Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel

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canandy

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Washington — Reuters Published on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009 10:09PM EDT Last updated on Tuesday, Oct. 27, 2009 10:15PM EDT

The brother of Afghan President Hamid Karzai has been getting regular payments from the Central Intelligence Agency, The New York Times reported on Tuesday, citing current and former U.S. officials.

Ahmed Wali Karzai is a suspected player in Afghanistan's opium trade and has been paid by the CIA over the past eight years for services that included helping to recruit an Afghan paramilitary force that operates at the CIA's direction in and around the southern city of Kandahar, the newspaper reported.

Ahmed Wali Karzai said in an interview that he cooperates with U.S. civilian and military officials but does not engage in the drug trade and does not receive payments from the CIA, the Times said.

The CIA neither confirmed nor denied the reported payments.

“No intelligence organization worth the name would ever entertain these kinds of allegations,” a CIA spokesman told Reuters.

According to the Times, the agency's financial ties to Ahmed Wali Karzai and its working relations with him have created deep divisions within the Obama administration.

Critics see the relationship as complicating Washington's increasingly tense relationship with President Karzai, it said.

The CIA's practices also suggest the United States is not doing everything in its power to stamp out the lucrative Afghan drug trade, a major source of revenue for the Taliban, the Times said.

In addition, some U.S. officials argue that the reliance on Ahmed Wali Karzai undermines the push to develop an effective central government that would eventually allow the United States to withdraw, the paper reported.



source: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/karzais-brother-said-to-be-on-cia-payroll/article1341073/

Offline chrisfromchi

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Re: Karzai's brother said to be on CIA payroll
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2009, 10:46:29 PM »
ya nothing to look at here...oooo look something shiny...

Offline IridiumKEPfactor

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Re: Karzai's brother said to be on CIA payroll
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2009, 11:05:57 PM »
Good a face with a name.



Here's an old radio interview about this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-w8Z059OJZ4


Offline larsonstdoc

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Re: Karzai's brother said to be on CIA payroll
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2009, 01:23:57 AM »
This shouldn't surprise us.  There have been many 3rd world leaders/politicians working for the CIA--Manuel Noriega, Usama Bin Laden, Saddam Hussein, etc.  The list goes on and on.  The CIA doesn't change their modus operandi.
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Offline Dig

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Re: Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2009, 01:49:14 AM »
Karzai's Brother On C.I.A. Payroll: NYT
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/10/27/karzais-brother-on-cia-pa_n_336279.html
| 10/27/09 11:58 PM | 


WASHINGTON — Ahmed Wali Karzai, the brother of the president of Afghanistan, gets regular payments from the CIA and has for much of the past eight years, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

The newspaper said that according to current and former American officials, the CIA pays Karzai for a variety of services, including helping to recruit an Afghan paramilitary force that operates at the CIA's direction in and around Kandahar.

The CIA's ties to Karzai, who is a suspected player in the country's illegal opium trade, have created deep divisions within the Obama administration, the Times said.

Allegations that Karzai is involved in the drug trade have circulated in Kabul for months. He denies them.

Critics say the ties with Karzai complicate the United States' increasingly tense relationship with his older brother, President Hamid Karzai. The CIA's practices also suggest that the United States is not doing everything in its power to stamp out the lucrative Afghan drug trade, a major source of revenue for the Taliban.

Some American officials argue that the reliance on Ahmed Wali Karzai, a central figure in the south of the country where the Taliban is dominant, undermines the U.S. push to develop an effective central government that can maintain law and order and eventually allow the United States to withdraw.

"If we are going to conduct a population-centric strategy in Afghanistan, and we are perceived as backing thugs, then we are just undermining ourselves," Maj. Gen. Michael T. Flynn, the senior American military intelligence official in Afghanistan, was quoted by the Times in an article published on its Web site.

Ahmed Wali Karzai told the Times that he cooperates with American civilian and military officials but does not engage in the drug trade and does not receive payments from the CIA.

Karzai helps the CIA operate a paramilitary group, the Kandahar Strike Force, that is used for raids against suspected insurgents and terrorists, according to several American officials. Karzai also is paid for allowing the CIA and American Special Operations troops to rent a large compound outside the city, which also is the base of the Kandahar Strike Force, the Times said.

Karzai also helps the CIA communicate with and sometimes meet with Afghans loyal to the Taliban, the newspaper reported.

CIA spokesman George Little declined to comment on the report.
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Offline gEEk squad

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Re: Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2009, 11:23:21 AM »
Resignation Letter by Senior civilian official in Afghanistan: Matthew P. Hoh

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/hp/ssi/wpc/ResignationLetter.pdf

On page 2 he lists his primary reasons for resigning:

The Afghan governments failings, particularly when weighed against the sacrifice of American lives and dollars, appear legioin and metastatic:

"Glaring corruption and unabashed graft;
 
"A President whose confidants and chief advisers comprise drug lords and war crimes villains, who mock our own rule of law and counternarcotics efforts;"
 
"A system of prvincial and distrct leaders constituted of local power brokers, opportunists and strongmen allied to the United States solely for, and limited by, the value of our USAID and CERP contracts and whose own political and ecnomic interests stand nothing to gain from any positive or genuine attempts at reconciliation; and"
 
"The recent election process dominated by fraud and discredited by low voter turnout, which has created an enormous victory for our enemy who now claims a popular boycott and will call into question worldwide our government's military, economic and diplomatic support for an invalid and illegitimate Afghan government."
 
His 4 page letter is worth the read.

Offline gEEk squad

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Re: Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2009, 11:26:43 AM »
http://www.infowars.com/ny-times-afghan-opium-kingpin-on-cia-payroll

Paul Joseph Watson
Prison Planet.com
Wednesday, October 28, 2009



A bombshell article in today’s edition of the New York Times lifts the lid on how the brother of Afghan President Hamid Karzai, a suspected kingpin of the country’s booming opium trade, has been on the CIA payroll for the past eight years. However, the article serves as little more than a whitewash because it fails to address the fact that one of the primary reasons behind the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan was the agenda to reinstate the Golden Crescent drug trade.

“The agency pays (Ahmed Wali) Karzai for a variety of services, including helping to recruit an Afghan paramilitary force that operates at the C.I.A.’s direction in and around the southern city of Kandahar, Mr. Karzai’s home,” reports the Times.

An October 2008 report from the Times reveals how, after security forces discovered a huge tractor-trailer full of heroin outside Kandahar in 2004, “Before long, the commander, Habibullah Jan, received a telephone call from Ahmed Wali Karzai, the brother of President Hamid Karzai, asking him to release the vehicle and the drugs.”

In 2006, following the discovery of another cache of heroin, “United States investigators told other American officials that they had discovered links between the drug shipment and a bodyguard believed to be an intermediary for Ahmed Wali Karzai.”

The Times article out today also discusses how the CIA uses Karzai as a go-between between the Americans and the Taliban. He is also directly implicated in the manufacturing of phony ballots and polling stations that were attributed to the President’s disputed election victory.

“If it looks like a duck, and it quacks like a duck, it’s probably a duck,” the American officer said of Mr. Karzai. “Our assumption is that he’s benefiting from the drug trade.”

Officials quoted by The Times described Karzai as a Mafia-like figure who expanded his influence over the drug trade with the aid of U.S. efforts to eliminate his competitors.

The Afghan opium trade has exploded since the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, following a lull after the Taliban had imposed a crackdown. According to the U.N., the drug trade is now worth $65 billion. Afghanistan produces 92 per cent of the world’s opium, with the equivalent of 3,500 tonnes leaving the country each year. Other figures put the number far higher, at around 6,100 tonnes a year.

The New York Times exposé pins the blame on Karzai, but fails to explain that one of the primary reasons behind the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan was the United States’ agenda to restore, not eradicate, the drug trade.

Before the invasion, the Taliban collaborated closely with the U.N. to reduce opium production down to just 185 tonnes, a figure at least 2000% below current levels. The notion that the “Taliban benefits from the drug trade” and that the U.S. is trying to stop it, as both Bush and Obama claimed, is the complete opposite of what is actually happening.

As Professor Michel Chossudovsky has highlighted in a series of essays, the explosion of opium production after the invasion was about the CIA’s drive to restore the lucrative Golden Crescent opium trade that was in place during the time when the Agency were funding the Mujahideen rebels to fight the Soviets, and flood the streets of America and Britain with cheap heroin, destroying lives while making obscene profits.

The Times implies that the drug lord Karzai being on the CIA payroll is little more than an embarrassing coincidence, when in reality he is just a middle manager for the U.S. military-industrial complex’s control of the drug trade in Afghanistan which stretches back decades and was only interrupted when the Taliban came to power.

“Heroin is a multibillion dollar business supported by powerful interests, which requires a steady and secure commodity flow. One of the “hidden” objectives of the war was precisely to restore the CIA sponsored drug trade to its historical levels and exert direct control over the drug routes,” writes Chossudovsky.

“As revealed in the Iran-Contra and Bank of Commerce and Credit International (BCCI) scandals, CIA covert operations in support of the Afghan Mujahideen had been funded through the laundering of drug money. “Dirty money” was recycled –through a number of banking institutions (in the Middle East) as well as through anonymous CIA shell companies–, into “covert money,” used to finance various insurgent groups during the Soviet-Afghan war, and its aftermath.”

Within two years of the CIA’s covert operation in Afghanistan, “CIA assets again controlled this heroin trade. As the Mujahideen guerrillas seized territory inside Afghanistan, they ordered peasants to plant opium as a revolutionary tax. Across the border in Pakistan, Afghan leaders and local syndicates under the protection of Pakistan Intelligence operated hundreds of heroin laboratories. During this decade of wide-open drug-dealing, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency in Islamabad failed to instigate major seizures or arrests.”

This is the history of the Afghan opium trade that the Times won’t tell you, and in failing to do so today’s article serves only to whitewash the true scale of the agenda behind the U.S. occupation of Afghanistan.


Offline chris jones

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Re: Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2009, 05:07:11 PM »

Ask any CIA agent what their job function is and they will give you the standard, we are an information gathering agency.
If so inclined they will toss in foriegn service only, not domestic.

Ya Ok, sounds FK terrific.  Anyone swallow that spin.

Thier spooks, phantoms, they could be if desired, military attaches, FBI, NSA or any other chosen disquise. The do have the means to do this.

My point, and I have lost it once again, Afghanistan, heroin.
There is more money to be had in drugs than in OIL.

The Golden Traingle was their supplier base for the CIA's importation of opium. Winter soldiers, a congressional hearing with testimony from soldiers who protected he CIA's heroin op.
PaulWithers an old friend of mine gave testimony , TDY for the CIA in Laos. Lulled into his psuedo patriotical mishaped loyalty for the military and the Gov. He was a Green Beret, highly decorated soldier who beleived whatever the Gov did was for the good of this nation, soon to discover that he was brainwashed.
Paul has disapeared, or been removed, I have heard that his wife and daughters life were threatened. He is said to have been returning home and never seen again.
Drugs, big money folks, and govs lackeys, have the the process polished. Its global.


Offline Aerioch

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Re: Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2009, 07:02:09 PM »
2001 U.S. Enters Afghanistan ..and by 2006 Opium production reaches record levels.

No coincidence here whatsoever ...  ::)

Quote
Afghanistan Opium Crop Sets Record
U.S.-Backed Efforts At Eradication Fail

   
By Karen DeYoung
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, December 2, 2006


Opium production in Afghanistan, which provides more than 90 percent of the world's heroin, broke all records in 2006, reaching a historic high despite ongoing U.S.-sponsored eradication efforts, the Bush administration reported yesterday.

In addition to a 26 percent production increase over past year -- for a total of 5,644 metric tons -- the amount of land under cultivation in opium poppies grew by 61 percent. Cultivation in the two main production provinces, Helmand in the southwest and Oruzgan in central Afghanistan, was up by 132 percent.

White House drug policy chief John Walters called the news "disappointing."

The administration has cited resurgent Taliban forces as the main impediment to stabilization and reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan, and the U.S. military investment has far exceeded anti-narcotic and development programs. But U.S. military and intelligence officials have increasingly described the drug trade as a problem that rivals and in some ways exceeds the Taliban, threatening to derail other aspects of U.S. policy.

"It is truly the Achilles' heel of Afghanistan," Gen. James L. Jones, the supreme allied commander for NATO, said in a recent speech at the Council on Foreign Relations. Afghanistan is NATO's biggest operation, with more than 30,000 troops. Drug cartels with their own armies engage in regular combat with NATO forces deployed in Afghanistan, he said. "It would be wrong to say that this is just the Taliban. I think I need to set that record straight," he added.

"They have their own capability to inflict damage, to make sure that the roads and the passages stay open and they get to where they want to go, whether it's through Pakistan, Iran, up through Russia and all the known trade routes. So this is a very violent cartel," Jones said. "They are buying their protection by funding other organizations, from criminal gangs to tribes, to inciting any kind of resistance to keep the government off of their back."

Any disruption of the drug trade has enormous implications for Afghanistan's economic and political stability. Although its relative strength in the overall economy has diminished as other sectors have expanded in recent years, narcotics is a $2.6 billion-a-year industry that this year provided more than a third of the country's gross domestic product. Farmers who cultivate opium poppies receive only a small percentage of the profits, but U.S. officials estimate the crop provides up to 12 times as much income per acre as conventional farming, and there is violent local resistance to eradication.

"It's almost the devil's own problem," CIA Director Michael V. Hayden told Congress last month. "Right now the issue is stability. . . . Going in there in itself and attacking the drug trade actually feeds the instability that you want to overcome."

"Attacking the problem directly in terms of the drug trade . . . would undermine the attempt to gain popular support in the region," agreed Lt. Gen. Michael D. Maples, director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. "There's a real conflict, I think."

The Afghan government has prohibited the aerial herbicide spraying used by U.S. anti-narcotic programs in Latin America. Instead, opium poppy plants in Afghanistan are destroyed by tractors dragging heavy bars. But only 38,500 of nearly 430,000 acres under cultivation were eradicated this year.

Because of security concerns and local sensibilities, all eradication is done by Afghan police, and corruption is a major problem at every level from cultivation to international trafficking. Although the drug trade is believed to provide some financing to the Taliban, most experts believe it is largely an organized criminal enterprise. According to a major report on the Afghan drug industry jointly released last week by the World Bank and the U.N. Office on Drugs and Crime, key narcotics traffickers "work closely with sponsors in top government and political positions."

The report drew specific attention to the Afghan Interior Ministry, saying its officials were increasingly involved in providing protection for and facilitating consolidation of the drug industry in the hands of leading traffickers. "At the lower levels," the report said, "payments to police to avoid eradication or arrest reportedly are very widespread. At higher levels, provincial and district police chief appointments appear to be a tool for key traffickers and sponsors to exercise control and favor their proteges at middle levels in the drug industry."

Opium cultivation was outlawed during Taliban rule in the late 1990s and was nearly eliminated by 2001. After the overthrow of the Taliban government by U.S. forces in the fall of that year, the Bush administration said that keeping a lid on production was among its highest priorities. But corruption and alliances formed by Washington and the Afghan government with anti-Taliban tribal chieftains, some of whom are believed to be deeply involved in the trade, undercut the effort.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai recently noted that "once we thought terrorism was Afghanistan's biggest enemy" but said that now "poppy, its cultivation and drugs are Afghanistan's major enemy."

Eradication and alternative development programs have made little discernible headway. Cultivation -- measured annually with high-resolution satellite imagery that is then parsed by analysts using specialized computer software -- is nearly double its highest pre-Karzai level.

"There is supposed to be a tremendous energy associated with this," Jones said of the counter-narcotics programs, "but it needs a fresh look because . . . we're losing ground.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/12/01/AR2006120101654.html
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Offline Georgiacopguy

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Re: Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2009, 07:10:26 PM »
Deny, deny, deny, demand proof, smear the witnesses...
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Offline Dig

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Re: Karzai's brother is key player in Opium/CIA drug trafficking cartel
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2009, 08:26:30 PM »
someone on MSNBC said that we need to protect the poppy fields to keep the price down.

if we destroy them then the price will go up and increase profits to the evil afghan warlords.

I almost cannonballed the TV.

they actually are now using this argument, it is beyond orwellian, it is pure insanity.
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Online TahoeBlue

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