Plague - first U.S. scientist to die of the plague in 50 years

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Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Plague - first U.S. scientist to die of the plague in 50 years
« Reply #40 on: November 12, 2017, 12:42:12 PM »
I keep thinking that a new and novel lab produced hybrid will be introduced to Africa in the near future ,,, this will be called a "mutation"
a mutated air-borne Pneumonic plague will be hard to stop


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5074783/Outbreak-plague-mutate-UNTREATABLE.html
Deadly outbreak of black death which has killed 140 in Madagascar may mutate and become UNTREATABLE

    Pneumonic plague has already infected 2,000 in Madagascar and killed 143 in the country's worst outbreak in 50 years
    Ten African nations are on alert amid fears the disease will spread via airplanes
    That has led to fears the disease could spread to Europe as Ebola did in 2014
    Expert warns that, once here, the disease could mutate and become untreatable

By Chris Pleasance for MailOnline

Published: 09:40 EST, 12 November 2017 | Updated: 09:40 EST, 12 November 2017

...

Ten African nations have been put on high alert over fears the disease, which spreads through the air, could be carried overseas on aircraft

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5074783/Outbreak-plague-mutate-UNTREATABLE.html#ixzz4yExfDRRS
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline egypt

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Re: Plague - first U.S. scientist to die of the plague in 50 years
« Reply #41 on: November 12, 2017, 01:51:03 PM »


It is truly hoped our Country has it set up to not do trade with Madagascar and the rest of countries in yellow.  All travel should stop.  Any lines connecting us with Madagascar & the yellow needs to be interrupted -- regardless of commerce.   Food & medicine they need can be dropped by parachute.  You would think in this modern day & age, the disease could be contained from the rest of Humanity.

love, e

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Plague - first U.S. scientist to die of the plague in 50 years
« Reply #42 on: November 15, 2017, 09:14:42 PM »
oh gee look at the new novel Plague ... how could that be ...

https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/world-news/660127/new-black-death-outbreak-kill-three-hours-Madagascar-death-toll-video
New BLACK DEATH plague strain can kill ‘in just 3 HOURS’ as lethal disease goes ‘airborne’

DOCTORS are struggling to keep a new lethal outbreak of the "Black Death" – also known as pneumonic plague – under control as numbers of recorded cases soar.

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Earlier this week, infection and immunity expert Dr Matthew Avison told Daily Star Online that the “extremely rare” disease has been “resilient” to antibiotics.

A spokesman for the World Health Organisation admitted there were fears that this strain of plague – which is now believed to be airborne – could cause a global outbreak of the disease.
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Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline egypt

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Re: Plague - first U.S. scientist to die of the plague in 50 years
« Reply #43 on: November 16, 2017, 01:08:18 AM »


What do we do to not get this Black Death plague?

love, e

Offline TahoeBlue

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Re: Plague - first U.S. scientist to die of the plague in 50 years
« Reply #44 on: November 16, 2017, 10:36:01 AM »
What do we do to not get this Black Death plague?
love, e[/size]

Are you a ancestor of black plague survivors ? ie european plague survivor ?


https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2005-03/uol-bdw031005.php
Public Release: 10-Mar-2005
Biologists discover why 10% of Europeans are safe from HIV infection

University of Liverpool

LIVERPOOL, UK - 9 March 2005: Biologists at the University of Liverpool have discovered how the plagues of the Middle Ages have made around 10% of Europeans resistant to HIV.

Scientists have known for some time that these individuals carry a genetic mutation (known as CCR5-Ä32) that prevents the virus from entering the cells of the immune system but have been unable to account for the high levels of the gene in Scandinavia and relatively low levels in areas bordering the Mediterranean.

They have also been puzzled by the fact that HIV emerged only recently and could not have played a role in raising the frequency of the mutation to the high levels found in some Europeans today.

Professor Christopher Duncan and Dr Susan Scott from the University's School of Biological Sciences, whose research is published in the March edition of Journal of Medical Genetics, attribute the frequency of the CCR5-Ä32 mutation to its protection from another deadly viral disease, acting over a sustained period in bygone historic times.

Some scientists have suggested this disease could have been smallpox or even bubonic plague but bubonic plague is a bacterial disease rather than a virus and is not blocked by the CCR5-Ä32 mutation.

Professor Duncan commented: "The fact that the CCR5-Ä32 mutation is restricted to Europe suggests that the plagues of the Middle Ages played a big part in raising the frequency of the mutation. These plagues were also confined to Europe, persisted for more than 300 years and had a 100% case mortality."
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Professor Duncan and Dr Scott illustrated in their book, Return of the Black Death (2004, Wiley), that this idea was incorrect and the plagues of Europe (1347-1660) were in fact a continuing series of epidemics of a lethal, viral, haemorrhagic fever that used the CCR5 as an entry port into the immune system.

Using computer modeling, they demonstrated how this disease provided the selection pressure that forced up the frequency of the mutation from 1 in 20,000 at the time of the Black Death to values today of 1 in 10.
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Professor Duncan added: "Haemorrhagic plague did not disappear after the Great Plague of London in 1665-66 but continued in Sweden, Copenhagen, Russia, Poland and Hungary until 1800. This maintenance of haemorrhagic plague provided continuing selection pressure on the CCR5-Ä32 mutation and explains why it occurs today at its highest frequency in Scandinavia and Russia."

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http://www.cnn.com/2015/03/31/health/anglo-saxon-potion-mrsa/index.html
Thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon potion kills MRSA superbug

London (CNN)It might sound like a really old wives' tale, but a thousand-year-old Anglo-Saxon potion for eye infections may hold the key to wiping out the modern-day superbug MRSA, according to new research.
The 10th-century "eyesalve" remedy was discovered at the British Library in a leather-bound volume of Bald's Leechbook, widely considered to be one of the earliest known medical textbooks.
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Lee enlisted the help of the university's microbiologists to see if the remedy actually worked.
The recipe calls for two species of Allium (garlic and onion or leek), wine and oxgall (bile from a cow's stomach) to be brewed in a brass vessel.
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The researchers then tested their recipe on cultures of MRSA, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a type of staph bacterium that does not respond to commonly used antibiotic treatments.

The scientists weren't holding out much hope that it would work -- but they were astonished by the lab results.
"What we found was very interesting -- we found that Bald's eyesalve is incredibly potent as an anti-Staphylococcal antibiotic in this context," Harrison said.
...

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https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2013/01/the-iron-in-our-blood-that-keeps-and-kills-us/266936/
The Iron in Our Blood That Keeps and Kills Us
    Bradley Wertheim Jan 10, 2013

An ambulance rushed Dr. Malcolm Casadaban to a Chicago emergency department with labored breathing and three days of fever, body aches, and cough. He died twelve hours later as heart, lungs, kidneys, and liver failed under the burden of overwhelming infection. Bacterial cultures of his blood eventually revealed the characteristic rods of Yersinia pestis. Somehow, the MIT-and Harvard-trained scientist died of septicemic plague -- the Black Death -- in Hyde Park, Chicago, in September of 2009.
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Autopsy revealed that Dr. Casadaban unknowingly suffered from hereditary hemochromatosis, a genetic disease leading to a toxic accumulation of iron in his organs. A modern manifestation of an ancient DNA mutation, this disorder can be traced to a single unknown ancestor who lived millennia ago. This mutation allowed her (or him) to more readily absorb iron from food, which may have unexpectedly aided survival in lean times -- possibly at the expense of iron-overload in later generations. We know little about the disease's founder, but we do know that she survived long enough to pass one copy of the gene to her children, and eventually, to nearly one in ten individuals of northern European ancestry.
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 The World Health Organization estimates that 1.6 billion persons worldwide current suffer from the lack of red blood cells known as anemia -- half of which may be caused by iron deficiency. One's inner paleo might wonder whether this pandemic of iron deficiency began in the Neolithic era as diets bloated with carbohydrates replaced those rich in meat and fish. Anemia decreases the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood; if marked, this will hinder an individual's ability to stay healthy, find food, and reproduce. The C282Y mutation increases iron absorption, and it may have inadvertently protected carriers against this threat.

A study of over one thousand C282Y heterozygotes demonstrated that these carriers indeed have modest protection from iron deficiency. Focusing the analysis on women, who for reasons of menstruation and childbirth are much more likely to develop iron-deficiency, the authors observed that 21 percent of C282Y carriers were iron-deficient compared to 32 percent of those women lacking the gene. Although this finding did not also hold true for men, carriers of both genders had a larger amount of iron attached to certain transport proteins than the normal population.
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Such a staggering body count underscores the potential selective power of the plague, and foments another theory for the mutation's presence in northern Europe. Author and researcher Sharon Moalem postulates that the mutation improved plague survival, as it may theoretically prevent Yersinia pestis from reproducing inside of human immune cells. During the Black Death, mortality may have been highest, up to 50-66 percent, in the British Isles -- a future hotbed of hereditary hemochromatosis. Cold northern winters spent shivering and sneezing around the fireplace might favor person-to-person transmission of the deadlier lung-favoring pneumonic form of the infection, instead of the flea-borne bubonic form seen commonly in Mediterranean outbreaks. In this most unsympathetic environment, minute DNA differences may decide survival or death. A genetic advantage would quickly spread through the island population -- it would have less value on the mainland where plague mortality may have been lower.

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https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/black-death-survivors-and-their-descendants-went-on-to-live-longer/
Black Death Survivors and Their Descendants Went On to Live Longer
By Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience on May 8, 2014
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 In the centuries before the Black Death, about 10 percent of people lived past age 70, said study researcher Sharon DeWitte, a biological anthropologist at the University of South Carolina. In the centuries after, more than 20 percent of people lived past that age.
...
In fact, research published in February in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggested that the plague did write itself into human genomes: The descendants of plague-affected populations share certain changes in some immune genes.
...

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http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2014/02/black-death-left-mark-human-genome
Black Death Left a Mark on Human Genome
By Elizabeth PennisiFeb. 3, 2014 , 4:15 PM

...
What events in history might have favored these versions of the genes in gypsies and Romanians, but not in Indians? Netea and his colleagues tested the ability of the toll-like receptors to react to Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that caused the Black Death. They found that the strength of the immune response varied depending on the exact sequence of the toll-like receptor genes.

Netea and Bertranpetit propose that the Rroma and European Romanians came to have the same versions of these immune system genes because of the evolutionary pressure exerted by Y. pestis. Other Europeans, whose ancestors also faced and survived the Black Death, carried similar changes in the toll-like receptor genes. But people from China and Africa—two other places the Black Death did not reach—did not have these changes.
(There have been multiple plagues throughout history around the world, but none have been so deadly as the Black Death, which killed an estimated one in every four Europeans, and so exerted very strong selection.) The similarities in the other genes were likely caused by other conditions experienced by Rroma and Europeans, but not Indians.

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Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline egypt

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Re: Plague - first U.S. scientist to die of the plague in 50 years
« Reply #45 on: November 16, 2017, 01:58:17 PM »


Thank you Tahoe Blue!

It's hoped my genetic background is a good one when it comes to Black Death.  And, maybe just a lot of colloidal silver will work since it is bacterial...

love, e