Building "Hal"

The original goal of Aquaint, which dates back to the 1990s, was simply to develop a sophisticated method of picking the right needles out of a vast haystack of information and coming up with the answer to a question. As with TIA, many universities were invited to contribute brainpower to the project. But in the aftermath of the attacks on 9/11, with the creation of the NSA's secret warrantless eavesdropping program and the buildup of massive databases, the project began taking on a more urgent tone.

"Think of 2001: A Space Odyssey and the most memorable character, HAL 9000. We are building HAL."

In a 2004 pilot project, a mass of data was gathered from news stories taken from the New York Times, the AP news wire, and the English portion of the Chinese Xinhua news wire covering 1998 to 2000. Then, 13 U.S. military intelligence analysts searched the data and came up with a number of scenarios based on the material. Finally, using those scenarios, an NSA analyst developed 50 topics, and in each of those topics created a series of questions for Aquaint's computerized brain to answer. "Will the Japanese use force to defend the Senkakus?" was one. "What types of disputes or conflict between the PLA [People's Liberation Army] and Hong Kong residents have been reported?" was another. And "Who were the participants in this spy ring, and how are they related to each other?" was a third. Since then, the NSA has attempted to build both on the complexity of the system—more essay-like answers rather than yes or no—and on attacking greater volumes of data.

"The technology behaves like a robot, understanding and answering complex questions," said a former Aquaint researcher. "Think of 2001: A Space Odyssey and the most memorable character, HAL 9000, having a conversation with David. We are essentially building this system. We are building HAL." A naturalized U.S. citizen who received her Ph.D. from Columbia, the researcher worked on the program for several years but eventually left due to moral concerns. "The system can answer the question, 'What does X think about Y?'" she said. "Working for the government is great, but I don't like looking into other people's secrets. I am interested in helping people and helping physicians and patients for the quality of people's lives." The researcher now focuses on developing similar search techniques for the medical community.
Thought policeman

A supersmart search engine, capable of answering complex questions such as "What were the major issues in the last 10 presidential elections?" would be very useful for the public. But that same capability in the hands of an agency like the NSA—absolutely secret, often above the law, resistant to oversight, and with access to petabytes of private information about Americans—could be a privacy and civil liberties nightmare. "We must not forget that the ultimate goal is to transfer research results into operational use," said Aquaint project leader John Prange, in charge of information exploitation for IARPA.

Once up and running, the database of old newspapers could quickly be expanded to include an inland sea of personal information scooped up by the agency's warrantless data suction hoses. Unregulated, they could ask it to determine which Americans might likely pose a security risk—or have sympathies toward a particular cause, such as the antiwar movement, as was done during the 1960s and 1970s. The Aquaint robospy might then base its decision on the type of books a person purchased online, or chat room talk, or websites visited—or a similar combination of data. Such a system would have an enormous chilling effect on everyone's everyday activities—what will the Aquaint computer think if I buy this book, or go to that website, or make this comment? Will I be suspected of being a terrorist or a spy or a subversive?
Controlling brain waves

Collecting information, however, has always been far less of a problem for the NSA than understanding it, and that means knowing the language. To expand its linguistic capabilities, the agency established another new organization, the Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL), and housed it in a building near IARPA at the M Square Research Park. But far from simply learning the meaning of foreign words, CASL, like Aquaint, attempts to find ways to get into someone's mind and understand what he or she is thinking.

One area of study is to attempt to determine if people are lying simply by watching their behavior and listening to them speak. According to one CASL document, "Many deception cues are difficult to identify, particularly when they are subtle, such as changes in verb tense or extremely brief facial expressions. CASL researchers are studying these cues in detail with advanced measurement and statistical analysis techniques in order to recommend ways to identify deceptive cue combinations."

Like something out of a B-grade sci-fi movie, CASL is even training employees to control their own brain waves.

Another area of focus explores the "growing need to work with foreign text that is incomplete," such as partly deciphered messages or a corrupted hard drive or the intercept of only one side of a conversation. The center is thus attempting to find ways to prod the agency's cipher-brains to fill in the missing blanks. "In response," says the report, "CASL's cognitive neuroscience team has been studying the cognitive basis of working memory's capacity for filling in incomplete areas of text. They have made significant headway in this research by using a powerful high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) machine acquired in 2006." The effort is apparently directed at discovering what parts of the brain are used when very good cryptanalysts are able to guess correctly the missing words and phrases in a message.

Like something out of a B-grade sci-fi movie, CASL is even trying to turn dull minds into creative geniuses by training employees to control their own brain waves: "The cognitive neuroscience team has also been researching divergent thinking: creative, innovative and flexible thinking valuable for language work. They are exploring ways to improve divergent thinking using the EEG and neurobiological feedback. A change in brain-wave activity is believed to be critical for generating creative ideas, so the team trains its subjects to change their brain-wave activity."   


The National Security Agency's eavesdropping on phone calls, e-mails, and other communications skyrocketed after 9/11. But that was only the beginning of its high-tech invasiveness, as Bamford reports. Above, NSA headquarters in Fort Meade, Maryland.



James Bamford is the author of three books on the National Security Agency, including the 2008 The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA From 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America, from which this article was adapted with kind permission of Doubleday. Bamford coproduced, with Scott Willis, NOVA's "The Spy Factory," which was based on this book.


WATCH THE MOVIE 'THE SPY FACTORY' - http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article21902.htm

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"He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself."

~ Thomas Paine, A Dissertation on the First Principles of Government, 1795
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« Reply #14 on: August 07, 2010, 10:53:19 AM »


Don't beleive it.


The only way to really delete a facebook account takes a few years.


1) start changing information
2) upload blurry outdated photos or photos of a different person
3) blur the line between who you are and a fake person
4) stop using it
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Satyagraha
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« Reply #15 on: December 18, 2010, 05:50:09 AM »

Don't beleive it.


The only way to really delete a facebook account takes a few years.


1) start changing information
2) upload blurry outdated photos or photos of a different person
3) blur the line between who you are and a fake person
4) stop using it



So you are telling people that they CAN'T get out of Facebook unless they continue to stay in Facebook, adding 'disinfo' to the site. Well, ok... but the first step to getting out of it is to STOP using it, and delete your account. Or are you saying that you should keep it there, but just stop using it?

If you delete your account, you will have stopped using it. Or am I missing something here?

Keeping your facebook account is like submitting voluntarily to body scans: only this one gives them even more info they can't 'see' in the scanned biometric data they get with xrays... it's much better than that. Your account gives them your contacts - your 'friends' and family.. a much richer database of information.

Why do you suppose every damned false flag 'lone' gunman has a very recently opened facebook page? It has become one of the 'checklist' items for setting up a patsy!

That's enough to show you that even your 'disinfo' can be used against you - why give them more data?
True or false; it's all going to be part of your profile.

Whatever way works best for you - as long as you just stop feeding the beast.
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"He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself."

~ Thomas Paine, A Dissertation on the First Principles of Government, 1795
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« Reply #16 on: December 18, 2010, 06:08:02 AM »

Take a look at this: do you think Facebook is keeping your information away from people who offer database analysis services? Think again. You're feeding their profiling database.

Only one week of a Facebook page is not enough time for our advanced deep blue machines to catch these people before they act out and become threats to society. Real time profiling with no limits can guarantee that the exact specific bizarro chain of events will never happen again. Even though there was no harm to the public other than the terrorism still conducted by the MSM, "NO LIMIT" profiling must be implemented ASAP before any of the implementers get indicted for sedition, fraud against the people of the US, treason, crimes against humanity, etc.



Data Profiling with No Limits
http://www.x88.com/product/x88_pandora_data_profiling_and_discovery.shtml

X88 Pandora takes data profiling & discovery to another level with none of the limitations of existing products. It pro-actively profiles 100% of the data for total accuracy with blistering performance and scalability, providing unlimited speed-of-thought analysis of both data and metadata.

There is no wait time, no need to run profiles or create queries, just instant access with no impact to operational systems. It provides the true content, structure, quality and relationships of your enterprise data in a single, integrated and consolidated view.

Pandora reverse-engineers everything from the data itself, never rejecting data and ensuring total accuracy. Utilising 64-bit technology, it scales linearly across multiple processor cores to give an ultra high speed performance in data profiling and discovery that has never before been experienced.
 
Power and Simplicity
All this power comes with true simplicity. The user interface was designed by practitioners to provide the most streamlined and intuitive navigation possible. Users require no technical skills at all and can be up to speed and productive in one day. Pandora is zero administration providing a low impact solution. Even installation is simple - just tell Pandora how much memory and disk space to use, and it figures everything else out for itself. There is no configuration, schema definition or administration and it is totally self maintaining.

It supports up to 2 billion tables, each with up to 2 billion rows per table, works with all international character sets and runs on commodity hardware.

Pandora allows colleagues to work collaboratively in a secure, role-based environment, and keeps a history of all activity, allowing users to log on and immediately pick up their work where they left off.
The X88 Pandora User Interface
Column Profiling
Pandora profiles data automatically at point of load, deriving the true content, quality and meaning of every data item, producing an extensive set of over 170 statistics automatically per column such as:-
Frequency distribution of column values, formats and phonetic patterns
Unique value, format and phonetic counts
Actual and most prevalent data types
Smallest, largest, least common, most common values and formats
Shortest, average and longest value length
Numeric scale & precision
Sum, average, variance & standard deviation
Null and blank counts

Pandora automatically standardises values to a common business interpretation whilst also retaining the original variants. If a column contains, for example, mixed alpha-numeric and integer values, Pandora will calculate statistics per data type too, so you could view the column as a whole, from an alpha-numeric view point or from an integer view point.

You can interactively click on any statistic to view related information. Pandora provides interactive drill down to the data associated with every statistic instantly, regardless of volumes, thanks to the revolutionary way that it stores information. A few mouse clicks are sufficient to interactively filter, sort, count and sum any data, metadata or profile. Unexpectedly frequent values or formats across multiple columns are highlighted using statistical analysis of values, formats and lengths in the Outliers Report.

Pandora automatically calculates structural and phonetic patterns, and provides unique distributions of these as Frequency Analysis views at column, table and even enterprise level. This includes information such as the value, its frequency, its format pattern and any phonetic patterns as well as unique information such as the count of columns that this value appears in throughout the whole enterprise, and how many times it appears in the entire database (overall database occurrences). Each column can also have documented expectations, which may be manually configured or automatically derived from, for example, existing database catalogues or Data Definition Language. These are automatically compared against profiling results and any inconsistencies are highlighted accordingly.

Example documented expectations are:
Expected data type
Expected length
Expected format pattern
Expected value range
Expected scale & precision
Expected nullability
Expected uniqueness (i.e 100% for a single column key)
At a click of a button, Pandora will also produce exportable quality reports.
Example Column Metadata
Profiling Column Values
Profiling Column Formats
Profiling Column Phonetics
Reporting

Pandora provides a number of reports for automatically assessing imported data, such as the Table Quality Report, Relationship Report and Outliers Report. Users can collaboratively extend business knowledge about the data by creating notes attached to any item in the repository, including attaching related views of data. All of this information can be exported as a composite report.

Pandora supports a number of export formats including web pages, allowing knowledge and data to be viewed by users outside of Pandora.

Apart from the data manipulation capabilities, Pandora also provides the ability to change the presentation of data views by setting colours, type-faces, widths, custom formatting and much more - to provide a bespoke appearance to output data.

Example Table Quality Report

Example Relationship Report

Dependency & Key discovery
Discovering multi-column keys and dependencies between columns in a table has always been an Achilles heel for products of this nature as traditional techniques can take hours or even days for small samples, resulting in highly misleading results. Pandora uses a revolutionary and unique approach to discovering dependencies and keys of any quality using the entire dataset in less time than existing products can analyse a small sample.

Dependencies and keys can be discovered incrementally and additively at differing quality levels, and the user can drill down to both valid and invalid detailed results, and then further drill down to the actual rows that are in error. Critical dependencies can be named, and saved as part of the repository.

Users can also simply define keys or dependencies to be checked individually, which is an extremely fast operation on 100% volume of the data. No other product can come close to the accuracy and performance of Pandora for this type of analysis.
Dependency Discovery
Relationship discovery


Pandora automatically and incrementally relates the enterprise together simply by loading data. It memorises every usage of every value, and allows immediate navigation to where those values exist or to where they are embedded regardless of volumes, number of tables or columns. Pandora provides detailed information about common value domains and cross-table joins automatically.

(Understand that YOU are a 'node' in the network filled with information, thank you for submitting. Your friends and family connected to your node become those common value domains - you are the 'common value' in this case - and their information is what gets joined to yours in the 'cross-table' joins. You are one 'table' of information. Their data is stored in their own separate individual tables of information. This helpful software, "Pandora" will 'join' those tables, making a much broader 'accurate' portrait. )

Quote
There is no time lost waiting for what-if analysis processes to run, and relationships can never be missed or misjudged. The statistics produced are 100% accurate, covering every aspect of a common value domain or cross-table join. Exceptions to a relationship are instantly available for interrogation as full interactive drill-down is provided to any aspect of any relationship, for example:-
View the joined rows between two related tables, including unmatched records (i.e. outer joins)
View the common value domain between two columns of different tables



Resist the tyranny of being a 'table' in their panopticon database.


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"He that would make his own liberty secure must guard even his enemy from oppression; for if he violates this duty he establishes a precedent that will reach to himself."

~ Thomas Paine, A Dissertation on the First Principles of Government, 1795
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« Reply #17 on: January 22, 2011, 07:18:19 AM »

Great information and I wish I had known this before I ever signed up for facebook.  Just have to be very very careful.
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« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2011, 11:39:05 AM »

You can use these videos to convince people why social networks are a bad thing.


The Onion- CIA's "Facebook" Program Dramatically Cut Agency's Costs:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJ380SHZvYU

The Truth About Facebook - Big Brother is Watching:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCLMQNqLjJY
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« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2011, 01:28:21 PM »

The best way is to not join in the first place... second best, is to get out, stay out, and delete your account. Sure all of the information the have up till now they will naturally cloister away if they have been following you... which they have, but by ceasing to participate, you have blinded them to where you are now...

Twitter on the other hand is a broadcast medium... just because you are following someone or being followed does not make yours a direct connection to them... far more private yet with a broader reach... facebook like myspace are direct person to person data collection tools...

@TheRealJTCoyote... my tweet-suite... Grin

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that to insure peace, security and happiness, the rifle and
the pistol are equally indispensable."

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« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2011, 08:45:25 AM »

BUMP
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« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2012, 03:31:08 PM »

I know this thread is old, but for people who read it, I as a programmer with > 10 years of experience can say:
There is absolutely no guarantee, ever, with any program or website that what you expect to happen actually happens. Especially with the given example of Facebook I wouldn't trust them at all. It's easy to just fake a front end fooling you into believing "you just got rid of all data", whereas it instead was simply marked as "hide from public". Unless you won't get unlimited access to their data center (which of course won't ever happen) there is absolutely no way to be sure. So your only long term protection is: Don't join in the first place!
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« Reply #22 on: December 20, 2012, 01:21:14 AM »

I know this thread is old, but for people who read it, I as a programmer with > 10 years of experience can say:
There is absolutely no guarantee, ever, with any program or website that what you expect to happen actually happens. Especially with the given example of Facebook I wouldn't trust them at all. It's easy to just fake a front end fooling you into believing "you just got rid of all data", whereas it instead was simply marked as "hide from public". Unless you won't get unlimited access to their data center (which of course won't ever happen) there is absolutely no way to be sure. So your only long term protection is: Don't join in the first place!

Thats a good plan, except that all the info and photos your friends and family will share about you.  photos. 
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« Reply #23 on: December 20, 2012, 03:27:43 AM »

Just load up some porn and see how long it will last ...

Make a screenshot when thrown out and use it against them for censoring your nature pics. Wink
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« Reply #24 on: December 20, 2012, 06:10:24 AM »

Per the story at the link, if you have posted any photos at Facebook, guess what, as of 16 January you no longer own those photos.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57559710-38/instagram-says-it-now-has-the-right-to-sell-your-photos/

Facebook owns Instagram, which has announced it has the perpetual right to sell users' photographs without payment or notification…  The only opt-out is to remove your photos, and perhaps the account before 16 JAN.  See the link announcement.
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WWW
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2013, 09:47:55 AM »

A refresher course on Facebook privacy controls (from an email I received)

Quote
By Patrick Marshall

With over a billion active users recording the minutiae of their activities, purchases, travel plans, and other personal information, Facebook is a potential treasure trove for hackers and marketers trolling for data.

Facebook's privacy settings seem to be a constantly moving target, so it's important to review them from time to time. Here's what you need to know.

The challenge of understanding Facebook privacy

Since its inception, Facebook has been — and often still is — criticized for its privacy controls. Well-publicized hacks of Facebook pages belonging to founder Mark Zuckerberg and the French president back in January 2011 didn't help. For many users, Facebook privacy controls were either lacking or too difficult to wade through.

Fortunately, Facebook's latest privacy-control enhancements are more accessible to the social site's users. Unfortunately, many of the controls are disabled by default or set at their lowest threshold. And there's still a bewildering array of privacy settings, scattered in different locations, that determine who can access information you've posted.

There's one other frequently misunderstood fact about Facebook privacy: Because friends of your friends can see some of the things you post and tag — even if you've set more restrictive settings — you're never sure just who is seeing what.

Review and change privacy via Privacy Shortcuts

Reviewing your Facebook privacy settings is important for understanding and controlling what personal information others — individuals and companies — can access on your page. The basic privacy settings are now easily accessed via the new Privacy Shortcuts tools, found under the lock icon to the right of your sign-in name.

Click the lock, and you'll get a drop-down list of options, starting with one of the most basic settings: Who can see my stuff? Click its down-arrow, and the first configuration option is Who can see my future posts? (see Figure 1).
 
Figure 1. Facebook's Privacy Shortcuts gives you quick access to basic privacy settings.
The default (or current) setting is clearly displayed. If you want to change it, just click the down arrow and choose Public, Friends, Only Me, a custom setting, or other listed choices (see Figure 2).
 
Figure 2. Facebook's options for choosing who sees your future posts
Although it's not well explained, selecting the "Custom" option (see Figure 3) lets you choose specific people or lists of people who won't be able to see your postings. You're also reminded that anyone tagged in your photos will be able to see those postings, regardless of the privacy settings you have in place.
 
Figure 3. The Custom Privacy tool gives finer control over who sees your future posts.
Curiously, if you want to change the audience for all of your old posts, you have to go to the Configuration menu, accessed via the gear icon next to the Private Shortcuts icon.
Managing your timeline posts, likes, tags, etc.

The next item under Who can see my stuff? is Where can I review all my posts and things I'm tagged in? Clicking this option takes you to the Activity Log page. (You can also access the log from the Privacy Settings option under the configuration menu.) Facebook's activity log lets you scan your likes and postings as well as photos in which you have been tagged. In each case, you can see who is able to see these items by hovering over the people icon next to the item. Click the pencil icon, and your options depend upon the type of item.
 
Figure 4. As you work with Facebook's privacy settings, popup dialog boxes can walk you through the log-review process.

For example, if the item is something you liked, clicking on the pencil icon will let you unlike it. For posts, the pencil lets you delete the posting. For photos in which you're tagged, options include hiding it on your timeline or requesting that the author of the tag or the photo remove it (see Figure 5). If it's a status update or a photo that has been posted to your wall by someone else, you can delete it, hide it on your timeline, or highlight it.
 
Figure 5. If you don't like being tagged in a photo, you can ask that the tag or photo be removed.
Viewing how your timeline looks to others

The last option under Who can see my stuff? is What do other people see on my timeline? Click it, and your timeline pops up with a black bar across the top and a control that states: This is what your timeline looks like to: — followed by "View as Public" or "View as Specific Person." A Tip box also pops up, stating, "Remember: Things you hide from your timeline still appear in news feed, search, and other places on Facebook." Confused? Me, too! One of the most daunting features of Facebook is trying to keep track of all the places your information can be seen.

Controlling who can send you messages

The next section of the Privacy Shortcuts menu — Who can contact me — has two options. The first — Whose messages do I want filtered into my Inbox — offers Basic Filtering (Mostly your friends and people you may know) and Strict Filtering (Mostly just friends — you may miss messages from other people you know). The use of the terms "mostly" and "may" leave me wondering who is really in charge here.
Next, you can choose whether to receive friend requests from any Facebook user or only from friends of friends, as shown in Figure 6.
 
Figure 6. Facebook's friend-request control

Locking down access to your previous posts

The third item on the Privacy Shortcuts menu, How do I stop someone from bothering me?, is simply a quick way to unfriend someone. Just enter the individual's name or e-mail address, and that person can no longer initiate conversations with you or see your timeline.
Clicking See More Settings at the bottom of Privacy Shortcuts takes you to the Privacy Settings and Tools screen, which is also accessible by clicking on the configuration (gear) icon next to the Privacy Shortcuts lock.

You'll find a lot of repetition here. As with Privacy Shortcuts, you can specify who can see your future posts, and you can access the Activity Log. However, an additional option — Limit Past Posts — restricts who can see previous posts. It changes posts shared with the public or friends of friends to just friends — and to people who are tagged plus their friends. (Gee, it's still kind of hard to know who is actually open to seeing what, isn't it?)

The next item specifies who can look you up using your e-mail address or phone number — everyone, friends of friends, or just friends — and whether or not search engines can link to your timeline (see Figure 7).
 
Figure 7. The Who can look me up? control also lets you control search-engine access to your Facebook timeline.

Just under the Privacy option in the left-hand navigation panel, you'll find an entry for Timeline and Tagging. This screen, too, repeats much of the controls available in the Privacy Shortcuts. You can, for example, specify who can view your posts. But there are some additional tools; for example, the Review posts friends tag you in before they appear on your timeline option. Although that sounds useful, it won't prevent your tagged image from appearing on other people's timelines.

At the bottom of the Timelines and Tagging Settings page, you'll find three options for configuring how tags are handled. With the first option, you can opt to review and approve or reject tags others want to add to posts in your timeline. The second option determines who else can see a post you're tagged in. (This one seems really confusing.) The options are the usual Friends, Only Me, and Custom.

The final setting in Timelines and Tagging Settings (shown in Figure Cool is Who sees tag suggestions when photos that look like you are uploaded? The only two options are you or your friends. (Does your head hurt now? Mine does.)
 
Figure 8. Facebook's Timeline and Tagging Settings

The last privacy-settings category (in the left-hand navigation panel below Timeline and Tagging) is Blocking. The first blocking option — Restricted List — lets you create a list of friends who can see only those posts you make public. There's also a note that "Facebook does not notify your friends when you add them to your Restricted list." This might be a good option for business contacts and others with whom you're only sorta friends.

There are four other blocking options, shown in Figure 9. For each, you just type in the names of those you want blocked. You can block users, application invitations, event invitations, and applications. The last item will prevent applications from contacting you or collecting nonpublic information. Unfortunately, the onus is on you to manage the lists.

(Of course, the best Facebook privacy policy is to refrain from downloading and using Facebook applications in the first place.)
 
Figure 9. The blocking controls include the ability to restrict applications from using your personal information.

Finally, it's worth noting that, although Facebook has added many privacy controls and simplified some existing ones, it has recently removed a major option: users can no longer hide themselves from Facebook searches. Small wonder some Facebook users have decided to unfriend themselves from the world's largest social network.
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Don't believe me. Look it up yourself!

The Great Deception - Forum/Library - My Research
http://z4.invisionfree.com/The_Great_Deception/index.php?showforum=110
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« Reply #26 on: March 24, 2013, 03:02:33 PM »

The scariest thing about facebook is how it de-humanises the way we share information with people.  I have read countless facebook posts which detail the most intricate parts of peoples lives and it is offered up willingly by the user to complete strangers.  The fact of it is, these people wouldn't walk up to some random person on the street and give them the reams of personal information that they freely distribute on face book. Also what you write on fb *NEVER* goes away; it is stored on a server and scraped by government agencies (who contribute a sum of money for said data).  It is a totally legal way of data mining and an extremely good source of information for character profiling.  You can never truly delete a face book account. You can shut down the account so that it is not active but everything you have ever posted remains neatly ID'd in a database.
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« Reply #27 on: April 26, 2013, 03:07:38 PM »

 Many people have tried, and I have never heard of anyone succeeding in deleting their FaceBook Data.

 Though what if we instead turn off the internet thus removing all access to data now, like magic. Try:

 http://www.turnofftheinternet.com/

 Works for me ... There ain't nothing like a good Proxy Button.

 No but really, I think we should. Turn it off.

 Join with me and Just imagine, for a moment :...

'Imagine there's no internet
It's easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people living for today

Imagine there's no internet
It isn't hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people living life in peace
...'
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2 Peter, 2:2.

'The Intellectual, the Plebitian & the Proletariat could be treated; just as wasps are treated.'
- Sanctimonious III. 1st Century.
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« Reply #28 on: May 05, 2013, 10:52:30 AM »

 The WEB? Screw that dumphole. Maybe that's just my influenza speaking, the first one in six years, the one after the dark-helicopter episode of last week? It's all documented on here.

 Maybe it's just that i was brought up in an age when paper meant everything and maybe it's the fact that the first Amazon Kindle I buy from 'New' doesn't even work, that I'm growing rapidly jaded as regards 'The Digital Universe ...'!

 Seems though that PopularMechanics are right at the forefront of promoting the idea that completely 'committing internet suicide' as some braniac has coined it, is the way forward for those worried about the amount of Control Government gain from surveying all your various accounts and websites. IF they DO!

 http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/how-to/computer-security/how-to-disappear-completely-from-the-internet
January 10, 2012.

"If you’ve ever used the Internet, you have an online identity. Maybe it’s slight: a Hotmail account here, a comment on a news story there. Or maybe you’ve been more prolific, leaving a trail of usernames, accounts, messages, and profiles across the digital landscape. In any case, an active internet user owes it to himself to do a bit of self-Googling. What you’ll find will be both enlightening and humbling—even worrying. [...]"


 Me, I think I'm just dog-tired of faking trust in a world based on little 0 & 1's that evaporates when the medium breaches. Did you know, that a GOOD QUALITY PRINTED BOOK on low acid Paper, Ph of 9, which I think is what is called 'alkaline reserve', can last for a 1000 years. I have books on acid paper which are 20 yrs old, already very yellow with age. That's because of the Acid in our environment, in the air, on our fingers, in the paper itself ...
An Alkaline additive serves to displace or cancel the ageing effects of ACID as it leaches into the paper over the decades. I can't see our Binary 'digital media' still being around at the beginning of the next Millennium; - can you?
- My New Kindle was broken before I even received it!
North Americans are the classical promoters of the idea of Low-Acid Paper, and the history of Hi-Quality American printing goes back centuries, whilst the Brits concentrated on producing books that disintegrate after a few reads. I think Paper or artificial paper even, some polymer perhaps, has a great future, whilst the future of the internet, looks increasingly shaky to me. Or maybe that is just me. I am after all well into my 6th decade already; I mean where does the time go, not down that big black hole called 'The Internest' I hope!?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acid-free_paper
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"The Dog has returned to its own vomit, and the sow that was bathed to rolling in the mire."
2 Peter, 2:2.

'The Intellectual, the Plebitian & the Proletariat could be treated; just as wasps are treated.'
- Sanctimonious III. 1st Century.
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« Reply #29 on: January 30, 2014, 05:32:08 AM »

The ONLY safe way to delete your Google+ account from you YouTube, Gmail, and other associated services...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fFOjzBEHxd0
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« Reply #30 on: May 05, 2014, 12:41:04 PM »

I have created a 23 minute video that attempts to explain the entire Facebook-Intelligence Community connection. 
If anyone has the time please watch and comment so i can know if there is anything that I should add.     

Watch it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxZOd7XMn8g
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