IBM

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Offline Letsbereal

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IBM
« on: August 16, 2009, 09:23:30 PM »
"IBM may have found a way to use DNA – the basic building block of life – to help construct the next generation of semiconductor chips"

"The scientists used electron-beam lithography and an etching process to create DNA origami-shaped “binding sites” on silicon and other materials used in chipmaking."


From: IBM heralds DNA chip breakthrough (The Financial Times) http://bit.ly/8iCfZ

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/2056a292-8ac1-11de-ad08-00144feabdc0.html?ftcamp=rss
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Mike Philbin

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IBM
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2009, 12:47:47 PM »
just completed a new blogpost about the latest badboy on the computing block...

IBM RoadRunner - petaflop surveillance
http://mikephilbin.blogspot.com/2009/09/ibm-road-runner-petaflop-surveillance.html

"A petaflop is 150,000 computations for every person on the planet every second." IBM talking head.

IBM's RoadRunner is the new supercomputer at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, USA. It's built from off-the-shelf components, so there shouldn't be any problem replicating the design for another government client ... the NSA, for example. At $133-million RoadRunner is quite affordable and its energy-efficient design has achieved a peak performance of 1.7 petaflops with a sustained performance of greater than 1.0 petaflops.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwfqSzkWu2k

Apparently, IBM's RoadRunner supercomputer is comparable in computational power to 500,000 PS3s working together. If you look at IBM's Advertising page on Youtube, you'll see that IBM are at the forefront of social engineering on this planet. Imagine a Ptech-enhanced RoadRunner snooping on the hither and yon of the entire planet and working out which of the six billion of us to corral or annihilate today.

Scared yet?

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: IBM RoadRunner - petaflop surveillance
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2009, 02:59:49 PM »
just completed a new blogpost about the latest badboy on the computing block...

IBM RoadRunner - petaflop surveillance
http://mikephilbin.blogspot.com/2009/09/ibm-road-runner-petaflop-surveillance.html

"A petaflop is 150,000 computations for every person on the planet every second." IBM talking head.

IBM's RoadRunner is the new supercomputer at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, USA. It's built from off-the-shelf components, so there shouldn't be any problem replicating the design for another government client ... the NSA, for example. At $133-million RoadRunner is quite affordable and its energy-efficient design has achieved a peak performance of 1.7 petaflops with a sustained performance of greater than 1.0 petaflops.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwfqSzkWu2k

Apparently, IBM's RoadRunner supercomputer is comparable in computational power to 500,000 PS3s working together. If you look at IBM's Advertising page on Youtube, you'll see that IBM are at the forefront of social engineering on this planet. Imagine a Ptech-enhanced RoadRunner snooping on the hither and yon of the entire planet and working out which of the six billion of us to corral or annihilate today.

Scared yet?

Keep in mind, this is what's COMMERCIALLY available.  So what do you think the NSA and other government entities have?
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Mike Philbin

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Re: IBM RoadRunner - petaflop surveillance
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2009, 03:23:53 PM »
oh, you think this 1.7 petflops is so 'last decade'?

any insider knowledge on this 'petaflops surveillance' uber-capability? I'll add it to my blogpost... for added Homer-slavering excitement.

:)

Orgetorix

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Re: IBM RoadRunner - petaflop surveillance
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2009, 06:27:51 PM »
oh, you think this 1.7 petflops is so 'last decade'?

any insider knowledge on this 'petaflops surveillance' uber-capability? I'll add it to my blogpost... for added Homer-slavering excitement.

:)

I think this 1.7 petaflop is like so retro, like so the decade before last.

Here's an interesting article that was posted earlier this week.

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=132792.0

Offline Joseon

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IBM Researchers Claim Light Based Computer Chip Advance
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2010, 07:28:49 PM »

An Ethiopian scientist residing in the United States is involved in a hi-tech research development that could revolutionise the way computers communicate and significantly reduce the energy they use, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Solomon Assefa, a doctoral graduate of the prestigious Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), is one of the three researchers working at the International Business Machines (IBM) Corp, whose work will soon be published in the scientific journal Nature, according to the newspaper.

The three scientists are claiming an important advance that could change the way computer chips communicate, sharply boosting speed while lowering energy consumption.

The goal is to use pulses of light rather than copper wires to exchange information between chips and to build the needed components out of silicon rather than costly, esoteric materials. IBM’s advance involves a key component called an avalanche photo detector, which converts light into electricity. The researchers say they used silicon and the element germanium to create a photo detector that is among the fastest and least power-hungry of its kind.

IBM is not alone in the pursuit. Researchers at universities and companies including Intel Corp and start-up Luxtera Inc have also been working on improving chip performance using siliconbased optical components.

“This is the next wave of computing,” said Richard Doherty, an analyst at market research firm Envisioneering Group and a patent holder in optical communications. “By 2020, it may be the dominant way Google, governments, banks and other large users are doing their computing.”

Optical communications involve encoding information on streams of light particles generated by lasers. The technology uses thin glass fibres rather than bulky cables, yet creates connections that allow more data to flow at higher speeds.

Such benefits are the reason long-distance telephone wires were replaced with fibre-optic cables, a technology developed in the 1970s. Companies like Luxtera already sell silicon based optical devices for linking computers. Researchers are racing to miniaturise optical components so they can be built into microprocessors.

Intel has built a series of optical components from silicon and related materials, including a prototype avalanche photo detector it announced in December 2008. IBM says its version can detect 40 gigabits of data a second – four times the speed of Intel’s – and operates at 1.5V rather than 30V.

“That can save a huge amount of power,” said Yurii Vlasov, the lead scientist of the IBM research.

IBM’s photo detector can detect weak pulses and amplify them without adding unwanted noise, a previous problem with the technology, he said. The company, which used germanium in a different way than Intel, says it reduces noise by 50pc to 70pc compared to existing avalanche photo detectors.

Mario Paniccia, director of Intel’s photonics technology lab, called IBM’s advance another sign of progress in the field.

“As a scientist, I think this is all great,” he said. “It just drives more competition.”

Vlasov said it could be five years before the technology makes its way into chips for high-end server systems. It could take another five years before it is used in consumer products such as cell phones or videogame players, he said.
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Offline sharpsteve

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Re: IBM Researchers Claim Light Based Computer Chip Advance
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2010, 08:24:27 PM »
do you have the link for that? Thanks

Offline Dig

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IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2010, 06:30:10 AM »
Saying it out loud: IBM is moving to Firefox as its default browser
http://www.sutor.com/c/2010/07/ibm-moving-to-firefox-as-default-browser/

I talk a lot about software in this blog but most of the discussion is at the personal level: I tried this, I experimented with that. I hardly ever talk about what I use for doing my IBM business and more rarely still do I talk about IBM’s internal policies about software use. This entry is different, and gives you a bit of a view inside the company.

Like many individuals and members of organizations, IBMers use their browsers a lot for conducting business. Our desktop and laptop software environments have some common applications but also software specific to do our various jobs. And these jobs are varied, as there are about 400,000 IBM employees around the world.

Some of the software we all use shouldn’t surprise you since we make it, such as Lotus Notes, Lotus Sametime, and Lotus Symphony.


We’re officially adding a new piece of software to the list of default common applications we expect employees to use, and that’s the Mozilla Firefox browser.

Firefox has been around for years, of course. Today we already have thousands of employees using it on Linux, Mac, and Windows laptops and desktops, but we’re going to be adding thousands more users to the rolls.

Some of us started using it because it was new and fast and cool. I tried it for those reasons, but I still use it for the following ones:
Firefox is stunningly standards compliant, and interoperability via open standards is key to IBM’s strategy.
Firefox is open source and its development schedule is managed by a development community not beholden to one commercial entity.
Firefox is secure and an international community of experts continues to develop and maintain it.
Firefox is extensible and can be customized for particular applications and organizations, like IBM.
Firefox is innovative and has forced the hand of browsers that came before and after it to add and improve speed and function.

While other browsers have come and gone, Firefox is now the gold standard for what an open, secure, and standards-compliant browser should be. We’ll continue to see this or that browser be faster or introduce new features, but then another will come along and be better still, including Firefox.

I think it was Firefox and its growth that reinvigorated the browser market as well as the web. That is, Firefox forced competitors to respond. Their software has gotten better and we have all benefited. We’ll see this again as Firefox continues to add even more support for HTML5.

So what does it mean for Firefox to be the default browser inside IBM? Any employee who is not now using Firefox will be strongly encouraged to use it as their default browser. All new computers will be provisioned with it. We will continue to strongly encourage our vendors who have browser-based software to fully support Firefox.

We’ll offer employee education and point our people to great online information, all of which will look wonderful in Firefox. IBM has contributed to the Firefox open source effort for many years and we’ll continue to do so.

There’s another reason we want to get as many of our employees using Firefox as soon as possible, and that is Cloud Computing. For the shift to the cloud to be successful, open standards must be used in the infrastructure, in the applications, and in the way people exchange data.

The longstanding commitment of Mozilla to open standards and the quality of the implementation of them in Firefox gives us confidence that this is a solid, modern platform that should be part of IBM’s own internal transformation to significantly greater use of Cloud Computing. Examples of this already include Blue Insight, an internal cloud for business analytics, and LotusLive, for online collaboration.

It is not news that some IBM employees use Firefox. It is news that all IBM employees will be asked to use it as their default browser.

As you think about the browser you use at home and at work, consider the reasons we have stated for our move. It’s your choice, obviously, but Firefox is enterprise ready, and we’re ready to adopt it for our enterprise.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2010, 08:59:48 AM »
But mozzila was co-opted many years ago now it is no better then the rest. It keeps tabs on you even better then IE.

H0llyw00d

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Offline HAZMAT

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Re: IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #10 on: July 02, 2010, 09:36:57 AM »
Eh, I shouldn't but I still use it because its the fastest.

Offline tinfoiltruth

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Re: IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2010, 09:47:58 AM »
OPERA


opera uses the same code as Firefox. just a different skin.

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #12 on: July 02, 2010, 09:51:42 AM »
Firefox's performance seems to degrade over time ... try this one (I find it's the fastest one out there):

SRWare Iron
http://www.srware.net/en/software_srware_iron.php

SRWare Iron: The browser of the future - based on the free Sourcecode "Chromium" - without any problems at privacy and security

Google's Web browser Chrome thrilled with an extremely fast site rendering, a sleek design and innovative features.  But it also gets critic from data protection specialists , for reasons such as creating a unique user ID or the submission of entries to Google to generate suggestions. SRWare Iron is a real alternative. The browser is based on the Chromium-source and offers the same features as Chrome - but without the critical points that the privacy concern.
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Offline Djævlen

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Re: IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #13 on: July 02, 2010, 09:58:35 AM »
I've always liked Safari.
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Offline Dig

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Re: IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #14 on: July 02, 2010, 10:12:51 AM »



“The technotronic era involves the gradual appearance of a more controlled society. Such a society would be dominated by an elite, unrestrained by traditional values. [...] The capacity to assert social and political control over the individual will vastly increase. It will soon be possible to assert almost continuous surveillance over every citizen and to maintain up-to-date, complete files, containing even most personal information about the health or personal behavior of the citizen in addition to more customary data. These files will be subject to instantaneous retrieval by the authorities.”
https://www.mega.nu/ampp/privacy.html
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Offline Joe(WI)

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Re: IBM/Firefox connection [Firefox logo is the snake eating its tail]
« Reply #15 on: July 02, 2010, 12:03:10 PM »
I still like the wicked cool FF2! Refuse to upgrade for the sake of youtube not bugging me with "Your Browser is Not Supported"

It has thrown very few curve balls at me, nothing I couldn't(didn't :P) undo. I am concerned Moz project went "Oooh, shiny!" Can anyone update me on security concerns about plugins or browser itself?

And I know I should check for all ports I have open and what is being transferred, I caught the library trying to network ME, what's up with that?

I need to get on my next pic tho, I'll leave concerns for you good folks.
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Offline ex_nihilo

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Cannocial and IBM partner
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2010, 01:15:01 PM »
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/07/21/ibm_canonical_db2_ubuntu/


Commercial Linux distributor Canonical has won the buzzword bingo for the week by putting Ubuntu, cloud, and appliance in the same sentence in announcing a partnership with IBM. It’s meant to bring the latter company’s DB2 databases to the latest Ubuntu 10.04 Server Edition Linux.

The deal has two parts. First, Canonical has taken IBM’s DB2 Express-C database, which is a lightweight relational database with PureXML integrated XML features like the real DB2 databases, and hardened it for Ubuntu 10.04 Server Edition and wrapped it all up in a loving Amazon Machine Image (AMI) format so it can be deployed on Amazon’s Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) utility.

According to Neil Levine, vice president of commercial services at Canonical, the Linux distributor thinks that getting a basic database certified for Ubuntu on EC2 is a key to getting IT shops to eventually deploy Ubuntu Enterprise Cloud, a clone of Amazon EC2 based on Ubuntu and the open source Eucalyptus cloud framework that sports KVM hypervisors and supports Amazon’s APIs for EC2.

The DB2 Express-C image can be deployed on the Amazon public could or on a private cloud based on UEC, despite the fact that Amazon runs its cloud on a home-tweaked Xen hypervisor.

“The developers are the ones really starting out on Amazon today, and they are figuring out what works and what does not,” says Levine. The DB2 Express-C appliance running on Ubuntu helps them get an image up and running on EC2 in a couple of clicks, and for the low, low price of zero that developers love. (DB2 Express-C is not open source, but it is freely distributed by IBM. Ubuntu 10.04 Server Edition is freely distributed.)

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wvoutlaw2002

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Re: Cannocial and IBM partner
« Reply #17 on: July 22, 2010, 04:55:11 PM »
Canonical has partnered with the makers of the Nazi death computers (IBM) before.

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=140903.0

Canonical's new CEO Jane Silber is a former VP of General Dynamics and ran the "Command and Control" division.

wvoutlaw2002

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Re: Cannocial and IBM partner
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2010, 05:11:46 PM »
Check it out. I have created a page for Canonical on Politicalfriendster.com and using the power of that site to expose Canonical's connections to the Military-Industrial Complex.

Prediction: Watch all the Ubuntu fanbois smear me big time as a Microsoft shill for daring to expose Canonical and Ubuntu for what it is. And it wouldn't surprise me if they try to ban me from the site and delete every connection I ever made on there.

Offline freedom_commonsense

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Re: Cannocial and IBM partner
« Reply #19 on: July 22, 2010, 05:28:32 PM »
I think Debian-based distros are the way forward.

wvoutlaw2002

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Re: Cannocial and IBM partner
« Reply #20 on: July 22, 2010, 05:54:17 PM »
I think Debian-based distros are the way forward.

Agreed. Debian-based OSes are among the easiest to use. But in the last 2 years, I've seen three companies who make Debian-based OSes fall and fall hard. The first was Linspire (bought out by Xandros). The second was Good OS (first hit big when its gOS Linux was preinstalled on the $198 Everex gPC sold at Walmart, but fell hard when Walfart decided to stop selling it and pulled them from the shelves). And the most recent one was Xandros. Xandros and Good OS still haven't officially announced their company closings, but with no new desktop OS from Xandros in almost 4 years (even Freespire is listed on Distrowatch as "dormant") and no new desktop OS from Good OS since late 2008, they've pretty much given up. And the worst thing about Xandros is this: They bought Linspire solely for the CNR Warehouse, and even the CNR website - cnr.com - has been down for at least TWO MONTHS. Xandros wasted their money when they bought Linspire.....but I guess it could have been worse. After all, Microsoft could have bought Linspire and released Microsoft LindowsOS. ;D

wvoutlaw2002

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Re: Cannocial and IBM partner
« Reply #21 on: July 22, 2010, 06:03:46 PM »
Canonical is now on Political Friendster. It's connections are listed as Ubuntu, IBM, and General Dynamics.

http://www.politicalfriendster.com/showPerson.php?id=8233&name=Canonical

Offline freedom_commonsense

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Re: Cannocial and IBM partner
« Reply #22 on: July 22, 2010, 06:28:35 PM »
Agreed. Debian-based OSes are among the easiest to use. But in the last 2 years, I've seen three companies who make Debian-based OSes fall and fall hard. The first was Linspire (bought out by Xandros). The second was Good OS (first hit big when its gOS Linux was preinstalled on the $198 Everex gPC sold at Walmart, but fell hard when Walfart decided to stop selling it and pulled them from the shelves). And the most recent one was Xandros. Xandros and Good OS still haven't officially announced their company closings, but with no new desktop OS from Xandros in almost 4 years (even Freespire is listed on Distrowatch as "dormant") and no new desktop OS from Good OS since late 2008, they've pretty much given up. And the worst thing about Xandros is this: They bought Linspire solely for the CNR Warehouse, and even the CNR website - cnr.com - has been down for at least TWO MONTHS. Xandros wasted their money when they bought Linspire.....but I guess it could have been worse. After all, Microsoft could have bought Linspire and released Microsoft LindowsOS. ;D

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Offline Letsbereal

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Supercomputers 'will fit in a sugar cube', IBM says
« Reply #23 on: November 14, 2010, 09:08:56 AM »
Supercomputers 'will fit in a sugar cube', IBM says
12 November 2010
, by Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter - Zurich ( BBC News)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-11734909

Excerpt:

A pioneering research effort could shrink the world's most powerful supercomputer processors to the size of a sugar cube, IBM scientists say.

The approach will see many computer processors stacked on top of one another, cooling them with water flowing between each one.

The aim is to reduce computers' energy use, rather than just to shrink them.
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worcesteradam

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Re: Supercomputers 'will fit in a sugar cube', IBM says
« Reply #24 on: November 14, 2010, 12:54:25 PM »
heat dissipation the main technological challenge in faster consumer level computers. Theyve had to move to multiple cores. So the hunt is on for new techniques

wvoutlaw2002

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IBM teams with 'Jeopardy!' to push the cybernetics agenda
« Reply #25 on: January 14, 2011, 07:48:38 AM »
IBM's Watson beats 'Jeopardy!' champs Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter in first public test
David R. Martin & Jim Fitzgerald
January 13, 2011

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, N.Y. — The clue: It's the size of 10 refrigerators, has access to the equivalent of 200 million pages of information and knows how to answer in the form of a question.

The correct response: "What is the computer IBM developed to become a 'Jeopardy!' whiz?"

Watson, which IBM claims as a profound advance in artificial intelligence, edged out game-show champions Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter on Thursday in its first public test, a short practice round ahead of a million-dollar tournament that will be televised next month.

Later, the human contestants made jokes about the "Terminator" movies and robots from the future. Indeed, four questions into the round you had to wonder if the rise of the machines was already upon us — in a trivial sense at least.

FULL ARTICLE

Offline James Redford

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IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #26 on: February 14, 2011, 02:42:42 PM »
IBM's Artificial Intelligence (A.I.) computer Watson is playing Jeopardy! today (i.e., on the 14th, and also on the 15th and 16th of this month) on television against the all-time Jeopardy! champions Brad Rutter and Ken Jennings. This is a historic event, as we're witnessing the emergence of computers that are sapient in that they can understand arbitrarily diverse and difficult questions in human language and reply correctly to them (i.e., where the questions contain ambiguous meanings, puns, jokes, double entendres, and other wordplay; as well, where the factual data in the reply itself can be quite obscure).

This is really quite amazing, as I didn't think I'd see computers reach the level of Watson this soon. I knew it was coming--as I've discussed on this forum, such as with physicist and mathematician Prof. Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theorem [1]--but I figured it would be another decade or so until we saw something comparable to Watson.

Watson has already won a practice event against Rutter and Jennings.

So you might want to watch Jeopardy! on the aforesaid dates. Assuming that Watson wins, or even that it merely does well, this event will be the first truly major breakthrough for humanlike intelligence in the history of Artificial Intelligence. Jeopardy! is syndicated, so check your local listings for the time and channel that it will be on.

According to Sam Gustin of Wired magazine ("IBM's Watson Supercomputer Wins Practice Jeopardy Round", January 13, 2011 http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2011/01/ibm-watson-jeopardy/ ), "Watson is not your run-of-the-mill computer. The system is powered by 10 racks of IBM POWER 750 servers running Linux, and uses 15 terabytes of RAM, 2,880 processor cores and can operate at 80 teraflops."

You can watch online the below PBS Nova program on Watson:

"Smartest Machine on Earth", Nova (PBS [Public Broadcasting Service]), aired February 9, 2011 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/smartest-machine-on-earth.html , http://video.pbs.org/video/1786674622

Below are some more videos and articles on Watson:

"IBM Watson: Countdown to Jeopardy!", ibm, February 10, 2011 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dP4Jc5rGT1A

"The Next Grand Challenge", ibm, December 15, 2010 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VjHMYuGkzlU

"IBM's Watson AI Jeopardy practice match", VentureBeat, January 13, 2011 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12rNbGf2Wwo

"Building Watson - A Brief Overview of the DeepQA Project", ibm, December 13, 2010 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3G2H3DZ8rNc

IBM - Watson http://www-03.ibm.com/innovation/us/watson/index.shtml

Ray Kurzweil, "Why IBM's Jeopardy Victory Matters", PC Magazine, January 20, 2011 http://www.pcmag.com/print_article2/0,1217,a=259558,00.asp?hidPrint=true

Clive Thompson, "What Is I.B.M.'s Watson?", New York Times, June 16, 2010 http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/20/magazine/20Computer-t.html?pagewanted=all

"Watson (artificial intelligence software)", Wikipedia, February 14, 2011 http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Watson_(artificial_intelligence_software)&oldid=413909329

-----

Note:

1. See, e.g., James Redford, "God Proven to Exist According to Mainline Physics", May 8, 2009 http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=104607.0
Author of "Jesus Is an Anarchist", Social Science Research Network (SSRN), Dec. 4, 2011 (orig. pub. Dec. 19, 2001) http://ssrn.com/abstract=1337761

Theophysics (a website with information on Prof. Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theory) http://theophysics.host56.com http://theophysics.ifastnet.com

charrington

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #27 on: February 14, 2011, 06:42:47 PM »
It won.

Offline James Redford

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #28 on: February 17, 2011, 05:37:02 AM »
IBM's Watson won the Jeopardy! contest. Watson obtained approximately 3.21446 times the dollar score as the next highest-scoring contestant, Ken Jennings. Below is the total score:

Watson: $77,147
Ken Jennings: $24,000
Brad Rutter: $21,600
Author of "Jesus Is an Anarchist", Social Science Research Network (SSRN), Dec. 4, 2011 (orig. pub. Dec. 19, 2001) http://ssrn.com/abstract=1337761

Theophysics (a website with information on Prof. Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theory) http://theophysics.host56.com http://theophysics.ifastnet.com

Offline iks83

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #29 on: February 17, 2011, 05:54:01 AM »
I think it is easier to program a computer to find the right question to the answer than the other way around. In the end Jeopardy is just What is/Who is <subject that fits best to the answer>? In the end the computer just takes the answer and shoots it through a search algorythm that returns the result. If the Watson also did real smalltalk and stuff then I would be impressed... or actually answers a question instead of questions an answer cause that would be much more difficult. Would be interesting to hear the answer to who did 9/11. Lets say the computer is hooked to the internet and also non public information sources. He needs to judge the credibility of the information by judging the source based on profession, work, accurancy, was it right in the past, did the source lie in the past and a billion other things, understanding the content, linking it with other sources, etc and form an answer. Would be awesome.

Offline Kilika

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #30 on: February 17, 2011, 06:05:50 AM »
I realize this is more than anything propaganda, but why is this such a big accomplishment for a computer? Seriously, computers are literally brain dead, and are nothing but data storage devices. That thing isn't operating on AI at all. It's just basic memory recall, admittedly at very fast speeds.

"Super computers" arent' any more special than they were when the first one was introduced called the Cray. They have just gotten much faster. That's it.

It can only operate based on the data put in it, or what database it has access to. Ask it a question and it will get the answer correct every time so long as the answer is in it's database. Unlike humans, it has perfect recall of memory, but that in itself isn't some super accomplishment. To me, all they are doing is tossing out these numbers that most people have no clue what it means and they just get the blank stare.

To me this is an attempt, or a continuation of trying to brainwash the public into thinking that computers are so super capable that humans don't stand a chance against them, to which I say bunk!

Let's see how Watson responds to me going over to the electric outlet and pulling the plug!

I won't be impressed in the least till Watson is able to prevent e-mail spam! ::)
"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)

Offline Kilika

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #31 on: February 17, 2011, 06:11:04 AM »
I think it is easier to program a computer to find the right question to the answer than the other way around. In the end Jeopardy is just What is/Who is <subject that fits best to the answer>? In the end the computer just takes the answer and shoots it through a search algorythm that returns the result. If the Watson also did real smalltalk and stuff then I would be impressed... or actually answers a question instead of questions an answer cause that would be much more difficult. Would be interesting to hear the answer to who did 9/11. Lets say the computer is hooked to the internet and also non public information sources. He needs to judge the credibility of the information by judging the source based on profession, work, accurancy, was it right in the past, did the source lie in the past and a billion other things, understanding the content, linking it with other sources, etc and form an answer. Would be awesome.

You beat me to it! I agree.

What they don't really like to talk about is that these things can do what appears to be amazing things, but in the end it's just a question and answer situation. And it will only give an answer based on available data. It cannot speculate, consider, reason, etc, and most importantly it cannot factor potential emotion-based results unless the programmers give it a set of potential emotional responses, so again, it isn't really "thinking" at all.

Data in, data out. That's it.
"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)

wvoutlaw2002

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #32 on: February 17, 2011, 08:50:05 AM »
Call me a crazy conspiracy theorist, but maybe this whole thing was rigged and that Jennings and Rutter were "coached" - aka ordered - to purposely lose to allow Watson to "win" in order to push the cybernetics agenda. Or maybe the whole thing was scripted.

Offline iks83

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #33 on: February 17, 2011, 09:06:34 AM »
It probably was scripted or at least Watson to be made out to be more to it than actually is. It is no AI or anything. Just a sophisticated search algorythm. Its like a PR stunt to get more research funding.

Offline EyesOpenWider

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #34 on: February 17, 2011, 09:22:03 AM »
Call me a crazy conspiracy theorist, but maybe this whole thing was rigged and that Jennings and Rutter were "coached" - aka ordered - to purposely lose to allow Watson to "win" in order to push the cybernetics agenda. Or maybe the whole thing was scripted.

I saw a CNN clip where the talking head said: "The humans lose." in re Watson and the battle of the wits. Pretty damn blatant if you ask me.

Offline Kilika

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #35 on: February 17, 2011, 12:35:57 PM »
Well, in that particular scenario, of course the humans lose. They didn't stand a chance. No way humans have as fast a recall of info as a super computer, IF the computer has the info already available in it's database.

Was it rigged? In a manner of speaking, I say yes, because they could only ask it questions it already has answers for.

Agreed, one big PR stunt that most people that aren't computer literate haven't got a clue about. Only those of us(I trained and worked in computer hardware maintenance) who know anything about computers can even begin to see the scam.
"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)

Offline James Redford

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #36 on: February 17, 2011, 02:43:37 PM »
I think it is easier to program a computer to find the right question to the answer than the other way around. In the end Jeopardy is just What is/Who is <subject that fits best to the answer>? In the end the computer just takes the answer and shoots it through a search algorythm that returns the result. If the Watson also did real smalltalk and stuff then I would be impressed... or actually answers a question instead of questions an answer cause that would be much more difficult. Would be interesting to hear the answer to who did 9/11. Lets say the computer is hooked to the internet and also non public information sources. He needs to judge the credibility of the information by judging the source based on profession, work, accurancy, was it right in the past, did the source lie in the past and a billion other things, understanding the content, linking it with other sources, etc and form an answer. Would be awesome.

IBM's Watson is a huge breakthrough in Artificial Intelligence. It has mastered one major aspect of sapience in that it can understand arbitrarily diverse and difficult questions in human language and reply correctly to them: i.e., where the questions contain ambiguous meanings, puns, jokes, riddles, double entendres, and other wordplay; as well, where the factual data in the reply itself can be quite obscure.

Someone who thinks that this is not an amazing breakthrough in Artificial Intelligence is also someone who doesn't know enough about the technical aspects of the matter. The state of the art in open domain question and answering systems was terrible before the Watson project.
Author of "Jesus Is an Anarchist", Social Science Research Network (SSRN), Dec. 4, 2011 (orig. pub. Dec. 19, 2001) http://ssrn.com/abstract=1337761

Theophysics (a website with information on Prof. Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theory) http://theophysics.host56.com http://theophysics.ifastnet.com

Offline James Redford

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #37 on: February 17, 2011, 02:54:48 PM »
Well, in that particular scenario, of course the humans lose. They didn't stand a chance. No way humans have as fast a recall of info as a super computer, IF the computer has the info already available in it's database.

Was it rigged? In a manner of speaking, I say yes, because they could only ask it questions it already has answers for.

Agreed, one big PR stunt that most people that aren't computer literate haven't got a clue about. Only those of us(I trained and worked in computer hardware maintenance) who know anything about computers can even begin to see the scam.

Your above statement is incorrect. The questions used were written for human contestants and randomly selected for the Watson match. Working in computer hardware maintenance doesn't give you any particular insight into the field of Artificial Intelligence, and it's clear from your statements in this thread that you are not knowledgeable about the subject. Open domain question and answering is a classic hard A.I. problem, one whose state of the art was terrible before Watson. It's one of the main features of sapience.
Author of "Jesus Is an Anarchist", Social Science Research Network (SSRN), Dec. 4, 2011 (orig. pub. Dec. 19, 2001) http://ssrn.com/abstract=1337761

Theophysics (a website with information on Prof. Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theory) http://theophysics.host56.com http://theophysics.ifastnet.com

Offline James Redford

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #38 on: February 17, 2011, 03:03:12 PM »
If you want to know what the ultimate limits are to this progression of technology, see Prof. Frank J. Tipler's below paper, which in addition to giving the Feynman-DeWitt-Weinberg quantum gravity/Standard Model Theory of Everything (TOE) correctly describing and unifying all the forces in physics, also demonstrates that the known laws of physics (viz., the Second Law of Thermodynamics, General Relativity, and Quantum Mechanics) require that the universe end in the Omega Point (the final cosmological singularity and state of infinite informational capacity identified as being God--of which is a different aspect of the Big Bang initial singularity, i.e., the uncaused first cause):

F. J. Tipler, "The structure of the world from pure numbers", Reports on Progress in Physics, Vol. 68, No. 4 (April 2005), pp. 897-964. http://math.tulane.edu/~tipler/theoryofeverything.pdf Also released as "Feynman-Weinberg Quantum Gravity and the Extended Standard Model as a Theory of Everything", arXiv:0704.3276, April 24, 2007. http://arxiv.org/abs/0704.3276

Out of 50 articles, Prof. Tipler's above paper was selected as one of 12 for the "Highlights of 2005" accolade as "the very best articles published in Reports on Progress in Physics in 2005 [Vol. 68]. Articles were selected by the Editorial Board for their outstanding reviews of the field. They all received the highest praise from our international referees and a high number of downloads from the journal Website." (See Richard Palmer, Publisher, "Highlights of 2005", Reports on Progress in Physics. http://www.webcitation.org/5o9VkK3eE )

Reports on Progress in Physics is the leading journal of the Institute of Physics, Britain's main professional body for physicists. Further, Reports on Progress in Physics has a higher impact factor (according to Journal Citation Reports) than Physical Review Letters, which is the most prestigious American physics journal (one, incidently, which Prof. Tipler has been published in more than once). A journal's impact factor reflects the importance the science community places in that journal in the sense of actually citing its papers in their own papers.

Tipler is Professor of Physics and Mathematics (joint appointment) at Tulane University. His Ph.D. is in the field of global general relativity (the same rarefied field that Profs. Roger Penrose and Stephen Hawking developed), and he is also an expert in particle physics and computer science. His Omega Point cosmology has been peer-reviewed and published in a number of prestigious physics and science journals in addition to Reports on Progress in Physics, such as Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (one of the world's leading astrophysics journals), Physics Letters, the International Journal of Theoretical Physics, etc.

For more on this, see my below post:

James Redford, "God Proven to Exist According to Mainline Physics", May 8, 2009 http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=104607.0
Author of "Jesus Is an Anarchist", Social Science Research Network (SSRN), Dec. 4, 2011 (orig. pub. Dec. 19, 2001) http://ssrn.com/abstract=1337761

Theophysics (a website with information on Prof. Frank J. Tipler's Omega Point Theory) http://theophysics.host56.com http://theophysics.ifastnet.com

Offline Kilika

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Re: IBM's Watson A.I. Computer to Challenge Jeopardy! Champions
« Reply #39 on: February 17, 2011, 05:45:57 PM »
Your above statement is incorrect. The questions used were written for human contestants and randomly selected for the Watson match. Working in computer hardware maintenance doesn't give you any particular insight into the field of Artificial Intelligence, and it's clear from your statements in this thread that you are not knowledgeable about the subject. Open domain question and answering is a classic hard A.I. problem, one whose state of the art was terrible before Watson. It's one of the main features of sapience.

No, this shows your ignonrant about computers! While trained in hardware, I didn't mention I also had to have programming classes as well. I just never worked in programming because I suck at it do to less than adequite math skills. But that doesn't mean I don't have a solid grasp of how computers work you clown. And you surely haven't got a clue what AI actually is. What that glorified hunk of metal and silicon did wasn't AI at all, it was simple data search and display.

AI involves reason to some extent. Watson didn't have to do any reasoning at all, just a data search based on defined parameters. You do realize that every single action a computer does is based on a question, right? If the answer isn't in it's database that it has access to, it will never get the correct answer, unless the question is a math question.

I guarantee you that if you were to ask that thing who the first president of the United States was, it would NEVER get the answer correct unless it already had access to the answer somewhere. Computers cannot reason, they can only operate on probabilitites and averages based on known data.

There is no way, no how a computer can produce the correct answer without access to the correct data to draw from, period. That is a fact.

"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)