The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History

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The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« on: December 30, 2009, 10:09:37 pm »
Kibitz: One of the original questions  was :
what was Willis Harman so excited about at the Sequoia Seminars in 1954?
What was Stolaroff so excited about?  
Well it turns out that they were excited about Gerald Heard.
....
1954 Gerald Heard gives a lecture to the Sequoia Seminar about mind expansion and describes the effects of certain mind-altering drugs - Myron Stolaroff and Willis Harman attending, Then in 1956 that Heard tells Stolaroff about LSD and directs him to Al Hubbard for a visit to Hollywood Hospital in Vancouver...


This thread is an investigation into the history of "The Sequoia Seminars" which began in the early 1950's and at sometime went on to  investigate the concepts of "LSD Therapy".   This all started with a confusion over "The Secora Seminars" which turned out to be  "The Sequoia Seminars" and a Willis Harmon was also referenced as Willis Harman ...  

I have found that between 1953 and 1954 a discovery had been made for the large scale production of LSD and I was looking for government programs related to this discovery (Chatter - Artichoke):

http://www.naderlibrary.com/aciddreams.refer.htm
...
"for eliciting true and accurate statements" D (CIA) "Potential New Agent for Unconventional Warfare, LSD," 5 August 1954.

"will most probably be found in the biochemistry departments" D (CIA) untitled cable, 26 May 1954. the purchase of ten kilos of LSD D (CIA) Memorandum to Chief of Security Research Staff, from Chief of Technical Branch, " ARTICHOKE Conference, 22 October 1953," 16 November 1953
"This is a closely guarded secret" D (CIA) Memorandum to Director of Central Intelligence via Deputy Director of Plans,
"Potential Large-Scale Availability of LSD through Newly-Discovered Synthesis by [deleted]," 26 October 1954.

http://scientific-misconduct.blogspot.com/2008/05/quiz-question-who-produced-lsd-for-cia.html
Quiz question - Who produced LSD for the CIA and MK-ULTRA in 1954?

In fact CIA documents show that a U.S. source for LSD supply was desired. In 1953 the CIA provided Eli Lilly with funding to attempt synthesis of LSD for CIA use without the need for the expensive and scarce reagents required by Sandoz. A year later, Lilly chemists succeeded in their quest, and subsequent supplies were from Lilly[1,2]. Another more potent chemical used by MK-Ultra, BZ (3-quinuclidinyl benzilate), was produced by Hoffman-La Roche.

http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/index/LSD_turns_60.html?cid=3267632
From 1947 to 1966, Sandoz produced and sold LSD tablets and the drug became popular, especially in the United States.
the SanDoz patent for LSD ran out in 1963.

------

Although the Eli Lilly process was published (somewhere) certain details were left out....

http://www.erowid.org/library/books_online/brotherhood_of_eternal_love.pdf
...
One objective was to keep any further LSD out of the hands of the West's enemies; another was to find out as much as possible about the drug; and the third was to experiment with LSD as a weapon in warfare and espionage.
...
Back home in the United States, the Eli Lilly company in Indianapolis established a new process for LSD which meant that the drug could now be mass-produced. The CIA agent who reported this development to his superiors noted that the military services had access to a home supply of LSD by the ton. Eli Lilly kept details of the full process confidential and made up a special batch of LSD for the CIA.
...
Point Richmond was the “prototypical underground laboratory.”
Owsley, Scully and Melissa Cargill moved there early in the summer of 1966.
...
Owsley was still working on the basis of a formula for LSD—the formula released by Eli Lilly in the 1950s which left out key details on purification and prevention of decay for commercial rather than security reasons. Point Richmond became a proving ground for filling in some of those blanks. Owsley had got as far as crystal LSD, which in itself required a reasonable level of purity; but he believed that if he could achieve absolute purity, then the LSD would be extra special with extra special results. Between them Owsley and Scully created 20 to 30 grams of what they thought was the purest LSD anyone had yet produced. The crystal lost its yellowish tinge and became almost blue-white under the fluorescent lamp. It was pure enough to be pizioluminescent—if the crystals were shaken or crushed, they gave off flashes of light. (LSD is one of a very small group of compounds with this property.)

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I need to start somewhere so here is goes (I'll re-edit this post till it looks clean)....

Secora Seminar - 1954 - Need help with more information

Anyone have any more info on the "Secora Seminar" or related history? Thanks in advance.

Tavistock - Systems Psychodynamics - mass brain-washing techniques

http://www.dprogram.com/willis_harmanp1.html


Global Mind Change

How did your own interest in the subject of consciousness start? Was it an early passion?

Willis Harman:

 No, I was trained as a scientist, thought I was going to be a chemist for a while, ended up as an electrical engineer and then systems engineer. And then in 1954 at age 36 I had an up-ending experience that I hadn't asked for and the net result was my path through life took a sudden swerve. It was a two-week seminar which, there was nothing like it at the time although later on there were things like Est and Silva Mind Control and all kinds of things, but at that time, it was a fairly intensive seminar and I only came into it because I didn't realise that. I was tricked into coming into it, thinking it was going to be a nice, safe intellectual discussion.

What was the seminar, specifically?
Willis Harman:
 It was called The Secora [Sequoia]  Seminar. The same group became Beyond War, they still exist, I think. It became apparent to me through that experience that I had feelings that I was not even aware of, you know my unconscious mind. Its rather hard to explain how an experience suddenly opens you up. It's not exactly a rational, linear process. At any rate I just started to search around for whoever knew something about any part of this.

I made one trip to Europe and got aquainted with The Society for Psychical Research, that was back in the days of Sir George Joy and Rosalyn Heywood. Celia Green was just a youngster coming in at that time. So in the next half dozen years or so I got somewhat involved in psychical research and somewhat involved in the psychedelic research. That sort of blew up in a way in the 1960's! So I shifted over to doing research on the future.

The "1954 Secora" seminars were "The Sequoia Seminars"

I have now determined that the "1954 Secora" seminars were "The Sequoia Seminars"

We have a nexus of SRI - RAND - Tavistock - Music via AMPEX - Myron Stolaroff - Merry Pranksters Kesey - and more ....

Also goes back to 1947 - mescaline experiments University Vancouver - Jolly West Project Chatter  
which is also project paperclip via Mescaline experiments that were performed at Dachua


Some preliminary links:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=mescaline+experiments+University+Vancouver+1947+chatter&btnG=Search&aq=f&oq=&aqi=

It still exists (no mention of the historical LSD "therapy" sessions in 1954):

The Sequoia Retreat Center of Northern California
....
Other special weekends have featured Dr. Willis Harman, co-founder of the World Business Academy and President of the Institute of Noetic Sciences, Dr. Elisabet Sahtouris, scientist and author, Helen Palmer, psychologist and author, and Brian Swimme, physicist, teacher and author.

Beyond War's successor organization, the Foundation for Global Community is active and can be found at www.globalcommunity.org.  Sequoia Seminar was purchased by the Hendricks family in 2005.  After much renovation and capital improvements, they have passed stewardship to us.  

The Sequoia Retreat Center stands on the shoulders of peace makers, reconciliation makers, stewards of the land and Sequoias.  Our roots are in the people who have created extraordinary lives.  We honor and extend that work by holding this space open.  



http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/eisner_betty/remembrances_lsd_therapy.pdf

http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft1870045n&chunk.id=d0e1544&doc.view=print

http://www.scribd.com/doc/20565623/storming-heaven-american-dream
...

To give another illustration of how things were developing: in 1954 Gerald Heard gave a lecture in Palo Alto to an organization called the Sequoia Seminar. Sitting in the audience was an engineer named Myron Stolaroff. Stolaroff was in charge of long-range planning at
Ampex, which was one of the first of the high-technology companies to emerge in the valleys south of San Francisco. Stolaroff had heard Gerald speak several times before and considered him one of the world's outstanding mystics. So when Heard began rhapsodizing
about the effects of certain mind-altering drugs, Stolaroff was predictably upset. "I thought you went to all these places anyway," he asked. "Why do you take this?" And Heard had replied, "Oh, but it just opens the doors in so many ways to so many vast dimensions."19

Whether he admitted it to himself or not, Myron Stolaroff was hooked, and a few months later, in Los Angeles on business, he visited Heard and had another long discussion about these new mind drugs. At one point Hubbard's name had come up, and Heard had implied
that if Stolaroff wished to try any of these substances, Al was the man to guide him through the experience. So Stolaroff had written Hubbard and one day Al had turned up on the doorstep, bounding into Myron's office with a tank of carbogen, a "fun-loving guy" who "radiated an enormous energy field."20 After the formal introductions were over, Hubbard had suggested that Stolaroff take a few lungfuls of the carbogen, and twenty or thirty breaths later the director of long-range planning was abreacting all over his office.

Stolaroff, who had been skeptical of a lot of Gerald's claims, was convinced. He arranged to visit Vancouver at the earliest opportunity for one of Hubbard's patented LSD sessions—by 1959 Hubbard was claiming he had conducted seventeen hundred LSD sessions.

It was a terrible experience. During those hours in Hubbard's apartment, Stolaroff relived his birth, the actual physical birth, gasping and writhing for what felt like days, until he broke through to the world, which actually smelled of ether. Although it was a torturous few
hours, Myron emerged from the LSD womb convinced that many of his personal eccentricities and neuroses could be traced back to the trauma of his birth. This was not a radical possibility as far as psychoanalysis was concerned; Otto Rank, one of Freud's last
disciples, had explored the effects of birth on the emerging psyche in numerous articles. But it would have taken psychoanalysis years to attain the level that LSD had reached in one climactic rush. Stolaroff returned to Ampex convinced that LSD "was the greatest discovery
that man had ever made."21
...
Myron Stolaroff was a good example. Stolaroff had been in charge of long-range planning at Ampex, one of the first of the big electronics firms to settle south of the Bay Area, when he had been bitten by the psychedelic bug. Together with Hubbard he had tried to interest Ampex's management in a program that would use LSD to solve all kinds of corporate problems, interpersonal problems, design problems, long-range planning problems. But the plan had foundered on Al's penchant for Christian mysticism. Stolaroff didn't let go, though: he started holding weekly LSD sessions for some of Ampex's more adventurous engineers;

Hubbard came down from Canada one weekend and took them all to a remote cabin in the Sierras where he guided them through the kind of ontological earthquake only Al could manufacture. The senior management of Ampex had been horrified. Having gotten to know
Hubbard through rather extraordinary circumstances, it didn't seem at all irrational for them to be worrying, "What if this nutball drives our best men crazy?" So there had been sighs of relief when Stolaroff decided to leave Ampex and set up his own nonprofit psychedelic
research center in Menlo Park, California—the International Foundation for Advanced Study. The Foundation, which opened in March 1961
, wasn't the only organization working with LSD in the San Francisco area.

The Palo Alto Mental Research Institute had been studying the drug since 1958, and had been instrumental in introducing dozens of local psychiatrists and psychologists, as well as interested laymen like Allen Ginsberg, to the perplexities of the Other World. But the Institute's composure had been shaken by several terrifying incidents—colossal bad trips in which the subject returned from the Other World in questionable shape—and interest in LSD's therapeutic potential had diminished. LSD programs were also under way at the Palo Alto Veterans Hospital, the San Mateo County Hospital, and Napa State Hospital, but no one was offering psychedelic therapy, and what little research was being done was unexciting: Leo Hollister (who will soon reappear in association with a hopeful young writer named Ken Kesey), at the Veterans Hospital, was still doing model psychoses work.

The point was that most LSD researchers were fairly conservative. So when a couple of engineers set up shop (Stolaroff's vice president, Willis Harman, had been an engineering professor at Stanford) and began poaching bread and butter patients—unlike Osmond and Hotter, Stolaroff wasn't just concentrating on chronic alcoholics, he was soliciting the man off the street, who in this case was the neurotic professional in the high tech-high education hub that surrounded Stanford—there were more than raised eyebrows. Charging five hundred dollars for one session with a highly questionable drug? The whole thing smacked of chicanery, despite the fact that Stolaroff had a licensed psychiatrist running the actual therapy sessions. But what was worse, it was chicanery with good word of mouth. The San Mateo Call Bulletin, scenting a medical scandal, had interviewed a number of Stolaroff's patients and found them laudatory to the point of hyperbole. At the Foundation's first and last open house, Stolaroff had been cornered by a disgruntled therapist who growled, "One of my ex-patients thinks you're a saint” making it clear that he thought Stolaroff was a charlatan.14 What was one to make, after all, of the Call Bulletin's statement that the Foundation's aims were "partly medical, partly scientific, partly philosophical, partly mystical"?15 The first two, okay, but philosophy was for philosophers, and mysticism? mysticism was for cranks!

http://fileshare200.depositfiles.com/auth-1252948980c9064f26db53789dde2968-66.249.71.8-613571625-19999864-guest/FS200-17/Markoff,_John_-_What_the_Dormouse_Said._How_the_60s_Counterculture_Shaped_the_PC_Industry.pdf

For the unrepentant patriarch of LSD, long, strange trip winds back to Bay Area
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/07/12/MNGK0QV7HS1.DTL

http://mindcontrolforums.com/acid-dreams-cia.htm

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The people involved are connected to Tavistock - RAND - SRI - AMPEX  and the CIA.

Some of the Players:
Arthur Balfour [Rhodes Round Table], one of the Prime Ministers of England, was a member of the Society for Psychical Research

http://www.spr.ac.uk/expcms/index.php?section=1

Welcome to the Website of the Society for Psychical Research
The SPR was the first organisation established to examine allegedly paranormal phenomena using scientific principles. Our aim is to learn more about events and abilities commonly described as "psychic" or "paranormal" by supporting research, sharing information and encouraging debate. Our members come from all over the world, and represent a variety of academic and professional interests. We welcome  active researchers as well as people who simply want to know more about the subject

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http://www.uccr.org/sequoia3.htm
Raindance Retreat & Conference Center  (formerly Sequoia Seminar)



http://www.sequoiaretreatcenter.com/About.htm

History of the Site

The origins of this place trace back more than eighty years to a search for unity of the disciplines of science and religion in the belief that each sought universal truths about reality.

The Jesus as Teacher studies were brought to the west in the 1930's by Dr. Harry Rathbun* of Stanford University and his wife Emilia.  Seminars were held at Asilomar and other locations.  By the 1940's it was clear that a permanent facility was needed.  Early meetings were held in a cottage and participants stayed in tents during the two and three week summer seminars.  *[Harry's Last Lecture: click here]

Sequoia Seminar was incorporated in 1949 and the building of the lodges and cabins you will find here today began.  The first lodge was built on land at the Quaker Center in Ben Lomond.  Here the tradition of working together was begun and the goal of blending buildings with the land was met in "Casa de Luz", House of Light.  This first lodge was given to the Quaker Center in 1973.
...
Other special weekends have featured Dr. Willis Harman, co-founder of the World Business Academy and President of the Institute of Noetic Sciences, Dr. Elisabet Sahtouris, scientist and author, Helen Palmer, psychologist and author, and Brian Swimme, physicist, teacher and author.

| -------------------------

Another Player: Sieigfried Linkwitz

http://www.linkwitzlab.com/about_me.htm
Work / Fun Hewlett-Packard Co., Palo Alto and Santa Rosa, California, '61-'98
(R&D Design Engineer, Project Mgr., Section Mgr., Senior Engineer)
Siemens, Zentrallabor, Muenchen, Germany, '61
Telefunken, Hannover, Germany, '57  

Education Ongoing ...
Stanford University, EE, '62-'64
TH Darmstadt, Germany, Dipl. Ing. Elektrotechnik, '55-'61
Abitur, Kant Gymnasium, Bad Oeynhausen, '55
Radio Amateur License DJ1SX (diy 2-m rig), '51

Spiritual search  Jesus as Teacher discussion groups - Sequoia Seminar - LSD - Creative Initiative - Beyond War - Eckhart Tolle - Adyashanti - Tony Parsons

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siegfried_Linkwitz

Siegfried Linkwitz (born 1935) is well known as the co-inventor of the Linkwitz-Riley filter[1] along with Russ Riley. He has submitted several important technical papers to the Journal of the Audio Engineering Society and other related publications, which have become foundational to modern loudspeaker theory[2]. Examples of his recent work include extensive development of dipolar loudspeaker theory[3]. Also a contributor to electronics and "DIY" loudspeaker enthusiast magazines such as Electronics (Wireless) World, and Speaker Builder magazines. [4] [5]

|----------

Mescaline experiments University of Vancouver/
WWII - Dachau - Mescaline - Plotner - Project Paperclip:


http://www.lambros.name/pdf/Napa_Sentinel_Articles.pdf

The Dachau mescaline experiments were written up by the US Naval Technical Mission.
US Navy interested in Interagation tools -  initiated Project Chatter in 1947 (same year the CIA was formed)
Dr. Strughold ... was in charge of the Dachua Experiments recruited for Project Paperclip...

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Original Captain trips - Captain Alfred M. Hubbard
http://old.disinfo.com/archive/pages/article/id1284/pg1/index.html


You will not read about him in the history books. He left no diary, nor chatty relatives to memorialize him in print. And if a cadre of associates had not recently agreed to open its files, Captain Alfred M. Hubbard might exist in death as he did in life--a man of mirrors and shadows, revealing himself to even his closest friends only on a need-to-know basis.

They called him "the Johnny Appleseed of LSD." He was to the psychedelic movement nothing less than the membrane through which all passed to enter into the Mysteries. Beverly Hills psychiatrist Oscar Janiger once said of Hubbard, "We waited for him like a little old lady for the Sears-Roebuck catalog." Waited for him to unlock his ever-present leather satchel loaded with pharmaceutically-pure psilocybin, mescaline or his personal favorite, Sandoz LSD-25.

Those who will talk about Al Hubbard are few. Oscar Janiger told this writer that "nothing of substance has been written about Al Hubbard, and probably nothing ever should."

He is treated like a demigod by some, as a lunatic uncle by others. But nobody is ambivalent about the Captain: He was as brilliant as the noonday sun, mysterious as the rarest virus, and friendly like a golden retriever.

The first visage of Hubbard was beheld by Dr. Humphry Osmond, now senior psychiatrist at Alabama's Bryce Hospital. He and Dr. John Smythies were researching the correlation between schizophrenia and the hallucinogens mescaline and adrenochrome at Weyburn Hospital in Saskatchewan, Canada, when an A.M. Hubbard requested the pleasure of Osmond's company for lunch at the swank Vancouver Yacht Club. Dr. Osmond later recalled, "It was a very dignified place, and I was rather awed by it. [Hubbard] was a powerfully-built man . . . with a broad face and a firm hand-grip. He was also very genial, an excellent host."

Captain Hubbard was interested in obtaining some mescaline, and, as it was still legal, Dr. Osmond supplied him with some. "He was interested in all sorts of odd things," Osmond laughs. Among Hubbard's passions was motion. His identity as "captain" came from his master of sea vessels certification and a stint in the US Merchant Marine.

At the time of their meeting in 1953, Al Hubbard owned secluded Daymen Island off the coast of Vancouver--a former Indian colony surrounded by a huge wall of oyster shells. To access his 24-acre estate, Hubbard built a hangar for his aircraft and a slip for his yacht from a fallen redwood. But it was the inner voyage that drove the Captain until his death in 1982. Fueled by psychedelics, he set sail and rode the great wave as a neuronaut, with only the white noise in his ears and a fever in his brain.

His head shorn to a crew and wearing a paramilitary uniform with a holstered long-barrel Colt .45, Captain Al Hubbard showed up one day in '63 on the doorstep of a young Harvard psychologist named Timothy Leary.

"He blew in with that uniform . . . laying down the most incredible atmosphere of mystery and flamboyance, and really impressive bullshit!" Leary recalls. "He was pissed off. His Rolls Royce had broken down on the freeway, so he went to a pay phone and called the company in London. That's what kind of guy he was. He started name-dropping like you wouldn't believe . . . claimed he was friends with the Pope."

Those who knew Al Hubbard would describe him as just a "barefoot boy from Kentucky," who never got past third grade. But as a young man, the shoeless hillbilly was purportedly visited by a pair of angels, who told him to build something. He had absolutely no training, "but he had these visions, and he learned to trust them early on," says Willis Harman, director of the Institute of Noetic Sciences in Sausalito, CA.

http://www.fargonebooks.com/high.html
...
His [Hubbard's] services were eventually recruited by Willis Harman, then-Director of the Educational Policy Research Center within the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) of Stanford University. Harman employed Hubbard as a security guard for SRI, "although," Harman admits, "Al never did anything resembling security work."

Hubbard was specifically assigned to the Alternative Futures Project, which performed future-oriented strategic planning for corporations and government agencies. Harman and Hubbard shared a goal "to provide the [LSD] experience to political and intellectual leaders around the world." Harman acknowledges that "Al's job was to run the special [LSD] sessions for us."

According to Dr. Abram Hoffer, "Al had a grandiose idea that if he could give the psychedelic experience to the major executives of the Fortune 500 companies, he would change the whole of society."

Hubbard's tenure at SRI was uneasy. The political bent of the Stanford think-tank was decidedly left-wing, clashing sharply with Hubbard's own world-perspective. "Al was really an arch-conservative," says the confidential source. "He really didn't like what the hippies were doing with LSD, and he held Timothy Leary in great contempt."

Humphry Osmond recalls a particular psilocybin session in which "Al got greatly preoccupied with the idea that he ought to shoot Timothy, and when I began to reason with him that this would be a very bad idea...I became much concerned that he might shoot me..."

"To Al," says Myron Stolaroff, "LSD enabled man to see his true self, his true nature and the true order of things." But, to Hubbard, the true order of things had little to do with the antics of the American Left.

Recognizing its potential psychic hazards, Hubbard believed that LSD should be administered and monitored by trained professionals. He claimed that he had stockpiled more LSD than anyone on the planet besides Sandoz--including the US government--and he clearly wanted a firm hand in influencing the way it was used.

However, Hubbard refused all opportunities to become the LSD Philosopher-King. Whereas Leary would naturally gravitate toward any microphone available, Hubbard preferred the role of the silent curandero, providing the means for the experience, and letting voyagers decipher its meaning for themselves. When cornered by a video camera shortly before this death, and asked to say something to the future, Hubbard replied simply, "You're the future."

In March of 1966, the cold winds of Congress blew out all hope for Al Hubbard's enlightened Mother Earth. Facing a storm of protest brought on by Leary's reckless antics and the "LSD-related suicide" of Diane Linkletter, President Lyndon Johnson signed into law the Drug Abuse Control Amendment, which declared lysergic acid diethylamide a Schedule I substance; simple possession was deemed a felony, punishable by 15 years in prison. According to Humphry Osmond, Hubbard lobbied Vice-President Hubert Humphrey, who reportedly took the cause of LSD into the Senate chambers, and emerged un-victorious.

"[The government] had a deep fear of having their picture of reality challenged," mourns Harman. "It had nothing to do with people harming their lives with chemicals--because if you took all the people who had ever had any harmful effects from psychedelics, it's minuscule compared to those associated with alcohol and tobacco."

FDA chief James L. Goddard ordered agents to seize all remaining psychedelics not accounted for by Sandoz. "It was scary," recalls Dr. Oscar Janiger, whose Beverly Hills office was raided and years' worth of clinical research confiscated.

Hubbard begged Abram Hoffer to let him hide his supply in Hoffer's Canadian Psychiatric Facility. But the doctor refused, and it is believed that Hubbard buried most of his LSD in a sacred parcel in Death Valley, California, claiming that it had been used, rather than risk prosecution. When the panic subsided, only five government-approved scientists were allowed to continue LSD research--none using humans, and none of them associated with Al Hubbard.

In 1968, his finances in ruins, Hubbard was forced to sell his private island sanctuary for what one close friend termed "a pittance." He filled a number of boats with the antiquated electronics used in his eccentric nuclear experiments, and left Daymen Island for California. Hubbard's efforts in his last decade were effectively wasted, according to most of his friends. Lack of both finances and government permit to resume research crippled all remaining projects he may have had in the hopper.

http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/hubbard_al/hubbard_al.shtml
Erowid Character Vaults - Captain Al Hubbard 1901 - Aug 31, 1982
Summary
Alfred Matthew Hubbard was known as the Johnny Appleseed of LSD. Born in Kentucky, he had angelic visions as a young boy that reportedly guided him in building a radioactive battery, which he sold for $75,000 in 1919. During Prohibition, he used his skill with electronics to set up a ship-to-shore communications system in the back of the taxi he drove to help smuggle alcohol into the U.S. and Canada. He was caught and served an 18 month prison sentence. However, his skills had not gone unnoticed. A scout from the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) recruited Hubbard into the OSS.

Captain Hubbard was put to work of shipping heavy armaments from San Diego to Canada prior to the U.S. officially joining WW II...and eventually faced a congressional investigation. To avoid federal prosecution he moved to Vancouver and became a Canadian citizen. There he founded a charter boat company and became a millionaire in the 1940s. He later received a full presidential pardon (#2676) from President Harry Truman.

In 1950, Hubbard experienced another angellic visitation telling him that something important to the future of mankind would soon be coming. When he read about LSD the next year, he knew that was it and immediately sought and acquired LSD, which he tried for himself in 1951. Following his own experience, he started to turn others on. He became well known for his procedure of initially introducing people to carbogen, to see how they reacted to a short-term alteration in consciousness, before he scheduled their LSD sessions.

At various times over the next 20 years, Hubbard reportedly worked for the Canadian Special Services, the U.S. Justice Department, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, and according to rumors, may have been involved with the CIA's MK-ULTRA project.

He also worked at the Hollywood Hospital with Ross McLean, with psychiatrists Abram Hoffer and Dr. Humphry Osmond, with Myron Stolaroff at the International Federation for Advanced Study in Menlo Park, and with Willis Harman at Stanford Research Institute (SRI) running psychedelic sessions with LSD.

How his government positions interacted with his work with LSD is still not known. During those years he introduced more than 6,000 people to LSD--including scientists, politicians, intelligence officials, diplomats, and church figures--and became known as the first "Captain Trips", travelling about with a leather case containing pharmaceutically pure LSD, mescaline, and psilocybin.

"If you don't think it's amazing," said Hubbard, "just go ahead and try it."

http://dogeatdogma.com/lsd.htm
...
Under the auspices of MK-ULTRA the CIA regularly dosed its agents and associates with powerful hallucinogens as a preemptive measure against the Soviets' own alleged chemical technology, often with disastrous results. The secret project would see at least two deaths: tennis pro Harold Blauer died after a massive injection of MDA; and the army's own Frank Olson, a biological-warfare specialist, crashed through a closed window in the 12th floor of New York's Statler Hotel, after drinking cognac laced with LSD during a CIA symposium. Dr. Osmond doubts that Hubbard would have been associated with such a project "not particularly on humanitarian grounds, but on the grounds that it was bad technique."

[Note: Recently, a researcher for <i>WorldNetDaily</i> and author of a forthcoming book based on the Frank Olson "murder," revealed to this writer that he has received, via a FOIA request of CIA declassified materials, documents which indicate that Al Hubbard was, indeed, in contact with Dr. Sidney Gottlieb and George Hunter White--an FBI narcotics official who managed Operation Midnight Climax, a joint CIA/FBI blackmail project in which unwitting "johns" were given drinks spiked with LSD by CIA-managed prostitutes, and whose exploits were videotaped from behind two-way mirrors at posh hotels in both New York and San Francisco. The researcher would reveal only that Al Hubbard's name "appeared in connection with Gottlieb and White, but the material is heavily redacted."]

Hubbard's secret connections allowed him to expose over 6,000 people to LSD before it was effectively banned in '66. He shared the sacrament with a prominent Monsignor of the Catholic Church in North America, explored the roots of alcoholism with AA founder Bill Wilson, and stormed the pearly gates with Aldus Huxley (in a session that resulted in the psychedelic tome <i>Heaven and Hell</i>), as well as supplying most of the Beverly Hills psychiatrists, who, in turn, turned on actors Cary Grant, James Coburn, Jack Nicholson, novelist Anais Nin, and filmmaker Stanley Kubrick.

} - - - - -

Update:

The Olympians: The Committee of 300- Dr. John Coleman
http://www.scribd.com/doc/27373383/273-The-Olympians-The-Committee-of-300

Olympics, Laodicea and Olympians

2050. (10) To weaken the moral fiber of the nation and to demoralize workers in the labor class by creating mass unemployment. As jobs dwindle due to the post industrial zero growth policies introduced by the Club of Rome, demoralized and discouraged workers will resort to alcohol and drugs. The youth of the land will be encouraged by means of rock music and drugs to rebel against the status quo, thus undermining and eventually destroying the family unit.

In this regard The Committee of 300 commissioned Tavistock Institute to prepare a blueprint as to how this could be achieved. Tavistock directed Stanford Research to undertake the work under the direction of Professor Willis Harmon.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2009, 03:54:54 pm »
http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft1870045n&chunk.id=d0e1544&doc.view=print
Psychology in Sequoia Seminar

Psychology was the most poorly defined of all the elements that made up Sequoia Seminar's philosophy, yet it was one of the most important and, even more than the ideas of Buchman or Heard, it set Sequoia Seminar apart from the tradition of Henry B. Sharman. Since Harry always argued that psychology would eventually prove what religion already knew, why bother with psychology at all? Because, among the three appropriate objects of love—God, self, and other—love of self or integrity required that people come to understand their subconscious needs and fears so that they could be free to carry out the will of God. The movement believed psychology could help people toward religion, and religion could help them psychologically.

A physician participating in a 1953 seminar wrote that he had learned that psychiatry taught, "To be happy you must be properly oriented to your environment and totally integrated, so that every action is a productive one leading to full potentiality." The seminar taught him that Jesus had said the same thing two thousand years ago and, he concluded, "a well-adjusted person is, by definition, religious."[81]

Psychology was, nevertheless, also perceived as potentially dangerous; when wrongly used it could either undermine the religious message or become the primary purpose of the group, relegating the teachings of Jesus to a secondary role. Freudian psychology, which defined religious belief as neurotic, was an example of the first danger. Harry believed that "Freudian psychology leads to a mechanistic view of the universe and to a philosophy of meaninglessness."[82] There is some indication that the Rathbuns felt, not without reason, that Boyden and her followers fell into the second danger when they split off from the main Sharman group in 1941 and began their own work.[83] The Rathbuns referred to them as "the psychologizers."

The exact role that psychology played in Sequoia Seminar meetings prior to 1955 is not clear, although its flavor is suggested by a list of recommended readings from 1950 that included works by Rollo May and Erich Fromm in addition to books by Kunkel, Jung, and Heard.[84] Much of the psychological activity that did occur took place under the direction of Emilia [Rathbun] with the assistance of Betty Eisner. Eisner had been a student of Harry's in the business law course. She had attended a Records study group at the Rathbuns' home in 1936 and was at the first Sequoia Seminar in 1946. She had gone on to earn a Ph.D. in clinical psychology and came up from her home in southern California to help lead some special seminars in the mid-1950s.[85]

A set of very complete notes from a 1952 continuation seminar gives some insight into the kind of psychological activity that took place in the sessions. A parenthetical comment near the beginning of the notes indicate that there were "several sessions during which Seminar participants verbalized their 'seventh veil' matter, their inmost blocks to further growth and progress on the Way."[86] These group confessions may have owed something to Emilia's years of experience hearing confessions in her Oxford Group work. When she told the participants, "nothing that has been said is a surprise, at least to me," she was repeating language she had used to describe her Buchmanite experience. Emilia assured the group that they became more lovable when they opened up and admitted their "inmost natures and problems," and explained that it was all part of the process of discovering what they could be so that they could see where they were and how they could move toward what God intended them to be.[87]

As the decade progressed the role of psychology in the group's activities increased. In 1956 Emilia Rathbun and Betty Eisner were coleaders of a group that wrote spontaneously on themes suggested by Emilia, "trying to express their own feelings rather than intellectual concepts."[88] In addition to spontaneous writing, they also did Jungian dream interpretation in groups and used art to express their feelings.[89] The 1958 annual report explained, "painting and other art work is becoming an increasingly important part of our program, particularly at the Continuation seminars. We are learning how such activities can contribute to the process of individual change with which we are concerned."[90]

So pervasive was the psychological approach by 1958 and 1959 that almost all of the continuation seminars given in those summers were psychologically focused and many included art. The most explicit was a seminar entitled "Group Therapy" led by Betty Eisner. It was described as "an intensive group therapy situation and will be conducted on a very personal level aimed at removing barriers within the individual which obstruct his growth in creative living. . . . The use of art materials will play an important role."[91]

Two comments made in 1959 indicate that the heavy emphasis on psychology may have gotten out of hand. The announcement letter for the 1959 seminar season cautioned potential participants that the leaders were "neither qualified nor intended to perform the function of psychotherapy," and they would not accept anybody who seemed more interested in that than in pursuing a religious life. About the same time, a handwritten memo from Emilia asked if people should not be "well grounded in the teachings of Jesus and have made the decision to follow the 'way' before they are enrolled in any group which has as its objective the process of introspection (therapy)." And, conversely, she asked if people who started work in psychotherapy should be "told that the process in the seminar structure leads to a choice of 'the way' of life commended by Jesus (commitment)?"[92]

Emilia's [Rathbun] fear that the psychotherapeutic aspects of the work might have begun to take precedence over the religious purpose seems particularly apt in retrospect. Although nobody knew it at the time, Sequoia Seminar was one of a stream of sources for what would become the "human potential" movement of the 1960s. Their stress of religious values kept them from total involvement, but for several years in the late 1950s they were the place where some of the California activists in the human potential movement got their start.

One was Del Carlson. Carlson was a Marine Corps veteran who had been attracted to a Records study group at San Jose State College in 1947 and who had participated actively in Students Concerned. He stayed with the movement after the demise of Students Concerned and was, for a dozen years, one of the mainstays of the group. A high school art teacher, he had his summers free and devoted them to Sequoia Seminar. He was the group's registrar, business manager, and leader of art therapy sessions until 1962.[93]
...
Carlson was also a friend of Michael Murphy, the man who founded Esalen. In fact, Carlson was a coleader of the first formal seminar ever held at Esalen in 1962, when it was still called Slate's Hot Springs.[94]
...
Even more important, both to Sequoia Seminar and the human potential movement, was Willis Harman.

An engineering professor at Stanford, Harman had attended a study group led by Harry [Rathbun] and then had gone to a Sequoia Seminar in 1954. He had not expected the heavy emphasis on meditation, introspection, and self-exposure, but he found that his engineer's rational world view was "permanently destroyed" as a result of his experience there. He embarked on an extended period of self-education in mysticism and psychic phenomena and moved into the inner circle of Sequoia Seminar.[95]

Harman had been very impressed by Gerald Heard's lectures on his experience with mescaline; he also made contact with Myron Stolaroff, one of the original American experimenters with LSD, who was also briefly involved with Sequoia Seminar.

On November 16, 1956, eight of the Sequoia Seminar leadership group accompanied Harman to the home of a physician member of the movement, where Harman took LSD for the first time [Interesting Harman in another interview says 1954] . In subsequent years almost every member of the Sequoia Seminar inner leadership group experimented with LSD on a number of occasions.

Many of the drug sessions were led by Betty Eisner who was very interested in the psychotherapeutic possibilities of low doses of the then legal hallucinogen. She and Harman disagreed strongly, however, on how the drug should be used since he [Harman] preferred larger doses that would provide the user with mystical experiences, rather than the milder effects that Eisner sought.[96]

Even though LSD was still a noncontrolled substance and, therefore, legal to use, Sequoia Seminar employed it very cautiously. It was never distributed to anyone other than group leaders, and their sessions were carefully planned and supervised, usually with the presence of one of the planning group members who was a medical doctor. There appear to have been few if any "bad trips," and the drug-induced mystical experiences and psychotherapeutic sessions are usually remembered positively by those who partook of them.

Experimentation with LSD stopped after 1959 because most of those involved felt there was nothing more to be gained from continued use and perhaps also because of a difficult confrontation between Emilia Rathbun and Betty Eisner that may have involved the use of the drug. Those, like Harman, who wished to pursue further interests in the drug left Sequoia Seminar and became active in other
groups such as Esalen and the International Foundation for Internal Freedom.[97]


Just how far the Rathbuns had moved from the tradition of Henry B. Sharman by the end of the decade is illustrated by the controversy that surrounded the last meeting of the trustees of the Sharman will in 1959. Harry was not only one of the trustees of the self-liquidating foundation set up by the will; he was also its executor.

In 1958 plans were made to dispose of the last twenty-five thousand dollars of the funds from Sharman's estate, and Harry apparently hoped that the bulk of the money could go to Sequoia Seminar. To convince the others that his group met the intention of the will, Harry invited them out to California for a seminar.[98] Opposition from the other trustees to the kind of program that the Rathbuns were running killed both the visit and any hope Harry had of getting Sharman funds, although Harry did lead a seminar for the trustees the next year at Springfield College in Massachusetts.

Word of the psychological emphasis had spread, and those who toed the orthodox Sharman line were not pleased with what they had heard. One trustee reported that a number of students of his had gone to Stanford and had reported back unfavorably on the Rathbuns' work. Another summed up his objections by telling Harry that he believed Sequoia Seminar was "quite different from those led by Dr. Sharman. Very little serious study of the Records themselves seems to be attempted and much time is devoted to the personal problems of the individual members. Training and skill in psychology and psychiatry seem to be very important."[99] And finally, a third pointed out that Sharman had wanted efforts directed at students and faculty, but Harry and Emilia were working mainly with nonacademic adults.[100]

The alienation of the trustees and the experimentation with LSD were both aspects of the way psychology had come to dominate the work of the group. This domination could have made the group an ongoing force within the new human potential movement in California. That course was not followed, however, because in the period between 1959 and 1962 Emilia underwent a number of severe personal strains that eventually climaxed in a religious revelation. This revelation was the basis for a reclarification of the whole meaning and purpose of the movement.

The psychologizing that Emilia had first questioned back in the early 1940s when it was led by Elizabeth Boyden had slowly worked its way into her own group, and by the end of the decade it threatened to eclipse the religious work completely. The philosophy that had evolved was based in part on the validity of psychology as a means for personal insight, but it also used the evolutionary and mystical theories of Gerald Heard, and always the objective study of the life of Jesus in the Sharman tradition. Emilia's personal crisis of the period after 1959 would have the effect of redressing the balance and putting psychology back into a secondary role. Psychology would be exchanged for a new interpretation of the religious message that would finally move Sequoia Seminar from proto-sect to a fully self-conscious religious movement.

The increasing stress on psychology toward the end of the 1950s, and the growing formalization of ideology, were both indications that the group was moving away from the churches (both literally and theoretically) and toward the sect end of the church-sect continuum. The codification of the movement's ideology decreased the likelihood that they would change to go along with trends in the larger society. The focus on psychology was perceived by members as a "service," exactly the kind of service predicted by the economic model as compensation for the increased cost of sect membership. The transition was not yet complete. The most obvious component of a sect is its divergence from standard church values. It is that divergence that makes membership so costly. At the end of the 1950s, Sequoia Seminar was still primarily a gospel study group that could operate from within the churches. There were signs of uniqueness beginning to appear, but they would not be fully embraced until after Emilia had her vision of a New Religion for the Third Age.

| ------------------

http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/eisner_betty/eisner_betty.shtml

Sep 29, 1915 - Jul 1, 2004
Summary
Betty Grover Eisner, Ph.D. was a clinical psychologist who was part of the group of LSD researchers active in Los Angeles in the 1950s and 60s.
According to Oscar Janiger, she participated in discussions about potential socially acceptable uses of LSD with a group including Aldous Huxley, Gerald Heard, Alan Watts, Anais Nin, and Sidney Cohen.

Dr. Eisner worked with LSD, mescaline, amphetamine, ketamine, Ritalin, and carbogen with her patients, both in individual and group settings. Some of the sessions she facilitated in group settings included "encounter group"-style expression, experimental combinations of psychoactive drugs and body work. She conducted important early research into the the use of LSD to treat alcoholism, notably with colleague Sidney Cohen.

In 1959, Dr. Eisner participated in the 10th Josiah Macy Conference on LSD. She also served on the Board of Advisors for the Albert Hofmann Foundation before her death in 2004. Her publications and personal correspondence are archived at Stanford University.

http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/eisner_betty/remembrances_lsd_therapy.pdf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_Eisner

Eisner was a therapist for Bill Wilson, co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, when he tried LSD. In addition to using hallucinogens like LSD and mescaline in psychedelic therapy, Eisner also gave stimulants such as methylphenidate and the inhaled gas mixture carbogen to her patients.

http://www.psychedelic-library.org/hoffer.htm

Treatment of Alcoholism with Psychedelic Therapy
    Abram Hoffer
        From: PSYCHEDELICS, The Uses and Implications of Psychedelic Drugs
        edited by Bernard Aaronson and Humphry Osmond Doubleday & Company, 1970.
        ©Aaronson & Osmond.

Introduction

    Alcoholics Anonymous, the great self-help group-therapy movement, is the only established treatment for alcoholics. Until much more is known about the personal (biochemical and psychological), familial, and social factors that contribute to alcoholism, so it will remain. Most new therapies are merely adjunctive to AA and will continue to be so until it is shown that they have therapeutic value when used alone. In my view, psychedelic therapy is best used as a preparation for AA.

    When Bill W. and Dr. Bob founded AA, alcoholism had not been accepted as a disease, either by society at large or by the medical profession. Society considered it a moral problem, but found itself confronted with an interesting dilemma, for only a small proportion of the total drinking society drank excessively. No moral sanctions were required for the majority, who eventually made social drinking an integral part of the culture.

    The majority who remained moral drinkers could not understand why a minority became intemperate or alcoholic. Moral sanctions were applied on the premise that excessive drinking arose from defects of character, defects of will, and defects in society. These sanctions included education, persuasion, incarceration, and banishment. Unfortunately, the most stringent measures had little permanent effect, and the proportion of the drinking society (a concept developed by Dr. H. Osmond) remained the same or increased. Medicine also considered alcoholism a non-disease.

    The founders of AA introduced the medical model first to alcoholics, later to society, and finally to the medical profession. This concept was very appealing to alcoholics because it gave them a satisfactory explanation for their misfortunes. If they were sick and not evil, then they might expect the same sort of treatment they would receive if they developed pneumonia or diabetes. Bill W. and Dr. Bob also introduced the concept of allergy, which thirty-five years ago was incorporated into medicine as a new group of diseases. (1)

    But AA insisted that alcoholism was more than a physical illness. It also carried strong personal responsibility. An alcoholic could not be censured for being an alcoholic, but he could be for doing nothing about it.

    Society resisted the idea that alcoholics are sick, since it got no guidance from a reluctant medical profession. Doctors expect diseases to be more or less definable, to have treatment that may be ineffective but must be in common use, and to have a predictable prognosis. When they became convinced that AA did help large numbers of alcoholics remain sober, they gradually accepted alcoholics as patients. Even now, the majority of hospitals are extremely reluctant to admit alcoholics who are drunk, and many doctors dread seeing them in their offices. Eventually AA forced the profession to accept the fact that alcoholism, which has been estimated to afflict 5 per cent of the population, is a disease. This marked the beginning of the final solution to the problem. For, having accepted the disease concept, doctors were challenged by the enormous problems, and, in a matter of a few years, several major therapeutic discoveries were made.

    The newer adjunctive therapies developed for alcoholism may be divided into the psychological and the biochemical. Psychotherapy, deconditioning therapy, and psychedelic therapy are examples of purely psychological therapy, while sugar-free diets for relative hypoglycemia, mega vitamin B3, megascorbic acid, and adrenocortical extracts (or extracts of licorice) are examples of pure chemotherapies.

    Psychedelic therapy is the only therapy that has prepared alcoholics to become responsible members of AA, when previously they had been unable to do so.

Psychedelic Therapy

    We must distinguish sharply between psychedelic reactions and the means for inducing them. Failure to understand this distinction has led to several futile researches, best exemplified by the study of Smart and Storm (1964), which was widely circulated in an extreme form before publication of the watered-down version.
 
    Psychedelic therapy refers to a form of psychotherapy in which hallucinogenic drugs are used in a particular way to facilitate the final goal, which for alcoholics is sobriety. The drugs may be mescaline, LSD, psilocybin, and many others, as well as combinations. It is therefore trivial to test the effect of LSD or other hallucinogens on alcoholics in such a way that there is no psychedelic reaction. In fact, these trivial experiences have led to trivial data, as reported by Smart et al. (1966), who claimed that a group of ten alcoholics given LSD did not differ in outcome from a group of ten given another psychoactive drug. Close examination of their report shows that no therapy was given, nor was there any encouragement of discussion of problems. The experience was not psychedelic, but was more in the nature of an inquisition, with the subject strapped to the bed, pretreated with dilantin, and ill from 800 mcg of LSD.

Since no investigator has ever claimed that LSD used in this way does have any therapeutic effect, this experiment suggests that LSD used with no therapeutic intent or skill is not apt to help. One of the subjects given LSD by Smart et al. described his experience in comparison with a psychedelic reaction he received from smaller quantities of LSD in Saskatchewan. The experiences and the outcome were quite different.

    Psychedelic therapy aims to create a set and a setting that will allow proper psychotherapy. The psychedelic therapist works with material that the patient experiences and discusses, and helps him resynthesize a new model of life or a new personal philosophy. During the experience, the patient draws upon information flooding in from the altered environment and from his own past, and uses it to eliminate false ideas and false memories. With the aid of the therapist, he evaluates himself more objectively and becomes more acutely aware of his own responsibility for his situation and, even more important, for doing something about it. He also becomes aware of inner strengths or qualities that help him in his long and difficult struggle toward sobriety.

    The book The Use of LSD in Psychotherapy and Alcoholism, edited by H. A. Abramson (1967), contains the best collection of scientific papers on psychedelic therapy.
 
    Around 1952, Osmond and I had become familiar with psychotomimetic reactions induced by LSD. There was a marked similarity between these reactions and schizophrenia and the toxic psychoses. Delirium tremens is one of the common toxic states. It occurred to us that LSD might be used to produce models of dt's. Many alcoholics ascribed the beginning of their recovery to "hitting bottom," and often "hitting bottom" meant having had a particularly memorable attack of dt's. We thought that LSD could be used this way with no risk to the patient.

We treated our first two alcoholics at the Saskatchewan Hospital, Weyburn, Saskatchewan, and one recovered.

    Other early pilot studies were encouraging, and we increased the tempo of our research until at one time six of our major psychiatric centers in Saskatchewan were using it. As of now, we must have treated close to one thousand alcoholics.

    Within a few years after our first patients were treated, we became aware that a large proportion of our alcoholics did not have psychotomimetic reactions. Their experiences were exciting and pleasant, and yielded insight into their drinking problems. It became evident that a new phenomenon had been recognized in psychiatry. Osmond created the word psychedelic to define these experiences, and announced this at a meeting of the New York Academy of Sciences in 1957.

    Following this, our researches were aimed at improving the quality and quantity of psychedelic reactions. Within the past ten years, major studies, under the direction of Dr. Ross MacLean, Hollywood Hospital, New Westminster, British Columbia, and under the direction of Dr. S. Unger at Spring Grove State Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, have added materially to our knowledge of the effect of psychedelic therapy on alcoholism.

    I will not review the results of psychedelic therapy in detail. This has been done in the books edited by H. A. Abramson and in The Hallucinogens by A. Hoffer and H. Osmond (1967). The one striking conclusion is that every scientist using psychedelic therapy with alcoholics found the same proportion of recoveries. Whether the experiments were considered controlled or not, about 50 per cent were able to remain sober or to drink much less. This seems to be a universal statistic for LSD therapy.

    (1). Dr. Walter Alvarez recently told me that when he wrote a paper on food allergies at the Mayo Clinic about fifty years ago, he was severely criticized by his colleagues. Only strong support from one of the Mayos, who discovered that he himself had a food allergy, protected Alvarez from even-more-powerful assault. Medicine seems very reluctant to take unto itself new diseases. (back)

http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/lsd/lsd_dose.shtml

LSD comes in several different forms. The most common is paper blotter. Other forms include gell caps, liquid, and gelatin. Each form will contain different quantities and purities of lysergic acid diethylamide. The chart below shows dosages for pure LSD measured in micrograms (ug). Micrograms are 1/1,000,000 of a gram.

Oral LSD Dosages
Threshold 20 ug
Light 25 - 75 ug
Common 50 - 150 ug  
Strong 150 - 400 ug
Heavy 400 + ug
LD50 (Lethal Dose*) 12,000 ug
 




Online TahoeBlue

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #2 on: December 31, 2009, 04:56:27 pm »
Excerpts from John Markoff - What the Dormouse Said

http://fileshare200.depositfiles.com/auth-1252948980c9064f26db53789dde2968-66.249.71.8-613571625-19999864-guest/FS200-17/Markoff,_John_-_What_the_Dormouse_Said._How_the_60s_Counterculture_Shaped_the_PC_Industry.pdf

...
Myron Stolaroff had grown up in a Jewish household in Roswell, New Mexico, in the 1920s and 1930s. His father was a local merchant, and the family was prominent locally. Myron graduated first in his class both from his high school and from the local military junior college. At Stanford University, he received a Phi Beta Kappa key and a Tau Beta Pi key in recognition of his scholarship. He was a student at Stanford when David Packard and Bill Hewlett came back to campus to show off their first commercial oscillator. Near the end of the Second World War, he received an engineering degree and took a job working as the first employee of Alexander M. Poni-atoff at a small electric-motor company in Belmont, California.

He began as a design engineer and later helped Poniatoff prototype the first magnetic reel-to-reel tape recorder, which launched the company that took its name from Poniatoff's initials plus "ex" for excellence. Ampex Electric and Manufacturing had been founded in San Carlos after Poniatoff had begun looking for new applications for his high-quality
motors. Ampex is no longer a factor in Silicon Valley and today is remembered largely because its corporate logo is still prominently visible on Highway 101, the freeway that slices through the heart of the Valley. However, Ampex was as significant as Hewlett-Packard in the Valley's lineage, and many pioneering engineers still remember the  company fondly.
...

Of course, none of that was apparent from what was nothing more than an invitation to attend a lecture being given by Harry Rathbun, a professor of business law at Stanford. Rathbun was a charismatic teacher who was tremendously popular on campus, where he lectured to overflow classes on subjects that included discussions of personal ethics and values.

Rathbun's presentation was given in a small library in South Palo Alto, and it struck Stolaroff "between the eyes."14 The themes the law professor addressed that evening included "Who are we?" and "Where are we going?" They were Big Questions About Life. Stolaroff was transported, realizing that his life had been hollow and that the questions Rathbun
was asking and answering mesmerized him.
...

As it turned out, Rathbun's own life had been transformed when he and his wife, Emilia, attended a 1935 wilderness retreat led by Henry B. Sharman, a wealthy retired Canadian. Sharman had written a book entitled Jesus as Teacher, which probed the historical records surrounding the New Testament.

After returning to Stanford, the Rathbuns began conducting study groups for Stanford students in their home on the teachings of Christ. The sessions were later expanded to include a two-week retreat at a center that was established in the mountains about forty miles southwest of campus near the sleepy beach town of Santa Cruz.

They became known as the Sequoia Seminars and ultimately, in the 1970s, spun off a series of cultlike groups (including the Creative Initiative Foundation, Beyond War, and Women to Women Building the Earth for the Children's Sake) that attracted a broad, largely upper-middle-class following.

In many cases, people who joined them sold their homes and personal belongings and dedicated their lives completely to these groups. However, long before the 1970s, the Sequoia Seminars had a less well known but more dramatic and far-reaching consequence, in their immediate impact on Myron Stolaroff. Although he had been angered by Harry Rathbun's sneaky trick of guiding him to the phi-losophy of Jesus, Stolaroff remained intrigued by Rathbun's ideas.

The following year, he decided to set aside his anti-Jesus bias and his concern about what was happening to Jews around the world in the name of Jesus and attend a longer set of discussion groups led by the Rathbuns. At the seminar, Stolaroff became a convert. By the time it was over, he felt that he had experienced true love for others for the first time in his life and become a believer in "the power of the message" of Jesus.15

He decided that the most important thing that he could do with his life was to commit himself to the will of God.
....
It was during one of his visits in 1956 that Heard spoke enthusiastically to Stolaroff about a new drug called LSD. The very idea shocked the young engineer, who couldn't figure out why a world-famous mystic would need to take a drug. Nevertheless, Heard was fervent and told Stolaroff about an unusual man who would occasionally come from Canada and administer the  substance to both him and Aldous Huxley.

With two passports and with a murky history of connections to both law enforcement and intelligence agencies, Al Hubbard was without question one of the most curious characters in America during the 1950s and 1960s. There are conflicting accounts of Hubbard's life, but the best summary of his early years appears in Jay Stevens's Storming Heaven: LSD and the American Dream.

Born in Kentucky, Hubbard surfaced publicly in Seattle in 1919 with the invention of a perpetual-motion machine.17 Later, there were tales of his running war materials by boat up the West Coast, where they were then shipped by land through Canada to Great Britain. And there was an intimation that he had had some loose affiliation with the Manhattan Project as a black-market supplier of uranium. Even after Stolaroff had come to know Hubbard well, he wasn't certain where the truth lay. But he soon fell under Hubbard's spell, viewing him as an especially powerful and articulate individual.

Hubbard is intriguing in part because while most popular accounts of the introduction of LSD in America focus on the roles played by author Ken Kesey and psychologist Timothy Leary, Hubbard was an earlier proponent, and an important influence in the use of psychedelics by a number of Silicon Valley's pioneering engineers.

Hubbard, while he was the  president of a Canadian uranium mine, had discovered psychedelics in the early 1950s when he participated in mescaline experiments at the  University of Vancouver.

He found LSD in 1955, and in addition to Huxley, Heard, and perhaps more than one thousand others during the 1950s, he introduced the drug to Stolaroff and indirectly to a small group of engineers who formed a splinter group from the Rathbuns' Sequoia Seminar.
...


Myron Stolaroff


He [Stolaroff] returned to California a zealot, a convert to the new LSD faith. He had decided that experiences like the one he had had in Canada were the answer to the world's problems.

LSD would give society a new set of powerful tools to advance human development. Like Engelbart, Stolaroff set off on his own grand quest to augment the human mind.

His first stop was his closest friends at the Sequoia Seminar, where he had become a member of the group's planning committee. He introduced them to LSD in turn and created an informal research group composed of five fellow engineers and their wives.

The group included a young Ampex engineer, Don Allen; Stanford electrical engineering professor Willis Harman; and several others from both Hewlett-Packard and SRI.

Stolaroff's study group set in motion an unheralded but significant train of events, plunging a small group of technologists into the world of psychedelics almost a decade before LSD became a standard recreational drug on American college campuses.

...

Fadiman had gone to Harvard and studied social relations. He soon came to consider the field as psychology without rats, and he had instead focused his energy on being an actor. After graduating in 1960, he spent a year in Paris, and while he was there Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert along with Aldous Huxley passed through on their way to deliver an academic paper on psychedelics in Copenhagen.

In Paris, Alpert, who had been Fadiman's professor at Harvard, told him, "The greatest thing in the world has happened to me, and I want to share it with you." He proceeded to pull a small bottle out of his pocket, introducing his former student to LSD.

Forced back to America by the threat of the draft, Fadiman moved to California a year later and arrived at Stanford as a distinctly unhappy graduate student in 1961. He was feeling that school was a waste of his life, which he would have rather spent in more cultured
Augmentation Europe.

Moreover, having recently been introduced to psychedelic drugs, the world suddenly seemed like a much different place. Full of self-pity, he began leafing through the Stanford class catalog looking for something that might be interesting to study. He found a small section of crossdisciplinary  classes, including one being taught by an electrical engineering professor, Willis Harman, called "The Human Potential." The class was to be a discussion of what was the highest and the best to which human beings could aspire.

In his new, more highly attuned state, Fadiman thought to himself, There's something here. That morning, he walked across campus to visit Harman. The man to whom he introduced himself looked like a totally straight and conservative engineering professor, and when Fadiman asked if he could take the interdisciplinary course, Harman replied that it was already full for the quarter, and perhaps he should think about it for the next quarter.

"I've taken psilocybin three times," Fadiman said quietly. The professor walked across the room, shut his office door, and said, "We'd better talk."

In the end, Fadiman became Harman's teaching assistant. He was able to talk to the students about things that Harman felt he couldn't. He also soon became the youngest researcher at the newly founded International Foundation for Advanced Study, Myron Sto-laroff's project for continuing his research on the uses of LSD.

When Stolaroff and Harman set up shop in Menlo Park in March 1961, they weren't the only ones on the Midpeninsula exploring the therapeutic uses of LSD. Experiments were already being conducted at the Veterans' Administration Hospital in Menlo Park, and the Palo Alto Mental Research Institute had also begun introducing local psychiatrists and psychologists, and even writers such as Allen Ginsberg, to psychedelic drugs.15

But the foundation was something new. Engineers rather than medical professionals led the project, and the clinic was intent on charging a five-hundred-dollar fee for each experience. An early local newspaper report described the foundation's goals as being "partly medical, partly scientific, partly philosophical, partly mystical."16

Stolaroff, with the help of Willis Harman, largely funded the foundation, the real purpose of which was to conduct the research needed to make LSD credible in the medical profession. They worked with several psychologists, including Fadiman, as well as the mysterious Al Hubbard, who was a mentor to both Harman and Stolaroff and who became a member of the board of directors.

Fadiman, who soon was teaching at San Francisco State, finished his Ph.D. in psychology at Stanford, and his research at the foundation focused on the changes in beliefs, attitude, and behavior that resulted from taking LSD.
...
The foundation was not far from Roy Kepler's bookstore and a short walk from the hole-in-the-wall store where the Midpeninsula Free University store and print shop were to locate in the mid-sixties. In another building a block away, Brand later established the Whole Earth Truck Store and the Whole Earth Catalog. About a mile away from the truck store, the original People's Computer Company settled and in turn was the catalyst for the Homebrew Computer Club in the mid-1970s. The club itself served to ignite the personal-computer industry.
...
Most of the Bay Area was comfortably oblivious. Beginning in 1961, for a period of more than four years, the International Foundation for Advanced Study led more than 350 people through LSD experiences.
...Among the participants were Dr. Charles Savage, a physician who had conducted medical experiments for the U.S. Navy in the early 1950s, exploring the use of psychedelics as a truth serum,
...
In his hunt for subjects for the foundation's creativity studies, Fadiman called George Leonard, a California-based editor for Look. The magazine was at work on a special issue entitled "California: A New Game with New Rules." Leonard and a colleague came to the foundation and took part in an LSD session in an attempt to help them think through the design of the issue.

In the end, Leonard, who wrote about his trip in his  autobiography, Walking on the Edge of the World, wasn't sure if the experience made a difference. However, the June 28,1966, edition of Look introduced the rest of the world to the social and cultural changes that were ripping through California. On the cover was a photo of Jim and Dorothy Fadiman, locked in a deep embrace amid a field of California poppies.

A backlash was inevitable. Fadiman continued to oversee the LSD creativity research with scientists and engineers, until one day, while
he was at the office with a group of four scientists lying on the floor listening to music in preparation for work on their technical problems
while under a low dose of LSD, he opened an official-looking letter from the Food and Drug Administration. He knew what was coming.

It was July 1966, and the government was looking for ways to show that it was acting to stop teenage drug use. The letter was an order to immediately stop the foundation's research. Fadiman turned to his colleagues and said, "I think we opened this letter tomorrow."

The formal experiments ended, but the secret was out. In 1966 and 1967, LSD was seeping out of an isolated bohemian niche and into the mainstream of America. It would even permeate SRI, the largely military funded research center that sat just blocks away from offices of the foundation and the Whole Earth Truck Store.




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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #3 on: December 31, 2009, 06:52:53 pm »
Stanford Alumni Obits:

http://www.stanfordalumni.org/news/magazine/2002/sepoct/classnotes/obituaries.html
...
Lucille Emma Orsolini Carley, ’34, of Palo Alto, April 9, at 93. A Nursing School alumna, she worked as a registered nurse until her marriage to Leon Carley, ’29, JD ’33, who predeceased her.

She co-founded the Sequoia Seminar, an organization promoting nonviolent conflict resolution. The organization was a forerunner of the Foundation for Global Community.

Survivors: her daughter, Sandra Varco; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.


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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #4 on: December 31, 2009, 07:15:46 pm »
Sequoia Seminar's -> Stolaroff  -> Ampex -> Owsley -> The Grateful Dead

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/topics/Aoxomoxoa
Aoxomoxoa is the third studio  by the Grateful Dead

It was originally titled Earthquake Country. Many Deadheads consider this era of the Dead to be the experimental apex of the band's history. It is also the first album with Tom Constanten  as an official member of the band. Rolling Stone, upon reviewing the album, mentioned that "no other music sustains a lifestyle so delicate and loving and lifelike." The album was certified gold by the  on May 13, 1997.

The title of the album is a palindrome  created by cover artist Rick Griffin  and lyricist Robert Hunter . According to the audio version of the Rock Scully memoir, Living with the Dead (read by the author and former Dead co-manager himself), the title is pronounced "OX-OH-MOX-OH-AH". The words "GRATEFUL DEAD" on the front of the album, written in large, flowing capital letters, can also be read "WE ATE THE ACID". The artwork around the bottom edge of the album cover depicts several phallic representations. In 1991 Rolling Stone selected Aoxomoxoa as having the eighth best album cover of all time. Tapes of outtakes from the recording sessions exist among fans.

The group had already initiated recording sessions for the album when Ampex manufactured and released the first Multitrack recording  machine offering 16 tracks of recording and playback (model number MM-1000). This doubled the number of tracks the band had available when they recorded Anthem of the Sun the previous year

Quote
Ampex is an American electronics company founded in 1944 by Alexander M. Poniatoff. The name AMPEX is an acronym, created by its founder, which stands for Alexander M. Poniatoff Excellence. At one time public, Ampex is currently a privately held company.- Origins :Alexander M...

As a direct consequence, the band spent eight months off-and-on in the studio not only recording the album but getting used to—and experimenting with—the new technology. Garcia commented that "it was our first adventure with sixteen-track and we tended to put too much on everything ... A lot of the music was just lost in the mix, a lot of what was really there." As a result, Garcia and Lesh went back in the studio in 1971 to remix the album, removing whole sections of songs for a re-release. The first release from 1969 has not been commercially available since the 1971 remix replaced it. Although somewhat rare, this original mix still circulates among tape traders and vinyl collectors to this day.

Musical personnel
Jerry Garcia
 - guitars, vocals  Bob Weir
 - guitars, vocals  Tom Constanten
 - keyboards  Ron "Pigpen" McKernan - organ
Phil Lesh
 - basses, vocals  Bill Kreutzmann
 - percussion  Mickey Hart

Production personnel
Grateful Dead  - producers and arrangers
Bob Matthews - executive engineer
Betty Cantor - engineer
Ron Wickersham - consulting engineer
Dan Healy - consulting engineer

Owsley Stanley
Owsley Stanley also known as The Bear, was an underground LSD cook, the first to produce large quantities of pure LSD....  - consulting engineer (credited as "Owsley")

Ram Rod, John P. Hagen & Jackson - equipment managers (listed as "Kwipment Krew")

| ------------------

Owsley Stanley - - Where did Charles Manson get his LSD?

Questions I ask myself - Where did Charles Manson get his LSD? - In progress...
(Most likely from Tim Scully)  


Laurel Canyon - David McGowan - Birth of the Hippie Generation - Abstract  

For the unrepentant patriarch of LSD, long, strange trip

For the unrepentant patriarch of LSD, long, strange trip winds back to Bay Area
Joel Selvin, Chronicle Senior Pop Music Critic
Thursday, July 12, 2007




http://www.thebear.org/

The small, barefoot man in black T-shirt and blue jeans barely rates a  second glance from the other Starbucks patrons in downtown San Rafael, although  he is one of the men who virtually made the '60s. Because Augustus Owsley  Stanley III has spent his life avoiding photographs, few people would know what  he looks like.

    The name Owsley became a noun that appears in the Oxford dictionary as  English street slang for good acid. It is the most famous brand name in LSD  history. Probably the first private individual to manufacture the psychedelic,  "Owsley" is a folk hero of the counterculture, celebrated in songs by the
Grateful Dead and Steely Dan.  

    For more than 20 years, Stanley  --  at 72, still known as the Bear  --   has been living with his wife, Sheila, off the grid, in the outback of  Queensland, Australia, where he makes small gold and enamel sculptures and  keeps in touch with the world through the Internet.

    As a planned two-week visit to the Bay Area stretched to three, four and  then five weeks, Bear agreed to give The Chronicle an interview because a  friend asked him. He has rarely consented to speak to the press about his life,  his work or his unconventional thinking on matters such as the coming ice age
or his all-meat diet.  

    Sporting a buccaneer's earring he got when he was in jail and a hearing  aid on the same ear, he keeps a salty goatee, and the sides of his face look  boiled clean from seven weeks of maximum radiation treatment for throat cancer.  Having lost one of his vocal cords, he speaks only in a whispered croak these  days. At one point, he was reduced to injecting his puree of steak and espresso  directly into his stomach.  

    "I never set out to change the world," he rasps in recalling his early  manufacture of LSD. "I only set out to make sure I was taking something (that)  I knew what it was. And it's hard to make a little. And my friends all wanted  to know what they were taking, too. Of course, my friends expanded very
rapidly."  

   By conservative estimates, Bear Research Group made more than 1.25 million  doses of LSD between 1965 and 1967, essentially seeding the entire modern  psychedelic movement.

    Less well known are Bear's contributions to rock concert sound. As the  original sound mixer for the Grateful Dead, he was responsible for fundamental advances in audio technology [AMPEX] , things as basic now as monitor speakers that  allow vocalists to hear themselves onstage.

    Says the Dead's Bob Weir: "He's good for a different point of view at  about any given time. He's brilliant. He knows everything."

    Bear, whose grandfather was a Kentucky governor and U.S. senator, grew up  in Los Angeles and Arlington, Va. He was thrown out of military school in the  eighth grade for being drunk and dropped out of school altogether at 18. He  managed to get accepted to the University of Virginia, where he spent a year  studying engineering. By 1956, he was in the Air Force, specializing in  electronics and radar.  

    Later, Bear studied ballet, acting and Russian, worked in jet propulsion labs [JPL] as well as radio and television, and then entered UC Berkeley in 1963, but  lasted less than a year.  

    Then he discovered acid [1963-1964?]
.

    He found the recipe for making LSD in the Journal of Organic Chemistry at  the UC Berkeley library. Soon after, Bear began to cook acid.  [His girlfriend was a chemist at UCB]

    The Berkeley police raided his first lab in 1966 and confiscated a  substance that they claimed was methedrine. When it turned out to be something  else  --  probably a component of LSD  --  Bear not only walked free but  successfully sued the cops for the return of his lab equipment.

    By the time he made a special batch called Monterey Purple for the 1967  Monterey Pop Festival   --  Owsley Purple was the secret smile on Jimi Hendrix's face that night  --  "Owsley" was an underground legend.

    In December 1967, agents arrested him at his secret lab in Orinda. The  "LSD Millionaire" headline in The Chronicle prompted the Dead to write the song  "Alice D. Millionaire." In 1970, after a pot bust in Oakland, a judge revoked  Bear's bail, and he served two years at Terminal Island near the Los Angeles
Harbor.  

    "If you make some, you've got to move some to get some money to make it,"  he says now. "But then you had to give a lot away to keep the street price  down. So anyway, I'm sort of embedded in this thing that I'm tangled up in. ...  Just as soon as it became illegal, I wanted out. Then, of course, I felt an
obligation."

    Bear, chemist to Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters, was involved with the  Dead almost from the band's beginnings at Kesey's notorious Acid Tests. Bear  was the Dead's first patron and, briefly, their manager. He bought the band  sound equipment and began to use the Dead as a laboratory for audio research [with AMPEX equipment] .

    "We'd never thought about high-quality PAs," says the Dead's Weir. "There was no such thing until Bear started making one."

    Bear made the first public address system specifically dedicated to music  in 1966. If he was the first concert sound engineer in rock music to take his  job seriously, his habit of making tape recordings of the shows he mixed also  gave the Dead an unprecedented archive of live recordings dating back to the
band's first days. Many of Bear's tapes have been turned into albums.
 
    Bear has always lived in a quite particular world. "He can be very anal retentive, on a certain level, on a genius level," says Paul Kantner of   Jefferson Airplane. "I've seen him send his eggs back three times at Howard  Johnson's."  

    His all-meat diet is a well-known example. When he was younger, Bear read  about the Eskimos eating only fish and meat and became convinced that humans  are meant to be exclusively carnivorous. The members of the Grateful Dead  remember living with Bear for several months in 1966 in Los Angeles, where the  refrigerator contained only bottles of milk and a slab of steak, meat they  fried and ate straight out of the pan. His heart attack several years ago had  nothing to do with his strict regimen, according to Bear, but more likely the  result of some poisonous broccoli his mother made him eat as a youth.  

    As a sound mixer, Bear holds equally strict viewpoints, insisting that the  most effective rock concert systems should have only a single source of sound,  his argument quickly veering into the realm of psycho-acoustics.

    "The PA can only be in one spot," he says. "All the sounds have to come  from a single place because the human brain is carrying around the most  sophisticated sound processing of any computer or living creature. It equals  the bats that fly by echo. It equals the dolphins. It equals the owls that hunt
at night without any daylight at all. It is a superb system for locating and  separating one sound from everything else."  

    Bear left Northern California in the early '80s, convinced that a natural  disaster was imminent. He predicted at the time that global warming would lead  to a six-week-long ultra-cyclone that could cover the Northern Hemisphere with  a new ice age. Determining that the tropical northern side of Australia would  be the most likely region to survive, Bear made a beeline for Queensland and  says he felt at home the moment he set foot on the new continent.

    "I might be right about the ice age thing," he allows. "I might be wrong."

    Old friends express shock that Bear would ever even admit to that  possibility, but, if not exactly mellowed in his old age, he has found room to  accommodate other points of view.     "He's come a long way," says Wavy Gravy, who visited Bear in Australia  this year. "He used to be real snappy and grumpy. Now he can be actually  sweet."      His four children are grown. He has five grandchildren, and his oldest  son, Pete, in Florida, just became a grandfather, making Bear a  great-grandfather for the first time. His other son, Starfinder, a  veterinarian, hosted a party for him last month at his Oakland home attended by  the old Dead crowd [I've been there] , a tortoise and a caged iguana. He has two daughters, Nina  and Redbird, and maintains his own Web site (www.thebear.org) where he sells his sculpture and posts various diatribes and essays.  

    He keeps up with the music scene  --  he singles out Wolfmother and the  Arctic Monkeys as new bands he likes. "Any time the music on the radio starts  to sound like rubbish, it's time to take some LSD," he says.   Owsley Stanley (he legally dropped the "Augustus" 40 years ago) has also not joined the ranks of the penitent psychedelicists who look on their  experiences as youthful indiscretions.  

    "I wound up doing time for something I should have been rewarded for," he  says. "What I did was a community service, the way I look at it. I was punished  for political reasons. Absolutely meaningless. Was I a criminal? No. I was a  good member of society. Only my society and the one making the laws are
different."

    At the hilltop San Anselmo home where Bear had been house-sitting, pretty  much all available space was taken over with his belongings. He squatted over  the piles, trying to figure out what to ship and what to take with him. Two  days before his flight, it looks like he'll need every minute.

    This time, he was extending his stay to catch his old friends Jorma  Kaukonen and Jack Casady of Hot Tuna play at the Fillmore. But when he left for  the airport the next day, he got as far as Sausalito before he discovered that  he had left the briefcase with the tickets back in San Anselmo, and the trip
home was postponed for another week.

    "I even said, 'I wonder what I'm leaving behind this time?' before I  left," he says, somewhat sadly.

| ------------------

http://www.brainsturbator.com/forums/viewthread/253/
http://www.siliconvalleywatcher.com/mt/archives/2005/06/a_tribute_to_on.php


Owsley Stanley appears at '67 drug arraignment. Chronicle photo, 1967
Credit: Chronicle Photo

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Owsley_Stanley

Owsley Stanley (born Augustus Owsley Stanley III, January 19, 1935) also known as The Bear, was an underground LSD cook, the first to produce large quantities of pure LSD.

His total production is estimated at around half a kilogram of LSD, or roughly 5 million 100-microgram "hits" of normal potency, although accounts vary widely. The widespread and low-cost (often given away free) availability of Stanley's high-quality LSD in the San Francisco area in the mid-1960s may have been crucial for the emergence of the hippie movement during the Summer of Love in the Haight-Ashbury area, which one historian of that movement, Charles Perry, has described as "one big LSD party." Stanley was also an accomplished sound engineer, and the longtime soundman and financier for seminal psychedelic rock band the Grateful Dead.

Stanley designed some of the first high-fidelity sound systems for rock music, culminating in the massive "Wall of Sound" electrical amplification system used by the Grateful Dead in their live shows, at the time a highly innovative feat of engineering, and was involved with the founding of high-end musical instrument maker Alembic Inc and the pre-eminent concert sound equipment manufacturer Meyer Sound. The combination of his notoriety in the psychedelic scene and his reclusive tendencies—in part cultivated to confuse the authorities; he avoided being photographed and refused to be interviewed for many years—led to the perpetuation of many inaccurate tales about him.
...
Early life
When Stanley was twenty-one, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force in 1956 and served for eighteen months before being discharged in 1958. Later, inspired by a 1958 performance of the Bolshoi Ballet, he began studying ballet in Los Angeles, supporting himself for a time as a professional dancer.[1] In 1963, he enrolled at the University of California, Berkeley where he became involved in the psychoactive drug scene. He dropped out after a semester, took a technical job at KGO-TV, and began producing LSD in a small lab located in the bathroom of a house near campus. His makeshift laboratory was raided by police on February 21, 1965. He beat the charges and successfully sued for the return of his equipment. The police were looking for methamphetamine, but found only LSD—which was not illegal at the time.

Stanley moved to Los Angeles to pursue the production of LSD. He used his Berkeley lab proceeds to buy 800 grams of lysergic acid monohydrate, the basis for LSD. His first shipment arrived on March 30, 1965. He produced 300,000 capsules (270 micrograms each) of LSD by May 1965 and then returned to the Bay Area.

In September 1965, Stanley became the primary LSD supplier to Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters; by this point Sandoz LSD was hard to come by and "Owsley Acid" had become the new standard. He was featured (most prominently his freak-out at the Muir Beach Acid Test in November 1965) in The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, a book detailing the history of Kesey and the Merry Pranksters by Tom Wolfe. Stanley attended the Watts Acid Test on February 12, 1966 with his new apprentice Tim Scully and provided the LSD.

| ---------------------

http://www.scribd.com/doc/20565623/storming-heaven-american-dream
Storming Heaven - LSD & The American Dream
Author: Jay Stevens
...
Owsley's scientific aptitude gained him admittance to the University of Virginia's School of Engineering. He lasted a year. By 1956 he was in the Air Force. He spent eighteen months at Edwards Air Force Base, in the high desert plateau east of Los Angeles, specializing in
electronics and radar
.

After his discharge, he moved to Los Angeles, where the electronics boom was just beginning, and spent the next few years drifting from job to job, never making more than eight thousand dollars a year, and never really exercising the intellect he knew he possessed.

During these years Owsley married, divorced, and remarried in a Tijuana ceremony that was later invalidated. He fathered a child, moved back with his first wife and then out again—"just a little boy afraid to grow up, a Peter Pan," one of his wives later told a reporter.4
In 1963 he was arrested for writing $645 dollars worth of bad checks, for which he received a suspended sentence and three years' probation.

After his trial ended, Owsley decided to take another crack at college, this time at Berkeley. He rented a room in a cheap boarding-house that catered to students and ex-students and began "moving in boxes full of such stuff as ballet shoes, a complete beekeeper's outfit and a painting in progress that showed the arm of Christ on the cross, portrayed more or less from a Christ's-eye view."5 Whatever competition he had as "house eccentric" was soon routed.

Owsley wrote poetry, studied Russian, drew strange but technically acceptable pictures, was a ballet enthusiast and an electronics nut. He was a sharp but eccentric dresser, a bit of a dandy, and he preferred to be known by his nickname. Bear. He reminded housemate
Charles Perry of a character in William Burroughs's Naked Lunch, the one who "has a theory on everything, like what kind of underwear is healthy."6 Some of his theories were truly brilliant, others merely weird, but he defended them all with a tenacity that was wearing on
those who thought the whole thing was about becoming mellow, hanging out, absorbing and contemplating. But if Owsley was hyperopinionated, he wasn't a bully about it. "There was something disinterested and nobly intentioned in his relentless enthusiasms. And his ideas were never boring," remembered Perry.

Owsley never ate dinner with us because he was antivegetarian. He argued that since the human race is descended from carnivorous apes, our digestive system is designed for meat alone, and vegetables are slow poison. Once when we smoked some hashish and developed a case of the munchies, he accused me of trying to poison him with apple pie. "I haven't had any plant food in my system for years," he groused between mouthfuls. "My digestion will be f_cked up for a month."7

He lasted a semester at Berkeley before quitting to take a technical job at KGO-TV. On the surface it seemed he was settling back into his habitual rut, and indeed he might have but for two additional factors. The first was his discovery of LSD. What happened to Owsley in the Other World we can only surmise from the reports of others.

Tim Leary, in his incomparable style, wrote how Owsley had "taken the full LSD trip, hurled down through his cellular reincarnations, disintegrated beyond life into pulsing electronic grids, whirled down beyond atomic forms to that unitary center that is one, pure, radiant, humming vibration."8 And when he whirled back up he was no longer the dilettante artist, the brilliant f**k-up.

Owsley returned with a mission: he was going to save the world by making the purest and cheapest and most abundant LSD possible.

And this was where the second factor became important. By the purest chance, Owsley had just begun a romance with a chemistry graduate student at Berkeley named Melissa.

Owsley's first lab was in the bathroom of a house near the Berkeley campus. There is some evidence that in addition to LSD, he was also making Methedrine. At least this was what the police thought when they raided the house in February 1965, and confiscated a chemical that may or may not have been an intermediate step toward LSD. It wasn't Methedrine, in any case, although that is what the police decided to charge him with.

Owsley's reaction to the bust became the foundation of his legend. Instead of panicking, he hired Arthur Harris, the deputy mayor of Berkeley, as his lawyer, and Harris quickly got the case thrown out on the grounds that no Methedrine had been found. But Owsley wasn't
content with simple vindication. Once the charges were dropped, Owsley turned around and successfully sued the police for the return of all his confiscated laboratory equipment. Then he disappeared.

He surfaced briefly in Alexandria, Virginia, where he contacted his family. "He was only four miles away but we spoke on the phone," his father later told a reporter. "He got mad at me, tried to tell me booze is worse [than drugs]. I told him to wash his hands and come back
and talk to me about it … We haven't had a pleasant relationship. We're not in accord with what he's doing. His life is divorced from ours. He's had two wives and a child by each and lives with another woman. When he came here with that floozy I wouldn't let him in."9 As a
parting shot, AOS2 described his son as "emotionally unbalanced, but has a brilliant' mind."

Los Angeles became Owsley's new base of operations. He formed a company called Bear Research Group and began ordering the necessary chemicals for synthesizing LSD. Using the Bear Research cover, he purchased substantial quantities of lysergic monohydrate, the essential ingredient in the LSD synthesis. All told he accumulated 800 grams—500 from Cycio Chemical and 300 from International Chemical and Nuclear Corp—signing, in both instances, affidavits to the effect that the chemicals would be used for research purposes only. He paid cash—twenty thousand dollars in hundred-dollar bills to Cycio alone, which suggested that the Berkeley factory, despite its short lifespan, had been more lucrative than anyone supposed.

Owsley received his first shipment of lysergic monohydrate on March 30, 1965. By May he had turned it into LSD. His method of distribution was largely word of mouth, which may be why the police once again learned of his clandestine lab. Unbeknownst to Owsley, Captain Alfred Tremblay, commander of the Los Angeles narcotics division, was emptying his garbage cans at regular intervals. Among the items Tremblay retrieved were several order forms, one of which came from Portland, Oregon, with a request for forty capsules and a
postscript: "love to Melissa."10

A year later Owsley's garbage would be prominently displayed during Tremblay's Congressional testimony. But by then Owsley had vanished from Tremblay's turf. As soon as his first run was complete he returned to San Francisco, where he amazed his old
housemates with the fact that he had actually made his own LSD. According to Charles Perry, Owsley's first product was "devastatingly strong in an almost heavy-handed way that recalled Owsley's own insistent manner." Like the Pranksters, Owsley's psychedelic perspective contained a lot of machismo; he was always taunting his friends to "take two and really cut loose into the cosmos."11

Owsley learned of Kesey sometime in the summer of 1965, setting the stage for their fateful meeting in the early morning hours after the aborted Beatles party. Fateful because without Owsley the Acid Tests probably would never have taken place, for the simple reason that LSD was too difficult to obtain. The dream of handing out thousands of doses was just that, a fantasy, or had been until that cocky little boho materialized out of the crowd of teenyboppers and said, "I'm Owsley."

This was the second bar in the Owsley legend: he was the Pranksters' chemist.

Flush with money, Owsley became the counterculture's most benevolent patron, buying sound equipment for indigent bands like the Grateful Dead and bankrolling the Haight's first newspaper, the San Francisco Oracle. According to his old housemate, Charles Perry, Owsley's Berkeley hideout frequently resembled a medieval court, with "a regular retinue of petitioners … present[ing] themselves like serfs pleading for boons from the King. I can still see Owsley listening warily but regally to their requests, enthroned in the nude on a huge fur-covered chair, drying his hair with a hair dryer."12 Owsley's personal enthusiasms, always exotic, became even grander. He collected oriental rugs and state-of-the-art electronics. He kept an owl, which he fed live mice. He made personalized perfumes, mixing the essences to suit his interpretation of the recipient's personality.

 If Owsley didn't invent the hippie dealer look, he certainly perfected it, with his elaborate turquoise belts and handtooled
boots. Food was another of his passions, and he enjoyed entertaining his entourage at various fine restaurants. The price of the meal was usually an Owsley soliloquy, either on the subject of antivegetarianism or else his famous LSD rap, a marathon romp through
Einsteinian physics and Buddhist philosophy, which added up to one large apercu: the Divine Force had given mankind LSD to counteract the discovery of nuclear fission.

| -------------------

http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/scully_tim/scully_tim.shtml

Tim Scully
Aug 27, 1944 -
Summary
Tim Scully is best known in the psychedelic underground for his work in the production of LSD from 1966 to 1969, for which he was indicted in 1973 and convicted in 1974. His best known product, dubbed "Orange Sunshine", was considered the standard for quality LSD in 1969. Scully worked with Owsley Stanley and Nick Sand in the late 1960s.

During his LSD manufacturing career, Scully worked in four labs (documented in his 1973 trial):
With Bear (Owsley) in a Pt. Richmond, CA lab in 1966, as his apprentice
With Bear in a first Denver lab (set up by Scully) in 1967
On his own in a second Denver lab in 1968
In a Windsor, CA lab, which he set up in 1969 (where Orange Sunshine was made and where Nick Sand learned the process)

Scully had his work "busted" twice — once in 1969 for the 1968 Denver lab (the search was eventually ruled illegal in 1972) and once in 1973 for the 1969 Windsor lab conspiracy (which resulted in a 20 year sentence). Scully spent his time in prison helping with computers and improving communications for disabled prisoners.

His entire life, Tim Scully has been interested in cutting edge technology and computers. As a teen in 1958, he earned an honorable mention at a San Francisco Bay Area science fair for designing and building a small computer. He later received recognition for building a small linear accelerator pictured in a 1961 edition of the Oakland Tribune. He was trying to make gold atoms from mercury.

Scully has been a pilot much of his adult life and has worked in biofeedback and interface systems for people with disabilities. He has published eight articles on the topic of biofeedback and as many on technical computer topics. He retired from his years of work with Autodesk in 2005 and is currently researching a book on the underground history of LSD.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #5 on: December 31, 2009, 08:16:18 pm »
The Berkeley ButterCup  Bakery - Kary Mullis - LSD and Suze Orman

Suze's got a twinkle in her eye, doesn't she?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jdyf333/2075297284/


Myron J. Stolaroff, the former Ampex executive, noted in 1999 that LSD was the most important invention of the last 1,000 years. No intelligent well-informed person would disagree.

Berkeley was world headquarters for LSD, a substance which the government conservatively estimates more than 90 million people have taken. (In 1993 a ranking DEA official, Gene Haislip, stated that the entire global supply was controlled by a group of approximately 100 people in the bay area.)

I was present when much LSD was delivered to the very tiny Buttercup bakery in Berkeley.

The manager of the Buttercup was Kary Mullis, the inventor of the ultra-important polymerase chain reaction DNA test.

Mullis famously attributes his invention to the fact that he took LSD in Berkeley.

The waitress at the Buttercup was Suze Orman, who went on to become the bestselling financial author. She was frequently annoyed at the 2 customers, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak, who were poor and tried to get free coffee.

When asked how Apple got the jump on IBM, Jobs famously said "Maybe they didn't take enough LSD." (Or check out the cover story in FORTUNE magazine, "The Edison of the Internet", about long-haired hippie Bill Joy and the U.C. Berkeley computer group.)

 A google search I just did shows 26,200 results for the quote "There are 2 major products that come out of Berkeley--LSD and UNIX."

There was a reason the President of the United States, Richard Nixon, labeled former Berkeley resident Timothy Leary "the most dangerous man in America". The reason, of course, was Leary's advocacy of LSD. In the words of a popular song from that time ("San Francisco [be sure to wear some flowers in your hair]" by Scott Mckenzie, 1967): "ALL ACROSS THE NATION, SUCH A STRANGE VIBRATION"...

("I never heard anyone really go into this, but the real power of LSD lay in the fact that, if you were a biochemist and your roommate had a trust fund, you could, in a long weekend, produce 5- to 10-million hits. To produce 5- to 10-million hit of any other psychedelic, you would have to have the resources of Upjohn Corporation. I mean it's an industrial scale undertaking. Because LSD is active in the microgram range, it is unique in that you're not simply able to get your neighborhood or your campus high, you are a political force at the national level.

If you're sitting on 10- to 15-million hits of LSD, you have a gun poised at the head of the establishment, and they react to it that way."

"Steve Jobs has never been shy about his use of psychedelics, famously calling his LSD experience 'one of the two or three most important things I have done in my life.'"

---Ryan Grim. Posted on huffingtonpost.com on July 8, 2009.
(please click on the link below to read more:
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ryan-grim/read-the-never-before-pub_b_227887.html

http://articles.sfgate.com/2008-10-25/business/17136595_1_oprah-magazine-foreclosure-crisis-economic-crisis/3
Q&A with personal financial guru Suze Orman

October 25, 2008 |By Carolyn Said, Chronicle Staff Writer
...
Q: You have some strong ties to the Bay Area; tell us about them.

A: In 1973, I came to Berkeley from Illinois and slept in my van on Hearst Avenue for four months while I worked in the hills for a tree service helping cut down eucalyptus trees. I was a waitress at the Buttercup Bakery (in Berkeley) from 1973 to 1980, making $400 a month.

E-mail Carolyn Said at csaid@sfchronicle.com.
(C) San Francisco Chronicle 2008

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kary_Mullis

Kary Banks Mullis (born December 28, 1944) is an American biochemist and Nobel laureate. Mullis shared the 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Michael Smith. Mullis received the prize for his development of the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), a process first described by Kjell Kleppe and 1968 Nobel laureate H. Gobind Khorana that allows the amplification of specific DNA sequences.[1]
...

Mullis earned a Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry[2] from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta in 1966, during which time he got married and started a business.[3] He then received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 1972
...
After receiving his PhD, Mullis left science to write fiction, but quit and became a biochemist at a medical school in Kansas City.[3] He then managed a bakery for two years.[4] Mullis returned to science at the encouragement of friend Thomas White, who later got Mullis a job with the biotechnology company Cetus Corporation of Emeryville, California.[1][4]

[edit] Use of LSD
In a Q&A interview published in the September, 1994, issue of California Monthly, Mullis said, "Back in the 1960s and early '70s I took plenty of LSD. A lot of people were doing that in Berkeley back then. And I found it to be a mind-opening experience. It was certainly much more important than any courses I ever took."[17] During a symposium held for centenarian Albert Hofmann, "Hofmann revealed that he was told by Nobel-prize-winning chemist Kary Mullis that LSD had helped him develop the polymerase chain reaction that helps amplify specific DNA sequences."[18] Replying to his own postulate during an interview for BBC's Psychedelic Science documentary, "What if I had not taken LSD ever; would I have still invented PCR?" He replied, "I don't know. I doubt it. I seriously doubt it."[19]

17 ^ Schoch, Russell (September 1994). "Q&A - A Conversation with Kerry Mullis". California Monthly (Berkeley, CA: California Alumni Association) 105 (1): 20. http://www.alumni.berkeley.edu/Alumni/Cal_Monthly/September_1994/QA_-_A_Conversation_with_Kerry_Mullis.asp. Retrieved 2008-03-11.  

More on the Berkeley LSD scene  circa 1970's:

http://americandigest.org/mt-archives/006949.php
Bill and Hillary's Hippie Daze


YESTERDAY drugs were such an easy game to play. Yesterday a Hillary operative ate his words faster than a stoner gobbling a smoldering roach when the fuzz kicks in the door.

Yesterday morning, the Washington Post reported that New Hampshire Clintonite Billy Shaheen(**) said "Obama's candor on the subject [of drugs in his youth] would "open the door" to further questions. "It'll be, 'When was the last time? Did you ever give drugs to anyone? Did you sell them to anyone?'"

By nightfall, the same abashed operative was groveling before the press with: "I deeply regret the comments I made today and they were not authorized by the campaign in any way."

I think he received a rocket via telephone from Hillary herself. She wants no discussion of youthful drug experiments. And with reason. Reasons that go back to the Clintons' Berkeley Summer of Love in 1971 -- if not before.

Reasons that I know well because I was in Berkeley in that summer of 1971. I was living about four blocks away from where Bill and Hillary were, in the parlance of the time, "shacked up." These were my not-so-mean streets. I know what went down. And I am here to tell you that there was no such thing as an unstoned student activist/hippy living in that neighborhood at that time. It was non-stop sex, drugs, rock and roll, and activism. I know. I was there. And while I don't remember everything, I remember a lot. More than I should given the quantity, quality, and diversity of the drugs that were on the scene, on the street, and in the bodies of all of us at the time in that place.

The tantalizing details of the Clintons' Berkeley sojourn were spelled out in an article late last month in The New York Sun (The Clinton's Berkeley Summer of Love by Josh Gerstein.). Of course, Mr Gerstein makes no accusations of drug use by the young, hip and activist couple (Hillary was clerking for the radical Treuhaft law firm in nearby Oakland. Bill gave up a summer of working for George McGovern to be with her.) Instead, he's dug up some charming details of two young politico-hippies in love in the town that was the town to be in if you were young hippies in love in 1971:

The new couple quickly became quite domestic. Bowing to her future husband's Arkansas roots, Mrs. Clinton baked him a peach pie. The pair also "produced a palatable chicken curry for any and all occasions we hosted," Mrs. Clinton recalled.

While Mrs. Clinton clerked at the Treuhaft firm in nearby Oakland, Mr. Clinton plowed through books, explored Berkeley shops, and scouted out San Francisco restaurants. According to the future senator, the pair also kindled their romance on long walks where Mr. Clinton occasionally used his southern twang to regale her with Elvis Presley tunes.

One night in July, the couple drove down to Stanford to listen to an outdoor concert by Joan Baez. The Southern boy was treated to a rendition of "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down," he recalled in his memoir.
----

He quotes Hillary's memoir , Living History, saying they "shared a small apartment near a big park not far from the University of California at Berkeley campus where the Free Speech Movement started in 1964." Then Gerstein goes on to posit that it was an apartment on Derby Street:

"The apartment was about six blocks from the main university campus and just three blocks from People's Park, the site of a violent 1969 confrontation between protesters and police that left one protester dead and more than 100 wounded."

Well, he's got that right. I know because I was part of the People's Park riots of 1969. Shotguns, death, helicopters spewing gas. The whole stupid shebang that left one man dead. Our own mini Kent State.

I was also around for the Free Speech Movement of 1964. By 1971 I'd been around Berkeley and the Bay Area for some time. And I was there, living in a house on corner of Fulton and Ward streets not more than four blocks from the Derby Street apartment. If the Clintons ventured outside onto Telegraph Avenue at all we would have passed each other on the street, skulked around Cody's books, and had cappuccino at the Med. On this you can bet your stash of primo Afghan hash.


The Green House, today. My apartment, below right. Acid factory, above right

The other thing you can bet the stash on about the Clintons in that summer of 1971 in Berkeley is that they were stoned, loaded, blasted, wasted, high as a kite, and just plain baked. At the very least. Assuming that pot and hashish was as far as it went. And it did not for many in that summer, I assure you, stop at that. Other drugs that were around for the asking and used frequently were LSD and cocaine. Heroin too, but I never saw it. It was on the down low, the QT, very hush-hush and you usually had to go to Oakland to score it.

In the house I lived in at the time, there were four apartments. Two in front and two in the rear. I lived in the downstairs front. Above me lived a couple, Ben and Carol. Carol was great at sewing and macrame. Ben was great at making tablets of Lysergic Acid.

Indeed, at the time Ben was one of the main suppliers for the bay area. Every so often Ben would go off somewhere and come back with a trunk which he and a partner would haul up the stairs and into the apartment above us. (Yes, like the Clintons I too was shacking up with what we referred to at the time as "my old lady." )

After a time, we'd here the thumping start... thump..... thump..... thump..... About one every three seconds or so. Ben had mixed up his LSD and was running the preparation through the pill press. "Making a run," he'd call it. After a long night of this, Ben and Carol and his partner would emerge from the apart, stoned as poleaxed penguins from the high you got by working around LSD in a less than controlled environment. Bags of small pills in blue or red or whatever color he'd decided on would remain behind to be shuffled out to the Hells Angels or whomever Ben had doing his distribution. You didn't ask about that. It was his business and Ben was the first person I ever knew to keep a number of guns lying around.

And that was the LSD scene in Berkeley at the time. The pot scene was even looser and more available. It wasn't a question of who on the streets of Berkley was baked. It was a question of who wasn't.

If you read the Sun article it is clear that there's more investigative reporting to be done on the question of the Clintons' summer of love. But there are a few hints.

Mrs. Clinton baked him a peach pie. The pair also "produced a palatable chicken curry for any and all occasions we hosted."

Peach pie alone could be innocent enough I suppose. But put that together with a chicken curry and you've got hard core stoner food, dude. And you know I'm right.

So unless the Clintons were very, very unhip at the time.... and we have it on his own good authority that our sax playing, jive talking, hypercool ex-president is the hippest statesman in the world... unless they were very odd, then they were -- off and on -- very stoned.

It was, after all, 1971. It was, after all, Berkeley California. If the Clintons, during their first prolonged cohabitation, were at all "normal" for the time their evenings at home would have consisted of
1) rolling a fat doobie, probably three or four;
2) whipping up some chicken curry
3) smoking a fat doobie;
4) getting some dim candles going along with a stick of incense
5) putting on a tried and true series of records; and
6) hopping into bed and, as we said then, "balling" until they passed out.

That was pretty much the standard evening's entertainment in the summer of 1971 in Berkeley. I know. I was there. And one thing I can tell you is that the non-conformist hippies of that time and that place ran to type. Glancing at a list of the singles that were hot in 1971, I can probably even guess the songs the Clintons played while they frolicked.

They would have started with 3 Dog Night's Joy to the World, then gone from there to either American Pie or Mr. Big Stuff for the dinner moment. After the second doobie and the peach pie and ice cream, it would have been time to mellow down with Rod Stewart's Maggie May / Reason to Believe and Carole King's It's Too Late. Then when you really started to get into it, a stoned and hip Lothario such as the young and even-more-randy-than-when-President Bill Clinton would not have left Led Zepplin's Stairway to Heaven off the turntable when he was going to make his move. Indeed, if he planned it right he'd stacked the albums carefully and at just the right moment, the killer platter would fall and it would be The Doors.....

You know that it would be untrue You know that I would be a liar
If I was to say to you  Girl, we couldn't get much higher
Come on baby, light my fire
Come on baby, light my fire
Try to set the night on fire

In the late night, stoned streets of Berkeley in 1971 whenever you heard that Light My Fire you knew somebody was getting laid.... maybe even three or four somebodies. Ensemble. I don't know about Bill, but by 1971 I was on my second copy of The Doors album.

Now, I am sure that you will never, ever have the ghost of a chance of getting either Hillary or Bill to, as we used to say, cop to any of this. But it happened that way, a long, long time ago, in a stoner's universe far, far away.

Believe me, the last thing Hillary Clinton wants is for anyone on her campaign or any other campaign to start looking into drug use. Especially for Candidates shacking up in Berkeley, just down from Telegraph Avenue, in the lovin' summer of 1971.

I know what happened. I was there. Not in their bedroom. At least, I don't think I was. But in mine, in the same town in the same summer. And that's what was, as we said then, "Happening, man." And I'm not running for anything. And I'm not stoned anymore either. At least, I don't think I am.

Then again, if Hillary was to have an epiphany on the question of dumping the insane laws again marijuana and promise not just a chicken curry in every pot, but a kilo of Acapulco gold in every pothead, she just might get people to vote for her that are usually too stoned to make it off the couch, much less to the polls. It might be the one promise that gets all America to vote.


Online TahoeBlue

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2010, 04:22:36 pm »
https://pgnet22.stanford.edu/get/file/g2sdoc/BenefactorFall07.pdf


Notice Emilia is miss-spelled "EmElia" : Helps to confuse no?

http://www.paloaltoonline.com/weekly/morgue/2004/2004_10_13.leadobit131.shtml
Publication Date: Wednesday, October 13, 2004
PHOTO SHOULD BE IN SYSTEM
Emelia Rathbun, founder of Global Community, dies

Emelia Lindeman Rathbun, a driving force behind the Palo Alto-based Creative Initiative and Global Community organization, died at her home Oct. 6 following a stroke three weeks earlier. She was 98.

"I've had a wonderful life," she told friends and family members shortly before her death, according to longtime friends and associates Virginia Fitton and Wileta Burch. Rathbun died peacefully at her Waverley Street home in the early morning hours, surrounded by family members.

She had suffered a minor stroke about two weeks before her death and told friends and family it was "time for me to die."

"I've lived almost a century and what a marvelous, fulfilling, fast life it has been," Rathbun reflected in a recent interview. "I lived on a hacienda, had tutors, rode horseback and in carriages, and sailed on ships whenever we came to America."

She was born on New Year's Day, 1906, in Colima, Mexico. Rathbun was the eldest of five children -- she had a brother and three sisters.

The family moved to San Jose in 1922, and she received a teaching credential from San Jose Normal School (predecessor to San Jose State University) in 1928 -- the same year she was chosen Rose Queen in San Jose's Fiesta de las Rosas. She taught first grade for a time at the former Mayfield School in Palo Alto.

She married Stanford law professor Harry J. Rathbun in 1931, creating a partnership that changed the lives of thousands of people in the Palo Alto/Stanford area and around the world -- using the group-dynamic approach to building a social-change organization.

Emelia initially was the driving force behind creation in 1962-63 of a woman's organization called Newsphere, based on the literary work of French priest/paleontologist/philosopher Teilhard de Chardin.

"We felt it was time for women to expand beyond the motherhood role," Burch recalled of the early launch of an arm of the women's movement -- separate and distinct from the more hard-edged feminism of the time.

"It was about the idea of being equal partners with men," Fitton added.

The group at first had no name, but was referred to only as "The Work," drawn from the "women's work and men's work" concept. It was dubbed Newsphere at a public launch in early 1963 at Foothill College. An early name for the effort was "Woman to Woman Build the Earth for the Children's Sake," a mouthful that became shortened to "Build the Earth."

In the early 1950s, the Rathbuns founded Sequoia Seminar, a retreat center in the Santa Cruz Mountains, where for more than 40 years they led seminars based on the teachings of Jesus Christ.

The movement became Creative Initiative in the 1960s, and at one time grew to involve several thousand members across the United States.

In the 1980s, the group spun off the Beyond War movement, a worldwide effort to convey the message that nuclear weapons had made all war obsolete. A "Beyond War Award" was presented to several world leaders for their arms control efforts.

Harry Rathbun died in 1987.

In 1992, the organization became the present Foundation for Global Community, with offices on High Street north of Lytton Avenue in downtown Palo Alto.

Rathbun is survived by a son, Richard of Palo Alto; a daughter, Juana Mueller of Huntington Beach; and four grandchildren.

A memorial service is scheduled for 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 15 at the First Congregational Church, Louis and Embarcadero roads, Palo Alto. The family requests that memorials be contributions to the Foundation for Global Community. -- Jay Thorwaldson

http://histsoc.stanford.edu/pdfmem/RathbunH.pdf

MEMORIAL RESOLUTION HARRY JOHN RATHBUN
(1894 – 1987)
Harry John Rathbun, Professor Emeritus of Law, died on September 28, 1987, at his home in Palo Alto after several months of declining health. He was born on June 14, 1894, in Mitchell, South Dakota, where he attended the Mitchell public schools and graduated as valedictorian of his high school class.
...
The courses he offered were particularly well received, and in 1950 he was named "Great Teacher" as a part of a survey of outstanding teachers conducted by Life Magazine. [Luce/bilderberg Mockingbird]
...
Harry's interests at Stanford were not confined to formal teaching. He and his wife Emilia became the first faculty residents in Fraternity Cluster I located near the Knoll and they held many meetings with students both in their home and in the fraternities.
...
Dating as far back as his high school graduation, and possibly before, Harry had an interest in world peace, justice, and the need for people to become worthy citizens not only of their own country but of the world. He had a deep interest in religion, although at a fairly early age he decided to pursue that interest outside the mainstream of traditional religious observance.

His quest for spiritual truth was heightened in 1935 when he and his wife Emilia attended a summer seminar taught by Henry Burton Sharman that examined the historical records of the New Testament.

Inspired by the intellectual foundation provided by Sharman, the Rathbuns on their return to Stanford gave study groups for students in their home.

As interest increased the sessions became known as the Sequoia Seminars and were held in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

In 1968 Harry and Emilia founded Creative Initiative, a nonprofit educational foundation that had as a goal the exploration of the meaning of life and man's role on earth. They gave seminars and lectures throughout the United States on the theme "One Earth, one humanity, one spirit."

Creative Initiative volunteers worked on a number of projects such as energy conservation, toxic waste disposal, and teen-age alcohol and drug abuse. This group ultimately evolved into Beyond War, an organization that promoted methods of conflict resolution other than nuclear or conventional war. By 1987 its membership had grown to 15,000 nationwide.

During the late 1960's and early 1970's, when there was a great deal of unrest and chaos on campus, Harry and Emilia founded the Community for Relevant Education (CRE) with a roster of over 200  students at one point in time, along with a number of faculty and staff, as well as citizens of nearby communities. CRE had the goal of finding creative solutions to some issues being raised at the time.

Meetings often occurred late at night after the students had finished studying. As an outgrowth of this movement, and also in response to the needs of the late 1960's, Harry was responsible for the initiation of the Involvement Corps, essentially a privately financed Vista. A number of Stanford students became Involvement Corps participants.
...

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/january24/rathbun-012407.html
Stanford Report, January 23, 2007
Gift to Religious Life endows new fund

A $4.5 million gift to the Office for Religious Life will endow a new fund, the Harry and Emilia Rathbun Fund for Exploring What Leads to a Meaningful Life, named in honor of the late law professor and his late wife. The endowment is a gift of the Palo Alto Foundation for Global Community, which is headed by the Rathbuns' son, Richard Rathbun.

The fund will support activities that encourage self-reflection and moral inquiry, including a new visiting fellows program, which will include a series, "Harry's Last Lecture on a Meaningful Life." The program will invite major figures to come to campus near Commencement to talk to students about personal values, beliefs and motivations.

Harry Rathbun, who taught in the Law School for more than three decades beginning in 1929, was known widely for annually devoting his final business law lecture to a discussion of the meaning of life. The tradition was prompted by a letter in the Stanford Daily from a graduating student who wrote that he feared going out in a world he didn't understand, Rathbun later recalled. "I had to tell those kids that the meaning of life was up to them, that no teacher and no school and nobody else could hand it to them like a diploma." "Harry's Last Lecture" became so popular with students that it eventually was held in Memorial Auditorium.

The Rathbuns also hosted Sunday night gatherings at their Palo Alto home where students came to discuss ethics, psychology and religion. Among the students who participated was former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who credited Rathbun with influencing her decision to go to law school and helping to shape the course of her life.

Rathbun, who was born in 1894, first earned mechanical and electrical engineering degrees from Stanford before returning for a law degree. After he retired in 1959, Rathbun continued to teach in the Law School as well as in the Business School's executive development and Sloan programs, where he lectured in business law and business ethics. He and his wife, Emilia, co-founded the Sequoia Seminar, which in the 1960s became the Creative Initiative and is now the Foundation for Global Community. Harry Rathbun died in 1987; Emilia Rathbun died in 2004.

The endowment will establish the Rathbun Visiting Fellow Program for five or more years. In addition to funding other new programming, the Harry and Emilia Rathbun Fund for Exploring What Leads to a Meaningful Life will support activities sponsored by the Office for Religious Life, including the "What Matters to Me and Why" series, the Heyns Lecture series and the Baccalaureate celebration.

| ---------------------
http://www.globalcommunity.org/timeline/78/#8
Emilia Lindeman Rathbun

Mrs. Rathbun was born on New Year's Day, 1906, in Colima, Mexico. Her father, an American citizen, was a civil engineer who built railroads and harbors in Mexico and married the daughter of a wealthy Mexican family. Emilia was the eldest in a family that included a brother and three sisters. I led a privileged life, she said, adding, "I was taught that privilege is a responsibility and your purpose is to help and serve—a wonderful heritage."

The family moved to San Jose, California, in 1922. She received her teaching credential from San Jose State University and for a number of years taught first grade in Palo Alto. In 1928, Emilia was chosen Rose Queen of San Jose's "Fiesta de las Rosas."

In 1931, Emilia married Harry J. Rathbun, a professor of law at Stanford University, and together they embarked on a life-long journey of helping others.

In the early 1950s, they founded Sequoia Seminar, an educational retreat center in the Santa Cruz Mountains and for more than 40 years led seminars based on the teachings of Jesus of Nazareth.
...
The Rathbuns are perhaps best known as the leaders of Creative Initiative, a nonprofit educational foundation which was based in Palo Alto and, at one time, involved several thousand members throughout the United States.

In the 1980s, Creative Initiative became the Beyond War movement, a worldwide effort to communicate that nuclear weapons had made all war obsolete and it was time to build a world beyond war. The Beyond War Award was presented in a global televised "spacebridge" ceremony each year to world leaders such as Vaclav Havel of Czechoslovakia, Mikhail Gorbachev of the Soviet Union, Rajiv Gandhi of India, and Olaf Palme of Sweden.

Mrs. Rathbun is survived by her son, Richard, who continues to play a leading role in the Foundation; her daughter, Juana Mueller, of Huntington Beach; and four grandchildren.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._B._Sharman

H. B. Sharman (Henry Burton, 1865-1953) devoted his life to educating others[1] about the life and teaching of Jesus.

Henry Burton Sharman was born 12 August 1865, in Stratford, Ontario, the eldest of eleven children. After attending school in Stratford, Sharman entered the Ontario Agricultural College (OAC) at Guelph in 1882 where he received a Diploma in Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Science in 1884. He traveled to England while at Guelph to import Hereford cattle.[2]
...
In 1926 Henry Sharman returned to China where he remained for three years as an exchange professor in the History Department at Yenching University in Peking. This was followed by a move to Wallingford, Pennsylvania, to accept an invitation to teach at Pendle Hill, a graduate school conducted by the Society of Friends. In 1933 he retired to California, continuing to conduct classes in the study of Jesus at YMCA conferences at Asilomar, California, and other locations.

Many of his students went on to lead groups in universities and retreat centers. Groups that carried on his seminar method included Pendle Hill, Sequoia Seminars, and the Guild for Psychological Studies [1].

Among his Canadian students who were influential were the controversial missionaries to China, the Endicotts, James Gareth Endicott[8] and his wife Shirley[9], and Murial Duckworth, the tireless peace activist.[10]. He was also influential in the life and teaching of his famous Unitarian sister-in-law, Sophia Lyon Fahs.[11]. One sociological study of Sharman's influence made much of a split in his students that occurred in the late 1940s and continued after his death, some focusing on transformation of the individual, and others the transformation of society.[12].

In addition to Records of the Life of Jesus, Sharman published Studies in the Life of Christ (1896); The Teachings of Jesus about the Future, according to the Synoptic Gospels (1909); Jesus in the Records (1918); Jesus as Teacher (1935); Studies in the Records of the Life of Jesus (1938); Son of Man and Kingdom of God: A Critical Study (1943) and Paul as Experient (1945), he also supervised the translation of some of his works into Chinese and Japanese.

All are currently out of print, except for Records of the Life of Jesus, which has been reprinted by the Guild for Psychological Studies. Sharman's original version used the English Revised Version of the gospel text, published in 1881. In 1991, the Guild for Psychological Studies published a new edition, based on the Revised Standard Version.

Quote
In 1933 he retired to California, continuing to conduct classes in the study of Jesus at YMCA conferences at Asilomar, California, and other locations.
http://www.visitasilomar.com/

Asilomar State Beach is located on the Monterey Peninsula in the city of Pacific Grove, California, USA. Nestled along the shoreline of California's famed Monterey Peninsula, Asilomar is a tranquil ocean front retreat cradled by forests and white sand beaches.  Asilomar (meaning "refuge by the sea" and pronounced a-SIL-o-mar) State Beach and Conference Grounds sits on 107 acres and offers overnight lodging and views of the forest, surf and sand.



The Asilomar Conference Center is a National Historic Landmark and on the Register of National Historic Places. The historic conference grounds are a relaxing retreat. A perfect destination for your special event or seminar.


Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2010, 04:40:14 pm »
My question is what happen to it, the mid 70's it fell off the edge of the world and why?
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2010, 05:23:18 pm »
My question is what happen to it, the mid 70's it fell off the edge of the world and why?

Good Question and one of mine as well. Has it really? I haven't gotten to some of the underlying "theology".
Mission completed?

Stolaroff 's question: Man or machine? Could "LSD Therapy" create the "enhanced human" ? Will Computer/robotic's rule the future of the world?

If you will notice many "engineers" are involved with the early story.  Also notice the early "Global Community" push.

One world govenment? (Beyond Jesus)

Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2010, 06:13:53 pm »
Well off the street it has.
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2010, 08:22:51 pm »
Well off the street it has.

Willis Harman / Willis Harmon has two faces :

http://www.scribd.com/doc/8478109/The-Complete-Social-History-Of-LSD-The-CIA-The-Sixties-And-Beyond

The psychedelic subculture and its relationship to the New Left and the political upheavals of the 1960's was the subject of an investigation by Willis Harmon, who currently heads the Futures Department at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI).

Located in Palo Alto, California, this prestigious think tank received a number of grants from the US Army to conduct classified research into chemical incapacitants.

Harmon made no bones about where he stood with respect to political radicals and the New Left. When Michael Rossman, a veteran of the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, visited SRI headquarters in the early 1970S, Harmon told him, "There's a war going on between your side and mine. And my side is not going to lose."

| ------------------------------


And another question is "What" is/was on the street? DMT? STP? or ALD? Also, with the many Isomers and production differences it maybe that the LSD of the 1950's was different from the later incarnations. Also dosage created wide differences in "mind altering" effects, which I'd like to expand on in another post.

The Grateful Dead "heads" were a nationwide distribution network. Jerry's gone but I doubt the GD distribution is.

What was ALD-52 :

http://www.erowid.org/library/books_online/brotherhood_of_eternal_love.pdf
...
Scully had one more ace up his sleeve. Windsor was not producing LSD but ALD-52, similar but not illegal, or so Scully believed. Scully found the ALD formula among scientific papers and books in the specialist library at Berkeley. It was a compound Hofmann had tested years before.

At the University of California Medical Center, Scully uncovered the scientific paper Hofmann and a colleague had published on the drug. From the US Patent Office he drew patent number 2,810,723, lodged by Sandoz with production details. In The Hallucinogens, co-authored by Osmond and Hofmann, Scully discovered a table comparing the effects of ALD and other drugs in the same family.

The table suggested that ALD might actually have advantages over LSD, reducing any side effects but achieving a stronger trip. Measurements of brain waves while people were taking the two drugs showed that while LSD produced brain waves associated with intense concentration and anxiety, ALD produced brain waves showing a more relaxed mental state.

There was one snag. Hofmann's formula meant making LSD first, then converting it into ALD. Although the finished product might be legal, at a crucial stage in its production it was illegal. The solution was a simple reversal in the order of production so that at no time was drug illegal. Neither Hitchcock nor the Brothers were told of ALD. Hitchcock had been badly burned financially when STP had picked up a bad name on the street. It was thought he would oppose ALD as yet another innovation that would prove difficult to sell. The drug was simply labelled “acid,” and he and the Brotherhood were none the wiser.
| -----------------

Willis Harmon/Harman and Al Hubbard :

http://www.scribd.com/doc/8478109/The-Complete-Social-History-Of-LSD-The-CIA-The-Sixties-And-Beyond
...
Willis Harmon was turned on to LSD in the late 1950's by Captain Al Hubbard, the legendary superspy, who took a special interest in his new convert. Shortly thereafter Harmon became vice-president of the International Federation for Advanced Studies (IFAS), an organization devoted to exploring the therapeutic and problem solving potential of LSD.

IFAS was the brainchild of Hubbard, who undoubtedly leaned on his political connections in Washington to insure that Harmon and his colleagues would be allowed to continue their drug investigations even after the first big purge of above-ground LSD research by the FDA in the early 1960s. During this period IFAS charged $500 for a single session of high-dose psychedelic therapy—an arrangement that led some critics to accuse IFAS of bilking the public.

Adverse publicity forced IFAS to disband in 1965, whereupon Harmon, who considered himself a disciple of the Captain, became director of the Educational Policy Research Center at SRI.

In October 1968 he invited Hubbard, then living in semiretirement in British Columbia, to join SRI as a part-time "special investigative agent." As Harmon stated in a letter to his acid mentor, "Our investigations of some of the current social movements affecting education indicate that the drug usage prevalent among student members of the New Left is not entirely undesigned. Some of it appears to be present as a deliberate weapon aimed at political change. We are concerned with assessing the significance of this as it impacts on matters of longrange educational policy. In this connection it would be advantageous to have you considered in the capacity of a special investigative agent who might have access to relevant data which is not ordinarily available."

Hubbard accepted the offer of a $100 per day consultant's fee, and from then on he was officially employed as a security officer for SRI.

"His services to us," explained Harmon, "consisted in gathering various sorts of data regarding student unrest, drug abuse, drug use at schools and universities, causes and nature of radical activities, and similar matters, some of a classified nature."

Hubbard was the ideal person for such a task. He boasted a great deal of experience both in the law enforcement field and in the use of psychedelic drugs. As a special agent for the FDA in the early 1960s, he led the first raids on underground acid labs, and a number of rebel chemists were arrested because of his detective work. The Captain was particularly irked when he learned that LSD in adulterated form was circulating on the black market.

To Hubbard this represented degradation of the lowest order. The most precious spiritual substance on earth was being contaminated by a bunch of lousy bathtub chemists out to make a quick buck. The Captain was dead set against illicit drug use. "Impure drugs are very dangerous," he explained, "and the Law takes a dim view of it." He kept a sample of street acid for "comparative purposes" each time he busted an underground LSD factory during the 1960s; most of these outfits, Hubbard maintained, were run by the Mafia.

Even though Hubbard took a lot of acid and was a maverick among his peers, he remained a staunch law-and-order man throughout his life. The crew-cut Captain was the quintessential turned-on patriot, a seasoned spy veteran who admired the likes of J. Edgar Hoover; Above all Hubbard didn't like weirdos—especially longhaired radical weirdos who abused his beloved LSD. Thus he was eager to apply his espionage talents to a secret study of the student movement and the acid subculture. After conferring with Harmon, the Captain donned a khaki uniform, a gold-plated badge, a belt strung with bullets, and a pistol in a shoulder holster. That was the uniform he wore throughout his tenure as an SRI consultant, which lasted until the late 1970S.

Ironically, while Harmon and Hubbard were probing the relationship between drugs and radical politics, a number of New Left activists grappled with a similar question. Political and cultural radicals from both sides of the Atlantic discussed the drug issue at a conference on "the dialectics of liberation," which took place in London during the summer of 1967.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2010, 11:36:31 pm »
Quote
http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft1870045n&chunk.id=d0e1544&doc.view=print
...
 One was Del Carlson. Carlson was a Marine Corps veteran who had been attracted to a Records study group at San Jose State College in 1947 and who had participated actively in Students Concerned. He stayed with the movement after the demise of Students Concerned and was, for a dozen years, one of the mainstays of the group. A high school art teacher, he [Carlson] had his summers free and devoted them to Sequoia Seminar. He was the group's registrar, business manager, and leader of art therapy sessions until 1962.[93]
...
Carlson was also a friend of Michael Murphy, the man who founded Esalen. In fact, Carlson was a coleader of the first formal seminar ever held at Esalen in 1962, when it was still called Slate's Hot Springs.[94]

Quote
http://www.escholarship.org/editions/view?docId=ft1870045n&chunk.id=d0e1544&doc.view=print
...
[Sequoia Seminar] Experimentation with LSD stopped after 1959 because most of those involved felt there was nothing more to be gained from continued use and perhaps also because of a difficult confrontation between Emilia Rathbun and Betty Eisner that may have involved the use of the drug. Those, like Harman, who wished to pursue further interests in the drug left Sequoia Seminar and became active in other groups such as Esalen and the International Foundation for Internal Freedom.[97]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esalen_Institute
Esalen Institute

Esalen Institute is a retreat center in Big Sur, California, United States, for humanistic alternative education and a nonprofit organization devoted to multidisciplinary studies ordinarily neglected or unfavored by traditional academia "in subjects ranging from meditation to massage, Gestalt, yoga, psychology, ecology, spirituality, art, music, and much more."[1]

[edit] Origins
Murphy and Price were classmates at Stanford University in the late 1940s and early 1950s, although they did not meet until later at the suggestion of Frederic Spiegelberg, a Stanford professor of comparative religion and Indic studies, with whom they had both studied. In the time since leaving Stanford, Price had attended Harvard University to continue studying psychology, lived in San Francisco with Alan Watts and experienced a transformative psychotic break and institutionalization before returning to San Francisco. Murphy, meanwhile, had gone to Sri Aurobindo's ashram in India and was also back in San Francisco.

After meeting, Murphy and Price found much in common and, in 1961, went to the Big Sur property. The two began drawing up plans for a forum that would be open to ways of thinking beyond the constraints of mainstream academia, while avoiding the dogmatism so often seen in groups organized around a single idea promoted by a charismatic leader.

They envisioned a laboratory for experimentation with a wide range of philosophies, religious disciplines and psychological techniques. Dr. Murphy’s widow, and Michael’s grandmother, Vinnie, had refused to lease the property previously, including an earlier request from Michael, although she agreed to do so this time and granted free use of the property. This, combined with capital that Price had (his father being an executive vice-president at Sears, Roebuck) and the networking support and aid of Spiegelberg, Watts, Huxley and his wife Laura, Gerald Heard and Gregory Bateson, the experiment soon got off the ground. Esalen was somewhat patterned after a monastery founded by Heard in Trabuco Canyon in Southern California called The College of All Religions, which was later donated to the Vedanta Society of Southern California.

Watts led the first seminar in 1962. In the summer of that same year Abraham Maslow happened to drive onto the grounds and was soon an important figure there. In 1964 Fritz Perls started a long-term residency at Esalen and became a major and lasting influence. Perls led numerous Gestalt Therapy seminars at Esalen, and he and Jim Simkin led Gestalt Therapy training courses there. Price became one of Perls's closest students during Perls's time at Esalen. Price continued practicing and teaching Gestalt at Esalen until his own death in a hiking accident in 1985. The method of Gestalt Practice that Dick Price developed[3] remains one of the most important products of the Esalen experiment.

Esalen gained popularity quickly and was soon publishing a catalog of programs. The facility was large enough to run multiple programs simultaneously and Esalen started creating numerous resident teacher positions. All of this combined to make Esalen a nexus for the counterculture of the 1960s.

Rather than lecturing and listening to lectures, a number of leaders and participants began experimenting with what Huxley called the non-verbal humanities: the education of the body, the senses, the emotions. The intention of much of the new work was to suggest a new ethic: to develop awareness to one’s present flow of experience, to express this fully and accurately, and to listen to the feedback. The "experiential" workshops that grew out of these experiments were particularly well attended and did much to shape Esalen’s future course
Early leaders included:

Richard Alpert  Ansel Adams  Buckminster Fuller  Michael Harner   Timothy Leary  Robert Nadeau
Linus Pauling  J.B. Rhine   Carl Rogers  Virginia Satir  B.F Skinner  Paul Tillich   Arnold Toynbee
 

Gia-Fu Feng provided a strong Asian perspective (along with Watts's influence).

Esalen was incorporated as a non-profit institution in 1967. Increased attention came to the institute when The New York Times Magazine published an article "Joy is the Prize: A Trip to Esalen Institute" by Leo E. Litwak on December 31, 1967.[4][5] The article was reprinted numerous times over the years in anthologies of outstanding magazine articles. More immediately, the article brought Esalen to the attention of scores of other media, not just in the U.S. but also overseas. Esalen responded by holding large-scale conferences in Midwest, East Coast cities and Europe and opening a satellite center in San Francisco. This offered extensive programs but was closed in the mid-1970s.

Many of the offerings seemed meant to challenge the status quo such as "The Value of Psychotic Experience" and even the movement of which Esalen was a part such as "Spiritual and Therapeutic Tyranny: The Willingness To Submit" and "Theological Reflection on The Human Potential". There was also a series of racial encounter groups.
...

| --------------

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/06/books/review/Johnson.t.html
Esalen - Sex, Drugs and Hot Tubs
By DIANE JOHNSON  Published: May 6, 2007
...
The book is most startling when describing Esalen’s connection to world events. According to Kripal’s sometimes rather infatuated account, it was Esalen that “enlisted the support of” Susan Sontag and Norman Mailer in helping to bring the Soviet Writers’ Union into International PEN. It was also of use to the C.I.A. ,which spent a lot of money looking into ESP, with experiments involving “the laser physicist turned C.I.A. psychic spy turned American mystic” Russell Targ, who gave parapsychology lectures at Esalen. (He would later give a demonstration to the Soviet Academy of Sciences as well.) Murphy’s wife, Dulce, Kripal claims, “was with” Jimmy Carter  when he announced the boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics; and through their extensive involvement with American-Soviet citizen exchanges (an outgrowth of their interest in Russian mysticism), the Murphys became friends of Arthur Hartman, Reagan’s ambassador to Russia, whom they persuaded to try to “melt” cold war relations through some “hot-tub diplomacy.”

Though the first experiments with LSD were conducted at respectable universities like the University of California , Los Angeles, Esalen was famously a laboratory for the psychopharmacological inquiries of the period. It also trafficked in Rolfing, the orgone theories of Wilhelm Reich, you name it, some of it now mainstream, some discredited. Where did it all go wrong, or did it? Were the seekers at Esalen on to something, or should they have forborne to shock native American puritanism with too much free love and LSD, which began to seem like hypocritical self-indulgence and just more of what Kripal calls “a stunning array of misogynistic metaphysical systems” that indulge male sexuality and control women?

Kripal poses another challenging question: With the world gripped anew by terror, “if not ... the apocalyptic variety expressed so dramatically by a Soviet-American Armageddon,” where are all the “countercultural actors, erotic mystics, psychedelic visionaries, ecstatic educators, esoteric athletes, psychic spies, gnostic diplomats and cultural visionaries” who emerged the last time around?

|------------------

http://www.hofmann.org/papers/questionair/index.html

RESEARCH REPORT NO. 1
INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR ADVANCED STUDY
QUESTIONNAIRE STUDY OF THE PSYCHEDELIC EXPERIENCE

The following is a brief summary report on the results of a questionnaire sent out to the first 113 clients of the International Foundation for Advanced Study after the offices were opened in March, 1961, and also to 40 non-paying, experimental subjects who had LSD sessions prior to this date. Of these, 93 patients (82%) and 26 non-patients (65%) returned completed questionnaires.

The treatment of the patients was as described in Sherwood, Stolaroff, and Harman (1962). Preparation lasting approximately a month preceded the LSD session. Dosages were moderately high (200-400 micrograms of LSD with an additional 200-400 mg. of mescaline). The group of volunteer subjects is not strictly comparable since in addition to the selective factors operating for the two groups, the non-patient group in general received less preparation and lower dosage.

The questionnaire was patterned after one used by Ditman et al., (1962) in a similar study. It consisted of 75 statements which the subject was asked to rate as regards his agreement with it, from 0 (not at all), 1 (a little), 2 (quite a bit), to S (very much). Additional questions requested subjective reports on particular aspects of the experience (such as impression of preparation and atmosphere, most meaningful insight, etc.).

In section III, responses obtained in the Ditman study are compared to the responses to the same items in the present study. In interpreting this comparison one should note that the volunteer subjects queried by Ditman were not led to expect benefits, the announced purpose of the experimentation being "to compare the LSD experience with that of delirium tremens". The patient group, in contrast, not only anticipated benefits but were willing to pay the medical costs of treatment.

Summary of results

In overall summary the most significant single figure is perhaps the percentage who claimed "quite a bit" or "very much" of lasting benefits, 83%. (Even allowing for the unlikely possibility that all non-respondents were negative, the percentage would still be over 70%.) The claimed improvement rate rises from 76% after 1 to 3 months to 85% after 12 months or more have elapsed since the LSD session.

Most commonly reported benefits include: increase in ability to love, 78%; to handle hostility, 69%; to.communicate, 69%; and to understand self and others, 88%; improved interpersonal relations, 72%; decreased anxiety, 66%; increased self esteem, 71%; a new way of looking at the world, 83%. Of particular interest is a correlation (tetrachoric r) of 0.9l between "greater awareness of a higher power, or ultimate reality" and claimed permanent benefit.

As regards negative responses, none of the experimental volunteers and only one patient felt he had been. harmed mentally. (By the time a year had elapsed since his session he had revised that opinion.) Immediately after LSD 24% find that daydreaming and introspection "interfere with getting things done"; this has fallen to 11% after one year. Problems within the marital relationship not previously present were reported by 27% for non-patients and 16% for patients.

Page 1

I   Sex Differences

One of the points of interest was whether there were significant differences in response to the LSD according to sex. The figures given below are percentages of the total group of clients whose first LSD session had been at least 3 months prior to the filling out of the questionnaire who marked these statements either "I agree with the statement very much" or "I agree quite a bit" (3 or 2 according to the questionnaire instructions). Three percentages are given, in columns marked M (male, N=38), F (female, N=34), and T (total, N=72).

II Effect of Time

Another point we were interested in was whether the effects of the LSD session tended to"wear off" - whether the answers would differ depending on the length of time since the session. Some sample percentages follow for four groups: A (less than three months since the LSD session, N=21), B (3-6 months, N=26), C (6-12 months, N=19), and D (over 12 months, N=27).

III Patients vs Non-patients

A comparison of patient- {after 3 months) with non-patients (all over 6 months since their first sessions) is of interest. Included also are figures from the Ditman study on the same items.

IV Outstanding Event or Insight

The answers to the remainder of the questions were helpful in evaluating present procedures and in suggestlng modifications. In particular, a desire for more follow-up was expressed repeatedly.

Sherwood, J.N., Stolaroff, M.J., and Harman, W.W.,"The Psychedelic Experience--
A New Concept In Psychotherapy, " J. Neuropsychiatry, 4:69-80; 1962

Ditman, K.S., Hayman, M.C., and Whittlesey, J.R.B., "Nature and Frequency Of Claims
Following LSD", J. Nerv. Ment. Dis. 134: 346-352; 1962

Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2010, 12:18:04 am »
Its never been the same, very strange, that after the experence nothing else suited or was acceptable to the point of not doing it at all.
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #13 on: January 05, 2010, 03:16:13 pm »
Its never been the same, very strange, that after the experence nothing else suited or was acceptable to the point of not doing it at all.

http://www.maps.org/news-letters/v08n3/08335hof.html

The Hofmann Report Autumn 1998

To our Friends and Supporters:

In the last report, I mentioned the satisfaction resulting from books I have written which stir up dormant personal connections of the past. Those who are familiar with the many benefits derived from the responsible use of psychedelics are hard pressed to understand the ardent negative evaluation by many government officials, mainstream scientists, and the public at large. Consequently it is gratifying to hear from those who are willing to speak up and share their personal experiences. Here is a recent letter forwarded to me by MAPS:


Dear MAPS and Mr. Stolaroff,
Enclosed is $35.00 for a subscription to your quarterly Bulletin. My interest is very personal. I am one of the lucky people who took LSD at the International Foundation for Advanced Study in Menlo Park, California, in the 1960s. The two session I had there were some of the most valuable experiences of my life. Though I worked with some wonderful therapists after that, nothing approached the kind of straightening out I got with LSD. Many times in the intervening years I have wished for a place like the IFAS where I could take LSD in a safe setting.

Reading The Secret Chief has given me some hope that someday qualified therapists will be able to use these drugs in their practices. It also made me mourn that I did not know about Jacob and did not try to seek out a place where I could have done it anyway. My life would have been much different. Thank you for all your work in trying to get these substances legitimized for therapeutic use. I'm 68 now, but I yearn for the opportunity to untangle more of my knots. Is it possible to participate in research studies? I also would be glad to write letters to Senators, Congressmen, the FDA, or anyone to help this process along. It's absurd to have these powerful tools unavailable to doctors, while the illicit drug trade sells everyone else whatever they want.

P. B.


Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2010, 10:55:32 pm »
he is now 80, how interesting.
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2010, 12:55:50 am »
http://globalcommunity.org/

The Foundation for Global Community (FGC) is the current manifestation of a series of prior organizations, all of which have made their contribution, both financially and in terms of a legacy of experience and collected wisdom, to FGC. All these organizations, Sequoia Seminar, Women to Women, Building the Earth, Creative Initiative, Beyond War, and the Foundation for Global Community, have been iterations of a fundamental philosophy.


[It is interesting how they took Jesus (and LSD) completely out of the History:]

http://globalcommunity.org/history.shtml

Early History
The Foundation for Global Community traces its origin back more than eighty years. Working in Canada at the turn of the 20th century, Dr. Henry Burton Sharman, theologian and scientist from the University of Chicago, sought to unify the disciplines of science and religion in the belief that each searched for the same universal truths about reality. To explore these issues, he invited groups of interested college students and professors to participate in six-week seminars in the Canadian wilderness each summer.

Dr. Harry Rathbun, a Stanford law and business professor, and his wife Emilia, participants in Sharman's seminars, brought the studies to the western United States in the late 1930's. By the late 1940's it was apparent that a permanent facility would aid the studies. Property was purchased and a lodge built in the Santa Cruz mountains of California. Here people of all philosophical and religious beliefs could come to study and discuss critical issues in an atmosphere of beauty and quiet. In 1949, Sequoia Seminar Foundation was incorporated.

In 1962, women affiliated with Sequoia Seminar decided to take an initiative in the world to seek a higher purpose for life. They were motivated by the uncertainty of the future for the children and the precariousness of all life. This was the time of the Berlin Wall, the Cuban Missile crisis, and talk of building backyard bomb shelters. By 1964, men and women were writing curricula, leading discussion groups and seminars, and planning and giving presentations for the public. Some of these programs were called "The Quest for Meaning," "Challenge to Change," and "The Challenge of Time."

In 1971, these activities were incorporated as Creative Initiative Foundation. During the 1970's, in addition to its regular courses and seminars, Creative Initiative addressed the issues of drug abuse, environmental concerns, the effects of violence on television, the need for energy conservation, the depletion of natural resources, and the dangers of pollution from toxic chemicals and long-term radioactive wastes from nuclear power plants. The focus of all these activities was always understanding and communicating the process by which people become mature, responsible human beings. All the educational endeavors challenged people to become informed, to educate others, and to take action in their own lives.

In 1981, the Cold War was at its height and there was talk about America's ability to fight and win a nuclear war and adding Pershing and cruise missiles to Europe. The growing alarm about the consequences of nuclear devastation was starkly depicted in the film "The Last Epidemic." A series of dialogues in 1982 convinced the people of Creative Initiative that survival in the nuclear age was the greatest problem facing humanity and that the immensity of the the US and Soviet nuclear arsenals was not comprehended by the public. Consequently, all courses, seminars, and projects were terminated so that the Creative Initiative community, numbering approximately 1,000, could focus full attention on this most pressing problem. Out of this commitment, the Beyond War movement developed. Beyond War eventually involved more than 20,000 people around the world, sponsored an annual Beyond War Award, and reached untold millions with its message.

With the end of the Cold War, the tearing down of the Berlin Wall, and other hopeful signs of change, Beyond War enlarged its focus and, in 1991, became Foundation for Global Community.

Beyond War (1982-1991)
Beyond War began in 1982 as a grassroots response to the threat of nuclear war. Early efforts focused on educating about the crisis. During 1982, workers showed "The Last Epidemic," (a film about the effect of a one megaton hydrogen bomb dropped on San Francisco) to hundreds of people in homes, churches, synagogues and clubs. People began to understand the consequences of nuclear war, but the need to communicate hope became apparent.

There was a growing realization that nuclear weapons are only a symptom of the real problem, which is our willingness to use war to resolve inevitable conflicts. The movement embarked on a three-month project to produce a concise statement about a new way of thinking which would address the root of the problem. Thus the Beyond War Statement evolved and became the cornerstone of the movement.

With the basic philosophy of the movement defined, the Beyond War Orientation (a three-part course) was developed as a way to communicate the nature of both the crisis and the solution.

The movement grew significantly when 2700 women from 34 states and eight foreign countries came together for a women's convocation in November 1983 to call for the end of war. The success of this first convocation inspired others, so that in the fall of 1984, 6000 women came together at eleven symposia throughout the western United States. These women launched the first Beyond War Ad Campaign, which published educational advertisements in six major newspapers and the California edition of TIME magazine.

On November 11, 1984, 2000 men gathered in San Francisco for an Armistice Day convocation entitled "Who Speaks for Earth?: The New Warrior." Acknowledging that men's strength, valor and courage have always insured individual and group survival, the men challenged themselves to unite and work cooperatively to insure the survival of the whole planet.

Later in November, eleven Silicon Valley executives traveled to the Soviet Union and Hungary to meet with their counterparts as part of the Beyond War International Task Force. The goal of this effort was to discover how Americans could work together with Soviets, given the two very different systems they lived in.

The Beyond War Award was created in 1983 to honor the great efforts of humankind as it moves to build a world beyond war. The award attracted national and international attention through the nominating and selection process. Many distinguished persons served on the selection committee (Jonas Salk, Betty Bumpers, Carl Sagan, Andrew Young, Rosalyn Carter, etc.)

In December 1983, the first award was presented to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops for their pastoral letter on peace. In 1984, the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War received the second award. It was presented to the co-founders, Dr. Lown of the US and Dr. Chazov of the USSR, simultaneously through the use of a live satellite teleconference link or "spacebridge" between Moscow and San Francisco. This historic event was viewed live by over 75,000 people. Over 100 million Soviets subsequently saw the televised videotape.

On January 29, 1985, over 80 ambassadors to the United Nations attended a presentation on Nuclear Winter. American astronomer Carl Sagan and Soviet physicist Sergei Kapitsa each communicated that even a limited nuclear exchange would threaten life on the entire planet, with no country exempt from the effect. The event was sponsored by Beyond War and twelve ambassadors who had previously heard Dr. Sagan speak on this crucial subject.

By this time, over 15,000 people were actively communicating the Beyond War idea in twelve targeted states (Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Georgia, Wisconsin, Iowa, Colorado, Oregon, Washington, and California). There was start-up activity in ten other states. As of March, 1985, there were 400 dedicated volunteers working full-time on Beyond War.


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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2010, 07:23:09 am »
LSD experience always took Jesus out of the picture and alway ran short of meeting that ground, a tendency to grind a peak to a jolting drain.
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2010, 09:49:53 pm »
Well you got anything else.
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2010, 11:05:09 pm »
Well you got anything else?

Having discovered  as much as I can , I was hoping to build the connection to the Huxley/Heard/Leary/Harvard operation.
This unfortunately is very loose. Once that connection was established I would continue documenting Leary's operation....

This gets interesting with the Leary Mary Pinchot / LSD / Cord Myer / S&B / CIA / Kennedy unknown scandal....

The Pinchot were a S&B family with connections to the beginning of the American Psychical Research Society / Eugenics / conservation movement the Gifford and Amos Pinchot Brothers  related to the wealthy New York Enos family, pals with Teddy Roosevelt ...

Mary's Pinchot's dad:
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USApinchotA.htm

Amos Pinchot was born in 1863. The son of a wealthy businessman, Pinchot studied law in New York City. In 1900 he married Gertrude Minturn. The couple had two children, Rosamund and Gifford. Pinchot held left-wing views and in 1911 helped establish the radical journal The Masses.

In 1912 Pinchot helped formed the Progressive Party. Later that year Theodore Roosevelt and Hiram Johnson became the party's candidates for the presidential election. The proposed program included women's suffrage, direct election of senators, anti-trust legislation and the prohibition of child labour. In winning 4,126,020 votes Roosevelt defeated William H. Taft, the official candidate of the Republican Party. However, he received less votes than the Democratic Party candidate, Woodrow Wilson.

Pinchot believed that the First World War had been caused by the imperialist competitive system. This was the point of view expressed by The Masses. In July, 1917, it was claimed by the authorities that articles by Floyd Dell and Max Eastman and cartoons by Art Young, Boardman Robinson and H. J. Glintenkamp had violated the Espionage Act. Under this act it was an offence to publish material that undermined the war effort. The legal action that followed forced the journal to cease publication. In April, 1918, after three days of deliberation, the jury failed to agree on the guilt of the men.

The second trial was held in September, 1918. John Reed, who had recently returned from Russia, was also arrested and charged with the original defendants. This time eight of the twelve jurors voted for acquittal and the defendants walked free on October 5, 1918.

[ reference See Movie "Reds"  
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jreed.htm
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jbryant.htm ]

Pinchot divorced his first wife and married Ruth Pickering in 1919. The couple had two children, Mary Pinchot and Antoinette Pinchot. Regular visitors to the home included Mabel Dodge, Crystal Eastman, Max Eastman, Louis Brandeis and Harold Ickes.

In 1920 two Italian immigrants, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, were accused of murdering a shoe factory payroll clerk in Braintree, Massachusetts. Pinchot and his wife were convinced that the two men were innocent and spent a great deal of time and effort trying to get them released.

Pinchot supported his friend, Robert La Follette, the the candidate of the Progressive Party in the 1924 presidential election. Although La Follette and his running partner, Burton K. Wheeler, gained support from trade unions, the Socialist Party and the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain, La Follette only won one-sixth of the votes.

Pinchot worked for several years on two books, Big Business in America and The History of the Progressive Party. However, the books were not published in his lifetime.

Initially he supported Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal. However, he was opposed his attempt to control the Supreme Court. In April, 1937, Pinchot had a letter published in the New York Times where he criticised Roosevelt's style of government "which places the fate of labor, industry and agriculture in a bureaucracy controlled by one man... I am forced to conclude that... you desire the power of a dictator without the liability of the name."

Pinchot's daughter from his first marriage, Rosamund Pinchot, became an actress. Although she only appeared in one Hollywood movie, she did get parts in several French films. However, she suffered from depression and in 1938 she committed suicide. Pinchot was devastated and never fully recovered from this tragedy.

Pinchot retained his pacifist views and in September, 1940, helped to establish the America First Committee (AFC). The America First National Committee included Robert E. Wood, John T. Flynn and Charles A. Lindbergh. Supporters of the organization included Burton K. Wheeler, Hugh Johnson, Robert LaFollette Jr., Hamilton Fish and Gerald Nye.

The AFC soon became the most powerful isolationist group in the United States. The AFC had four main principles: (1) The United States must build an impregnable defense for America; (2) No foreign power, nor group of powers, can successfully attack a prepared America; (3) American democracy can be preserved only by keeping out of the European War; (4) "Aid short of war" weakens national defense at home and threatens to involve America in war abroad.

The AFC influenced public opinion through publications and speeches and within a year the organization had 450 local chapters and over 800,000 members. The AFC was dissolved four days after the Japanese Air Force attacked Pearl Harbor on 7th December, 1941.

Pinchot grew increasing depressed by the progress of the Second World War and in the summer of 1942 he slit his wrists. He survived this suicide attempt but his health never recovered and spent the rest of his life in hospital.

Amos Pinchot died of pneumonia in February, 1944.

Mary's Uncle Gifford:

http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/governors/pinchot.asp?secid=31
http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/1879-1951/4284/gifford_pinchot/469112

If Gifford Pinchot had not become governor of Pennsylvania, he would be still famous for his legacy reagarding America's forests. In fact, Pinchot was quoted as saying, "I have been governor every now and then, but I am a forester all the time." Pinchot was born August 11, 1865, to Episcopalian parents in Simsbury, Connecticut, the son of James W. Pinchot, a successful New York City wallpaper merchant and Mary Eno, daughter of one of New York City's wealthiest real estate developers, Amos Eno.

The first member of Pinchot's family in Pennsylvania, Francis Joseph Smith, came from Belgium with a letter from Benjamin Franklin to Robert Morris, and after serving as major in the Revolutionary War, settled in the Delaware Valley at Shawnee, now in Monroe County. Pinchot's great grandfather, Constantine Pinchot, and his grandfather, C.C.D. Pinchot, settled in Milford, Pike County, in 1816. James Pinchot was born in Milford and built the present Pinchot mansion there in 1886. The former governor's home, known as Grey Towers, is now owned by the USDA Forest Service (founded by Pinchot) and is a national historic landmark.

Governor Pinchot received his preparatory education at Philips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and was graduated from Yale University in 1889. Pinchot was determined to establish forestry as a legitimate occupation, despite the fact that forestry was not a recognized profession at that time in the United States.

Amos Eno offered his grandson a business position that most likely would have made Pinchot independently wealthy, but Pinchot considered forest conservation a more important calling. With his father's encouragement, he studied forestry in Germany, France, Switzerland, and Austria. In January 1892, Pinchot, at the invitation of George Vanderbilt, created the first example in the United States of practical forest management on a large scale at Vanderbilt's Biltmore Estate, near Ashville, North Carolina. Proving that conservation practices could be both beneficial for forests and still profitable, the Biltmore arboretum became a model for forest management around the world.

From 1898 to 1910, Pinchot consolidated the fragmented government forest work under the U. S. Division of Forestry, later the Bureau of Forestry, and then the United States Forest Service. In 1903, Pinchot also became professor of Forestry at Yale University and, in 1904, his friend President Theodore Roosevelt appointed him chief of Forestry. Under Pinchot's guidance, the number of national forests increased from 32 in 1898 to 149 in 1910. Pinchot and Roosevelt agreed on many points of conservation and worked tirelessly to end the destruction of U.S. forests.

Pinchot also visited the Philippine Islands in 1902 and recommended a forest policy for the islands. He was appointed by President Roosevelt to the Committee on Organization of Government Scientific Work in 1903; to the Commission on Department Methods in 1905; to the Inland Waterways Commission in 1907; and, in 1908, to the Commission on Country Life, Chairman of the National Conservation Commission, and Chairman of the National Conservation Commission. He was also appointed chairman of the Joint Committee on Conservation, by the first conference of Governors at Washington, December 1908. In 1917, he was a member of the U.S. Food Administration.

On August 15, 1914, Pinchot married Cornelia Elizabeth Bryce (1881–1960), a native of Rhode Island and daughter of a wealthy journalist and politician, Lloyd Bryce. Cornelia and Gifford both were longtime friends with Theodore Roosevelt, who attended their wedding. As one of the most politically active first ladies in the history of Pennsylvania, she was a very strong advocate for women's rights, full educational opportunities for women, seeking wage and union protections for women and children, and encouraging women to participate in the political process.

Her family's wealth, influence from socially and politically prominent relatives, and Progressive Era politics proved to be a great influence on her husband's political agenda. Her influence among female voters is credited as a key factor in the election of her husband. Cornelia Bryce Pinchot ran for the U.S. House of Representatives three times and attempted to succeed her husband as governor in the primary of 1934, but lost all four elections. ...

http://www.historycooperative.org/cgi-bin/justtop.cgi?act=justtop&url=http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/pmh/132.1/miller.html
Cornelia Pinchot ran unsuccessfully against incumbent Louis T. McFadden

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,743671,00.html
...
Shortly after Congressman Louis T. McFadden of the 13th Pennsylvania District had accused President Hoover of treason on the War Debts last winter, Mrs. Cornelia Bryce Pinchot, the Governor's wife and no political friend of the President, announced her Republican candidacy for the House from Mr. McFadden's district. Last week 15th District voters renominated Mr. McFadden who returned to the House to receive an ovation from his colleagues.

Mrs. Pinchot had campaigned in a bright blue Studebaker. Often she stepped out wearing mannish knickerbockers. Big posters bearing her sharp profile had blared: "Ye cannot serve God and mammon." Defeated, she observed: "People did not seem as anxious to send me to Congress as I was to go." Then she, too, journeyed to Washington, dined with many another Governor's wife at the White House.

http://www.sweetliberty.org/issues/hoax/mcfadden.htm
...
McFadden's later career was marked by violent criticism of his party's financial policies.  Opposition to the Hoover moratorium on war debts led him to propose to the House on 12-13-1932 that the President be impeached.  He bitterly attacked the governors of the Federal Reserve Board for "having caused the greatest depression we have ever known".  Both the President and the Board, he was convinced, were conspiring with the "international" bankers to ruin the country.  He lost his seat to a Democrat in 1934, although two years previously he had had the support of the Republican, Democratic and Prohibition parties.  He died in 1936 while on a visit in new York City.

Congressman Louis T. McFadden's Federal Reserve Speeches in Congress

Congressman McFadden's Remarks in Congress on the Federal Reserve Corporation -- 1934
"Mr. Chairman, we have in this Country one of the most corrupt institutions the world has ever known. I refer to the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Reserve Banks, hereinafter called the Fed. The Fed has cheated the Government of these United States and the people of the United States out of enough money to pay the Nation's debt. The depredations and iniquities of the Fed has cost enough money to pay the National debt several times over.   ...

http://alterdestiny.blogspot.com/2006/11/tuesday-forgotten-american-blogging_07.html
...
In the 1920s, Grant served as the head of the Immigration Restriction League and the Eugenics Research Association. He was a key player in the Second Eugenics Congress in 1921, which built on the original 1912 Eugenics Congress in Britain led by such notables as Winston Churchill and Arthur Balfour. Among the attendees of the Second Eugenics Congress were Alexander Graham Bell, leading conservationist Gifford Pinchot and future U.S. President Herbert Hoover. Sadly, Theodore Roosevelt died in 1919 or no doubt he would have attended as well. Grant went on to publish a sequel to Passing of the Great Race in 1933. Entitled The Conquest of a Continent, Grant wished for the creation of a separation nation for blacks in order to protect white blood from their taint, though he knew that the realities of the American South made this impossible. At the very least, he wanted stricter anti-miscegenation laws, the promotion of contraception among blacks so they stop breeding, and extremely strict legal segregation.

http://www.kmf.org/williams/bushbook/bush7.html

*Pinchot, Amos
*Pinchot, Gifford (S&B 1889) - Invented the aristocrats' "conservation" movement. He was President Theodore Roosevelt's chief forester, substituting federal land-control in place of Abraham Lincoln's free-land-to-families farm creation program. Pinchot's British Empire activism included the Psychical Research Society and his vice presidency of the first International Eugenics Congress in 1912.

Gifford Pinchot (S&B 1889) invented the aristocrats' ``conservation'' movement. He was President Theodore Roosevelt's chief forester, substituting federal land-control in place of Abraham Lincoln's free-land-to-families farm creation program. Pinchot's British Empire activitism included the Psychical Research Society and his vice-presidency of the first International Eugenics Congress in 1912.

Helping Pinchot initiate this century's racialist environmentalism were his cohorts George W. Woodruff (S&B 1889), Teddy Roosevelt's Assistant Attorney General and Acting Interior Secretary; and Henry Solon Graves (S&B 1892), chief U.S. forester 1910-20. Frederick E. Weyerhauser (S&B 1896), owner of vast tracts of American forest, was a follower of Pinchot's movement, while the Weyerhauser family were active collaborators of British-South African super-racist Cecil Rhodes. This family's friendship with President George Bush is a vital factor in the present environmentalist movement.


Mary Pinchot in 1942



Mary and Cord Meyer on their wedding day (1945)



JFK with Mary Meyer (far right). Antoinette Bradlee is second on the left.

Mary Pinchot was born on 14th October, 1920. Her father Amos Pinchot, was a wealthy lawyer who helped fund the radical journal, The Masses. He was also a key figure in the Progressive Party. Her mother, Ruth Pinchot, was a journalist who worked for worked for magazines such as The Nation and The New Republic.

As a child Mary was brought into contact with left-wing intellectuals. People like Mabel Dodge, Crystal Eastman, Max Eastman, Louis Brandeis, Robert La Follette and Harold Ickes were regular visitors at their Grey Towers home in Milford, Pennsylvania.

Mary attended Brearley School and Vassar College. In 1938 she began going out with William Attwood. It was while with Attwood at a dance held at Choate that she met John F. Kennedy for the first time.

While at Vassar Mary became interested in left-wing politics. This did not seem to upset her father, Amos Pinchot, who wrote to his brother Gifford: "Vassar seems to be very interested in communism. And a great deal of warm debating is going on among the students of Mary's class, which I think is an excellent thing. People of that age ought to be radical anyhow."

After leaving Vassar she obtained work as a journalist at United Press. This included writing for magazines such as Mademoiselle. Mary also became a member of the American Labor Party. This insured that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) started a file on Meyer's political activities. Mary, like her parents, was also a committed pacifist.

In 1944 Mary met Cord Meyer, a lieutenant in the US Marines who was recovering from serious shrapnel injuries that had resulted in him losing an eye. The couple married on 19th April, 1945. Soon afterwards the couple went to San Francisco to attend the conference that established the United Nations. Cord went as an aide to Harold Stassen, whereas Mary, who was working for the North American Newspaper Alliance at the time, was one of the reporters sent to cover this important event.

Cord Meyer had been shocked by the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. After the war Meyer commissioned a film by Pare Lorentz called The Beginning or the End. Meyer wanted this film to be the definitive statement about the dangers of the atomic age. Cord wrote at the time: "Talked with Mary of how steadily depressing is our full realization of how little hope there is of avoiding the approaching catastrophe of atomic warfare."

The following year Meyer published a book about his war experiences, Waves of Darkness. Meyer expressed pacifist views in the book: "The only certain fruit of this insanity will be the rotting bodies upon which the sun will impartially shine tomorrow. Let us throw down these guns that we hate."

For a while Mary worked as an editor for the Atlantic Monthly. Her first child Quentin was born in 1945. After the birth of Michael in 1947 she became a housewife but still managed to attend classes at the Art Students League in New York City.

Like her husband, Mary became an advocate of world government. In May, 1947, Cord Meyer was elected president of the United World Federalists. Under his leadership, membership of the organization doubled in size. Albert Einstein was one of his most important supporters and personally solicited funds for the organization. Mary wrote for its journal, The United World Federalists.

Mary's third child, Mark, was born in 1950. The family now moved back to Cambridge. Cord was showing signs of becoming disillusioned with the idea of world government. He had experienced problems with members of the American Communist Party who had infiltrated the organizations he had established. It was about this time that he began working secretly for the Central Intelligence Agency.

In 1950 Meyer formed the Committee to Frame a World Constitution with Robert Maynard Hutchins and Elizabeth Mann Borgese. As a result of this work Meyer made contact with the International Cooperative Alliance, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the Indian Socialist Party and the Congress of Peoples Against Imperialism. It is almost certain that this had been done on behalf of the CIA.

Allen W. Dulles made contact with Cord Meyer in 1951. He accepted the invitation to join the CIA. Dulles told Meyer he wanted him to work on a project that was so secret that he could not be told about it until he officially joined the organization. Meyer was to work under Frank Wisner, director of the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This became the espionage and counter-intelligence branch of the CIA. Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on "propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures; subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements in threatened countries of the free world."

Meyer became part of what became known as Operation Mockingbird, a CIA program to influence the mass media. According to Deborah Davis (Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post): Meyer was Mockingbird's "principal operative".

Mary and the family now moved to Washington where they became members of the Georgetown Crowd . This group included Frank Wisner, Richard Bissell, Desmond FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Tracy Barnes, Philip Graham, Katharine Graham, David Bruce, Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow, Eugene Rostow, Chip Bohlen and Paul Nitze. The Meyers also socialized with other CIA officers or CIA assets James Angleton (Cicely Angleton), Wistar Janney (Mary Wisnar), Ben Bradlee (Antoinette Bradlee) and James Truitt (Anne Truitt).

In August, 1953, Joseph McCarthy accused Cord Meyer of being a communist. The Federal Bureau of Investigation added to the smear by announcing it was unwilling to give Meyer "security clearance". Suspicion also fell on Mary at this time and it was revealed that the FBI had been investigating her activities. However, the FBI refused to explain what evidence they had against the Meyers. Allen W. Dulles and Frank Wisner both came to Meyer's defence and refused to allow him to be interrogated by the FBI.

The FBI eventually revealed the charges against Meyer. Apparently he was a member of several liberal groups considered to be subversive by the Justice Department. This included being a member of the National Council on the Arts, where he associated with Norman Thomas, the leader of the Socialist Party and its presidential candidate in 1948. Meyer was eventually cleared of these charges and was allowed to keep his job.

Cord Meyer became disillusioned with life in the CIA and in January, 1954, he went to New York City and attempted to get a job in publishing. Although he saw contacts he had made during his covert work with the media (Operation Mockingbird) he was unable to obtain a job with any of the established book publishing firms. In the summer of 1954 the Meyer family's golden retriever was hit by a car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. The dog's death worried Cord. He told colleagues at the CIA he was afraid the same thing might happen to one of his children.

In the summer of 1954 the Meyers got new neighbours. John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie Kennedy purchased Hickory Hill, a house several hundred yards from where the Meyers lived. Mary became good friends with Jackie and they went on walks together.

In November, 1954, Meyer replaced Thomas Braden as head of International Organizations Division. Meyer began spending a lot of time in Europe. One of Meyer's tasks was to supervise Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, the United States government broadcasts to Eastern Europe. According to Nina Burleigh (A Very Private Woman) Meyer was "overseeing a vast 'black' budget of millions of dollars channeled through phony foundation of a global network of associations and labor groups that on their surface appeared to be progressive".

On 18th December, 1956, Mary's nine-year-old son, Michael, was hit by a car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. It was the same spot where the family's golden retriever had been killed two years earlier. The tragedy briefly brought the couple together. However, in 1958, Mary filed for divorce. In her divorce petition she alleged "extreme cruelty, mental in nature, which seriously injured her health, destroyed her happiness, rendered further cohabitation unendurable and compelled the parties to separate."

Mary continued to live with her two sons in the family home of Langley Commons. She took up art and her sister, Antoinette Pinchot and her husband Ben Bradlee, allowed her to set up a studio in their converted garage. Mary also began a relationship with the abstract artist, Kenneth Noland. Mary also got to know Robert Kennedy, who had moved in to his brother's house, Hickory Hill, after John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy moved out in 1960.

According to Nina Burleigh (A Very Private Woman) James Angleton began bugging Mary's telephone and bedroom after she left Cord Meyer. This information came from an interview with Joan Bross, the wife of John Bross, a high-ranking CIA official. Angleton became a regular visitor to the family home and took Mary's sons fishing.

In October 1961, Mary began visiting John F. Kennedy in the White House. It was about this time she began an affair with the president. Mary told her friends, Ann and James Truitt, that she was keeping a diary about the relationship.

In 1962 Mary made contact with Timothy Leary, the director of research projects at Harvard University. Leary supplied LSD to Mary who used it with Kennedy. Leary also claimed that Mary helped influence Kennedy's views on nuclear disarmament and rapprochement with Cuba. It was later discovered that the FBI was keeping a file on Mary. Later, James Angleton, head of counterintelligence at the CIA admitted that the agency was bugging Mary's telephone and bedroom during this period.

Kennedy aide, Meyer Feldman, claimed in an interview with Nina Burleigh that the president might have discussed substantial issues with her: "I think he might have thought more of her than some of the other women and discussed things that were on his mind, not just social gossip."

In January, 1963, Philip Graham, the publisher of the Washington Post, attended a convention of American newspaper editors in Phoenix. Graham, who was suffering from alcoholism, disclosed at the meeting that John F. Kennedy was having an affair with Mary Meyer. No newspaper reported this incident but Kennedy decided to bring an end to the affair. However, they continued to see each other at social functions.

According to his biography, Flashbacks (1983) Timothy Leary claims that Mary phoned him the day after Kennedy was assassinated: "They couldn't control him any more. He was changing too fast. He was learning too much... They'll cover everything up. I gotta come see you. I'm scared. I'm afraid."

In the summer of 1964 Meyer told friends that she believed someone had been inside her house while she was away. On another occasion she told Elizabeth Eisenstein that "she thought she had seen somebody leaving as she walked in". Mary reported these incidents to the police. Eisenstein said Mary was clearly frightened by these incidents.

On 12th October, 1964, Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead as she walked along the Chesapeake and Ohio towpath in Georgetown. Henry Wiggins, a car mechanic, was working on a vehicle on Canal Road, when he heard a woman shout out: "Someone help me, someone help me". He then heard two gunshots. Wiggins ran to the edge of the wall overlooking the tow path. He later told police he saw "a black man in a light jacket, dark slacks, and a dark cap standing over the body of a white woman."

Mary appeared to be killed by a professional hitman. The first bullet was fired at the back of the head. She did not die straight away. A second shot was fired into the heart. The evidence suggests that in both cases, the gun was virtually touching Mary’s body when it was fired. As the FBI expert testified, the “dark haloes on the skin around both entry wounds suggested they had been fired at close-range, possibly point-blank”.

Soon afterwards Raymond Crump, a black man, was found not far from the murder scene. He was arrested and charged with Mary's murder. Police tests were unable to show that Crump had fired the .38 caliber Smith and Wesson gun. There were no trace of nitrates on his hands or clothes. Despite an extensive search of the area no gun could be found. This included a two day search of the tow path by 40 police officers. The police also drained the canal near to the murder scene. Police scuba divers searched the waters away from where Mary was killed. However, no gun could be found. Nor could the prosecution find any link between Crump and any Smith and Wesson gun.

Crump’s lawyer, Dovey Roundtree, was convinced of his innocence. A civil rights lawyer who defended him for free, she argued that Crump was so timid and feeble-minded that if he had been guilty he would have confessed everything while being interrogated by the police.

No newspaper reports identified the true work of her former husband, Cord Meyer. He was described as a government official or an author. A large number of journalists knew that Meyer had been married to a senior CIA officer. They also knew that she had been having an affair with John F. Kennedy. None of this was reported. In fact, the judge, ruled that the private life of Mary Meyer could not be mentioned in court.

The trial judge was Howard Corcoran. He was the brother of Tommy Corcoran, a close friend of Lyndon B. Johnson. Corcoran had been appointed by Johnson soon after he became president. It is generally acknowledged that Corcoran was under Johnson’s control. His decision to insist that Mary’s private life should not be mentioned in court was very important in disguising the possible motive for the murder. This information was also kept from Crump’s lawyer, Dovey Roundtree. Although she attempted to investigate Mary's background she found little information about her: "It was as if she existed only on the towpath on the day she was murdered."

During the trial Wiggins was unable to positively identify Raymond Crump as the man standing over Meyer's body. The prosecution was also handicapped by the fact that the police had been unable to find the murder weapon at the scene of the crime or to provide a credible motive for the crime. On 29th July, 1965, Crump was acquitted of murdering Mary Meyer. The case remains unsolved.

In March, 1976, James Truitt, a former senior member of staff at the Washington Post, gave an interview to the National Enquirer. Truitt told the newspaper that Meyer was having an affair with John F. Kennedy when he was assassinated. He also claimed that Meyer had told his wife, Ann Truitt, that she was keeping an account of this relationship in her diary. Meyer asked Truitt to take possession of a private diary "if anything ever happened to me".

Ann Truitt was living in Tokyo at the time that Meyer was murdered on 12th October, 1964. She phoned Bradlee at his home and asked him if he had found the diary. Bradlee, who claimed he was unaware of his sister-in-law's affair with Kennedy, knew nothing about the diary. He later recalled what he did after Truitt's phone-call: "We didn't start looking until the next morning, when Tony and I walked around the corner a few blocks to Mary's house. It was locked, as we had expected, but when we got inside, we found Jim Angleton, and to our complete surprise he told us he, too, was looking for Mary's diary."

James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief, admitted that he knew of Mary's relationship with John F. Kennedy and was searching her home looking for her diary and any letters that would reveal details of the affair. According to Ben Bradlee, it was Mary's sister, Antoinette Bradlee, who found the diary and letters a few days later. It was claimed that the diary was in a metal box in Mary's studio. The contents of the box were given to Angleton who claimed he burnt the diary. Angleton later admitted that Mary recorded in her diary that she had taken LSD with Kennedy before "they made love".

Leo Damore claimed in an article that appeared in the New York Post that the reason Angleton and Bradlee were looking for the diary was that: "She (Meyer) had access to the highest levels. She was involved in illegal drug activity. What do you think it would do to the beatification of Kennedy if this woman said, 'It wasn't Camelot, it was Caligula's court'?" Damore also said that a figure close to the CIA had told him that Mary's death had been a professional "hit".

There is another possible reason why both Angleton and Bradlee were searching for documents in Meyer's house. Meyer had been married to Cord Meyer, a leading CIA operative involved in a variety of covert operations in the early 1950s. Were they worried that Meyer had kept a record of these activities? Was this why Mary Pinochet Meyer had been murdered?

After leaving the CIA in 1977 Cord Meyer wrote several books including an autobiography, Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA. In the book Meyer commented on the murder of his wife: "I was satisfied by the conclusions of the police investigation that Mary had been the victim of a sexually motivated assault by a single individual and that she had been killed in her struggle to escape." Carol Delaney, the longtime personal assistant to Meyer, later admitted: "Mr. Meyer didn't for a minute think that Ray Crump had murdered his wife or that it had been an attempted rape. But, being an Agency man, he couldn't very well accuse the CIA of the crime, although the murder had all the markings of an in-house rubout."

In February, 2001, the writer, C. David Heymann, asked Cord Meyer about the death of Mary Pinchot Meyer: "My father died of a heart attack the same year Mary was killed, " he whispered. "It was a bad time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed John F. Kennedy."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Psychical_Research

It was founded in 1882 by a group of eminent thinkers including Edmund Gurney, Frederic William Henry Myers, William Fletcher Barrett, Henry Sidgwick, and Edmund Dawson Rogers. The Society's headquarters are in Marloes Road, London. It publishes the quarterly Journal of the Society for Psychical Research (JSPR), the irregular Proceedings and the magazine Paranormal Review. It holds an annual conference, regular lectures and two study days per year.
...
Its purpose was to encourage scientific research into psychic or paranormal phenomena in order to establish their truth. Research was initially aimed at six areas: telepathy, mesmerism and similar phenomena, mediums, apparitions, physical phenomena associated with séances and, finally, the history of all these phenomena. The Society is run by a President and a Council of twenty people. The organization is divided between London and Cambridge (where the archives are located), the London headquarters were initially at 14 Dean's Yard.
...
Later, an American branch of the Society was formed as the American Society for Psychical Research (ASPR) in 1885, becoming an affiliate of the original SPR in 1890. American writers sometimes incorrectly call the SPR the British Society for Psychical Research (BSPR), to distinguish it from the American SPR, but the modifer should not be added.

http://www.answers.com/topic/american-society-for-psychical-research

Founded in 1885 in Boston, Massachusetts, on the initiative of Prof. W. F. Barrett. Its initial officers included president Prof. Simon Newcomb; secretary N. D. C. Hodges; and, four vice-presidents, Profs. Stanley Hall, George S. Fullerton, Edward C. Pickering, and Dr. Charles S. Minot. Those involved in the controversial field found it difficult to maintain support, even with renowned advocates such as Harvard Psychologist and Professor of Philosophy, William James, a member of the illustrious Boston family that included his brother, novelist Henry James. In 1889, for financial considerations, then-president S. P. Langley affiliated the ASPR to the English Society for Psychical Research. The research work of the American Society for Psychical Research was conducted by Dr. Richard Hodgson from 1887 until his death in 1905. The society, never strong, was dissolved the following year.

http://books.google.com/books?id=rUzOAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA729&lpg=PA729&dq=pinchot+%22Society+for+Psychical+Research%22&source=bl&ots=_VQTtkZ_2J&sig=ru-t4_A9lPqZQh0iNVpF1z3KFBo&hl=en&ei=im5JS-ioGo_KsQOMr6j1Dw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CBAQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=&f=false

http://www.archive.org/stream/journalamerican02resegoog/journalamerican02resegoog_djvu.txt
LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR  PSYCHICAL RESEARCH.  1907
SECTION B OF THE   AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC  RESEARCH
Mr. Gifford Pinchot, 1615 Rhode Island Ave., Washington, D. C.

Quote
Amos Pinchot was born in 1863. The son of a wealthy businessman, Pinchot studied law in New York City. In 1900 he married Gertrude Minturn.


The Minturn's were an interesting family with connections to the Opium trade....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Bowne_Minturn,_Jr.

Robert B. Minturn, Jr. (born New York, 21 February 1836, died 15 December 1889), was an American shipping magnate of the mid- to late 19th century.

Robert was the son of Robert Bowne Minturn (Sr.) and Anna Mary Wendell, in New York City. He graduated from Columbia University in 1856, and joined his father’s shipping firm, Grinnell, Minturn & Co., which is best known as being the owners of the clipper ship Flying Cloud. He is the author of New York to Delhi: by way of Rio de Janeiro, Australia and China (New York, 1858), an account of his voyage in connection with his work.

He married Sarah Susannah Shaw (born Massachusetts, 1839, died 1926), the sister of Robert Gould Shaw. They had a number of children:
 
The Minturn sisters.
 Edith Minturn Phelps Stokes - Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes - John Singer Sargent  - 1897

( Isaac Newton Phelps Stokes. His personal wealth was estimated at USD$250,000,000 at the time of his death, or about USD$5.515E+9 in today's dollars.[6] )

Robert Shaw Minturn (born New York, August 1863)
Sarah May Minturn (born Staten Island, N.Y., 3 September 1865); she married Henry Dwight Sedgwick III
Edith Minturn (born New York, ca. 1868)
Gertrude Minturn (born New York, June 1872)
Mildred Minturn (born New York, November 1875)
Hugh Minturn (born New York, September 1882)
As Vice President of the railroad that founded the town of Minturn, Colorado, he gave his name to that town.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9A04E1DE143FE433A25756C1A9679D946197D6CF

THE WEDDINGS OF A DAY; Marriage of Miss Gertrude Minturn to Mr. Pinchot.
The Ceremony at St. George's Church -- Many Guests Invited -- The Bride's Costume
November 15, 1900, Wednesday
Page 7, 2225 words

The wedding of Amos R. Eno Pinchot and Miss Gertrude Minturn was celebrated at noon yesterday in St. George's Church, Stuyvesant Square, by the Rev. Dr. Rainsford, rector of the church. The bride, who entered the church on the arm of her brother, Robert Shaw Minturn, who afterward gave her away, wore a gown of cream-white satin, severely plain in style and trimmed only with drapery of point lace on the bodice.... Mr Pinchot's best man was his brother Gifford Pinchot...

Another Minturn comes back into the story "As Sixties  "IT" Girl Edith Minturn Sedgwick Who met Leary at Hitchcocks LSD place via Andy Warhol's crew, Leary's wife and Warhol girl 'Nena' von Schlebrügge:


http://www.warholstars.org/stars/edie.html
Andy Warhol was often blamed for Edie Sedgwick's descent into drug addiction and mental illness. However, before meeting Warhol, Edie had been in mental hospitals twice and came from a family with a history of mental illness. She was only close to Warhol for about a year, from approximately March 1965 to February 1966.

http://www.spiritus-temporis.com/edie-sedgwick/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edie_Sedgwick
...
Edie Sedgwick was born in Santa Barbara, California, to Alice Delano de Forest (1908–1988) and Francis Minturn Sedgwick, (1904–1967), a philanthropist, rancher, and sculptor.[4] She was named after her father's aunt, Edith Minturn, famously painted, with her husband,
...
In March 1965, Sedgwick met artist and avant-garde filmmaker Andy Warhol at Lester Persky's apartment. She began going to The Factory artist studio regularly in March 1965 with her friend, Chuck Wein.

http://www.freebase.com/view/en/nena_von_schlebrugge
'Nena' von Schlebrügge - She married LSD guru Timothy Leary in 1964. They were married in Millbrook, New York, at the Hitchcock house where Leary had been carrying on his hallucinogenic experiments.

More about the ENO family:

http://www.seasonsmagazines.com/magazines/farmingtonvalley/200909Fall/cemetery.shtml
...
... the Simsbury Cemetery on Hopmeadow Street in the center of town, you can look up toward one of the mausoleums on the crest of the hill and thank the man who made your drive a safe one.
William P. Eno, dubbed the “Father of Traffic Safety,” proposed rules of the road for the newfangled automobile more than 100 years ago.

Eno, who died in 1945 at age 86, lies in the grandest of five mausoleums built for the family of Amos R. Eno, a Simsbury native who once was the largest landowner in Manhattan. In 1900, William Eno stated in The Rider and Driver magazine that “the first important principle of the rules of the road is that vehicles shall keep to the right.” A graduate of Yale (and member of Skull & Bones), Eno is also credited with helping to invent the stop sign, one-way streets and the ubiquitous traffic cop. Oddly enough, Eno, though he established the Eno Transportation Foundation in Washington, D.C., never learned to drive — a chauffeur took him everywhere.

Also see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amos_Eno_House
Noah Phelps was a graduate of Yale University....
Daughter Lucy Phelps married Amos R. Eno of Simsbury. They moved to New York City where he and a cousin opened a profitable dry goods business. Amos parlayed his profits into real estate investment in Manhattan, New York. In the 1860s he built the famous Fifth Avenue Hotel at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 23rd Street in Manhattan. It was here that he and relatives established the Second National Bank of New York...In 1884 scandal hit the family when one of Amos' sons, John Chester, embezzled millions of dollars from his father's bank and then fled to Canada to avoid prosecution...

|----

More about the Cord's

Cord Myer had a Twin brother  Quentin who died in combat in WWII:
http://www.northhampton-nh.gov/Public_Documents/NorthHamptonNH_BComm/WWIIMonumentsbrochure.pdf
Name: Quentin Meyer Service: U.S. Marine Corps Rank: First Lieutenant
ID: 0032025
Died: May 11, 1945
Buried: Honolulu Memorial in Honolulu, HI
Plot D Grave 279

Cord Meyer's Dad Cord Meyer (Sr.) and his father name was Cord Meyer:

http://www.earlyaviators.com/emeyer.htm
CORD MEYER 1895-1964

     Cord Meyer, 69 years of age, president of the Cord Meyer Company, 68 William Street, New York, was one of the major real estate developers of the Borough of Queens in the City of New York.

     Cord Meyer died unexpectedly at his summer home in North Hampton, N. H., on June 19th, 1964. He lived at 116 East 66th Street, New York City. At the time of his death he was planning the 1964 Early Birds Reunion and Convention at the Wings Club in the Biltmore Hotel, New York.

     Cord Meyer learned to fly on a Wright model B plane at George Beatty's (EB) Aviation School in Mineola, Long Island, making his first solo flight on October 2, 1912. F.A.I. Airplane Pilot's Certificate #176 was issued to him. He was born in New York City, the son of Cord and Cornelia Covert Meyer.

The family had been established in New York by another Cord Meyer, Cord's father, who fled Germany after the revolution of 1838, opened a grocery store in Brooklyn and eventually became a wealthy wholesale grocer and sugar refiner.

     Cord Meyer attended the New York City schools, St. Paul's School in New Hampshire and Yale University, where he was captain of the crew.

     Before entering college in the class of '17 though, he had become interested in flying and had soloed from an airfield near Mineola Fair Grounds. At Yale, Mr. Meyer joined a flying club that became the Army's first reserve flying squadron then the United States entered the First World War.

Commissioned a Lieutenant in the Aviation Section of the U. S. Army Signal Corps in 1917, Cord Meyer was sent to Issudun, France for pursuit training. He was a member of William Thaw's (EB) 103rd Squadron, formerly the Lafayette Escadrille, at the front until he was disabled in a DeHaviland crackup. He was decorated by both the French and American armies.

      After the war he was Commander of American Legion "Air Service Post 501" in New York City and was Director of New York CAP unit during World War II. He also headed a Draft Board in New York.

     Cord Meyer was the father of two sets of twins, all boys. All four of his sons became Marine officers.

     One of Cord Meyer's sons was named Quentin, after his father's companion in World War I, Quentin Roosevelt. Like his namesake, Quentin Meyer was killed in combat.    

Quote
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quentin_Roosevelt

Quentin Roosevelt (November 19, 1897 – July 14, 1918) was the youngest and favorite son of President Theodore Roosevelt. Family and friends agreed that Quentin had many of his father's positive qualities and few of the negative ones. Encouraged by his father, he joined the United States Army Air Service where he became a fighter pilot during World War I. Extremely popular with his fellow pilots and known for being daring, he was killed in aerial combat over France.

In 1918, Cord Meyer was in his only crash, when a plane in which he was a passenger, hit a telegraph wire. Mr. Meyer was severely injured and the Pilot, Blair Thaw, was killed.

Surviving Cord Meyer are his wife and three sons, Cord Meyer, Jr., Thomas Drake Meyer and William Blair Meyer, and nine grandchildren.
from The Early Birds of Aviation CHIRP, December, 1964, Number 71 Awarded: Silver Star, Purple Heart

Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2010, 10:04:52 am »
Sandwich it that was the most important yet. It explains just how JFK’s awakening happen. What may be overlooked in what may seem out of controlled was very indeed controlled and studied and still is under observation. Although the experiment has left several stages, (that is why the real drops are not available), the final analysis is being concluded, which may take several more years. Your problem may be and I am not sure, if you are a subject of the experiment or not, just how close you can you get to the papers that are being used for the conclusion and it could very well be perilous. I believe what is happening reaches a level of perception illustrated in the current media to the common mind to perceive the truth with rose color glasses so as not to alarm them to the final terror. Therefore the conclusion is what it the level of shades of gray that can be colored.  That is still being worked out. So the experiment goes on, and just who would believe it or not.
Are You Experience? 
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

sociostudent

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2010, 09:22:43 pm »
Having discovered  as much as I can , I was hoping to build the connection to the Huxley/Heard/Leary/Harvard operation.
This unfortunately is very loose. Once that connection was established I would continue documenting Leary's operation....

This gets interesting with the Leary Mary Pinchot / LSD / Cord Myer / S&B / CIA / Kennedy unknown scandal....

The Pinchot were a S&B family with connections to the beginning of the American Psychical Research Society / Eugenics / conservation movement the Gifford and Amos Pinchot Brothers  related to the wealthy New York Enos family, pals with Teddy Roosevelt ...

Mary's Pinchot's dad:
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USApinchotA.htm

Amos Pinchot was born in 1863. The son of a wealthy businessman, Pinchot studied law in New York City. In 1900 he married Gertrude Minturn. The couple had two children, Rosamund and Gifford. Pinchot held left-wing views and in 1911 helped establish the radical journal The Masses.

In 1912 Pinchot helped formed the Progressive Party. Later that year Theodore Roosevelt and Hiram Johnson became the party's candidates for the presidential election. The proposed program included women's suffrage, direct election of senators, anti-trust legislation and the prohibition of child labour. In winning 4,126,020 votes Roosevelt defeated William H. Taft, the official candidate of the Republican Party. However, he received less votes than the Democratic Party candidate, Woodrow Wilson.

Pinchot believed that the First World War had been caused by the imperialist competitive system. This was the point of view expressed by The Masses. In July, 1917, it was claimed by the authorities that articles by Floyd Dell and Max Eastman and cartoons by Art Young, Boardman Robinson and H. J. Glintenkamp had violated the Espionage Act. Under this act it was an offence to publish material that undermined the war effort. The legal action that followed forced the journal to cease publication. In April, 1918, after three days of deliberation, the jury failed to agree on the guilt of the men.

The second trial was held in September, 1918. John Reed, who had recently returned from Russia, was also arrested and charged with the original defendants. This time eight of the twelve jurors voted for acquittal and the defendants walked free on October 5, 1918.

[ reference See Movie "Reds"  
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jreed.htm
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/Jbryant.htm ]

Pinchot divorced his first wife and married Ruth Pickering in 1919. The couple had two children, Mary Pinchot and Antoinette Pinchot. Regular visitors to the home included Mabel Dodge, Crystal Eastman, Max Eastman, Louis Brandeis and Harold Ickes.

In 1920 two Italian immigrants, Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, were accused of murdering a shoe factory payroll clerk in Braintree, Massachusetts. Pinchot and his wife were convinced that the two men were innocent and spent a great deal of time and effort trying to get them released.

Pinchot supported his friend, Robert La Follette, the the candidate of the Progressive Party in the 1924 presidential election. Although La Follette and his running partner, Burton K. Wheeler, gained support from trade unions, the Socialist Party and the Scripps-Howard newspaper chain, La Follette only won one-sixth of the votes.

Pinchot worked for several years on two books, Big Business in America and The History of the Progressive Party. However, the books were not published in his lifetime.

Initially he supported Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal. However, he was opposed his attempt to control the Supreme Court. In April, 1937, Pinchot had a letter published in the New York Times where he criticised Roosevelt's style of government "which places the fate of labor, industry and agriculture in a bureaucracy controlled by one man... I am forced to conclude that... you desire the power of a dictator without the liability of the name."

Pinchot's daughter from his first marriage, Rosamund Pinchot, became an actress. Although she only appeared in one Hollywood movie, she did get parts in several French films. However, she suffered from depression and in 1938 she committed suicide. Pinchot was devastated and never fully recovered from this tragedy.

Pinchot retained his pacifist views and in September, 1940, helped to establish the America First Committee (AFC). The America First National Committee included Robert E. Wood, John T. Flynn and Charles A. Lindbergh. Supporters of the organization included Burton K. Wheeler, Hugh Johnson, Robert LaFollette Jr., Hamilton Fish and Gerald Nye.

The AFC soon became the most powerful isolationist group in the United States. The AFC had four main principles: (1) The United States must build an impregnable defense for America; (2) No foreign power, nor group of powers, can successfully attack a prepared America; (3) American democracy can be preserved only by keeping out of the European War; (4) "Aid short of war" weakens national defense at home and threatens to involve America in war abroad.

The AFC influenced public opinion through publications and speeches and within a year the organization had 450 local chapters and over 800,000 members. The AFC was dissolved four days after the Japanese Air Force attacked Pearl Harbor on 7th December, 1941.

Pinchot grew increasing depressed by the progress of the Second World War and in the summer of 1942 he slit his wrists. He survived this suicide attempt but his health never recovered and spent the rest of his life in hospital.

Amos Pinchot died of pneumonia in February, 1944.

Mary's Uncle Gifford:

http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/bah/dam/governors/pinchot.asp?secid=31
http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/1879-1951/4284/gifford_pinchot/469112

If Gifford Pinchot had not become governor of Pennsylvania, he would be still famous for his legacy reagarding America's forests. In fact, Pinchot was quoted as saying, "I have been governor every now and then, but I am a forester all the time." Pinchot was born August 11, 1865, to Episcopalian parents in Simsbury, Connecticut, the son of James W. Pinchot, a successful New York City wallpaper merchant and Mary Eno, daughter of one of New York City's wealthiest real estate developers, Amos Eno.

The first member of Pinchot's family in Pennsylvania, Francis Joseph Smith, came from Belgium with a letter from Benjamin Franklin to Robert Morris, and after serving as major in the Revolutionary War, settled in the Delaware Valley at Shawnee, now in Monroe County. Pinchot's great grandfather, Constantine Pinchot, and his grandfather, C.C.D. Pinchot, settled in Milford, Pike County, in 1816. James Pinchot was born in Milford and built the present Pinchot mansion there in 1886. The former governor's home, known as Grey Towers, is now owned by the USDA Forest Service (founded by Pinchot) and is a national historic landmark.

Governor Pinchot received his preparatory education at Philips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire, and was graduated from Yale University in 1889. Pinchot was determined to establish forestry as a legitimate occupation, despite the fact that forestry was not a recognized profession at that time in the United States.

Amos Eno offered his grandson a business position that most likely would have made Pinchot independently wealthy, but Pinchot considered forest conservation a more important calling. With his father's encouragement, he studied forestry in Germany, France, Switzerland, and Austria. In January 1892, Pinchot, at the invitation of George Vanderbilt, created the first example in the United States of practical forest management on a large scale at Vanderbilt's Biltmore Estate, near Ashville, North Carolina. Proving that conservation practices could be both beneficial for forests and still profitable, the Biltmore arboretum became a model for forest management around the world.

From 1898 to 1910, Pinchot consolidated the fragmented government forest work under the U. S. Division of Forestry, later the Bureau of Forestry, and then the United States Forest Service. In 1903, Pinchot also became professor of Forestry at Yale University and, in 1904, his friend President Theodore Roosevelt appointed him chief of Forestry. Under Pinchot's guidance, the number of national forests increased from 32 in 1898 to 149 in 1910. Pinchot and Roosevelt agreed on many points of conservation and worked tirelessly to end the destruction of U.S. forests.

Pinchot also visited the Philippine Islands in 1902 and recommended a forest policy for the islands. He was appointed by President Roosevelt to the Committee on Organization of Government Scientific Work in 1903; to the Commission on Department Methods in 1905; to the Inland Waterways Commission in 1907; and, in 1908, to the Commission on Country Life, Chairman of the National Conservation Commission, and Chairman of the National Conservation Commission. He was also appointed chairman of the Joint Committee on Conservation, by the first conference of Governors at Washington, December 1908. In 1917, he was a member of the U.S. Food Administration.

On August 15, 1914, Pinchot married Cornelia Elizabeth Bryce (1881–1960), a native of Rhode Island and daughter of a wealthy journalist and politician, Lloyd Bryce. Cornelia and Gifford both were longtime friends with Theodore Roosevelt, who attended their wedding. As one of the most politically active first ladies in the history of Pennsylvania, she was a very strong advocate for women's rights, full educational opportunities for women, seeking wage and union protections for women and children, and encouraging women to participate in the political process.

Her family's wealth, influence from socially and politically prominent relatives, and Progressive Era politics proved to be a great influence on her husband's political agenda. Her influence among female voters is credited as a key factor in the election of her husband. Cornelia Bryce Pinchot ran for the U.S. House of Representatives three times and attempted to succeed her husband as governor in the primary of 1934, but lost all four elections. ...

http://www.historycooperative.org/cgi-bin/justtop.cgi?act=justtop&url=http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/pmh/132.1/miller.html
Cornelia Pinchot ran unsuccessfully against incumbent Louis T. McFadden

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,743671,00.html
...
Shortly after Congressman Louis T. McFadden of the 13th Pennsylvania District had accused President Hoover of treason on the War Debts last winter, Mrs. Cornelia Bryce Pinchot, the Governor's wife and no political friend of the President, announced her Republican candidacy for the House from Mr. McFadden's district. Last week 15th District voters renominated Mr. McFadden who returned to the House to receive an ovation from his colleagues.

Mrs. Pinchot had campaigned in a bright blue Studebaker. Often she stepped out wearing mannish knickerbockers. Big posters bearing her sharp profile had blared: "Ye cannot serve God and mammon." Defeated, she observed: "People did not seem as anxious to send me to Congress as I was to go." Then she, too, journeyed to Washington, dined with many another Governor's wife at the White House.

http://www.sweetliberty.org/issues/hoax/mcfadden.htm
...
McFadden's later career was marked by violent criticism of his party's financial policies.  Opposition to the Hoover moratorium on war debts led him to propose to the House on 12-13-1932 that the President be impeached.  He bitterly attacked the governors of the Federal Reserve Board for "having caused the greatest depression we have ever known".  Both the President and the Board, he was convinced, were conspiring with the "international" bankers to ruin the country.  He lost his seat to a Democrat in 1934, although two years previously he had had the support of the Republican, Democratic and Prohibition parties.  He died in 1936 while on a visit in new York City.

Congressman Louis T. McFadden's Federal Reserve Speeches in Congress

Congressman McFadden's Remarks in Congress on the Federal Reserve Corporation -- 1934
"Mr. Chairman, we have in this Country one of the most corrupt institutions the world has ever known. I refer to the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Reserve Banks, hereinafter called the Fed. The Fed has cheated the Government of these United States and the people of the United States out of enough money to pay the Nation's debt. The depredations and iniquities of the Fed has cost enough money to pay the National debt several times over.   ...

http://alterdestiny.blogspot.com/2006/11/tuesday-forgotten-american-blogging_07.html
...

In the 1920s, Grant served as the head of the Immigration Restriction League and the Eugenics Research Association. He was a key player in the Second Eugenics Congress in 1921, which built on the original 1912 Eugenics Congress in Britain led by such notables as Winston Churchill and Arthur Balfour. Among the attendees of the Second Eugenics Congress were Alexander Graham Bell, leading conservationist Gifford Pinchot and future U.S. President Herbert Hoover. Sadly, Theodore Roosevelt died in 1919 or no doubt he would have attended as well. Grant went on to publish a sequel to Passing of the Great Race in 1933. Entitled The Conquest of a Continent, Grant wished for the creation of a separation nation for blacks in order to protect white blood from their taint, though he knew that the realities of the American South made this impossible. At the very least, he wanted stricter anti-miscegenation laws, the promotion of contraception among blacks so they stop breeding, and extremely strict legal segregation.

http://www.kmf.org/williams/bushbook/bush7.html

*Pinchot, Amos
*Pinchot, Gifford (S&B 1889) - Invented the aristocrats' "conservation" movement. He was President Theodore Roosevelt's chief forester, substituting federal land-control in place of Abraham Lincoln's free-land-to-families farm creation program. Pinchot's British Empire activism included the Psychical Research Society and his vice presidency of the first International Eugenics Congress in 1912.

Gifford Pinchot (S&B 1889) invented the aristocrats' ``conservation'' movement. He was President Theodore Roosevelt's chief forester, substituting federal land-control in place of Abraham Lincoln's free-land-to-families farm creation program. Pinchot's British Empire activitism included the Psychical Research Society and his vice-presidency of the first International Eugenics Congress in 1912.

Helping Pinchot initiate this century's racialist environmentalism were his cohorts George W. Woodruff (S&B 1889), Teddy Roosevelt's Assistant Attorney General and Acting Interior Secretary; and Henry Solon Graves (S&B 1892), chief U.S. forester 1910-20. Frederick E. Weyerhauser (S&B 1896), owner of vast tracts of American forest, was a follower of Pinchot's movement, while the Weyerhauser family were active collaborators of British-South African super-racist Cecil Rhodes. This family's friendship with President George Bush is a vital factor in the present environmentalist movement.


Mary Pinchot in 1942



Mary and Cord Meyer on their wedding day (1945)



JFK with Mary Meyer (far right). Antoinette Bradlee is second on the left.

Mary Pinchot was born on 14th October, 1920. Her father Amos Pinchot, was a wealthy lawyer who helped fund the radical journal, The Masses. He was also a key figure in the Progressive Party. Her mother, Ruth Pinchot, was a journalist who worked for worked for magazines such as The Nation and The New Republic.

As a child Mary was brought into contact with left-wing intellectuals. People like Mabel Dodge, Crystal Eastman, Max Eastman, Louis Brandeis, Robert La Follette and Harold Ickes were regular visitors at their Grey Towers home in Milford, Pennsylvania.

Mary attended Brearley School and Vassar College. In 1938 she began going out with William Attwood. It was while with Attwood at a dance held at Choate that she met John F. Kennedy for the first time.

While at Vassar Mary became interested in left-wing politics. This did not seem to upset her father, Amos Pinchot, who wrote to his brother Gifford: "Vassar seems to be very interested in communism. And a great deal of warm debating is going on among the students of Mary's class, which I think is an excellent thing. People of that age ought to be radical anyhow."

After leaving Vassar she obtained work as a journalist at United Press. This included writing for magazines such as Mademoiselle. Mary also became a member of the American Labor Party. This insured that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) started a file on Meyer's political activities. Mary, like her parents, was also a committed pacifist.

In 1944 Mary met Cord Meyer, a lieutenant in the US Marines who was recovering from serious shrapnel injuries that had resulted in him losing an eye. The couple married on 19th April, 1945. Soon afterwards the couple went to San Francisco to attend the conference that established the United Nations. Cord went as an aide to Harold Stassen, whereas Mary, who was working for the North American Newspaper Alliance at the time, was one of the reporters sent to cover this important event.

Cord Meyer had been shocked by the dropping of the atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. After the war Meyer commissioned a film by Pare Lorentz called The Beginning or the End. Meyer wanted this film to be the definitive statement about the dangers of the atomic age. Cord wrote at the time: "Talked with Mary of how steadily depressing is our full realization of how little hope there is of avoiding the approaching catastrophe of atomic warfare."

The following year Meyer published a book about his war experiences, Waves of Darkness. Meyer expressed pacifist views in the book: "The only certain fruit of this insanity will be the rotting bodies upon which the sun will impartially shine tomorrow. Let us throw down these guns that we hate."

For a while Mary worked as an editor for the Atlantic Monthly. Her first child Quentin was born in 1945. After the birth of Michael in 1947 she became a housewife but still managed to attend classes at the Art Students League in New York City.

Like her husband, Mary became an advocate of world government. In May, 1947, Cord Meyer was elected president of the United World Federalists. Under his leadership, membership of the organization doubled in size. Albert Einstein was one of his most important supporters and personally solicited funds for the organization. Mary wrote for its journal, The United World Federalists.

Mary's third child, Mark, was born in 1950. The family now moved back to Cambridge. Cord was showing signs of becoming disillusioned with the idea of world government. He had experienced problems with members of the American Communist Party who had infiltrated the organizations he had established. It was about this time that he began working secretly for the Central Intelligence Agency.

In 1950 Meyer formed the Committee to Frame a World Constitution with Robert Maynard Hutchins and Elizabeth Mann Borgese. As a result of this work Meyer made contact with the International Cooperative Alliance, the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, the Indian Socialist Party and the Congress of Peoples Against Imperialism. It is almost certain that this had been done on behalf of the CIA.

Allen W. Dulles made contact with Cord Meyer in 1951. He accepted the invitation to join the CIA. Dulles told Meyer he wanted him to work on a project that was so secret that he could not be told about it until he officially joined the organization. Meyer was to work under Frank Wisner, director of the Office of Policy Coordination (OPC). This became the espionage and counter-intelligence branch of the CIA. Wisner was told to create an organization that concentrated on "propaganda, economic warfare; preventive direct action, including sabotage, anti-sabotage, demolition and evacuation measures; subversion against hostile states, including assistance to underground resistance groups, and support of indigenous anti-Communist elements in threatened countries of the free world."

Meyer became part of what became known as Operation Mockingbird, a CIA program to influence the mass media. According to Deborah Davis (Katharine the Great: Katharine Graham and the Washington Post): Meyer was Mockingbird's "principal operative".

Mary and the family now moved to Washington where they became members of the Georgetown Crowd . This group included Frank Wisner, Richard Bissell, Desmond FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Tracy Barnes, Philip Graham, Katharine Graham, David Bruce, Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow, Eugene Rostow, Chip Bohlen and Paul Nitze. The Meyers also socialized with other CIA officers or CIA assets James Angleton (Cicely Angleton), Wistar Janney (Mary Wisnar), Ben Bradlee (Antoinette Bradlee) and James Truitt (Anne Truitt).

In August, 1953, Joseph McCarthy accused Cord Meyer of being a communist. The Federal Bureau of Investigation added to the smear by announcing it was unwilling to give Meyer "security clearance". Suspicion also fell on Mary at this time and it was revealed that the FBI had been investigating her activities. However, the FBI refused to explain what evidence they had against the Meyers. Allen W. Dulles and Frank Wisner both came to Meyer's defence and refused to allow him to be interrogated by the FBI.

The FBI eventually revealed the charges against Meyer. Apparently he was a member of several liberal groups considered to be subversive by the Justice Department. This included being a member of the National Council on the Arts, where he associated with Norman Thomas, the leader of the Socialist Party and its presidential candidate in 1948. Meyer was eventually cleared of these charges and was allowed to keep his job.

Cord Meyer became disillusioned with life in the CIA and in January, 1954, he went to New York City and attempted to get a job in publishing. Although he saw contacts he had made during his covert work with the media (Operation Mockingbird) he was unable to obtain a job with any of the established book publishing firms. In the summer of 1954 the Meyer family's golden retriever was hit by a car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. The dog's death worried Cord. He told colleagues at the CIA he was afraid the same thing might happen to one of his children.

In the summer of 1954 the Meyers got new neighbours. John F. Kennedy and his wife Jackie Kennedy purchased Hickory Hill, a house several hundred yards from where the Meyers lived. Mary became good friends with Jackie and they went on walks together.

In November, 1954, Meyer replaced Thomas Braden as head of International Organizations Division. Meyer began spending a lot of time in Europe. One of Meyer's tasks was to supervise Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, the United States government broadcasts to Eastern Europe. According to Nina Burleigh (A Very Private Woman) Meyer was "overseeing a vast 'black' budget of millions of dollars channeled through phony foundation of a global network of associations and labor groups that on their surface appeared to be progressive".

On 18th December, 1956, Mary's nine-year-old son, Michael, was hit by a car on the curve of highway near their house and killed. It was the same spot where the family's golden retriever had been killed two years earlier. The tragedy briefly brought the couple together. However, in 1958, Mary filed for divorce. In her divorce petition she alleged "extreme cruelty, mental in nature, which seriously injured her health, destroyed her happiness, rendered further cohabitation unendurable and compelled the parties to separate."

Mary continued to live with her two sons in the family home of Langley Commons. She took up art and her sister, Antoinette Pinchot and her husband Ben Bradlee, allowed her to set up a studio in their converted garage. Mary also began a relationship with the abstract artist, Kenneth Noland. Mary also got to know Robert Kennedy, who had moved in to his brother's house, Hickory Hill, after John F. Kennedy and Jackie Kennedy moved out in 1960.

According to Nina Burleigh (A Very Private Woman) James Angleton began bugging Mary's telephone and bedroom after she left Cord Meyer. This information came from an interview with Joan Bross, the wife of John Bross, a high-ranking CIA official. Angleton became a regular visitor to the family home and took Mary's sons fishing.

In October 1961, Mary began visiting John F. Kennedy in the White House. It was about this time she began an affair with the president. Mary told her friends, Ann and James Truitt, that she was keeping a diary about the relationship.

In 1962 Mary made contact with Timothy Leary, the director of research projects at Harvard University. Leary supplied LSD to Mary who used it with Kennedy. Leary also claimed that Mary helped influence Kennedy's views on nuclear disarmament and rapprochement with Cuba. It was later discovered that the FBI was keeping a file on Mary. Later, James Angleton, head of counterintelligence at the CIA admitted that the agency was bugging Mary's telephone and bedroom during this period.

Kennedy aide, Meyer Feldman, claimed in an interview with Nina Burleigh that the president might have discussed substantial issues with her: "I think he might have thought more of her than some of the other women and discussed things that were on his mind, not just social gossip."

In January, 1963, Philip Graham, the publisher of the Washington Post, attended a convention of American newspaper editors in Phoenix. Graham, who was suffering from alcoholism, disclosed at the meeting that John F. Kennedy was having an affair with Mary Meyer. No newspaper reported this incident but Kennedy decided to bring an end to the affair. However, they continued to see each other at social functions.

According to his biography, Flashbacks (1983) Timothy Leary claims that Mary phoned him the day after Kennedy was assassinated: "They couldn't control him any more. He was changing too fast. He was learning too much... They'll cover everything up. I gotta come see you. I'm scared. I'm afraid."

In the summer of 1964 Meyer told friends that she believed someone had been inside her house while she was away. On another occasion she told Elizabeth Eisenstein that "she thought she had seen somebody leaving as she walked in". Mary reported these incidents to the police. Eisenstein said Mary was clearly frightened by these incidents.

On 12th October, 1964, Mary Pinchot Meyer was shot dead as she walked along the Chesapeake and Ohio towpath in Georgetown. Henry Wiggins, a car mechanic, was working on a vehicle on Canal Road, when he heard a woman shout out: "Someone help me, someone help me". He then heard two gunshots. Wiggins ran to the edge of the wall overlooking the tow path. He later told police he saw "a black man in a light jacket, dark slacks, and a dark cap standing over the body of a white woman."

Mary appeared to be killed by a professional hitman. The first bullet was fired at the back of the head. She did not die straight away. A second shot was fired into the heart. The evidence suggests that in both cases, the gun was virtually touching Mary’s body when it was fired. As the FBI expert testified, the “dark haloes on the skin around both entry wounds suggested they had been fired at close-range, possibly point-blank”.

Soon afterwards Raymond Crump, a black man, was found not far from the murder scene. He was arrested and charged with Mary's murder. Police tests were unable to show that Crump had fired the .38 caliber Smith and Wesson gun. There were no trace of nitrates on his hands or clothes. Despite an extensive search of the area no gun could be found. This included a two day search of the tow path by 40 police officers. The police also drained the canal near to the murder scene. Police scuba divers searched the waters away from where Mary was killed. However, no gun could be found. Nor could the prosecution find any link between Crump and any Smith and Wesson gun.

Crump’s lawyer, Dovey Roundtree, was convinced of his innocence. A civil rights lawyer who defended him for free, she argued that Crump was so timid and feeble-minded that if he had been guilty he would have confessed everything while being interrogated by the police.

No newspaper reports identified the true work of her former husband, Cord Meyer. He was described as a government official or an author. A large number of journalists knew that Meyer had been married to a senior CIA officer. They also knew that she had been having an affair with John F. Kennedy. None of this was reported. In fact, the judge, ruled that the private life of Mary Meyer could not be mentioned in court.

The trial judge was Howard Corcoran. He was the brother of Tommy Corcoran, a close friend of Lyndon B. Johnson. Corcoran had been appointed by Johnson soon after he became president. It is generally acknowledged that Corcoran was under Johnson’s control. His decision to insist that Mary’s private life should not be mentioned in court was very important in disguising the possible motive for the murder. This information was also kept from Crump’s lawyer, Dovey Roundtree. Although she attempted to investigate Mary's background she found little information about her: "It was as if she existed only on the towpath on the day she was murdered."

During the trial Wiggins was unable to positively identify Raymond Crump as the man standing over Meyer's body. The prosecution was also handicapped by the fact that the police had been unable to find the murder weapon at the scene of the crime or to provide a credible motive for the crime. On 29th July, 1965, Crump was acquitted of murdering Mary Meyer. The case remains unsolved.

In March, 1976, James Truitt, a former senior member of staff at the Washington Post, gave an interview to the National Enquirer. Truitt told the newspaper that Meyer was having an affair with John F. Kennedy when he was assassinated. He also claimed that Meyer had told his wife, Ann Truitt, that she was keeping an account of this relationship in her diary. Meyer asked Truitt to take possession of a private diary "if anything ever happened to me".

Ann Truitt was living in Tokyo at the time that Meyer was murdered on 12th October, 1964. She phoned Bradlee at his home and asked him if he had found the diary. Bradlee, who claimed he was unaware of his sister-in-law's affair with Kennedy, knew nothing about the diary. He later recalled what he did after Truitt's phone-call: "We didn't start looking until the next morning, when Tony and I walked around the corner a few blocks to Mary's house. It was locked, as we had expected, but when we got inside, we found Jim Angleton, and to our complete surprise he told us he, too, was looking for Mary's diary."

James Angleton, CIA counterintelligence chief, admitted that he knew of Mary's relationship with John F. Kennedy and was searching her home looking for her diary and any letters that would reveal details of the affair. According to Ben Bradlee, it was Mary's sister, Antoinette Bradlee, who found the diary and letters a few days later. It was claimed that the diary was in a metal box in Mary's studio. The contents of the box were given to Angleton who claimed he burnt the diary. Angleton later admitted that Mary recorded in her diary that she had taken LSD with Kennedy before "they made love".

Leo Damore claimed in an article that appeared in the New York Post that the reason Angleton and Bradlee were looking for the diary was that: "She (Meyer) had access to the highest levels. She was involved in illegal drug activity. What do you think it would do to the beatification of Kennedy if this woman said, 'It wasn't Camelot, it was Caligula's court'?" Damore also said that a figure close to the CIA had told him that Mary's death had been a professional "hit".

There is another possible reason why both Angleton and Bradlee were searching for documents in Meyer's house. Meyer had been married to Cord Meyer, a leading CIA operative involved in a variety of covert operations in the early 1950s. Were they worried that Meyer had kept a record of these activities? Was this why Mary Pinochet Meyer had been murdered?

After leaving the CIA in 1977 Cord Meyer wrote several books including an autobiography, Facing Reality: From World Federalism to the CIA. In the book Meyer commented on the murder of his wife: "I was satisfied by the conclusions of the police investigation that Mary had been the victim of a sexually motivated assault by a single individual and that she had been killed in her struggle to escape." Carol Delaney, the longtime personal assistant to Meyer, later admitted: "Mr. Meyer didn't for a minute think that Ray Crump had murdered his wife or that it had been an attempted rape. But, being an Agency man, he couldn't very well accuse the CIA of the crime, although the murder had all the markings of an in-house rubout."

In February, 2001, the writer, C. David Heymann, asked Cord Meyer about the death of Mary Pinchot Meyer: "My father died of a heart attack the same year Mary was killed, " he whispered. "It was a bad time." And what could he say about Mary Meyer? Who had committed such a heinous crime? "The same sons of bitches," he hissed, "that killed John F. Kennedy."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Society_for_Psychical_Research

It was founded in 1882 by a group of eminent thinkers including Edmund Gurney, Frederic William Henry Myers, William Fletcher Barrett, Henry Sidgwick, and Edmund Dawson Rogers. The Society's headquarters are in Marloes Road, London. It publishes the quarterly Journal of the Society for Psychical Research (JSPR), the irregular Proceedings and the magazine Paranormal Review. It holds an annual conference, regular lectures and two study days per year.
...
Its purpose was to encourage scientific research into psychic or paranormal phenomena in order to establish their truth. Research was initially aimed at six areas: telepathy, mesmerism and similar phenomena, mediums, apparitions, physical phenomena associated with séances and, finally, the history of all these phenomena. The Society is run by a President and a Council of twenty people. The organization is divided between London and Cambridge (where the archives are located), the London headquarters were initially at 14 Dean's Yard.
...
Later, an American branch of the Society was formed as the American Society for Psychical Research (ASPR) in 1885, becoming an affiliate of the original SPR in 1890. American writers sometimes incorrectly call the SPR the British Society for Psychical Research (BSPR), to distinguish it from the American SPR, but the modifer should not be added.

http://www.answers.com/topic/american-society-for-psychical-research

Founded in 1885 in Boston, Massachusetts, on the initiative of Prof. W. F. Barrett. Its initial officers included president Prof. Simon Newcomb; secretary N. D. C. Hodges; and, four vice-presidents, Profs. Stanley Hall, George S. Fullerton, Edward C. Pickering, and Dr. Charles S. Minot. Those involved in the controversial field found it difficult to maintain support, even with renowned advocates such as Harvard Psychologist and Professor of Philosophy, William James, a member of the illustrious Boston family that included his brother, novelist Henry James. In 1889, for financial considerations, then-president S. P. Langley affiliated the ASPR to the English Society for Psychical Research. The research work of the American Society for Psychical Research was conducted by Dr. Richard Hodgson from 1887 until his death in 1905. The society, never strong, was dissolved the following year.


http://books.google.com/books?id=rUzOAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA729&lpg=PA729&dq=pinchot+%22Society+for+Psychical+Research%22&source=bl&ots=_VQTtkZ_2J&sig=ru-t4_A9lPqZQh0iNVpF1z3KFBo&hl=en&ei=im5JS-ioGo_KsQOMr6j1Dw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=4&ved=0CBAQ6AEwAw#v=onepage&q=&f=false

http://www.archive.org/stream/journalamerican02resegoog/journalamerican02resegoog_djvu.txt
LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR  PSYCHICAL RESEARCH.  1907
SECTION B OF THE   AMERICAN INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC  RESEARCH
Mr. Gifford Pinchot, 1615 Rhode Island Ave., Washington, D. C.
 

The Minturn's were an interesting family with connections to the Opium trade....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Bowne_Minturn,_Jr.

Robert B. Minturn, Jr. (born New York, 21 February 1836, died 15 December 1889), was an American shipping magnate of the mid- to late 19th century.

Robert was the son of Robert Bowne Minturn (Sr.) and Anna Mary Wendell, in New York City. He graduated from Columbia University in 1856, and joined his father’s shipping firm, Grinnell, Minturn & Co., which is best known as being the owners of the clipper ship Flying Cloud. He is the author of New York to Delhi: by way of Rio de Janeiro, Australia and China (New York, 1858), an account of his voyage in connection with his work.

He married Sarah Susannah Shaw (born Massachusetts, 1839, died 1926), the sister of Robert Gould Shaw. They had a number of children:
 

The Minturn sisters.

Robert Shaw Minturn (born New York, August 1863)
Sarah May Minturn (born Staten Island, N.Y., 3 September 1865); she married Henry Dwight Sedgwick III
Edith Minturn (born New York, ca. 1868)
Gertrude Minturn (born New York, June 1872)
Mildred Minturn (born New York, November 1875)
Hugh Minturn (born New York, September 1882)
As Vice President of the railroad that founded the town of Minturn, Colorado, he gave his name to that town.

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9A04E1DE143FE433A25756C1A9679D946197D6CF

THE WEDDINGS OF A DAY; Marriage of Miss Gertrude Minturn to Mr. Pinchot.
The Ceremony at St. George's Church -- Many Guests Invited -- The Bride's Costume
November 15, 1900, Wednesday
Page 7, 2225 words

The wedding of Amos R. Eno Pinchot and Miss Gertrude Minturn was celebrated at noon yesterday in St. George's Church, Stuyvesant Square, by the Rev. Dr. Rainsford, rector of the church. The bride, who entered the church on the arm of her brother, Robert Shaw Minturn, who afterward gave her away, wore a gown of cream-white satin, severely plain in style and trimmed only with drapery of point lace on the bodice.... Mr Pinchot's best man was his brother Gifford Pinchot...


WOW. Good job, TB! Got anything else on the institute for psychical research? It's what I've been studying recently.

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #21 on: January 12, 2010, 02:42:28 pm »

WOW. Good job, TB! Got anything else on the institute for psychical research? It's what I've been studying recently.

Yes the SPR - American-SPR - British-SPR is very interesting in that the early members are a who's who of Pilgrims-S&B-Milner/Rhodes round table (Royals). This post should be split into a separte thread.

There interests in Eugenics and "Human Improvement" fold into this field since they believed that Pychic abilities might be improved via various means . They divided up later into "spirituals" and "scientific" directions. So LSD would be the scientific direction. With the Sequoia Seminars there was a synthesis of spiritulism and scientific.

http://ghosts.monstrous.com/society_for_psychical_research.htm

The Society for Psychical Research (SPR) was founded in 1882 by three dons of Trinity College, Cambridge. Sir William F. Barrett, a professor of physics at the Royal College of Science in Dublin, had been conducting experiments in the 1880s testing the notion of thought-transference. Barrett conceived of the idea of forming an organization of spiritualists, scientists, and scholars who would join forces in a dispassionate investigation of psychical phenomena.

F.W.H. Myers, Edmund Gurney and Henry Sidgewick attended a conference in London that Barrett convened, and the Society for Psychical Research (SPR) was created with Sidgewick, who had a reputation as an impartial scholar, accepting the first presidency. (including Frederic William Henry Myers) because of their interest in spiritualism.

The great American psychologist, William James, met Gurney in England in 1882 and immediately they struck up a close friendship. Later James also became a close friend of Myers. In 1884, Barrett toured the United States and succeeded in arousing the interest of American scholars in forming a similar society, which was established in 1885, and in which William James took an active role. The American Society for Psychical Research constituted the first organized efford for experimental psychological research in the United States. For a period of many years, before the ascendency of the German experimental approach of Wilhelm Wundt, psychology in the United States was equated with the efforts of psychical research.

The Society set up six working committees, each with a specific domain for exploration:

1. An examination of the nature and extent of any influence which may be exerted by one mind upon another, apart from any generally recognized mode of perception.
2. The study of hypnotism, and the forms of so-called mesmeric trance, with its alleged insensibility to pain; clairvoyance and other allied phenomena.
3. A critical revision of Reichenbach's researches with certain organizations called "sensitive," and an inquiry whether such organizations possess any power of perception beyond a highly exalted sensibility of the recognized sensory organs.
4. A careful investigation of any reports, resting on strong testimony, regarding apparitions at the moment of death, or otherwise, or regarding disturbances in houses reputed to be haunted.
5. An inquiry into the various physical phenomena commonly called spiritualistic; with an attempt to discover their causes and general laws.
6. The collection and collation of existing materials bearing on the history of these subjects.

The Society is run by a President and a Council of twenty people. The organisation is divided between London and Cambridge, the London headquarters were initially at 14 Deans Yard.

Famous supporters of the society have included Alfred Lord Tennyson, Mark Twain, Lewis Carroll, Carl Jung, J.B. Rhine and Arthur Conan Doyle (who was shamefully duped on at least one occasion by tricksters).

The Society was especially active in the thirty years after it was founded, gaining fame for its debunking of Madame Blavatsky and the Theosophical Society in 1884. Most initial members were spiritualists but there was a core of 'professional' investigators - the Sidgwick Group, headed by Henry Sidgwick, a formation pre-dating the SPR by eight years. The Society was wracked by internal strife, a large part of the membership (the Spiritists) leaving as early as 1887 in opposition to the approach taken by the so-called intellectuals.

The Society still exists and states its principal areas of study as "exchanges between minds, or between minds and the environment, which are not dealt with by current orthodox science." Of its initial aims, the most successful has been the gathering of data relating to the history of the paranormal - the SPR has built up an extensive library and archive.

Some links:

http://www.spr.ac.uk/expcms/index.php?section=29
...

The Legacy
The work of the early researchers established the main methodological principles and the main areas of research. The study of mediumship continued, providing much information on aspects of human personality and altered states of consciousness, as well as perfecting investigative techniques.

Field investigations were carried out, and further collections, analyses and surveys of spontaneous phenomena were published. Following the general trend discerned also in psychology, towards an experimental, more biological, approach, experimental methods kept undergoing refinements and improvements. Much important pioneering work on free-response and quantitative experiments was done in the 1920s and 1930s, by researchers such as George Tyrrell. Mathematician and physicist by education, he explored a variety of methods for inducing altered states of consciousness, techniques to differentiate between telepathy and clairvoyance, and made attempts to automate the randomisation of targets.

The establishment of J.B. Rhine’s Parapsychology Laboratory in the USA in the 1930s was a spur to collaborative work and studies designed to replicate Rhine's results using his methods (see Overview). Both J.B. Rhine and his wife Louisa served as Presidents of the SPR in 1980. In fact, the work of the SPR has, over the years, attracted a remarkable roll-call of great names of learning, both as members and Presidents.

As the knowledge about aspects of psychical research and related areas expanded, so did the function of the SPR, from a mainly investigative to an educational body. Even in its earliest days the Society began creating a psychical research library and an archive of original documents, now housed both at its offices in London and at Cambridge University Library, which are continuously maintained and updated. The Society’s own publications, its Journal and occasional Proceedings, have been appearing since the 1880s. In them one can find a wealth of wide-ranging material relating to investigations and experiments past and present, as well as theoretical studies and papers discussing the relationship between psychical research and fields such as psychology, philosophy, physics, medicine, evolutionary biology, social sciences. One of the Society’s major recent projects was to have all its publications and the classics of psychical research made available online, together with an Abstracts Catalogue, in which related abstracts are arranged in themed collections.

Today, apart from its educational activities, the SPR continues to promote and support the main areas of psychical research: spontaneous phenomena, mediumship, and experimental work. Now that parapsychology has become an academic subject, with postgraduate courses offered at a number of universities, many of these projects are carried out as part of university research. However, the function of the Society is still very much to bring together independent individuals with many different approaches and views but sharing a passion for the subject, so that findings and ideas can be shared, evaluated and disseminated (see Research).

http://www.aspr.com/who.htm

The American Society for Psychical Research is the oldest psychical research organization in the United States. For more than a century, it's mission has been to explore extraordinary or as yet unexplained phenomena that have been called psychic or paranormal, and their implications for our understanding of consciousness, the universe and the nature of existence. How is mind related to matter, energy, space and time?

In what unexplained ways do we interconnect with the universe and each other? The ASPR addresses these profoundly important and far-reaching questions with scientific research and related educational activities including lectures, conferences and other information services. ...

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #22 on: January 12, 2010, 03:47:36 pm »
Quote
Fadiman had gone to Harvard and studied social relations. He soon came to consider the field as psychology without rats, and he had instead focused his energy on being an actor. After graduating in 1960, he spent a year in Paris, and while he was there Timothy Leary and Richard Alpert along with Aldous Huxley passed through on their way to deliver an academic paper on psychedelics in Copenhagen.

In Paris, Alpert, who had been Fadiman's professor at Harvard, told him, "The greatest thing in the world has happened to me, and I want to share it with you." He proceeded to pull a small bottle out of his pocket, introducing his former student to LSD.

Now Richard Alpert does seems to have a connection to the Sequoia Seminars that I cannot confirm.


Stolaroff Collection © 2009 Erowid.org

Quote
Richard Alpert earned Ph.D. in Human Development from Stanford University in 1957. He was an instructor at Stanford from 1957-58.


So Alpert was at Stanford from 1956 to 1958, The same time as the Sequoia Seminars were experimenting with LSD. I find it hard to believe that Alpert who gets his PHD in "Human Development" and then spends two years as a prof at Stanford did not at least hear of the experiments going on all around him . Now it is said that Alpert was a "closeted" gay man and that he was having an affair with a man in Berkeley/Oakland? so maybe all this was just ignored by him. I find it interesting that I can find NOTHING about him regarding his time at Stanford. Again has his bio been massaged? The Stanford University website has nothing on this prominant alumni...

And then, he makes a beeline for Harvard and starts up a program with Leary (where he could be top bananna? Just a co-incidence? REALLY? Or was he given instructions to startup another "program" ). It maybe that Leary and Alpert were used as a way to coverup the origins of the earlier programs at Stanford SRI and to discredit LSD as a "therapy".

Also for background Alpert's father George was extremely well connected as president of the New Haven Railroad .

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Also George Alpert was one of the founders of Brandeis University named after Louis Brandeis:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Brandeis
Louis Brandeis
United States Supreme Court Justice from 1916 to 1939.
Brandeis became active in the Federation of American Zionists in 1912, as a result of a conversation with Jacob de Haas,  During Wilson's first year as president, Brandeis "played a key role in shaping the Federal Reserve Act," according to banking historian Albert Link ...
Brandeis also brought his philosophy and influence into the Woodrow Wilson administration to bear in the negotiations leading up to the Balfour Declaration

Brandeis and Jekell Island 1910:

http://www.apfn.org/apfn/reserve.htm
SECRETS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE
...
"Mr. Schiff is head of the great private banking house of Kuhn, Loeb & Co. which represents the Rothschild interest on this side of the Atlantic. He has been described as a financial strategist and has been for years the financial minister to the great impersonal power known as Standard Oil. He was hand-in-glove with the Harrimans, the Goulds and the Rockefellers, in all their railroad enterprises and has become the dominant power in the railroad and financial world in America.

Louis Brandeis, because of his great ability as a lawyer and for other reasons which will appear later, was selected by Schiff as the instrument through which Schiff hoped to achieve his ambition in New England. His job was to carry on an agitation which would undermine public confidence in the New Haven system and cause a decrease in the price of its securities, thus forcing them on the market for the wreckers to buy."74

We mention Schiff’s lawyer, Brandeis, here because the first available appointment on the Supreme Court of the United States which Woodrow Wilson was allowed to fill was given to the Kuhn, Loeb lawyer, Brandeis.

 "In Paris in June of 1919, Brandeis met with such friends as Paul Warburg, Col. House, Lord Balfour, Louis Marshall, and Baron Edmond de Rothschild."

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Richard Alpert AKA Ram Dass born original last name Alperovitz

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ram_Dass
Richard Alpert (born April 6, 1931), also known as Baba Ram Dass, is a contemporary spiritual teacher who wrote the 1971 bestseller Remember Be Here Now. He is well known for his personal and professional association with Timothy Leary at Harvard University in the early 1960s. He is also known for his travels to India and his relationship with the Hindu guru Neem Karoli Baba.

Youth and college
Alpert was born to a prominent Jewish family in Newton, Massachusetts. His father, George Alpert, was one of the most influential lawyers in the Boston area and president of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, as well as one of the leading founders of Brandeis University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. The youngest of three boys, Richard as a child was described as being engaging and loved by all—the family mascot. He went on to receive a Bachelor of Arts degree from Tufts University, master's degree from Wesleyan University and doctorate (in psychology) from Stanford University.

Harvard professorship and the Timothy Leary/Richard Alpert research
After returning from a visiting professorship at the University of California, Berkeley [Stanford?], Alpert accepted a permanent position at Harvard, where he worked with the Social Relations Department, the Psychology Department, the Graduate School of Education, and the Health Service, where he was a therapist.

He was also awarded research contracts with Yale and Stanford [SRI???]. However, perhaps most notable was the work he was doing with his close friend and associate, Dr. Timothy Leary.

Having only recently obtained his pilot's license, Alpert flew his private plane to Cuernavaca, Mexico, where Leary first introduced him to teonanácatl, the Magic Mushrooms of Mexico. By the time Alpert made it back to America, Leary had already consulted with Aldous Huxley, who was visiting at M.I.T., and through Huxley and a number of graduate students they were able to get in touch with Sandoz, which had produced a synthetic component of ergot wheat fungus called LSD.

Alpert and Leary brought a test batch of both substances back to Harvard ["Test batch"? This is a BS story IMHO], where they conducted the Harvard Psilocybin Project and experimented with LSD relatively privately.

Leary and Alpert were formally dismissed from the university in 1963.

http://www.eilatgordinlevitan.com/kurenets/k_pages/alperovitz.html
Alperovitz Family Part 1

[Ram Dass is Related to Herb Alpert (brass)]


#al53:.Herb Alpert was born in Los Angeles on March 31,1935.
The son of a Russian immigrant and a Hungarian mother, began playing the trumpet when he was eight.He studied classical music and his first trumpet teacher was Harold Mitchell.
 


George Alpert 1898-1988
GEORGE ALPERT born; 24 Mar 1898 died; 11 Sep 1988 Last Residence;
Cohasset, Norfolk, MA
A lawyer, financier and philanthropist, was president of the New Haven Railroad and helped found Brandeis University.

Ram Dass was born, Richard Alpert, on April 6, 1931 in Boston, Mass., the son of a wealthy lawyer George Alpert who was the president of the New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad and founder of Brandeis University.

As Richard Alpert he received a B.A. from Tufts College in 1952, an M.A. in motivation psychology from Wesleyan University in 1953, and a Ph.D. in human development from Stanford University in 1957. He was an instructor at Stanford from 1957-58. He taught and conducted research at the Department of Social Relations and the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University from 1958 to 1963.

While at Harvard, his explorations of human consciousness led him to conduct intensive research with LSD and other psychedelic elements, in collaboration with Timothy Leary, Aldous Huxley, Allen Ginsberg, and others. Because of the controversial nature of this research, Ram Dass and Leary were dismissed from Harvard in 1963.

In 1967, he traveled to India where he met his spiritual teacher, Neem Karoli Baba (there is a beautiful picture of Maharaj-ji here. Here he was given the name Ram Dass (Servant of God). While in India and after his return to North America he has studied yoga and meditation and a variety of spiritual practices, including Hinduism, karma, yoga and Sufism.

In 1974, Ram Dass created the Hanuman Foundation, which has developed many projects, including the Prison-Ashram Project, designed to help inmates grow spiritually during incarceration. He also helped develop the "Living/Dying Project", with Stephen Levine which provides support for the conscious dying.

In 1978 Ram Dass co-founded and became a board member of the Seva Foundation, an international organization dedicated to relieving suffering in the world. Seva supports programs designed to help wipe out curable blindness in India and Nepal, restore the agricultural life of impoverished villagers in Guatemala, assist in primary health care for American Indians, and to bring attention to the issues of homelessness and environmental degradation in the United States, among others. There is a Canadian Seva Service Society which is active in the same areas of service.

On 19 February 1997, Ram Dass suffered a stroke which left him paralyzed on the right side of his body and limited his ability to speak. For more information, go to the Ram Dass Tapes web site and click on "News" under the "Ram Dass" heading. A Community Satsang page can also be found by going to the Ram Dass Tapes web site and clicking on the "Message Board" heading.

To read one of the first media reports of his stroke check out this article at the San Fransisco Examiner on February 26, 1997.
On Monday, May 26, 1997 Ram Dass gave his first interview to Don Lattin, Chronicle Religion Writer, (San Fransisco Chronicle) since his stroke. In this interview titled "Stroke Teaches Ram Dass Anew to `Be Here Now': Spiritual teacher slowly recovering" we can hear Ram Dass' struggle to communicate with words since his stroke. We can also, however, experience some of the "eloquence to silence" which has become a tool for Ram Dass since his stroke.

On March 11th, 1998 Ram Dass gave his first public lecture since his stroke. He was invited to speak at Don Holmlund's class on "America in the '60s" at the College of Marin. Ram Dass spoke about the many ways psychedelics had shaped the social and spiritual values of a generation, and he told stories of the Harvard psychedelic experiments and of his adventures with Tim Leary.

Ram Dass has begun to travel and offer satsang again. If you go to the Ram Dass Tapes web site and check out "Ram Dass - Schedule & Lectures" you will find his teaching schedule.  Ram Dass has written a number of books on spiritual topics. The Ram Dass Tape Library offers copies of those books, as well as tapes and videos of his talks, for sale. As someone who has used the books and tapes extensively I highly recommend them to you.

Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #23 on: January 12, 2010, 05:22:18 pm »
That is funny that confirming Albert relationship to Sequoia Seminar is stumpping you, see he supplied much of the experiential value of the study. Have you read Be Here Now? The comfirmation may be difficult and allusive but the inferences cannot be denied. It has been over thirty years since I read much of the material but I recollect you will find what you are looking for.
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Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #24 on: January 12, 2010, 06:27:37 pm »
Psychedelic Science in the 21st Century - Conference - April 15 2010

With the economic breakdown will the next move be back to "Brave New World" Psychedelic's?

http://www.maps.org/home.html
The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is a membership–based, IRS–approved 501 (c) (3) nonprofit research and educational organization. Our mission is

1) to treat conditions for which conventional medicines provide limited relief—such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain, drug dependence, anxiety and depression associated with end-of-life issues—by developing psychedelics and marijuana into prescription medicines;

2) to cure many thousands of people by building a network of clinics where treatments can be provided; and

3) to educate the public honestly about the risks and benefits of psychedelics and marijuana.

http://www.maps.org/conference/

Psychedelic Science in the 21st Century
April 15-18, 2010 in the San Francisco Bay Area
An International Conference
Offering Continuing Medical Education (CME) Credits.

Open to Physicians,  Other Therapeutic and Medical Professionals,
and the General Public

Psychedelic Science will bring together international experts to present on psychedelic research and psychedelic psychotherapy topics for the largest conference dedicated solely to psychedelics in the U.S. in 17 years. There will be three full days of programming with concurrent tracks exploring clinical applications, issues relevant to healthcare professionals, and social and cultural issues surrounding the therapeutic and recreational uses of psychedelics.

Psychedelic Science will offer pre- and post-conference workshops with Stanislav Grof, M.D., Rick Doblin, Ph.D., Michael Mithoefer, M.D., Annie Mithoefer, B.S.N., Alex and Allyson Grey, David Nichols, Ph.D., Franz Vollenweider, M.D., Ralph Metzner, Ph.D., and Ann Harrison and Carolyn "Mountain Girl" Garcia of the Women's Visionary Congress.

sociostudent

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #25 on: January 12, 2010, 06:50:55 pm »
Psychedelic Science in the 21st Century - Conference - April 15 2010

With the economic breakdown will the next move be back to "Brave New World" Psychedelic's?

http://www.maps.org/home.html
The Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS) is a membership–based, IRS–approved 501 (c) (3) nonprofit research and educational organization. Our mission is

1) to treat conditions for which conventional medicines provide limited relief—such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), pain, drug dependence, anxiety and depression associated with end-of-life issues—by developing psychedelics and marijuana into prescription medicines;

2) to cure many thousands of people by building a network of clinics where treatments can be provided; and

3) to educate the public honestly about the risks and benefits of psychedelics and marijuana.

http://www.maps.org/conference/

Psychedelic Science in the 21st Century
April 15-18, 2010 in the San Francisco Bay Area
An International Conference
Offering Continuing Medical Education (CME) Credits.

Open to Physicians,  Other Therapeutic and Medical Professionals,
and the General Public

Psychedelic Science will bring together international experts to present on psychedelic research and psychedelic psychotherapy topics for the largest conference dedicated solely to psychedelics in the U.S. in 17 years. There will be three full days of programming with concurrent tracks exploring clinical applications, issues relevant to healthcare professionals, and social and cultural issues surrounding the therapeutic and recreational uses of psychedelics.

Psychedelic Science will offer pre- and post-conference workshops with Stanislav Grof, M.D., Rick Doblin, Ph.D., Michael Mithoefer, M.D., Annie Mithoefer, B.S.N., Alex and Allyson Grey, David Nichols, Ph.D., Franz Vollenweider, M.D., Ralph Metzner, Ph.D., and Ann Harrison and Carolyn "Mountain Girl" Garcia of the Women's Visionary Congress.


I personally believe that some natural psychedelics (like psilocybin and Dimethyltryptamine), used in the appropriate set and setting of course, can be beneficial for end-of-life therapy and some psychological issues. We had an interview on Truth Frequency with Dr. Rick Strassman, author of DMT: the spirit molecule several weeks ago, and it's still one of our favorite interviews.

However, LSD is NOT a natural substance, and was used by the CIA covertly throughout the 50's-60's to chemically blow people's brains out. THAT I do NOT agree with whatsoever. It was given out on college campuses (particularly UCLA and UC Berkeley) to get the kids to stop protesting the vietnam war. It was one of the first flat-out attacks by covert intelligence agencies on our nation's youth, and wasn't the last, by any means.

Offline trailhound

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #26 on: January 12, 2010, 07:04:03 pm »
Wow nice thread.

Here's a great documentary where you can hear it from the source regarding LSD.

http://nfb.ca/film/hofmanns_potion

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At the heart of that Western freedom and democracy is the belief that the individual man, the child of God, is the touchstone of value..." -RFK

Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #27 on: January 13, 2010, 12:29:58 am »
I personally believe that some natural psychedelics (like psilocybin and Dimethyltryptamine), used in the appropriate set and setting of course, can be beneficial for end-of-life therapy and some psychological issues. We had an interview on Truth Frequency with Dr. Rick Strassman, author of DMT: the spirit molecule several weeks ago, and it's still one of our favorite interviews.

However, LSD is NOT a natural substance, and was used by the CIA covertly throughout the 50's-60's to chemically blow people's brains out. THAT I do NOT agree with whatsoever. It was given out on college campuses (particularly UCLA and UC Berkeley) to get the kids to stop protesting the vietnam war. It was one of the first flat-out attacks by covert intelligence agencies on our nation's youth, and wasn't the last, by any means.

I not sure you understand your own conclusions, so let me run this by you. It was not the lack of natural substance rather that creative application of over induce reactions, mostly by music. LSD had diminished reactions due to various components or lack thereof. Often appropriate setting was the most inappropriate settings. It is true many people perished but primarily due to external sources rather than “chemical blow out” not to exclude that possibility but to limit the reality of its occurrence. What should be noted is that it was not LSD (pure) but rather derivatives components to diminish LSD unexpected clarity of the not so obvious.     The imperceptible was not the intent of the experience rather unanticipated conclusion, therefore the design blow outs. Although protesting the Vietnam was a subject of the objective; it was not to stop it, but to control it, and certainly not its primary purpose.  Sometimes things blow up in face of these mad scientists or not.   
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

Offline phosphene

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #28 on: January 13, 2010, 12:50:17 am »
LSD is derived from ergot, a fungus that grows naturally on grain.  hofman was searching for a cure to the common cold when he isolated LSD from the fungus. He never would of know about its' psychedelic properties if he hadnt spilled a couple drops on his hand in the lab and started tripping balls.

the same fungus has been accused of contributing to the salem witch trials.....people bake bread out of tainted grain, eat it, and all trip balls at the same time...then they are accused of being witches/possessed etc.

http://www.psychedelic-library.org/child.htm

"A strange game. The only winning move is not to play."--Joshua

Offline Edgar

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #29 on: January 13, 2010, 09:16:08 am »
LSD is derived from ergot, a fungus that grows naturally on grain.  hofman was searching for a cure to the common cold when he isolated LSD from the fungus. He never would of know about its' psychedelic properties if he hadnt spilled a couple drops on his hand in the lab and started tripping balls.

the same fungus has been accused of contributing to the salem witch trials.....people bake bread out of tainted grain, eat it, and all trip balls at the same time...then they are accused of being witches/possessed etc.

http://www.psychedelic-library.org/child.htm



Very interesting book, the conclusion Albert Hoffman offers:
"I see the true importance of LSD in the possibitity  of providing material aid to meditation aimed at the mystical experience of a deeper, comprehensive reality. Such a use accords entirely with the essence and working character of LSD as a sacred drug. "

This indeed is logical if the external source of “Meditation” wasn’t less than the truth, and subject to vanity.

It is comparable to the fruit of the knowledge of good and evil, and you may be able to see the consequences of that are.   Therefore the aid you are willing to accept could be the hindrance you fear.

King Solomon had his own conclusion:
Ecclesiastes 12:10-14 
The preacher sought to find out acceptable words: and that which was written was upright, even words of truth.  The words of the wise are as goads, and as nails fastened by the masters of assemblies, which are given from one shepherd.  And further, by these, my son, be admonished: of making many books there is no end; and much study is a weariness of the flesh.  Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this is the whole duty of man.  For God shall bring every work into judgment, with every secret thing, whether it be good, or whether it be evil.

My Natural man agrees with Albert Hoffman more or less, however my Spiritual man sides with Solomon, if the twain do meet, I think not, to bad.
The King James Bible is not a version. It is the Bible.
Psalms 119:140  Thy word is very pure: therefore thy servant loveth it.

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #30 on: January 13, 2010, 04:40:32 pm »
Excerpts of analysis of "The Aquarian Conspiracy" by Executive Intelligence Review

Other than Willis Harman and SRI their is not much of a direct connection to the Sequoia Seminars. But it does show that the Sequoia Seminars/LSD experimentation could have been a precursor operation/project used to evaluate the possible direction of the future projects. Also by the 1970's Harman had switched hats and with Hubbard was creating an "anti-LSD" opposition.

http://whale.to/b/rouche11.html  www.LaRouchePub.com

In the spring of 1980, a book appeared  called The Aquarian Conspiracy [ by Marilyn Ferguson ] that put  itself forward as a manifesto of the  counterculture. Defining the  counterculture as the conscious  embracing of irrationality -- from rock  and drugs to biofeedback, meditation,  "consciousness-raising," yoga, mountain  climbing, group therapy, and  psychodrama. The Aquarian Conspiracy  declares that it is now time for the 15  million Americans involved in the  counterculture to join in bringing about  a "radical change in the United States."
...
The counterculture is a conspiracy -- but  not in the half-conscious way Ferguson  claim -- as she well knows. Ferguson  wrote her manifesto under the direction  of Willis Harman, social policy director  of the Stanford Research Institute, as a  popular version of a May 1974 policy  study on how to transform the United  States into Aldous Huxley's Brave New  World. The counterculture is a  conspiracy at the top, created as a  method of social control, used to drain  the United States of its commitment to  scientific and technological progress.

That conspiracy goes back to the 1930s,  when the British sent Aldous Huxley to  the United States as the case officer for  an operation to prepare the United  States for the mass dissemination of  drugs. We will take this conspiracy apart  step-by-step from its small beginnings  with Huxley in California to the  victimization of 15 million Americans  today. With 'The Aquarian Conspiracy',  the British Opium War against the United  States has come out into the open.
...
Aldous Huxley, along with his brother  Julian, was tutored at Oxford by H.G.  Wells, the head of British foreign  intelligence during World War I and the  spiritual grandfather of the Aquarian  Conspiracy. Ferguson accurately sees the  counterculture as the realization of what  Wells called The Open Conspiracy: Blue  Prints for a World Revolution. The "Open  Conspiracy,"
...
What Ferguson left out is that Wells  called his conspiracy a "one-world brain"  which would function as "a police of the  mind." Such books as the Open  Conspiracy were for the priesthood  itself.
...
Under Wells's tutelage, Huxley was first  introduced to Aleister Crowley. Crowley  was a product of the cultist circle that  developed in Britain from the 1860s  under the guiding influence of Edward  Bulwer-Lytton -- who, it will be recalled,  was the colonial minister under Lord  Palmerston during the Second Opium War.
...
In 1937, Huxley was sent to the United  States, where he remained throughout  the period of World War II. Through a Los  Angeles contact, Jacob Zeitlin, Huxley  and pederast Christopher Isherwood  were employed as script writers for  MGM, Warner Brothers, and Walt Disney  Studios. Hollywood was already  dominated by organized crime elements  bankrolled and controlled through  London. Joseph Kennedy was the  frontman for a British consortium that  created RKO studios, and "Bugsy" Siegel,  the West Coast boss of the Lansky  syndicate, was heavily involved in  Warner Brothers and MGM.

Huxley founded a nest of Isis cults in  southern California and in San Francisco,  that consisted exclusively of several  hundred deranged worshipers of Isis and  other cult gods. Isherwood, during the  California period, translated and  propagated a number of ancient Zen  Buddhist documents, inspiring  Zen-mystical cults along the way.8

In effect, Huxley and Isherwood (joined  soon afterwards by Thomas Mann and his  daughter Elisabeth Mann Borghese) laid  the foundations during the late 1930s  and the 1940s for the later LSD culture,  by recruiting a core of "initiates" into the  Isis cults that Huxley's mentors,  Bulwer-Lytton, Blavatsky, and Crowley,  had constituted while stationed in India.
...
The CIA operation was code named  MK-Ultra, its result was not  unintentional, and it began in 1952, the  year Aldous Huxley returned to the  United States.

Lysergic acid diethylamide, or LSD, was  developed in 1943 by Albert Hoffman, a  chemist at Sandoz A.B. -- a Swiss  pharmaceutical house owned by S.G.  Warburg. While precise documentation is  unavailable as to the auspices under  which the LSD research was  commissioned, it can be safely assumed  that British intelligence and its  subsidiary U.S. Office of Strategic  Services were directly involved.

Allen  Dulles, the director of the CIA when that  agency began MK-Ultra, was the OSS  station chief in Berne, Switzerland  throughout the early Sandoz research.  One of his OSS assistants was James  Warburg, of the same Warburg family,  who was instrumental in the 1963  founding of the Institute for Policy  Studies, and worked with both Huxley and Robert Hutchins."10

Aldous Huxley returned to the United  States from Britain, accompanied by Dr.  Humphrey Osmond, the Huxleys' private  physician. Osmond had been part of a  discussion group Huxley had organized at  the National Hospital, Queens Square,  London. Along with another seminar  participant, J.R. Smythies, Osmond  wrote Schizophrenia: A New Approach, in  which he asserted that mescaline -- a  derivative of the mescal cactus used in  ancient Egyptian and Indian pagan rites  -- produced a psychotic state identical in  all clinical respects to schizophrenia.

On  this basis, Osmond and Smythies  advocated experimentation with  hallucinogenic drugs as a means of  developing a "cure" for mental disorders.

Osmond was brought in by Allen Dulles to  play a prominent role in MK-Ultra. At the  same time, Osmond, Huxley, and the  University of Chicago's Robert Hutchins  held a series of secret planning sessions  in 1952 and 1953 for a second, private  LSD mescaline project under Ford  Foundation funding.11

Hutchins, it will  be recalled, was the program director of  the Ford Foundation during this period.  His LSD proposal incited such rage in  Henry Ford II that Hutchins was fired  from the foundation the following year.

It was also in 1953 that Osmund gave  Huxley a supply of mescaline for his  personal consumption. The next year, [1954] Huxley wrote The Doors of Perception,  the first manifesto of the psychedelic  drug cult, which claimed that  hallucinogenic drugs "expand  consciousness." Although the Ford  Foundation rejected the Hutchins-Huxley  proposal for private foundation  sponsorship of LSD, the proposal was not  dropped.

Beginning in 1962, the Rand  Corporation of Santa Monica, California  began a four-year experiment in LSD,  peyote, and marijuana. The Rand  Corporation was established  simultaneously with the reorganization  of the Ford Foundation during 1949.  Rand was an outgrowth of the wartime  Strategic Bombing Survey, a "cost  analysis" study of the psychological  effects of the bombings of German  population centers.

According to a 1962 Rand Abstract, W.H.  McGlothlin conducted a preparatory  study on "The Long-Lasting Effects of  LSD on Certain Attitudes in Normals: An  Experimental Proposal." The following  year, McGlothlin conducted a year-long  experiment on thirty human guinea pigs,  called "Short-Term Effects of LSD on  Anxiety, Attitudes and Performance."  The study concluded that LSD improved  emotional attitudes and resolved anxiety  problems.12

Huxley At Work Huxley expanded his own  LSD-mescaline project in California by  recruiting several individuals who had  been initially drawn into the cult circles  he helped establish during his earlier  stay. The two most prominent  individuals were Alan Watts and the late  Dr. Gregory Bateson (the former husband  of Dame Margaret Mead). Watts became  a self-styled "guru" of a nationwide Zen  Buddhist cult built around his  well-publicized books.

Bateson, an  anthropologist with the OSS, became the  director of a hallucinogenic drug  experimental clinic at the Palo Alto  Veterans Administration Hospital. Under  Bateson's auspices, the initiating "cadre"  of the LSD cult -- the hippies -- were  programmed.13

Watts at the same time founded the  Pacifica Foundation, which sponsored  two radio station WKBW in San Francisco  and WBM-FM in New York City. The  Pacifica stations were among the first to  push the "Liverpool Sound" -- the  British-imported hard rock twanging of  the Rolling Stones, the Beatles, and the  Animals. They would later pioneer "acid  rock" and eventually the self-avowed  psychotic "punk rock."

During the fall of 1960, Huxley was  appointed visiting professor at the  Massachusetts Institute of Technology in  Boston. Around his stay in that city,  Huxley created a circle at Harvard  parallel to his West Coast LSD team. The  Harvard group included Huxley, Osmund,  and Watts (brought in from California),  Timothy Leary, and Richard Alpert.

The ostensible topic of the Harvard  seminar was "Religion and its  Significance in the Modern Age." The  seminar was actually a planning session  for the "acid rock" counterculture.  Huxley established contact during this  Harvard period with the president of  Sandoz, which at the time was working  on a CIA contract to produce large  quantities of LSD and psilocybin (another  synthetic hallucinogenic drug) for  MK-Ultra, the CIA's official chemical  warfare experiment.

According to  recently released CIA documents, Allen  Dulles purchased over 100 million doses  of LSD -- almost all of which flooded the  streets of the United States during the  late 1960s. During the same period,  Leary began privately purchasing large  quantities of LSD from Sandoz as well.14

From the discussions of the Harvard  seminar, Leary put together the book  The Psychedelic Experience, based on  the ancient cultist Tibetan Book of the  Dead. It was this book that popularized  Osmund's previously coined term,  "psychedelic mind-expanding."

The Roots of the Flower People

Back in California, Gregory Bateson had  maintained the Huxley operation out of  the Palo Alto VA hospital. Through LSD  experimentation on patients already  hospitalized for psychological problems,  Bateson established a core of "initiates"  into the "psychedelic" Isis Cult.

Foremost among his Palo Alto recruits  was Ken Kesey. In 1959, Bateson  administered the first dose of LSD to  Kesey. By 1962, Kesey had completed a  novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest,  which popularized the notion that  society is a prison and the only truly  "free" people are the insane.15

Kesey subsequently organized a circle of  LSD initiates called "The Merry  Pranksters." They toured the country  disseminating LSD (often without  forewarning the receiving parties),  building up local distribution  connections, and establishing the  pretext for a high volume of publicity on  behalf of the still minuscule  "counterculture."

By 1967, the Kesey cult had handed out  such quantities of LSD that a sizable drug  population had emerged, centered in the  Haight-Ashbury district of San Francisco. 

Here Huxley collaborator Bateson set up  a "free clinic," staffed by Dr. David  Smith -- later a "medical adviser" for the  National Organization for the Reform of  Marijuana Laws (NORML);

Dr. Ernest  Dernberg an active-duty military officer,  probably on assignment through  MK-UItra; Roger Smith-a street gang  organizer trained by Saul Alinsky.

During  the Free Clinic period, Roger Smith was  the parole officer of the cultist mass  murderer Charles Manson;

Dr. Peter  Bourne -- formerly President Carter's  special assistant on drug abuse. Bourne did his psychiatric residency at the  Clinic. He had previously conducted a  profiling study of GI heroin addicts in Vietnam.

The Free Clinic paralleled a project at  the Tavistock Institute, the  psychological warfare agency for the  British Secret Intelligence Service.  Tavistock, founded as a clinic in London  in the 1920s, had become the Psychiatric  Division of the British Army during World  War II under its director, Dr. John  Rawlings Rees.16

During the 1960s, the Tavistock Clinic  fostered the notion that no criteria for  sanity existed and that psychedelic  "mind-expanding" drugs are valuable  tools of psychoanalysis.

In 1967,  Tavistock sponsored a Conference on the  "Dialectics of Liberation," chaired by  Tavistock psychoanalyst Dr. R.D. Laing,  himself a popularized author and  advocate of drug use. That conference  drew a number of people who would  soon play a prominent role in fostering  terrorism; Angela Davis and Stokely  Carmichael were two prominent  American delegates.

Thus, by 1963, Huxley had recruited his  core of "initiates." All of them -- Leary,  Osmund, Watts, Kesey, Alpert -- became  the highly publicized promoters of the  early LSD counterculture.

By 1967, with  the cult of "Flower People" in  Haight-Ashbury and the emergence of  the antiwar movement, the United  States was ready for the inundation of  LSD, hashish and marijuana that hit  American college campuses in the late  1960s.

'The Beating of Drums . . .'

In 1963, the Beatles arrived in the  United States, and with their decisive  airing on the Ed Sullivan Show, the  "British sound" took off in the U.S.A. For  their achievement, the four rocksters  were awarded the Order of the British  Empire by Her Majesty the Queen. The  Beatles and the Animals, Rolling Stones,  and homicidal punk rock maniacs who  followed were, of course, no more a  spontaneous outpouring of alienated  youth than was the acid culture they  accompanied.
...
The Vietnam War and the Anti-Vietnam  War Trap

But without the Vietnam War and the  "anti-war" movement, the Isis cult would  have been contained to a fringe  phenomenon -- no bigger than the  beatnik cult of the 1950s that was an  outgrowth of the early Huxley ventures  in California. The Vietnam War created  the climate of moral despair that opened  America's youth to drugs.
...

In the United States, the New York banks  provided several hundred thousand  dollars to establish the Institute for  Policy Studies (IPS), effectively the U.S.  branch of the Russell Peace Foundation.  Among the founding trustees of the IPS  was James Warburg, directly  representing the family's interests.

IPS drew its most active operatives from  a variety of British-dominated  institutions. IPS founding director Marcus  Raskin was a member of the Kennedy  administration's National Security  Council and also a fellow of the National  Training Labs, a U.S. subsidiary of the  Tavistock Institute founded by Dr. Kurt  Lewin.
 
After its creation by the League for  Industrial Democracy, Students for a  Democratic Society (SDS), the umbrella  of the student anti-war movement, was  in turn financed and run through IPS --  up through and beyond its splintering  into a number of terrorist and Maoist  gangs in the late 1960s.21 More broadly,  the institutions and outlook of the U.S.  anti-war movement were dominated by  the direct political descendants of the  British-dominated "socialist movement"  in the U.S.A., fostered by the House of  Morgan as far back as the years before  World War I.

This is not to say that the majority of  anti-war protesters were paid, certified  British agents. On the contrary, the  overwhelming majority of anti-war  protesters went into SDS on the basis of  outrage at the developments in Vietnam.  But once caught in the environment  defined by Russell and the Tavistock  Institute's psychological warfare experts,  and inundated with the message that  hedonistic pleasure-seeking was a  legitimate alternative to "immoral war,"  their sense of values and their creative  potential went up in a cloud of hashish  smoke.
...
In 1962, Huxley helped found the Esalen  Institute in Big Sur, California, which  became a mecca for hundreds of  Americans to engage in weekends of  T-Groups and Training Groups modeled  on behavior group therapy, for Zen,  Hindu, and Buddhist transcendental  meditation, and "out of body"  experiences through simulated and  actual hallucinogenic drugs.23
As described in the Esalen Institute  Newsletter: "Esalen started in the fall of  1962 as a forum to bring together a wide  variety of approaches to enhancement of  the human potential . . . including  experiential sessions involving encounter  groups, sensory awakening, gestalt  awareness training, related disciplines.  Our latest step is to fan out into the  community at large, running programs in  cooperation with many different  institutions, churches, schools,  hospitals, and government."24

Esalen's nominal founders were two  transcendental meditation students,  Michael Murphy and Richard Price, both  graduates of Stanford University. Price  also participated in the experiments on  patients at Bateson's Palo Alto Veterans  Hospital. Today Esalen's catalogue  offers: T-Groups; Psychodrama Marthon;  Fight Training for Lovers and Couples;  Religious Cults; LSD Experiences and the  Great Religions of the World; Are You  Sound, a weekend workshop with Alan  Watts; Creating New Forms of Worship;  Hallucinogenic Psychosis; and Non-Drug  Approaches to Psychedelic Experiences.
...
The next leap in Britain's Aquarian  Conspiracy against the United States was  the May 1974 report that provided the  basis for Ferguson's work. The report is  entitled "Changing Images of Man,"  Contract Number URH (489~215O, Policy  Research Report No. 414.74, prepared by  the Stanford Research Institute Center  for the Study of Social Policy, Willis  Harman, director.

The 319-page  mimeographed report was prepared by a  team of fourteen researchers and  supervised by a panel of twenty-three  controllers, including anthropologist  Margaret Mead, psychologist B.F.  Skinner, Ervin Laszlo of the United  Nations, Sir Geoffrey Vickers of British  intelligence.

The aim of the study, the authors state,  is to change the image of mankind from  that of industrial progress to one of  "spiritualism." The study asserts that in  our present society, the "image of  industrial and technological man" is  obsolete and must be "discarded":

"Many  of our present images appear to have  become dangerously obsolete, however .  . .

Science, technology, and economics  have made possible really significant  strides toward achieving such basic  human goals as physical safety and  security, material comfort and better  health. But many of these successes  have brought with them problems of  being too successful -- problems that  themselves seem insoluble within the set  of societal value-premises that led to  their emergence . . .

Our highly  developed system of technology leads to  higher vulnerability and breakdowns.  Indeed the range and interconnected  impact of societal problems that are  now emerging pose a serious threat to  our civilization . . . If our predictions of  the future prove correct, we can expect  the association problems of the trend to  become more serious, more universal  and to occur more rapidly."

Therefore, SRI concludes, we must  change the industrial-technological  image of man fast: "Analysis of the  nature of contemporary societal  problems leads to the conclusion that . .  . the images of man that dominated the  last two centuries will be inadequate for  the post-industrial era."

Since the writing of the Harman report,  one President of the United States,  Jimmy Carter, reported sighting UFOs his  National Security Adviser Zbigniew  Brzezinski made speeches proclaiming  the advent of the New Age, the Joint  Chiefs of Staff every morning read  so-called intelligence reports on the  biorhythms and horoscopes of the  members of the Soviet Politburo. The  House of Representatives established a  new congressional committee, called the  Congressional Clearinghouse on the  Future, where the likes of Ferguson have  come to lecture up to a hundred  congressmen.25

What began as Britain's creation of the  counterculture to open the market for  its dope has come a long way.

The LSD Connection

Who provided the drugs that swamped  the anti-war movement and the college  campuses of the United States in the  late 1960s? The organized crime  infrastructure which had set up the  Peking Connection for the opium trade in  1928 -- provided the same services in the  1960s and 1970s it had provided during  Prohibition. This was also the same  network Huxley had established contact  with in Hollywood during the 1930s.

The  LSD connection begins with one William  "Billy" Mellon Hitchcock. Hitchcock was a  graduate of the University of Vienna and  a scion of the millionaire Mellon banking  family of Pittsburgh. (Andrew Mellon of  the same family had been the U.S. Treasury Secretary throughout  Prohibition.)

In 1963, when Timothy  Leary was thrown out of Harvard,  Hitchcock rented a fifty-five-room  mansion in Millbrook, New York, where  the entire Leary-Huxley circle of  initiates was housed until its later move  back to California.26

Hitchcock was also a broker for the  Lansky syndicate and for the Fiduciary  Trust Co., Nassau, Grand Bahamas --- a  wholly owned subsidiary of Investors  Overseas Services. He was formally  employed by Delafield and Delafield  Investments, where he worked on buying  and selling vast quantities of stock in the  Mary Carter Paint Co., soon to become  Resorts International.

In 1967, Dr. Richard Alpert put Hitchcock  in contact with Augustus Owsley Stanley  III. As Owsley's agent, Hitchcock  retained the law firm of Babinowitz,  Boudin and Standard 27 -- to conduct a  feasibility study of several Caribbean  countries to determine the best location for the production and distribution of  LSD and hashish.

During this period, Hitchcock joined  Leary and his circle in California.

Leary  had established an LSD cult called the  Brotherhood of Eternal Love and several  front companies, including Mystics Art  World, Inc. of Laguna Beach, California.  These California-based entities ran  lucrative trafficking in Mexican  marijuana and LSD brought in from  Switzerland and Britain.

The British  connection had been established directly  by Hitchcock, who contracted the  Charles Bruce chemical firm to import  large quantities of the chemical  components of LSD with financing from  both Hitchcock and George Grant Hoag,  the heir to the J.C. Penney dry goods  fortune, the Brotherhood of Eternal Love  set up LSD and hashish  production-marketing operations in  Costa Rica in 1968. 28

Toward the end of 1968, Hitchcock  expanded the LSD-hashish production  operations in the Caribbean with funds  provided by the Fiduciary Trust Co.  (IOS). In conjunction with J. Vontobel  and Co. of Zurich, Hitchcock founded a  corporation called 4-Star Anstalt in  Liechtenstein.

This company, employing  "investment funds" (that is, drug  receipts) from Fiduciary Trust, bought up  large tracts of land in the Grand  Bahamas as well as large quantities of  ergotamine tartrate, the basic chemical  used in the production of LSD.29

Hitchcock's personal hand in the LSD  connection abruptly ended several years later. Hitchcock had been working  closely with Johann F. Parravacini of the  Parravacini Bank Ltd in Berne,  Switzerland. From 1968, they had  together funded even further expansion  of the Caribbean-California LSD-hashish  ventures.

In the early 1970s, as the  result of a Securities and Exchange  Commission investigation, both  Hitchcock and Parravacini were indicted  and convicted of a $40 million stock  fraud. Parravacini had registered a $40  million sale to Hitchcock for which  Hitchcock had not put down a penny of  cash or collateral. This was one of the  rare instances in which federal  investigators succeeded in getting inside  the $200 billion drug fund as it was  making its way around the "offshore"  banking system.

Another channel for laundering dirty drug  money -- a channel yet to be  compromised by federal investigative  agencies is important to note here. This  is the use of tax-exempt foundations to  finance terrorism and environmentalism.  One immediately relevant case makes  the point.

In 1957, the University of Chicago's  Robert M. Hutchins established the  Center for the Study of Democratic  Institutions (CSDI) in Santa Barbara,  California. Knight Commander Hutchins  drew in Aldous Huxley, Elisabeth Mann  Borghese, and some Rhodes Scholars who  had originally been brought into the  University of Chicago during the 1930s  and 1940s.

The CSDI was originally funded 1957 to  1961 through a several-million-dollar  fund that Hutchins managed to set up  before his untimely departure from the  Ford Foundation.

From 1961 onward, the  Center was principally financed by  organized crime. The two funding  conduits were the Fund of Funds, a tax  exempt front for Bernie Cornfeld's lOS,  and the Parvin Foundation, a parallel  front for Parvin-Dohnnan Co. of Nevada. 

IOS and Marvin-Doorman held controlling  interests in the Desert Inn, the Aladdin,  and the Dune -- all Las Vegas casinos  associated with the Lansky syndicate

IOS, as already documented, was a  conducting vehicle for LSD, hashish, and  marijuana distribution throughout the  1960s.30

In 1967 alone, IOS channeled  between $3 and $4 million to the center.  Wherever there is dope, there is Dope,  Inc.

Offline phosphene

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #31 on: January 13, 2010, 05:21:34 pm »
yeah, well, it's not LSD or Hofmann that are to blame for MKULTRA and other sadistic weird experiments. It's the twisted psychopaths that use the substances for evil purposes who are to blame. A psychedelic experience or "spirit journey" has been an important part of most cultures since the beginning of man. The native Americans used peyote, ayahuasca in the amazon, and on and on.
"A strange game. The only winning move is not to play."--Joshua

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #32 on: January 13, 2010, 05:43:11 pm »
.... A psychedelic experience or "spirit journey" has been an important part of most cultures since the beginning of man. The native Americans used peyote, ayahuasca in the amazon, and on and on.

Absolutely. however, Tavistock has been scientifically been investigating the ways and means to control individuals and populations for over 100 years. The 1960's push was a deliberate operation and experiment.   

Offline phosphene

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #33 on: January 13, 2010, 05:57:01 pm »
Absolutely. however, Tavistock has been scientifically been investigating the ways and means to control individuals and populations for over 100 years. The 1960's push was a deliberate operation and experiment.   

understood. and good info. but it starts to come off as more like anti-LSD propaganda. Nobody can take over the world with LSD, or any other drug. It's an absurd idea. But that didnt stop them from trying, and failing. The real reason the establishment has banned psychedelics is because they cannot make obedient workers out of people who have taken a spirit journey....and that affects their profits.
"A strange game. The only winning move is not to play."--Joshua

Offline trailhound

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #34 on: January 13, 2010, 09:01:52 pm »
.did they get you to trade
Your heros for ghosts?
Hot ashes for trees?
Hot air for a cool breeze?
Cold comfort for change?
And did you exchange
A walk on part in the war
For a lead role in a cage?


 Psychedelics were not invented by nor were they a good tool for TPTB.  Also they do not equal big profits for dopeinc.  That being said...I guess I will shut up. :)

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At the heart of that Western freedom and democracy is the belief that the individual man, the child of God, is the touchstone of value..." -RFK

sociostudent

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #35 on: January 13, 2010, 11:16:19 pm »
Well, I think some of ya'll are wrong about LSD being great and all (anyone remember the "sunshine acid"? Or the tents for people having bad trips at woodstock?), but widespread fear of drugs like these cause a lot of laws to be passed that infringe upon the religious rights of indigenous people around the world, as well as people going through end-of-life care by restricting DMT and psilocybin use and research by incorrectly lumping all psychedelics into one category.

Our bodies don't naturally produce LSD, but they DO produce dimethyltryptamine.

Offline NinjaGaijin

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #36 on: January 13, 2010, 11:43:58 pm »
My mother, aunt, grandmother and grandfather were given acid in the 50's in Australia for 'psychotherapy', namely having a doctor give you acid, with your whole family in a sterile hospital environment, then be asked to relive experiences of your sadistic father (my great grandfather). Really positive experience I'm sure.

Perhaps this usage accounts for own interest and love of this substance.
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Devotional Soul

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #37 on: January 14, 2010, 03:27:50 am »
Well, I think some of ya'll are wrong about LSD being great and all (anyone remember the "sunshine acid"? Or the tents for people having bad trips at woodstock?), but widespread fear of drugs like these cause a lot of laws to be passed that infringe upon the religious rights of indigenous people around the world, as well as people going through end-of-life care by restricting DMT and psilocybin use and research by incorrectly lumping all psychedelics into one category.

Our bodies don't naturally produce LSD, but they DO produce dimethyltryptamine.

I agree that you can't put all psychedelics in the same category.  DMT is released in our dream time and before death, and it naturally occurs in plants.  Not even other natural psychedelics like peyote and psilocybin can compare to that!  It can heal with cellular reconstruction for the physical body as well as awaken the higher levels of consciousness of the soul, the subtle spiritual body. 

Lab made chemi lsd is toxic to the body and stays stored in the spinal chord for a long time. 

The Grateful Dead played at Bohemian Grove, and their art and symbols are all nwo symbols, skull and bones, lightning bolt, etc.  They knew part of their job was to distract the hippies away from politics. 


Offline NinjaGaijin

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Re: The Sequoia Seminars - 1954 - LSD Therapy - History
« Reply #38 on: January 14, 2010, 05:01:10 am »
I always knew grateful dead sucked, just didnt know it was for more than the music - ty, now i have a better picture.
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Offline trailhound

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"Do not let your hatred of a people incite you to aggression." Qur'an 5:2
At the heart of that Western freedom and democracy is the belief that the individual man, the child of God, is the touchstone of value..." -RFK