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Offline decepticon

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #40 on: February 17, 2011, 05:54:45 PM »
gotta side with redford on this one.

as far as the theory that it's easier to answer an answer than a question, that is nonsense.

which one of these sentences is harder to understand/explain ?

1.) What is pie ?

2.) This fruity round treat is enjoyed by young and old alike, and is a homonym for a mathematical anamole.

Seems to me it would be alot easier to pull up a search for pie and just read off all the results. comprehending the english language deductively is a HUGE step.

Deducing facebook posts is next :)
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Offline Kilika

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #41 on: February 17, 2011, 05:58:20 PM »
Oh, I guess I learned absolutely nothing in my years working on computer mainframes for the US Navy.

Just because you can change out a video card doesn't mean you know computers. ::)

All I can say is prove I'm wrong.
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Offline decepticon

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2011, 06:02:05 PM »
What if i own an IT Consulting firm ?

would i maybe know computers then ?
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Offline decepticon

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2011, 07:51:37 PM »
No, this shows your ignonrant about computers! While trained in hardware, I didn't mention I also had to have programming classes as well. I just never worked in programming because I suck at it do to less than adequite math skills. But that doesn't mean I don't have a solid grasp of how computers work you clown. And you surely haven't got a clue what AI actually is. What that glorified hunk of metal and silicon did wasn't AI at all, it was simple data search and display.

AI involves reason to some extent. Watson didn't have to do any reasoning at all, just a data search based on defined parameters. You do realize that every single action a computer does is based on a question, right? If the answer isn't in it's database that it has access to, it will never get the correct answer, unless the question is a math question.

I guarantee you that if you were to ask that thing who the first president of the United States was, it would NEVER get the answer correct unless it already had access to the answer somewhere. Computers cannot reason, they can only operate on probabilitites and averages based on known data.

There is no way, no how a computer can produce the correct answer without access to the correct data to draw from, period. That is a fact.



this is the best i can put it.

when you inherintly know you will be presented with a question, there are lots of paramaters already established. questions start with who, what, where, when and why. so immediately all results can be classified into people, things, places, times. the why question would be the real stumper  :)

then certain keywords in the question would narrow down the answer within one of the fields above.  IE...

Who was the first president of the united states ?

Searching People...searching united states....searching presidents...keyword "first" tips computer to select president #1...output: George Washington

ON THE OTHER HAND:

you give the computer some random sentence that it must provide a question for, lets say...

The Art of the Steal for $800, Alex  :D

A Goya stolen (but recovered) in 2006 belonged to a museum in this city (Ohio, not Spain)


The computer first must decide what the object of this answer is. a goya ? a museum ? a city ? then there are parenthesis, so it has to understand the grammar structure and english language. then quickly apply it to a massive database.

i'm not going to write you a program to prove it, search engines like google use a question/answer structure. you can literally type your question "who was the first president of the united states" into google, and wikki to prez #1. (it will actually finish your question for you as you type)  :P
and if you're still skeptical, type a jeopardy question in google and try to find what you're looking for.
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Offline iks83

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #44 on: February 18, 2011, 01:40:32 AM »
Redford is wrong in many aspects. First you said the AI Watson is answering questions which it did not. It is forming questions based on the answer. Yes you can call it artificial intelligence because it is programmed in a complex way to handle the input. I doubt it can come up with own code and modify its routines when it hits a problem or something the programmer didnt include.

Second the professors paper and the people around that still believe in the big bang so they are discredited right from the start. The big bang is religion disguised as science which the title "God Proven to Exist According to Mainline Physics" clearly shows. Its like a paper about how the universe works written by someone who still believes the earth is flat and in the center of the universe. Oh those people were scientists too and made up all kinds of theories that proved them right and were accepted by all the other scientists.

Offline Kilika

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #45 on: February 18, 2011, 05:47:14 AM »
this is the best i can put it.

when you inherintly know you will be presented with a question, there are lots of paramaters already established. questions start with who, what, where, when and why. so immediately all results can be classified into people, things, places, times. the why question would be the real stumper  :)

then certain keywords in the question would narrow down the answer within one of the fields above.  IE...

Who was the first president of the united states ?

Searching People...searching united states....searching presidents...keyword "first" tips computer to select president #1...output: George Washington

ON THE OTHER HAND:

you give the computer some random sentence that it must provide a question for, lets say...

The Art of the Steal for $800, Alex  :D

A Goya stolen (but recovered) in 2006 belonged to a museum in this city (Ohio, not Spain)


The computer first must decide what the object of this answer is. a goya ? a museum ? a city ? then there are parenthesis, so it has to understand the grammar structure and english language. then quickly apply it to a massive database.

i'm not going to write you a program to prove it, search engines like google use a question/answer structure. you can literally type your question "who was the first president of the united states" into google, and wikki to prez #1. (it will actually finish your question for you as you type)  :P
and if you're still skeptical, type a jeopardy question in google and try to find what you're looking for.


That's my whole point, you just confirmed what I'm saying. Without access to that "massive database", the know variables that must be inputed into the equation, it will never get the correct answer. It will lock up.

You say "grammar structure", well same thing, that's the info that must be available to Watson to draw a correct answer from. It's got to have the rules of grammar structure as it may be defined in order to know what is correct grammar. The rules of grammar are your variables, otherwise it doesn't know any difference, and will only randomly get the answer correct if at all.

A computer is no better than the data inserted into it, and or has access to. Allow the human contestants access to the same database Watson is using and at the same speed as Watson, THEN you might have a contest.
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Offline decepticon

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #46 on: February 18, 2011, 01:54:34 PM »
well of course it would be nothing without the database, what would a human be without the brain ? can we stop talking about how useless it would be if we went in and pulled out major components ?

the revolutionary step forward is the programming that enables a computer to understand the object of a phrase or sentence. and jeopardy answers are some of the most complex phrases there are. that's why jeopardy is so much fun, it's harder for the human brain to analyze these phrases, and find the object of them. as opposed to a simple question where we can immediately gather (generally) what the question is asking for.

this is a huge step. if you don't understand how incredibly complex that is, lets just say it's never been done before. don't get me wrong the computer has a long way to go to catch up with the brain, scientists don't even know how the brain works. true this computer doesn't "think" for itself, that would be a quantum leap, this is just a major step.

and like i said earlier, analyzing facebook posts is next  ;)
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Offline Dok

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IBM's Five Best Predictions in Tech for the Next Five Years
« Reply #47 on: December 28, 2011, 09:50:40 AM »
IBM's Five Best Predictions in Tech for the Next Five Years

So what's in store for us within the next five years? Here are all five with a brief summary:

People power will come to life
We will make our own energy instead of relying on monopolizing power companies. If it moves, then it can create energy. "In the next five years, advances in renewable energy technology could make it possible for us to draw on power generated by everything from our running shoes to the ocean’s waves.," predicts IBM distinguished engineer Harry Kolar.

You will never need a password again
Passwords won't be necessary because security measures will depend on your biological makeup. "Biometric data such as retinal scans and voice files will be combined through software to build you a DNA-unique online password," the company claims.

Mind reading is no longer science fiction
Scientists are trying to figure out how to link the devices you own directly to your brain without an actual physical The Matrix-like cranial plug. The idea is to think about making a call, and the smartphone responding to the command.

The digital divide will cease to exist
"Mobile devices will assist you in your daily life by initiating the communication with you and providing helpful information based on your context," predicts IBM chief technology officer for telco research Paul Bloom. "For example, when you order your lunch from your cell phone, you might get a message recommending a healthier selection, based on the restaurant and your personal profile."

Junk mail will become priority mail
"Imagine a future where some sources of unsolicited advertisement produce such useful and perfectly timed ads, that you would signup," writes Jeff Jonas, IBM Distinguished Engineer and Software Group's Chief Scientist of Entity Analytics. "A world where virtually every text message or email pushed at you is so relevant that this 'service' starts feeling like a best friend."

IBM points out that many of its previous predictions have come true including the use of nanotechnology, the ability to affordably decipher an individual’s entire genome, communicating with the internet via speech recognition, and remote access to healthcare. As for its current predictions, IBM explains each in a 5-minute video summary, embedded below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=tuisda1q6ns

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/IBM-5-in-5-future-technology-innovations,14315.html
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Offline decemberfellow

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Re: IBM's Five Best Predictions in Tech for the Next Five Years
« Reply #48 on: December 28, 2011, 10:27:04 AM »
The only one I see and question would be the first one about energy, especially the part of make our own energy instead of relying on monopolizing power companiesthey would be the monopolizing power and I am sure at the flick of a switch...

Wasn't there a video about a guy ordering a pizza only to be challenged by the pizza person on his health?
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Offline Kilika

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Re: IBM's Five Best Predictions in Tech for the Next Five Years
« Reply #49 on: December 28, 2011, 04:33:20 PM »
The only one I see and question would be the first one about energy, especially the part of make our own energy instead of relying on monopolizing power companiesthey would be the monopolizing power and I am sure at the flick of a switch...

Wasn't there a video about a guy ordering a pizza only to be challenged by the pizza person on his health?

Oh, you could be making your own energy. It's possible now. But what they are talking about is all those energy-making devices would be grid-tied. Just like with the electric cars when charging, they are tied to the electric grid and provide power back to the grid system, for free no less, though they make it seem like your being "credited" with the energy you "sold" to them.

Yeah, those electric utilities are going nowhere.
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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM making more powerful Watson supercomputer available for public use
« Reply #50 on: November 14, 2013, 03:34:51 AM »
IBM making more powerful Watson supercomputer available for public use
14 November 2013
, by Russell Brandom (The Verge)
http://www.theverge.com/2013/11/14/5100928/ibm-opens-watson-up-to-developers-with-new-api

IBM's Watson supercomputer is taking a big step towards public use. Today, the company announced plans to open Watson up to developers in 2014, establishing an open platform and API that would let coders to build apps on top of the supercomputer's database and natural language skills. It's not the first time the project's been used by outside groups, but the new platform will give developers complete control of the front-end, and require only minimal input from the Watson team at IBM. Companies will still have to contract an instance of Watson from IBM, but once that's done, their programs will be able to pull questions and answers from the supercomputer in real time.

IBM says the API itself is unusually simple, providing programs with a direct path to ask Watson natural language questions and get an answers back with links to the relevant content from Watson's database. The question is what the rest of the world might use it for. "We believe that this is such a significant development in the future of computing that we want other people involved in it," said IBM's chief technology officer Rob High. "We want to let other partners to have a much deeper say in how cognitive computing evolves." The program is launching with three partners, including a Fluid Retail deployment that plans to bring a Watson-powered personal-shopper feature to North Face's e-commerce shop in 2014.


Wonder if you would break even if you hire this sucker and do some Bitcoin mining? :P
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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM Sued Over Claim Spy Program Cooperation Hurt Sales
« Reply #51 on: December 15, 2013, 04:16:46 PM »
IBM Sued Over Claim Spy Program Cooperation Hurt Sales
13 December 2013
, by Bob Van Voris (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2013-12-13/ibm-sued-over-claim-spy-program-cooperation-hurt-sales.html

An IBM shareholder sued the company over claims its cooperation with a National Security Agency eavesdropping program caused a drop in sales in China, hurting investors.

The Louisiana Sheriffs’ Pension and Relief Fund, in a complaint filed yesterday in Manhattan federal court, accuses IBM of defrauding investors by concealing that sales slowed after Edward Snowden disclosed the company was cooperating with the NSA.

In June, documents released by Snowden revealed the NSA’s “Prism” surveillance program, which used information from technology companies such as IBM, the pension fund said.

IBM also lobbied in favor of a bill that would allow it to share customers’ personal data, including data from users in China, with the NSA, according to the complaint.

“The company knew but misrepresented or concealed from investors that the disclosures of its lobbying and its association with the Prism and NSA spying scandal caused businesses in China as well as the Chinese government to abruptly halt doing business with IBM, leading to an immediate, and precipitous decline in sales,” the pension fund said in its complaint.

China Sales

On Oct. 16, IBM, the largest computer-services provider, reported a 22 percent drop in sales in China compared with the previous quarter as a result of the Snowden disclosures, according to the Louisiana fund, which said it pays retirement, death and disability benefits to more than 20,000 active and retired employees of sheriff’s offices throughout the state.

The suit is “pushing a wild conspiracy theory,” IBM’s general counsel, Robert Weber, said in a statement today.

“This lawsuit seeks to confuse IBM’s support for a U.S. cybersecurity legislative proposal -- which has yet to be enacted -- with the completely unrelated NSA surveillance program called PRISM,” Weber said in the statement.

“Even a cursory reading of the legislative proposal, known as CISPA, makes clear that it has nothing to do with the recently disclosed NSA surveillance program.”

The pension fund is seeking to represent a class of investors who bought IBM stock from June 25 to Oct. 16.

The case is Louisiana Sheriffs’ Pension & Relief Fund v. International Business Machines Corp., 13-cv-08818, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).
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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM Wins Most U.S. Patents for 21st Year in a Row
« Reply #52 on: January 14, 2014, 09:13:48 PM »
IBM Wins Most U.S. Patents for 21st Year in a Row
14 January 2014
, by Alex Barinka (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2014-01-14/ibm-wins-most-u-s-patents-for-21st-year-in-a-row.html

Excerpt:

The Top 10 U.S. Patent Winners of 2013:
01  IBM              6,809
02  Samsung       4,675
03  Canon           3,825
04  Sony            3,098
05  Microsoft       2,660
06  Panasonic      2,601
07  Toshiba         2,416
08  Hon Hai         2,279
09  Qualcomm      2,103
10  LG Electronics 1,947

International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) amassed more U.S. patents than any other company for the 21st straight year, helped by its push into big-data services, which glean insights by mining large quantities of information.

IBM’s 6,809 patents in 2013 scored an annual record, the company said today in a statement. With inventors from 41 countries, more than 31% of the patents came from overseas.

South Korea’s Samsung Electronics Co. and Tokyo-based Canon Inc. (7751) ranked second and third.

While computer-related patents can take almost three years to process, the annual list shows where companies are seeking growth opportunities.

As sluggish demand for computer hardware has dragged down revenue, IBM is focusing more on fast-growing areas such as analytics and cloud computing.

Last week, IBM said it’s forming a separate division for its Watson tool -- a so-called cognitive technology that can analyze vast amounts of data and answer questions in plain English.

Bernie Meyerson, vice president for innovation at IBM, said the unit relies on recent patents.

“The work on cognitive is based on numerous of the patents that were just issued related to Watson,” Meyerson said in an interview from IBM’s headquarters in Armonk, New York.

“That new division is now a major commercial focus. By funding research in that area, you will fund patents in that area.”
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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM Enlists Supercomputer Watson Ahead of Pentagon Health Solictation
« Reply #53 on: April 24, 2014, 04:33:18 AM »
IBM Enlists Watson Ahead of Pentagon Health Solictation
24 April 2014
, by Kathleen Miller (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2014-04-24/ibm-enlists-watson-ahead-of-pentagon-health-solictation.html

IBM will add technology from its Watson supercomputer, known for beating humans on “Jeopardy!,” to its federal health unit before the Pentagon seeks bids on a $11 billion health-records project.

The world’s biggest computer services provider also is hiring Keith Salzman, a former chief medical information officer at the Army hospital in Tacoma, Washington, where the Pentagon plans to test the new health records project, for its U.S. federal team.

Salzman will become the division’s chief medical officer, IBM said in a news release today.

IBM, whose U.S. agency contracts have slipped over the past two years, is making the changes as companies prepare to compete to deliver a new electronic medical-records system for the Defense Department.

The lifecycle cost of the project may be as much as $11 billion, Jonathan Woodson, assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, said in testimony before a U.S. House appropriations subcommittee this month.

“You have to bring a lot to the table in federal health care,” Andrew Maner, IBM’s managing partner for its U.S. federal division, said in a telephone interview.

“Watson is not going to implement an electronic medical-records solution, but it can be used to make clinicians better or more efficient.”

The Armonk, New York-based company, which had $1.2 billion in U.S. agency contracts during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30, was the government’s No. 51 supplier, according to a Bloomberg Government ranking of the top 200 vendors released April 22.

It slipped six spots from the prior year, when it had about $1.5 billion in U.S. contracts.

‘Jeopardy’ Success

IBM will offer technology from its Watson Group to aggregate and study clinical information for U.S. health agencies, according to the press release.

Watson, an artificial-intelligence system best known for its success on the “Jeopardy!” television quiz show, can analyze large amounts of data.

That may help cut costs, speed medical research and improve care, the company said in its release.

Maner declined to comment on whether IBM would compete for the records project or include Watson technology in a potential bid.

It wants to see the government’s solicitation for the work first, he said. If IBM does bid, “you need to show up with everything,” Maner said.

That includes the right commercial and federal experience, the best bidding partners, as well as “innovative technology,” such as Watson, he said.

Information technology services companies such as Hewlett-Packard, based in Palo Alto, California; Leidos Holdings, based in Reston, Virginia; and IBM are likely to bid on the Pentagon health records work, said Brian Friel, a Bloomberg Industries analyst.
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Offline Letsbereal

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China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #54 on: June 26, 2014, 06:08:30 AM »
China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others - Move to ditch foreign mainframes benefits Huawei, Inspur
26 June 2014
, by Li Xiaoxiao, Qin Min, Zhang Yuzhe, Nan Hao, Qu Yunxu and Zheng Peishan - Beijing (Caixin Online - MarketWatch)
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/china-pulling-the-plug-on-ibm-oracle-others-2014-06-26

E-commerce companies and banks in China are scrapping hardware and uninstalling software for mainframe servers made by American suppliers in favor of homegrown brands said to be safe, advanced and a lot less expensive.


Microsoft: NSA security fallout 'getting worse' ... 'not blowing over' - 'Double-digit declines in people's trust in American tech companies' is bad for business
19 June 2014
, by Jack Clark (The Register)
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/06/19/microsoft_nsa_fallout/
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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #55 on: June 26, 2014, 10:20:52 AM »
So like the NSA Snowdon thingy, which is not even described as a scandal, has BLOWBACK

w00t !

Offline ScipioAfricanus

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #56 on: June 26, 2014, 12:32:17 PM »
China used American expertise to get better now they are dumping America. genius.

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #57 on: June 26, 2014, 05:37:23 PM »
China used American expertise to get better now they are dumping America. genius.

Yep! Remember this from 2000?

============================================================

Clinton Signs China Trade Bill

By Associated Press – October 19, 2000
Posted in: National, News


Chinese American-owned businesses are to benefit

By Associated Press & Ian Kim

President Bill Clinton has signed the China trade bill, a hard-fought victory for the White House that promises to ultimately open markets in the communist country to billions of dollars in U.S. goods and services.

Even as he signed the bill, the president was dispatching U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky to Beijing Oct. 10 to nudge the Chinese to complete its agreements to join the World Trade Organization. Talks are stalled as China backpedals on details of its trade accords with the United States and other nations.

 
President Clinton signs the U.S.-China Relations Act of 2000 on Oct. 10. Photo courtesy of the White House.

“Our work is not over when I sign the bill. China still must complete its WTO accession agreements,” Clinton said. “But when it happens, China will open its markets to American products from wheat to cars to consulting services, and our companies will be far more able to sell goods without moving facilities or investments there.”

Clinton was joined at the ceremony on the South Lawn by several members of the cabinet and about 50 Republican and Democratic lawmakers. The measure passed the House 237-197 on May 24 after much arm-twisting by the White House. It easily passed the Senate, 83-15, on Sept. 19.

Not all Republicans disagreed with the president. Not all Democrats agreed.

“In case you’ve all forgotten, this thing was hard to pass,” Clinton joked. “This was a lot of trouble.”

The measure establishes “Permanent Normal Trade Relations” (PNTR) with China. This means the United States will lower its tariffs on imports from China, and has scrapped its system in which Congress annually reviewed China’s trade privileges. In response, China is expected to lower its trade barriers, benefiting U.S. exporters.

In China, the government’s Xinhua News Agency said in a brief report that the signing of the trade bill serves the “fundamental interests of the people of the two sides.”
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Offline Letsbereal

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #58 on: July 01, 2014, 05:57:01 AM »
IBM’s China troubles could be getting worse - Business isn’t looking brighter, and now Lenovo deal is stalled
1 July 2014
, by Therese Poletti - San Francisco (MarketWatch)
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/ibms-china-troubles-could-be-getting-worse-2014-07-01

IBM Corp.’s revenue has declined for eight consecutive quarters, but it steadfastly continues to maintain a strong earnings outlook for both 2014 and 2015, even as analysts have become more skeptical that the company will deliver.

Investors are hoping for an update on IBM”s goal of reaching $18 in earnings per share for 2014, and to learn of any encouraging signs for its hardware business.

The tech giant is slated to report second-quarter earnings on July 17.

But many on Wall Street appear dubious that IBM will be able to hit its targets.

The current Wall Street consensus for earnings in 2014, according to FactSet Research, is $17.88 a share, with revenue of $97.38 billion, down from $99.75 billion in 2013.

The average recommendation on the stock is a hold.

Adding new pressure to IBM are recent reports from China that suggest its current troubles there may not improve.

In the third quarter of 2013, a big drop in sales in China especially hurt IBM’s results.

The company cited business execution problems and China’s economic reforms as contributors to the decline.

Then in April, IBM said first quarter revenue in China fell 20%.

“We’re seeing a slowdown in that procurement process as they implement reforms,” IBM Chief Financial Officer Martin Schroeter told a J.P. Morgan Technology Conference in May.

“We are investing with the idea that China, like the rest of the growth markets, they’re absolutely going to come back and they’re going to be fine.”

But, he added, “you can’t predict when that is going to happen.”

IBM is also doing more to work with customers in China.

In early June it opened a new customer center in Beijing especially designed for mainframe and cloud computing, where customers can go for briefings, technical training, testing and technical support.

But news agency Caixin Online in Beijing reported last week that some Chinese companies are starting to pull the plug on expensive mainframe hardware and software made by IBM, Oracle and EMC, in favor of cheaper Chinese developed technology.

Huawei Technology, for example, was described as one rival that has been winning contracts from state company and bank information technology departments.

In addition, some Chinese Internet companies, like Alibaba, are copying Facebook and Google and developing their own data centers and server racks with off-the-shelf hardware.

In the first quarter of this year, IBM saw revenue of its overall hardware business fall 23%, with mainframes hit the hardest.

Yet IBM has managed to report strong earnings, helped in part by cost management and stock buybacks.

Schroeter will host his second call with Wall Street later in July. There will likely be more questions about China.

Compounding IBM’s issues in China now is the company’s pending $2.3 billion sale of its server business to Lenovo, which the Wall Street Journal reported last week has stalled, as the U.S. government investigates security concerns over the deal.

The same issues came up previously in 2005 when Lenovo bought IBM’s PC business, which eventually was given the go-ahead, with some conditions.

Investors also will be listening closely for updates from IBM on its sales to China, or whether media reports about IBM’s China business are overblown.

Indeed, as Caixin Online itself noted, the switch to servers developed by Chinese companies is a slow process, especially for banks, because some suppliers have yet to meet the necessary security and stability requirements.

Cindy Shaw, an analyst at Discern, wrote in a note on Monday that she expects market share losses to erode sales in China for enterprise IT vendors including IBM, EMC and Oracle (the latter two of which she does not cover) and to a lesser extent Hewlett-Packard.

“Efforts to replace the existing infrastructure should have a very long tail that causes a slow decline in current recurring revenue (e.g., services and software licenses),” she wrote.
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Offline jerryweaver

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #59 on: July 01, 2014, 06:47:18 AM »
Solar wars: US penalizes China by doubling tariffs on panels

http://on.rt.com/wpny08

I was very concerned about China after reading about the AK-47 scandal in 1997.

http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~wbova/fn/gov/lb_china.pdf

Long Beach Naval Base Goes to Communist China
By Rowan Scarborough
The Washington Times
The Senate has struck a compromise that would allow a Communist Chinese ocean
carrier to operate a terminal at the old naval base in Long Beach, Calif., if President
Clinton certifies it is not a security threat. The deal in the 1998 defense-authorization bill
blunts a House measure to ban the Chinese Ocean Shipping Co. (Cosco) from Long
Beach. The new compromise language of a House-Senate conference would block Cosco
only if Mr. Clinton failed to exercise his waiver authority. Such a move seems unlikely
because the White House supports Long Beach's efforts to woo Cosco.
An aide to Sen. James M. Inhofe, Oklahoma Republican, who led the Cosco resistance in
the Senate, said yesterday the senator either had to accept the loophole or get no language
at all. "I don't think it's meaningless. There's no doubt it's weaker. And the senator is not
happy with that," the staffer said.
He said Mr. Inhofe has been assured by Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, Mississippi
Republican, that he will be given floor time to introduce and debate a stand-alone bill to
bar Cosco.
Mr. Inhofe heads the Senate Armed Services subcommittee on readiness, which handled
the Cosco issue. The panel's senior Democrat, Sen. Charles S. Robb of Virginia, opposed
blocking Cosco, as did many other Democrats. He argued local communities should be
free to dispose of bases abandoned by the Pentagon. Rep. Duncan Hunter, California
Republican and the sponsor of a Cosco ban that won House approval, expressed
disappointment in the Clinton waiver. But he said at least the amendment requires the
president to certify that security agencies will face no additional burden by Cosco's
presence at Long Beach.
"I think it's easier for some Clinton aides to say Cosco hasn't delivered a nuclear bomb in
the last 10 days," Mr. Hunter said. "However, I think it's more difficult for them to say
this isn't going to increase the burden when you have this very large facility with the
intelligence-gathering apparatus that China can install.
"This is the equivalent of a new, huge Chinese embassy on our soil, with all the
intelligence problems that attend such a facility," he added. He says Cosco is an arm of
China's People's Liberation Army and a threat to conduct espionage in Southern
California.
But it is uncertain whether Cosco will ever operate the Long Beach site, regardless of
what action Congress takes. Through court action, environmentalists forced the port of
Long Beach to terminate its Cosco lease and conduct a second impact study. Officials

Allowing Cosco to control a large piece of strategic coastline that once held a historic
naval base is unpalatable to many conservatives. When Mr. Inhofe last month appeared to
back off a fight over Cosco, callers complained loudly on radio talk shows.
Cosco is one of the world's largest carriers and is fast expanding operations in the
Atlantic. Last year, U.S. inspectors discovered a Cosco ship, Empress Phoenix, carrying
an illegal shipment of 2,000 AK-47 rifles to the San Francisco area.
Mr. Hunter says
Cosco also transports destabilizing weapons to Syria, North Korea, Iran and Pakistan.
(c) 1997 Washington Time

Offline Donovan

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #60 on: July 01, 2014, 10:18:10 AM »
China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others - Move to ditch foreign mainframes benefits Huawei, Inspur
26 June 2014
, by Li Xiaoxiao, Qin Min, Zhang Yuzhe, Nan Hao, Qu Yunxu and Zheng Peishan - Beijing (Caixin Online - MarketWatch)
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/china-pulling-the-plug-on-ibm-oracle-others-2014-06-26

E-commerce companies and banks in China are scrapping hardware and uninstalling software for mainframe servers made by American suppliers in favor of homegrown brands said to be safe, advanced and a lot less expensive.


Microsoft: NSA security fallout 'getting worse' ... 'not blowing over' - 'Double-digit declines in people's trust in American tech companies' is bad for business
19 June 2014
, by Jack Clark (The Register)
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/06/19/microsoft_nsa_fallout/

Wtf are they talking about?

The Chinese OWN IBM/Lenovo. They bought it out nearly a decade ago. And the company that purchased it has direct ties to the Chinese military. Its the reason most US government agencies dumped IBM computers when they were bought out and switched to Dell and HP computers.

So the Chinese arent going to dump something they own.

I'm calling BS on the article.

Offline Letsbereal

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #61 on: July 04, 2014, 10:40:02 AM »
China Ousts Foreign Servers for Local Brand, People’s Daily Says
4 July 2014
, (Bloomberg News)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2014-07-04/china-ousts-foreign-servers-for-local-brand-people-s-daily-says.html

China is replacing imported servers after the successful trial of a local brand by a state-owned bank as the nation steps-up a campaign for information security, the official People’s Daily newspaper reported today.

Inspur Group Ltd.’s Tiansuo K1 system has replaced imported servers “in large quantity” after its successful use by China Construction Bank Corp. (939)’s Xinjiang branch, People’s Daily reported, citing Wang Endong, chief designer of the system.

The paper is the official newspaper of China’s Communist Party.

The branch started testing the hardware in August 2010 and used the system for all businesses in 2011, replacing hardware from International Business Machines Machines Corp. (IBM), the report said, citing Lin Leiming, a deputy manager in CCB’s information technology department.

More industries including power, oil and agriculture will start to use Inspur’s Tiansuo K1 system, according to the report, which didn’t provide details and cited Wang for the information.

Anthony Guerrieri, a Shanghai-based IBM spokesman, couldn’t be reached by phone and he didn’t immediately respond to e-mailed request for comment on the report.

The Chinese government is reviewing whether domestic banks’ reliance on high-end servers from IBM compromises the nation’s financial security, while government agencies including the People’s Bank of China and the Ministry of Finance are conducting a trial replacing IBM servers with Inspur, Bloomberg reported in May, citing people familiar with the matter.

IBM isn’t aware of any Chinese government policy recommending against the use of IBM servers within the country’s banking industry, Jeff Cross, a spokesman for IBM, said in a statement in May responding to that report.

IBM and other foreign vendors including Hewlett-Packard Co. (HPQ) and Oracle Corp. (ORCL) held 99% of China’s server market before the Tiansuo K1 system, the People’s Daily reported.

Tensions over cyber security between the U.S. and China have been rising since May, when U.S. prosecutors charged five Chinese military officers with allegedly hacking American companies to steal corporate secrets.
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Offline Letsbereal

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #62 on: July 07, 2014, 04:24:54 PM »
IBM to Help China Manage Air Quality, Renewable-Energy Supplies
7 July 2014
, (Bloomberg News)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2014-07-07/ibm-to-help-china-manage-air-quality-renewable-energy-supplies.html

International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) started a project to support China in managing air quality and energy consumption as well as forecasting renewable-energy supplies.

Under the project, the Armonk, New York-based company is cooperating with the Beijing municipal government on a system to determine the type, source and level of emissions and predict air quality in the capital, IBM said today in a statement.

The project will enable utilities to estimate the amount of renewable energy that will be available for grid transmission or storage, IBM said.

The company is also developing a new system to manage energy consumption of industrial companies that represent more than 70% of China’s total energy consumption.

The move comes as IBM seeks to counter declining sales in the world’s second-biggest economy, where revenue fell 20% last quarter, dragged down by decreasing hardware spending.

U.S. companies have also faced tensions over cybersecurity in China after U.S. prosecutors in May charged five Chinese military officers with allegedly hacking into computers of American companies.

China is reviewing whether domestic banks’ reliance on IBM’s high-end servers compromises the nation’s financial security, Bloomberg News reported May 27 citing people familiar with the matter.

IBM said in May it wasn’t aware of any government policy recommending against use of its servers.

The world’s biggest carbon emitter is paying closer attention on renewable energy and air quality after Premier Li Keqiang declared war on smog in a speech in March.

The nation has pledged to cut carbon emissions per unit of economic output by as much as 45% from 2005 levels before 2020.

IBM is helping Hengqin Island in Guangdong province to cut energy consumption, costs and carbon emissions, it said.
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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM Sets Aside Rivalry to Partner With China’s Inspur
« Reply #63 on: August 22, 2014, 02:18:11 PM »
IBM Sets Aside Rivalry to Partner With China’s Inspur
22 August 2014
, by Alex Barinka (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/print/2014-08-22/ibm-sets-aside-rivalry-to-partner-with-china-s-inspur.html

International Business Machines Corp. (IBM) has formed a partnership with Inspur Group Ltd. after the Chinese company tried to lure away customers with its “IBM to Inspur” marketing campaign.

IBM’s database and WebSphere software will be used on Inspur’s servers, which are the first high-end hardware to be wholly developed and produced by a Chinese company.

Inspur will also be designing systems using IBM’s Power8 chips, the companies said today in an e-mailed statement.

The deal sets aside the companies’ rivalry, spurred by tensions between the U.S. and Chinese governments over claims of cyberspying and hacking American companies.

Inspur had set out on a campaign to win over IBM’s customers after Bloomberg News reported in May that China’s government was studying if domestic banks’ reliance on the American company’s technology threatened national security.

IBM said at the time that it wasn’t aware of any Chinese government policy recommending against the use of IBM servers within the country’s banking industry.

Earlier today, China Daily reported that IBM said it never stopped providing new servers to Chinese banks, citing an interview with D.C. Chien, chairman and chief executive officer of IBM China Group.

IBM has been trying to turn around falling revenue in China, which have weighed heavily on CEO Ginni Rometty’s profit goals.

Sales in the country declined 11% in the second quarter from a year earlier, after tumbling 20% in the first three months of the year, adjusted for currency conversions.

Almost half of IBM’s China revenue comes from hardware sales, the company said in May.

Middleware Market

For Inspur, the deal could help convince potential customers to buy its hardware with the option to use IBM’s software.

IBM’s sales of application infrastructure and middleware -- the type of offerings its new Chinese partner will deploy -- accounted for the biggest share of the worldwide market last year at 30%, according to researcher Gartner Inc.

In a separate statement today, IBM said it’s also working with China Telecom Corp. (728) in a three-year agreement to help small- and medium-sized businesses run cloud-based applications, which are stored on remote servers instead of on-site.
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EvadingGrid

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #64 on: January 05, 2015, 08:30:51 AM »
Will 2015 be the year that China becomes the dominant computer player ?

They have the people, and they have that spark of innovation and 'can do' attitude, backed by the capacity to produce in volume.

Offline sab

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Re: China pulling the plug on IBM, Oracle, others
« Reply #65 on: January 05, 2015, 07:27:59 PM »

http://rt.com/shows/keiser-report/218951-episode-max-keiser-701/

On episode 701, IBM is talked about near the end.

Offline Letsbereal

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BlackBerry Makes Samsung Tablets Spy-Proof With IBM Software
« Reply #66 on: March 16, 2015, 01:08:29 PM »
BlackBerry Makes Samsung Tablets Spy-Proof With IBM Software
16 March 2015
, by Cornelius Rahn (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-03-14/blackberry-uses-ibm-software-to-make-samsung-tablets-spy-proof

Excerpt:

BlackBerry introduced a modified Samsung tablet computer that lets government and corporate users access consumer applications such as YouTube and WhatsApp while keeping confidential work-related information away from spies and crooks.

The €2,250 ($2,360) SecuTABLET will be available by the third quarter, Hans-Christoph Quelle, head of BlackBerry’s Secusmart unit, said in an interview Sunday.

More than 10,000 units will be shipped annually in Germany by next year, with a higher number sold by International Business Machines, which is handling sales to companies worldwide, he said.

The SecuTABLET combines Samsung Electronics Co.’s Tab S 10.5 with Secusmart’s microSD card and IBM software to wrap applications that hold sensitive data into a virtual container where they can’t be harmed by malware.

Germany’s computer-security watchdog is evaluating the device for classified government communication and will probably give its approval before the end of the year, Quelle said.

“For many of the tasks that officials and executives need to carry out, a phone just isn’t enough -- they want a tablet,” Quelle said at the CeBIT technology conference in Hanover, Germany.

“The most important thing is that we combine security with usability. We don’t want to take the fun things away from people.”

BlackBerry acquired Secusmart last year in an effort to win more business from customers demanding rigorous data security.

The Waterloo, Ontario-based company, which sold few of its own 2011 Playbook tablets, is shifting from making hardware to building security components and software into competitors’ devices as the frequency of cyber attacks mounts.
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Offline Letsbereal

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Why IBM Wants to Bring Spark Mainstream
« Reply #67 on: June 16, 2015, 12:42:06 AM »
Why IBM Wants to Bring Spark Mainstream https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfqJTQnVZvA

Jun 15, 2015 Bloomberg Business

Rob Thomas, vice president of data analytics at IBM, explains why the company is doubling down on data analytics. He speaks with Bloomberg's Emily Chang on "Bloomberg West."
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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM is shrinking, and the future looks ugly
« Reply #68 on: October 20, 2015, 04:02:15 PM »
IBM is shrinking, and the future looks ugly
20 October 2015
, by Jennifer Booton (MarketWatch)
http://www.marketwatch.com/story/ibm-is-shrinking-and-the-future-looks-ugly-2015-10-20

Most of Big Blue’s growth expected to come from stock buybacks in 2016.
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Offline Letsbereal

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Re: IBM
« Reply #69 on: December 20, 2015, 05:48:19 PM »
IBM Bets on Watson With Global Research Center in Germany
15 December 2015
, by Jeremy Kahn and Alex Webb (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-12-15/ibm-bets-on-watson-with-new-global-research-center-in-germany
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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM Shares Tumble After Earnings Forecast Misses Estimates
« Reply #70 on: April 19, 2016, 11:44:53 PM »
IBM Shares Tumble After Earnings Forecast Misses Estimates
19 April 2016
, by Jing Cao (Bloomberg)
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-04-19/ibm-shares-tumble-after-earnings-forecast-misses-estimates
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