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Author Topic: Art Acevedo - Police Chief of Austin TX - Independent or another lapdog?  (Read 4604 times)
Col3_11n12
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« on: January 22, 2010, 12:16:26 PM »

I'm getting really confused about the Austin, TX police chief.   Isn't he the same guy who appeared on the Alex Jones show about a year ago telling us about all the things happening with the police, and how he was the good guy defending the people who was going to clean it all up?

What's up with the AUSTIN gun show, being intimidated by the AUSTIN police department, under Art Acevedo's watch?   Isn't this the same Austin PD guilty of the police murder of Nathaniel Sanders, and the same police chief let the cop get off scott free with a wrist-slap of a couple days' free vacation (a.k.a. "suspension")?    And the same Austin PD who declared it "suicide" when the Austin Palestinian teacher had both arms and both feet duct-taped and his body was dumped in a lake right in the middle of downtown Austin?

What's Alex doing?   Is there any reason why I should believe Art Acevedo is *NOT* a liar and a hypocrite?   Or is Alex too scared to admit that his own police chief, who has jurisdiction over his residence, whom he hosted on his own show, has been nothing more than an glorified accessory to murder wearing a badge?   Or are we just counting on the listening audience being stupid and not being able to connect the dots that this is the same guy?
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jofortruth
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2010, 12:19:48 PM »

The suggestion has been made that we need to look into the background of Art and find his skeletons and expose him and his real objectives.

He seems to be playing the political game (rather than doing his duties as a Peace Officer who really protects the people from the thugs such as the ATF who conduct unlawful raids under the guise of "helping the people")

We need more people looking at his actions since getting into office! Then go to the Mayor who appointed him and tell him to remove the man from office, if the results deem this necessary!

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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2010, 12:42:09 PM »

Oops sorry, Viper, I deleted this meaning to quote it.

You said that Art is drawing blood of citizens on the roadside checking for drunk drivers.  Can you repeat your post?  Here's an article that proves what you said:
http://www.dui.com/dui-library/texas/news/police-chief-wants-to-draw-blood-for-texas-dwi-in-austin
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« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2010, 12:45:05 PM »

The mayor doesn't appear to be that good a guy either.   You're constantly complaining about the toll roads in Austin.  That could be the governor doing it, but I don't think so:   Texas killed the Texas corridor.  Looks like the Austin mayor just ignored overwhelming public opposition for local Austin toll roads.   If that's just the part I hear, what else is the mayor up to no good for?

By the looks of it, I think AJ has been had.   It's like, finally, a good police boss!   On the Alex Jones show.   And then it turns out the guy is actually one of the absolute worst out there.
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« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2010, 12:47:34 PM »

@jofortruth, OK buddy but you owe me one Cheesy

I was saying Art was on AJ's show a while ago but things have changed since then,
cause of all the bad decisions he's making and AJ has since called him out on it.
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jofortruth
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« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2010, 12:49:02 PM »

Austin police chief proposes "Big Brother" camera system
http://www.citizinemag.com/texas/0801_policecameras.htm

Quote
By Thom White

AUSTIN January 23, 2008 - On Tuesday, recently-appointed Austin police chief Art Acevedo announced to the media a proposed police surveillance camera system that would attempt to record all public activity in the Sixth Street district in order to reduce the likelihood of crime. The cameras' recordings would be reviewed in secret by police personnel who would use the footage as evidence in prosecutions against individuals they identify committing crimes on video.

Chief Acevedo said if there is no public opposition to the installation of the public spy cameras, the equipment will be installed and begin recording around 6th Street in a few months.

According to news reports, Chief Acevedo told reporters, "As I travel around the city, I have been approached by residents in high-crime areas who are not only asking, but who are really starting to demand the use of technology." Acevedo said. "People in this community want us to do everything we can to keep them safe. This is one of those strategies."

According to KEYE-TV, Chief Acevedo said, "This is to put people on notice: criminals, the community, and the cops -- that, yes... You're in an area to be surveilled that's out in the open. So, guess what? Before you start fighting with somebody, before you start stabbing somebody, before you start trying to victimize somebody, your action may be caught on tape, and you may be prosecuted and convicted, because we'll have the best evidence."

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« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2010, 12:50:01 PM »

@jofortruth, OK buddy but you owe me one Cheesy

I was saying Art was on AJ's show a while ago but things have changed since then,
cause of all the bad decisions he's making and AJ has since called him out on it.

Yes you are right!    I found the quote button this time!    Yep I do! Wink


Let's find as much on this guy as we can and show what he's really doing around Austin, TX!
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« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2010, 12:54:42 PM »

Acevedo Visits Trinity and talks to the kids and their fathers: (Says he raised provocative issues during his speech)
http://www.trinitykids.com/page.cfm?p=635&newsid=27
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« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2010, 01:01:27 PM »

Art Acevedo, Chief of Police, Austin Police DepartmentArt Acevedo, Chief of Police, Austin Police Department
http://impactnews.com/northwest-austin/people/1264-art-acevedo-chief-of-police-austin-police-department

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By Darcie Duttweiler Friday, 27 June 2008
Contact: Art.acevedo@ci.austin.tx.us This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , 947-5030

Art Acevedo was sworn in as Austin Police Department’s eighth chief of police last July (so, in 2007). Acevedo began his professional career in law enforcement in 1986 in California, where he grew up, and earned his Bachelor of Science degree in public administration from the University of La Verne.

Q. What is a typical day on the job for you?

A. [Laughs] There is no typical day. A typical day is a very long one that includes usually up to seven days a week. You get up early and hit the ground running. You go from meeting to meeting, getting media inquiries, and cramming as much as you can into one day. One of the commitments I made in the hiring process was to be well known by the community. I wanted the community to know my heart and my thinking process, and I feel that the relationship with this department and the community starts and ends with the chief. If the chief of police does not have a good, solid working relationship that’s built on trust and respect, no matter how good the cops are, they will never be able to achieve their full potential. I never turn down an opportunity to speak with folks if my calendar will allow it. We’ve created an environment that makes people feel like I’m their chief. I have people in the streets who call out, ‘Chief Art, Chief Art,’ and I have no clue who they are.

Q. Do you have any day-to-day duties?

A. One day you could end up at the hospital with one of your folks hurt, which is one of the worst things about this job, having to go to hospitals. Another day, you’re at the city hall, in and out of meetings and speeches. There are a lot of speaking engagements. I think I have some today. I enjoy [those] because it gives me the opportunity to reach out to other people and to bridge the gaps of different segments of the community. There is a historical divide, and I think the more the folks from East Austin get to know the folks from West Austin, and North and South and Central, the more they’ll realize we have much more in common than differences. When people come together and realize they have the same hopes, fears and dreams, it drops a lot of barriers, and we end up with a much better community.

Q. What made you want to take the job in Austin?

A. I went online looking for job opportunities. I was reading the job description, and I felt in my heart they were describing me. I know that’s kind of corny, but I’m a corny guy. I turned to my wife, and I said, ‘They’re looking for someone who understands community relations, who’s committed to policing, who understands the media.’ To me, the media are our partners. They hold us accountable, which is why we have the First Amendment, and they help us reach out to the community and get our message out in the community. But I really felt like I was the right person, so I put a lot of work into trying to get this job, and I got it.

Q. What are your main roles as chief of police?

A. My main role is setting, from a broad policy perspective, the vision, the goals and the standards for the organization. So really, I’m responsible for the overall operations of the organization in terms of the successes and the failures. I paint a broad picture for the folks. My chief of staff is responsible for the daily operations. He’s the one who takes my message and my vision, and his officers carry out that vision. I don’t want to get caught up in the minutiae because when you get caught up in the minutiae, you’re not trusting your people, and you end up missing things. I’m a big picture guy.

Q. What is the toughest decision you’ve had to make?

A. The toughest issues you have to deal with are when you’re deciding whether you’re going to fire someone because you know that decision is going to impact their families and their kids. It is a decision that is not taken lightly. Some of them are really easy in terms of making the decision, but it’s still agonizing for me because you have children paying for the sins of their parents. You think of your own children. I have three, and they’re very proud of the fact their dad is a police officer, and if I ever lost my job, the sense of disappointment and shame goes to them. You’ve gotta move beyond that and think of what is good for the organization and what is good for the masses. We have an obligation to ourselves and our community we serve to set the bar really high for performance and responsibility because I really believe people will rise to the level of expectations that you set.
 
Q. What’s unique about Austin’s challenges?

A. Here we live in a big city that has a small-town mentality. I don’t think Austin realizes that we’ve grown up. They think this is still a small, quiet town. This is a major, urban city. You can’t leave your doors unlocked. You can’t leave your garage door open and then turn around and wonder why you got burglarized. And that happens all the time. There is a little bit of denial and naiveté here. Wishing we’re still a small town ain’t gonna cut it, and we can’t be like parents who never see their children as adults. The baby we call Austin has grown up, and with that growth has come some ills that affect every other urban American city. And we live in a safe city, but I don’t care where you live — there isn’t a community on the planet Earth where crime does not impact you sooner or later. I always tell my wife and children that we’re safe, but you need to be aware that things can happen.

Q. Any similarities between Austin and California?

A. There are a lot of Californians here. It’s a very California-like city. This city draws comparisons to San José. I love that Texans are extremely genuine and friendly. I really have a sense of community here that you don’t get other places. It really makes Austin a special place to live. I feel fortunate to be a part of this community.

Q. Any unique challenges in North Austin?

A. No, I don’t think any of us live on an island. There may be different degrees of the same challenge, but property crime hits every part of Austin. Crime will visit every neighborhood in the country at some point, but it’s the degree of those visits. The thing with North Austin is that the city is growing in a northerly direction. We are constantly looking at our resources to ensure that we have a proper distribution of resources. Our city is constantly changing. We have to track those changes and make the appropriate adjustments to our strategies. Next month we start our Comstat, which is a data, intelligence-driven policing. We can gather data more effectively and use the information to solve crime and look at it and try to predict where the crime is moving to next.

Q. What is the “Summer Heat 2008” campaign?

A. Every summer between Memorial Day and Labor Day, an average of 16 Austinites lose their lives on our roadways because you have greater incidents of drunk driving, you have people traveling more for summer vacations. Historically, it’s a time when we have more injuries and deaths. We wanted a campaign to see if we could save some lives. Through increased enforcement and zero-tolerance for seat belt, speeding and DWI, we’re hoping that when Labor Day comes around, we have maybe 15 [deaths], and, that’s a life saved. A lot of people think that when we enforce traffic laws, it’s about money. I could not care less. I’m not in the moneymaking business; I’m in the life-saving business. What drives us to enforce the traffic laws is to sometimes save people from themselves. When cops write those tickets, the lives they save may be their own. We all live, shop, play in Austin. People are up in arms about this pedestrian law, saying that we just want to make money. No, 40 percent of my fatalities last year — 24 out of 60 people that died — were pedestrians.
Q&A about the Violent Crimes Task Force

Q. What is the Violent Crimes Task Force?

A. That is a task force created under a grant from the Justice Grant Program. It’s a $500,000, one-year project that will be using intelligence-driven data. It will be a multijurisdictional response to violent crimes and gangs in the area. We’re very fortunate that our gang activity, and our overall crime level, is low when you compare it to other major metropolitan areas, and we want to keep it that way. That’s why we go out and aggressively pursue these grants because it lets us leverage our internal resources with some federal dollars to really have an impact on violent crime. Our hope is to cut back on robberies, solve robberies and other gang-related crimes.
 
Q. And phase one is now complete?

A. It ran through May 17, and the second phase started June 2 and will go through July 12. And it’s data-driven policing, and it will tell us where we’re at, and we’ll see if we need to move the task force. Crime is like a cancer, and if you let it go unchecked in one part of the community, it’ll only be a matter of time before it hits you. With intelligence-based policing, we have got to keep the heat on. If the criminals move, we have to move with them. The hope is eventually they’ll move to another city altogether.

Q. How did phase one go?

A. There is a direct correlation to enforcement and traffic safety and crime. The more we’re out there, the greater our visibility … Here are the results: We’ve seen a 20 percent reduction of violent crime in April. There were zero robberies in the Loyola and Manor area. Zero robberies in the Rundberg, I-35 area, so they did really well. The only area where robberies went up was the Cameron and St. John area, so that tells us we need to strengthen our presence there. We are always looking for opportunities to leverage our resources to combat any problems we may have.
 
Q. You’ve proposed installing video surveillance cameras in four high-crime areas around town, including on Rundberg Lane and IH 35, which is expected to cost a great deal. How do you believe cameras in this area will alleviate crime, and is it worth the price?

A. The funding we’re getting from that is from grants, and we’re always looking for grant funding. It’s absolutely worth the price because of a couple of reasons. Number one, if you know there is a camera there to capture your behavior, hopefully your behavior will change. Two, it gives us the opportunity for a real-time response to criminal activity. Three, some of the technology that’s available now, you can program it where if someone falls down, automatically that camera will alert and that actual picture will come up at the monitoring station. There are a lot of ways to program these cameras. You could program it so that if there are more than ten people, an alert will come up. So, imagine in terms of a medical emergency if someone passes out or falls, we can be alerted right away. As technology, as face recognition becomes available, we will be able to alert when we see a wanted person on that camera. This is a long-term project that has other capabilities in the future.
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« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2010, 01:07:31 PM »

Police ready to 'take on' commenters, chief says
http://www.statesman.com/news/content/news/stories/local/2009/09/18/0918comments.html?cxntlid=digg


Quote
People who misrepresent themselves as officials in online comments could face civil, criminal penalties, Acevedo says.
By Tony Plohetski
AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF
Friday, September 18, 2009

Austin Police Chief Art Acevedo says he and some of his officers have been harassed, lied about and had their identities falsely used in online blogs and in reader comment sections on local media Internet sites.

They've had enough.

In a meeting this month with department brass, Acevedo and the group discussed how they think such posts erode public trust in the department and how they have been wrongly maligned.

They have since researched their legal options and decided that from now on, they might launch formal investigations into such posts, Acevedo said. He said investigators might seek search warrants or subpoenas from judges to learn the identities of the authors — he thinks some could be department employees — and possibly sue them for libel or file charges if investigators think a crime was committed.

"A lot of my people feel it is time to take these people on," Acevedo said. "They understand the damage to the organization, and quite frankly, when people are willfully misleading and lying, they are pretty much cowards anyway because they are doing so under the cloak of anonymity."

The effort to crack down on potentially illegal statements or comments that are possibly libelous — those published with the goal of defaming a person — is the second time in recent months that the department has confronted new social media.

In March, the social networking site Twitter shut down a fake account that pretended to issue official Austin police bulletins after the department and the Texas attorney general's office complained.

University of Texas law professor David Anderson said the hosts of sites where potentially libelous comments are posted are granted immunity by federal laws. Those who post comments can still be sued, however.

State lawmakers this year passed a law that took effect Sept. 1 making it a third-degree felony to use another person's name to post messages on a social networking site without their permission and with the intent to harm, defraud, intimidate or threaten.

Along with Internet blogs that offer readers a chance to give their opinions, media outlets — including the American-Statesman — in recent years have begun allowing readers to make comments online about stories and blogs.

The American-Statesman has a policy on what people can write in online comments. The newspaper asks that people keep their comments civil, not engage in personal attacks and not use profanity or racial or ethnic slurs. Comments about a person's sexual orientation or religion also are grounds for the removal of a comment.

Acevedo said he and other officers in recent months have faced allegations of sexual impropriety and suggestions that they engaged in quid pro quo behavior. A police commander has had his name falsely used as the author of comments about the department.

Acevedo said that in several cases, he thinks department employees were responsible for comments that appeared on sites such as Statesman.com. Officers and civilian workers who were responsible for the comments could face disciplinary action.

According to police policy, employees are barred from criticizing or ridiculing the department, its policies or employees in speech or in writing when it is "defamatory, obscene or unlawful." Rules also prohibit such speech or writing when it affects "the confidence of the public in the integrity of the department and its employees."

"If you want to criticize, critique, question actions, that's allowable under the First Amendment, and we encourage that," Acevedo said. "When you start actually representing facts, when they are absolutely outright lies, that can lead to civil liability and, potentially, criminal liability."

Austin Fire Chief Rhoda Mae Kerr recently updated department policies prohibiting people from posting obscene or defamatory comments on social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter. Department spokeswoman Michelle DeCrane said Thursday that officials have not yet discussed how they will enforce the updated policy.

According to published reports, lawsuits have been popping up nationally involving anonymous online speech.

However, the Associated Press has reported that most of the cases fail because statements of opinion are protected under the First Amendment. Courts are requiring officials to show they have a legitimate defamation claim — that is, one involving a false assertion of fact that hurts someone's reputation.


Wow! This doesn't sound like the mentality of a PEACE officer, now does it?
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« Reply #10 on: January 22, 2010, 06:08:11 PM »

To paraphrase, for those who don't want to read the entire story:   Art Lotsavideo wants to harass, arrest, and criminally charge people who make posts on the internet which portray the Austin PD in a bad light.   I can see why AJ might not be more vocal about this a-hole, seeing as how he's in his jurisdiction.   

I hope your web server isn't in Austin.

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« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2010, 02:35:26 PM »

    And the same Austin PD who declared it "suicide" when the Austin Palestinian teacher had both arms and both feet duct-taped and his body was dumped in a lake right in the middle of downtown Austin?


Yes, the same PD that received a waiver for $382, 000 from Treasury Department (TFI) about a month before Hamad's death and has pretended to investigate this death.  Treasury's IRS is the most likely suspect in this death.  ATF is a former Treasury bureau but now under DOJ. APD's favorite customer.
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« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2010, 11:44:56 AM »

Austin Texas Gunshow Update (Police Chief Art's Rep claims they used the Nuisance Law to justify what they did? Another lie?
http://www.ammoland.com/2010/01/23/austin-...gunshow-update/
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=157050.0

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Saturday, January 23rd, 2010

Letters to the AmmoLand Editor: Got something on your mind? Let us know and you can see it here.

Austin, Texas --(AmmoLand.com)-

Dear Peaceable Texan:

As many of you know, I am an attorney of two decades experience practicing law in Austin. I have been investigating the events surrounding the gunshow of last weekend where APD and ATF used intimidation tactics to pressure the landlord of the property to cancel future shows at the Crocket Center. The following is what I have learned from my review of the law and speaking to the promoter and an individual that had his private collection confiscated Saturday.

On Tuesday APD attempted to deflect public attention by implying that multiple arrests at the location gave the city grounds to prosecute the landlords for nuisance. I am attaching a copy of the TX nuisance statutes and as anyone who can read can see–they clearly do not apply here.

But what is really ridiculous about such a claim is that if arrests alone constitute grounds for nuisance, then every mall and HEB in the state would be nuisances since arrests for shoplifting occur at these locations constantly.

The Crocket Center is owned by Walmart and leased to HEB, who in turn subleases to another entity which in turn leases it one weekend a month to the gunshow promoter.

The individual who was hassled and had his half dozen firearms seized Saturday was a private citizen there to sell his collection. According to him, APD and/or ATF had a man approach him and offer to buy a gun; the man displayed a Texas Driver’s License to prove he was over 21. The sale was made and later APD officers roughly grabbed the shirt of the seller and marched him outside and accused him of selling to an illegal alien. This apparently is the latest tactic to entrap the unwary citizen in the ATF’s snare. As if anyone could possibly know the immigration or citizenship status of anyone else. Yet ATF seized all his firearms and told him the matter was “under investigation.” This, ladies and gentlemen, is the ‘possible illegal gun sale’ referred to as the reason for HEB to pull the plug on future shows in the Statesman article (attached).

The tyranny of these laws and the APD/ATF “stings” are self evident. The government allows literally millions of foreigners to enter our country and then uses them to set citizens up for prison time. We should all be asking: who was this illegal alien, and where is he now? Why is he free with a driver’s license in our state and why is he not being deported? I would venture a guess that since Austin is a “sanctuary city” the police did not detain this man or turn him over to immigration authorities; indeed, they probably rewarded him in some fashion to get his cooperation.

THIS IS INTOLERABLE. We citizens are being used and abused at every turn. Our government is using foreigners to set us up, steal our property, lock us up, and end the venerable cultural events we know as “gunshows.” I want to suggest that perhaps the better tactic to prevent sales to aliens is to REMOVE THEM FROM THE COUNTRY.

In my opinion the appropriate place to apply public pressure is with HEB, since they have the right to continue to allow gunshows at this location. They have no liability under the nuisance law, and they have teams of lawyers who can figure that out. I am sure they can read. A general boycott of HEB is called for if they assist the government in shutting down a gunshow.

The TSRA has refused to get involved. NRA is also, as usual, silent. Once they see the grassroots taking action though, I expect NRA and/or TSRA will step in to take credit for leading them.

Word has it–I have not confirmed this–that today at 3 p.m. at Red’s Indoor Range on Hwy 290 the NRA is presenting Gov. Perry with an award of some kind and endorsement in his bid for re-election. Some are planning to be there to politely bring this matter to his attention–and the NRA’s–because if they are going to pretend to be pro-gun rights they need to actually DO SOMETHING to defend them.

Sincerely,
Paul Velte
Member Peaceable Texans for Firearms Rights

Texas Nuisance Statute:
http://mailman.io.com/pipermail/pt-l/attac.../attachment.pdf
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« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2010, 09:25:23 AM »

I'm a bit skeptical of this award to the Texas governor.   Sounds a bit like Obama's Nobel peace prize.   However, under Rick Perry's watch, Texas did pass a statute explicitly making it legal for an unlicensed citizen to carry a gun in their own vehicle.   Before it was ambiguous, and the police took advantage of the situation by arresting people who had a gun.   The charges always got dismissed, but not before the citizens had to go through all the rigamarole with the arrest, defending it, etc..  I think a Houston police chief was quoted as saying, "You can get out of the time, but you can't get out of the ride."   And you couldn't sue the police, because...well...the law was ambiguous.   Now you can.
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