Lockerbie "Bomber" / CIA / Nat Rothschild / Iran-Contra Cover Up

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Offline Satyagraha

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Friday, August 14, 2009
Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2009/08/lockerbie-links-to-franklin-dutroux.html

The Lockerbie bomb has links to:
1. Mossad

2. Iran-Contra

3. The Dutroux and Franklin child abuse scandals

4. Major Charles McKee.

According to a BBC report (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/777974.stm):
A Pan Am investigation is believed to have concluded that the Lockerbie bomb was targeted specifically to kill a small band of US Defence Intelligence Agency operatives (including Major Charles McKee) who had uncovered a drugs ring run by a CIA unit in Lebanon.

The drugs-ring is said to have been set up by Israeli Mossad agents.
Reportedly, the drugs ring involved 'CIA-asset' Monzer al-Kassar, a Syrian with links to the brother of Syria's President Assad.

Reportedly Monzer al-Kassar was involved with Lt-Colonel Oliver North, of Iran-Contra fame.

According to the site ISGP (http://www.isgp.eu/dutroux_and_nebula/Beyond_Dutroux_part_two_Nebula.htm):

"The CIA and its allies allowed the Contras to ship huge amounts of cocaine into the United States and sell it to mafia families in New York, Los Angeles, Texas, Miami, and a number of other places.

"The proceeds of these sales allowed the Contras to buy (third-rate) arms and other supplies from the United States...

"The Israelis played a major role in the whole Iran-Contra affair.

"They were used as an intermediary to sell the arms to Iran.

"They also supported the United States in training the Contras, and apparently also in shipping the drugs and assassinating those who tried to expose these schemes..."

Certain people called Boas, Mathot, Vanden Boeynants and Beaurir reportedly had their names linked to the Dutroux child abuse scandal in Belgium, and to Iran-Contra.



"Incredibly, not only have the Belgians that were involved in Iran Contra been accused of child abuse (Boas, Mathot, Vanden Boeynants and Beaurir), but North and his employer, vice president and later president George Bush, were uncomfortably close to the Franklin child abuse affair in the United States.

"Both were mentioned by witnesses as having attended the parties of alleged child abuser, Satanist, Contra supporter, money launderer and drug dealer Lawrence E. 'Larry' King."

TIME magazine, 27 April 1992, tells us more about Major Charles McKee (Pan Am 103 Why Did They Die? - TIME)

According to Time Magazine, Charles McKee's mother suspects that it was a government action that indirectly led to her only son's death.

Beulah McKee is quoted as saying: "For three years, I've had a feeling that if Chuck hadn't been on that plane, it wouldn't have been bombed... I've never been satisfied at all by what the people in Washington told me."

In Beirut, McKee was a military attache assigned to the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA).

An investigation by Time disclosed that:

According to "an FBI field report from Germany", the bomb probably went onto the plane in Frankfurt, not in Malta.

The flight may have been targeted "because on board was an intelligence team led by Charles McKee."

Pan Am's lawyers hired Interfor, a New York firm run by Juval Aviv.


Al Kassar

The central figure in the Interfor investigation is Syrian arms and drug trafficker, Monzer al-Kassar.

Kassar "was part of the covert network run by U.S. Lieut. Colonel Oliver North."

A CIA unit code-named COREA, based in Wiesbaden, Germany "was reported to be trafficking in drugs and arms..."

According to Aviv, "agents in COREA's Wiesbaden headquarters allowed al- Kassar to continue running his smuggling routes to American cities..."

It is assumed that Al-Kassar "wouldn't want anything to disrupt his profitable CIA-assisted drug and arms business."

Reportedly, Al-Kassar figured out that Pan Am Flight 103 was a target and "notified the COREA unit."

In Frankfurt, a polygraphist administered lie-detector tests to Pan Am baggage handlers Kilin Caslan Tuzcu and Roland O'Neill.

Pan Am believes that they were the only ones who were in a position to place the bomb-laden bag aboard Flight 103.

The polygraphist testified thatTuzcu "was not truthful when he said he did not switch the suitcases."

The polygraphist also told the grand jury, "It is my opinion that Roland O'Neill wasn't truthful when he stated he did not see the suitcase being switched, and when he stated that he did not know what was in the switched suitcase."

Coleman

In 1987, Lester Coleman, an undercover Defence Intelligence Agency (DIA) operative, was transferred from Lebanon to Cyprus, where he began work for the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA).

In Nicosia, Coleman saw CIA (COREA) shipments of heroin "grow into a torrent".

The drugs couriers with their heroin arrived by ferry from the Lebanon.

The drugs couriers then received their travel orders from the DEA.

The couriers "were escorted to the Larnaca airport by the Cypriot national police and sent on their way to Frankfurt and other European transit points".

Coleman says the DEA paid him with unsigned Visa traveler's checks issued by B.C.C.I. in Luxembourg.

Coleman says that informant Ibrahim el-Jorr told him that that in Frankfurt airport suitcases containing heroin were put on flights to the U.S. by agents or other sources working in the baggage area.

Reportedly, Germany's BKA federal police was involved in the plot, as was the UK Customs and Excise service.

Coleman became a witness for Pan Am.

Informants had told Coleman that al-Kassar and the Syrian President's brother Rifaat Assad were taking over drug production in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, under protection of the Syrian army.

Coleman says he learned that the main European transfer point for their heroin shipments was the Frankfurt airport.

Charles McKee's team in Beirut got wind of Al-Kassar's CIA connection.

The team was outraged that the COREA unit in Wiesbaden was doing business with a Syrian who had terrorist connections.

A key member of the team was Matthew Gannon, 34, the CIA's deputy station chief in Beirut.

McKee and Gannon expressed their anger about al-Kassar to the CIA HQ in Langley in the USA, but they got no response.

Gannon's father-in-law Thomas Twetten was then chief of Middle East operations based in Langley. He was also Oliver North's CIA contact.

McKee, Gannon and three other members of the team decided to fly back to CIA HQ and expose the COREA unit's secret deal with al- Kassar.

They booked seats on Pan Am 103.

In his book, Lockerbie: The Tragedy of Flight 103, Scottish radio reporter David Johnston described how CIA agents helicoptered into Lockerbie shortly after the crash. They were looking for McKee's suitcase.

"Having found part of their quarry," Johnston wrote, "the CIA had no intention of following the exacting rules of evidence employed by the Scottish police. They took the suitcase and its contents into the chopper and flew with it to an unknown destination."

Several days later the empty suitcase was returned to the same spot, where Johnston reported that it was "found" by two British Transport Police officers, "who in their ignorance were quite happy to sign statements about the case's discovery."

M. Gene Wheaton, a retired U.S. military-intelligence officer, said: "A couple of my old black ops buddies in the Pentagon believe the Pan Am bombers were gunning for McKee's ... team."

Victor Marchetti, former executive assistant to the CIA's deputy director, and co-author of The CIA and the Cult of Intelligence, said of the plot against PanAm 103: "The Mossad knew about it and didn't give proper warning."



And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Dig

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Re: Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2009, 10:42:54 AM »
W T F ?
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline lavosslayer

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Re: Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2009, 11:08:52 AM »
Quote
Kassar "was part of the covert network run by U.S. Lieut. Colonel Oliver North."

I always knew that guy was shady...all of this information is quite amazing but not unexpected.
"Those who would trade freedom for security deserve neither" -- Benjamin Franklin

Offline Dig

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Re: Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2009, 03:28:40 PM »
Release of dying Pan Am Flight 103 bomber sparks coverup charges
http://rawstory.com/08/news/2009/08/14/release-of-dying-pan-am-flight-103-bomber-sparks-coverup-charges/
By Muriel Kane Published: August 14, 2009


British papers reported on Friday that the terminally ill Libyan agent convicted in the 1988 bombing of Pam Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland has reached a deal with the Scottish government to drop his appeal of the conviction in exchange for being allowed to return to Libya to die with his family.

The deal has aroused strong opposition from the United States government and from relatives of the American passengers and crew members killed in the bombing who would prefer to see Abdelbaset al-Megrahi die in jail.

In Britain, however, negative reaction appears to be centered on a fear that the deal is intended to to promote a coverup. Al-Megrahi, who was convicted in 2001 after an 84-day trial, has always insisted that he was framed. His lawyers claim to have evidence that the bombing was carried out not by Libya but by Palestinians backed by Syria.

According to the Guardian, “British relatives and the Scottish National party MSP Christine Grahame said ministers must hold a public and independent inquiry into the attack. Pamela Dix, a prominent British relative whose brother Peter was a passenger on the flight, said … ‘These questions are still out there: what was the motivation for the bombing, who ordered it, who carried it out and who was at the top of the chain of command.’”

Grahame also told the Times of London, “There are a number of vested interests who have been deeply opposed to this appeal because they know it would go a considerable way towards exposing the truth behind Lockerbie.”

“The victims’ relatives will be deprived of an appeal that they saw as their last chance, short of the independent public inquiry that they have long demanded, of finding out who really killed their sons, daughter, spouses and parents when Pan Am Flight 103 blew up over Lockerbie in December 1988,” the Times explained. “They and other experts have long doubted the evidence used to convict al-Megrahi and asked how a single man could have carried out such a deadly attack. They have questioned whether Syria or Iran was really responsible. Some even suspect that the CIA tampered with the evidence.”

And a former member of the British House of Commons suggested the deal “imeans that Lockerbie will be one of those mysteries like the assassination of President Kennedy that will remain unsolved for a long time — possibly forever. … It would come as a mighty relief to officials at the Crown Office in Edinburgh, to certain officials in the stratosphere of Whitehall, and above all to officials in Washington.”
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
« Reply #4 on: August 15, 2009, 05:58:42 PM »
Stepping back in time...

Scotland: Lockerbie Bomber Must Serve 27 Years
By Lizette Alvarez (NYT)
Published: Tuesday, November 25, 2003
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/11/25/world/world-briefing-europe-scotland-lockerbie-bomber-must-serve-27-years.html?fta=y

Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi, the Libyan intelligence officer sentenced to a life term in a Scottish prison for the 1988 downing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland, must serve at least 27 years before he can apply for parole, a Scottish court ruled. Mr. Megrahi, 51, was convicted and sentenced in 2001 for the murders of the 270 people killed. He was before a court again because of a law that requires that prisoners sentenced to life be told how many years they must serve before they can apply for parole. Lizette Alvarez (NYT)



November 15, 2008

Early Release for Lockerbie Prisoner Is Rejected
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/15/world/europe/15megrahi.html?fta=y
By ALAN COWELL
LONDON — Scottish judges on Friday rejected a request by the only man convicted in the 1988 Lockerbie bombing, Britain’s bloodiest terror attack, to be released early from jail to spend time with his family while he is treated for prostate cancer.

Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi, 56, a former Libyan intelligence officer, was jailed in 2001 after a trial under Scottish law at a special court in the Netherlands. He has always proclaimed his innocence in the explosion on board Pan Am Flight 103 on Dec. 21, 1988, that killed 270 people, including 179 Americans. He lost an initial appeal in 2002 and a second appeal is to be heard next year. He is serving a 27-year sentence.

His lawyers said there was a “compelling case” for him to be freed early on bail after being diagnosed with prostate cancer last September.

In the ruling Friday, however, three senior Scottish judges at the Court of Criminal Appeal in Edinburgh said “the critical question” in light “of the atrocity of which the applicant stands convicted” was whether the court should release him on compassionate grounds because of his health.

“On balance the court is not persuaded, on the information before it, that it should.”

“While the disease from which the appellant suffers is incurable and may cause his death, he is not at present suffering material pain or disability,” the panel said.

Some relatives of the Lockerbie victims took issue with the ruling. Jim Swire, a spokesman for British relatives, whose daughter Flora was killed in the bombing, said in a statement that it had never been “a goal of our group to seek revenge.”

“And the refusal of a return to his family for a dying man whose verdict is not even yet secure looks uncomfortably like either an aspect of revenge — or perhaps timidity,” the statement said.

Mr. Megrahi was not in court for Friday’s ruling. In hearings leading up to the judgment, lawyers acting for him said he would not live long and should be freed to live in Scotland with his family while physicians treated him.

But prosecutors said the Lockerbie bombing was such a serious offense that he should remain in jail.

The three judges said that there was “no immediate prospect of serious deterioration in his condition” and the prognosis for his illness was uncertain. The ruling was read out by Lord Arthur Hamilton, Scotland’s most senior judge.

“If he responds well to the course of palliative treatment which he has now started, his life expectancy may be in years,” the judges said. But they did not rule out reconsidering their decision if Mr. Megrahi’s condition worsened.

In a statement read by his lawyer, Mr. Megrahi said he was “very distressed” that the judges had denied him “the chance to spend my remaining time with my family.”

“I wish to reiterate that I had nothing whatsoever to do with the Lockerbie bombing and that the fight for justice will continue regardless of whether I am alive to witness my name being cleared,” he said.

The case has long been contentious.

A Scottish judicial review body ruled in July, 2007, after an investigation lasting nearly four years, that Mr. Megrahi might have been wrongfully convicted and was entitled to appeal the verdict.

The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission delivered an 800-page report — much of it secret — that identified several areas where “a miscarriage of justice may have occurred.”

The commission cast doubt on the testimony of a witness, who changed his story several times and had been shown a photograph of the Libyan official days before picking him out of a lineup. It also challenged evidence presented at the trial that the official had purchased the clothes found in the suitcase that held the bomb.

The section of the commission’s findings made public centered on evidence relating to purchases of clothing at a shop called Mary’s House in Sliema, Malta, on Dec. 7, 1988. The clothing was said to have been wrapped around the bomb. The bomb was said to have been put on board a plane in Malta and then transferred to a Pan Am flight from Frankfurt to London before it was loaded onto Flight 103 at Heathrow Airport.

The original trial found that the bomb was hidden in a Toshiba radio cassette player placed inside a brown, hard-shell Samsonite suitcase with clothing traced to Mary’s House. The trial court found that Mr. Megrahi bought the clothing at the shop on Dec. 7, 1988. But, the Scottish commission ruled, new evidence relating to the dates when Christmas lights were switched on in Malta suggested that the clothes had been bought before Dec. 6, 1988, before the time when there was evidence that Mr. Megrahi was on Malta.

Additionally, the commission questioned the reliability of evidence by the shop’s proprietor, Tony Gauci, who singled out Mr. Megrahi in a lineup. It said that additional evidence, not available to Mr. Megrahi’s defense in the original trial, indicated that four days before the lineup “at which Mr. Gauci picked out the applicant, he saw a photograph of the applicant in a magazine article linking him to the bombing.”




And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Satyagraha

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Re: Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2009, 06:08:34 PM »
Lockerbie bombing: Hillary Clinton urges Scotland not to release Megrahi
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/scotland/6033294/Lockerbie-bombing-Hillary-Clinton-urges-Scotland-not-to-release-Megrahi.html
Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, has urged Scotland's justice secretary not to release Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al Megrahi, the man found guilty of the Lockerbie Pan Am bombing.


Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al Megrahi has dropped his appeal against the conviction Photo: GETTY

In a phone call to Kenny MacAskill, Mrs Clinton said Megrahi, convicted of murdering 270 people in the 1988 bombing, should serve out his sentence in Scotland, her spokesman said.

"Our interest is justice, and our interest is the commitment that we made to the families of the victims," he said.
 
Mrs Clinton's phone call came as news emerged that Megrahi has applied to have his second appeal against his conviction dropped.

The condition of Megrahi, who has terminal prostate cancer, had taken a "significant turn for the worse" in recent weeks, his lawyers said.

He applied two days ago to the High Court in Edinburgh to abandon his appeal against conviction for the worst terrorist atrocity on British soil, they said.

It has been reported that Megrahi could be released as early as next week on compassionate grounds.

"As the appeal hearing has commenced, and the court seized of the matter, leave of the court is required before the appeal can be formally abandoned," a spokesman for the legal firm Taylor & Kelly said.

A court hearing to discuss Megrahi's application to drop his appeal will take place in Edinburgh on Tuesday.

It remains unclear whether his decision, announced by his lawyers on Friday, will affect any planned release.

The Libyan government applied in May for him to be transferred to Libya to serve the rest of his sentence.

Britain has a prisoner transfer treaty with that country but no transfer can be made if there are outstanding legal proceedings.

Dropping the appeal would remove this potential block.

Last month Megrahi put in a separate request to the Scottish Government to be released on compassionate grounds.

This can be granted even if an appeal is still under way.

His decision comes after relatuves expressed revulsion over reports Megrahi is to be freed on compassionate grounds.

Scottish ministers have apparently been persuaded that Megrahi, 57, has only weeks to live.

He is expected to be freed next week to return home to his family, and could be back in Libya in time for the start of Ramadan on Friday.

The decision has left American relatives "dumbfounded", while politicians warned that it could be a "catastrophic" move by Alex Salmond and his Scottish National Party administration.

US families who lost loved ones called the development "vile and unforgivable" and said the Libyan should "rot in jail".

Their reaction was in stark contrast to the view of British relatives, who are largely convinced of Megrahi's innocence.

Dr Jim Swire, the veteran Lockerbie campaigner who lost his daughter Flora, said he did not believe the Libyan was guilty, adding: "The sooner he is back home with his family the better. I think it would be inhumane and downright cruel to keep him in jail."

The intelligence agent was convicted in 2001 of the murder of 259 passengers and crew on Pan Am Flight 103, and 11 people on the ground in the market town of Lockerbie.

He has served only eight years of a minimum sentence of 27 years - less than two weeks for each of his victims.

The Scottish Executive said no final decision had been made, but Mr MacAskill is said to be "minded" to free him within days.

He paid an unprecedented and controversial visit to Megrahi in Greenock prison last week.

There is a legal convention that prisoners are only freed on compassionate grounds if they have less than three months to live. If the Libyan is released and lives for much longer, the case is certain to trigger an international row.

He has always protested his innocence and was the only person convicted of the atrocity after his co-accused was acquitted at a trial in a special Scottish court sitting in Holland in 2001.

The Libyan authorities have asked for his release on compassionate grounds, and have also submitted a separate request for his transfer to a Libyan jail.

Tony Blair, the then Prime Minister, signed a controversial prisoner transfer agreement after meeting Col Muammar Gaddafi in 2007.

Mr Blair had previously marked the thawing of relations with Libya by shaking hands with the Libyan leader after BP signed a new oil contract.

The country paid compensation for the Lockerbie bombing as part of the price for its international rehabilitation.

If Megrahi is freed because he is dying ill, his second appeal - granted after an independent body said he may be the victim of a miscarriage of justice - can continue after his death.

Tam Dalyell, the former Labour MP who was instrumental in persuading the Libyan authorities to hand over Megrahi, welcomed the news.

He is also convinced of Megrahi's innocence and has long argued that he was no more than a sanctions-buster for Libyan Arab Airlines. He maintains the bombing was instigated by Iran in revenge for the accidental shooting down of a Libyan airline by the warship USS Vincennes.

But Susan Cohen, whose only child Theodora, 20, was one of 35 Syracuse University students on Pan Am flight 103, said any suggestion of freedom on compassionate grounds was "vile".

Speaking from her home in New Jersey, she added: "It just shows that the power of oil money counts for more than justice. There have been so many attempts to let him off. It has to do with money and power and giving Gaddafi what he wants. My feelings, as a victim, apparently count for nothing."

Bob Minetti, an American relative who lost his son Rick, said he was very sceptical about Megrahi's illness.

"We understand Megrahi was just a tool in this, he wasn't really the person that decided what to do.

"We would really rather see Gaddafi in jail, but Megrahi was the one who was convicted and lost his appeal. So I'm really happy to see him in jail."

John Lamont, the Scottish Tory justice spokesman, said: "Alex Salmond must now prove publicly that Mr Megrahi is at death's door or he should not be released."

Robert Brown, for the Liberal Democrats, said the decision was "wrong in principle, wrong in practice and set the wrong precedent.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline gunDriller

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Re: Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2009, 09:47:48 AM »
According to a BBC report (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/777974.stm):
A Pan Am investigation is believed to have concluded that the Lockerbie bomb was targeted specifically to kill a small band of US Defence Intelligence Agency operatives (including Major Charles McKee) who had uncovered a drugs ring run by a CIA unit in Lebanon.

this + the "magic suitcase" = Mossad and/or CIA did it, with help from their cut-outs.

"good guy investigators", just doing their job for what they thought was the US gov't., discovered the drug dealing.

then went home to report their findings - and had to be stopped.  which necessitated the Magic Suitcase - a suitcase which was routed on different flights until it found its way onto the Lockerbie flight.

various props & people were "sheep-dipped" so that TPTB could cook up a story that "Libya did it".

yes, they would blow up an airline full of civilians to keep a $billion-dollar drug operation going.
http://theinfounderground.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=5367

Cheney managed the War Games.  Israel did the Demolitions.

http://iamthewitness.com/

Offline Dig

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Re: Lockerbie links to Franklin, Dutroux, Mossad, McKee
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2009, 11:21:49 AM »
this + the "magic suitcase" = Mossad and/or CIA did it, with help from their cut-outs.

"good guy investigators", just doing their job for what they thought was the US gov't., discovered the drug dealing.

then went home to report their findings - and had to be stopped.  which necessitated the Magic Suitcase - a suitcase which was routed on different flights until it found its way onto the Lockerbie flight.

various props & people were "sheep-dipped" so that TPTB could cook up a story that "Libya did it".

yes, they would blow up an airline full of civilians to keep a $billion-dollar drug operation going.
Watch the Gunderson/Chip Tatum interviews.  Throughout the late 1970's through today, the G7 banksters control the Mossad/CIA/MI6/German Intel, etc.  They all work together on these type of activities.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Terrorist Lockerbie Bomber released to silence connections with CIA
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2009, 10:40:05 AM »
The CIA and the Lockerbie Bomb
http://www.infowars.com/articles/ps/uk_lockerbie_bomber_and_the_cia.htm
aangirfan | April 23, 2007 

The Lockerbie bomber could be set free within two months, according to The Sunday Times, 22 April 2007.

It is possible that Iran will be made the new scapegoat for the Lockerbie Bomb.
But, what about CIA involvement?

Major Charles McKie worked for the US Defence Intelligence Agency.
While in Lebanon, McKee reportedly discovered a CIA team who were working with Manzur El-Khassar , a Syrian drug dealer.

Reportedly El-Khassar was friends with Lt. Col. Oliver North who reportedly was involved with trafficking in drugs and guns.

Reportedly Major Charles McKie was going to act as a whistleblower, but he was killed in the 1988 Lockerbie Bombing.

Mr. Tam Dalyell, MP in the House of Commons, London, 26 March 2002, referred to Mary Boylan and the Lockerbie Bomb. http://www.i-p-o.org/lockerbie_dalyell.htm
According to Dalyell, former Woman Police Constable Mary Boylan states: "Towards the latter part of 1999, I was asked to attend at Dumfries Police Station, to give a statement to the Procurator Fiscal regarding my duties at Lockerbie... I was informed that my notebook could not be found. Shortly after this I read in a Scottish broadsheet that Lothian and Borders Police notebooks had been destroyed...

"I drove to Lockerbie's Garden of Remembrance to pay my respects. I noticed a brass plaque there with the inscription 'Joseph Patrick Curry, Captain US Army Special Forces. Killed in the line of duty'...
According to Dalyell, in 1989, Police Constable Boylan was informed by a colleague that the suitcase belonging to Curry was that which contained the bomb that blew up Pan Am 103.

After the December 21, 1988 Lockerbie bombing, several polythene bags containing white powder were found, according to Edinburgh's Radio Forth reporter David Johnstone. Alternative theories of the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 ...

According to the BBC: BBC News WORLD Lockerbie: Conspiracy theories
"An internal investigation by Pan Am is believed to have found that the bomb planted on Flight 103 was put on the plane during a stop-over in Frankfurt... The Pan Am report is believed to have concluded that the bomb was not aimed at the killing of Americans in general, but was targeted specifically to kill a small band of DIA operatives that had uncovered a drugs ring run by a 'rogue' CIA unit in Lebanon... The drugs-ring and the connection to Hezbollah is said to have been set up by Israeli Mossad agents."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Re: Terrorist Lockerbie Bomber released to silence connections with CIA
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2009, 10:40:44 AM »
Monday, August 29, 2005
Police chief- Lockerbie evidence was faked
http://scotlandonsunday.scotsman.com/
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2005/08/police-chief-lockerbie-evidence-was.html

According to the newspaper 'Scotland on Sunday' , 28 August 2005, a Scottish Police chief has revealed that the Lockerbie evidence was faked.

The 1989 Lockerbie Bomb incident killed 270 people.

The former police chief has given lawyers a signed statement claiming that evidence in the Lockerbie bombing trial was fabricated.

The officer has testified that the CIA planted the fragment of circuit board crucial in convicting Al Megrahi.

The police chief's identity has not yet been revealed.

According to the Scotsman, "the claims pose a potentially devastating threat to the reputation of the entire Scottish legal system."

The officer is supporting claims by a former CIA agent that his bosses "wrote the script" to incriminate Libya.

An insider told Scotland on Sunday that the retired officer approached them after Megrahi's appeal - before a bench of five Scottish judges - was dismissed in 2002.

The insider said: "He said he believed he had crucial information. A meeting was set up and he gave a statement that supported the long-standing rumours that the key piece of evidence, a fragment of circuit board from a timing device that implicated Libya, had been planted by US agents.

"Asked why he had not come forward before, he admitted he'd been wary of breaking ranks, afraid of being vilified.

"He also said that at the time he became aware of the matter, no one really believed there would ever be a trial. When it did come about, he believed both accused would be acquitted. When Megrahi was convicted, he told himself he'd be cleared at appeal."

The source added: "When that also failed, he explained he felt he had to come forward.

"He has confirmed that parts of the case were fabricated and that evidence was planted. At first he requested anonymity, but has backed down and will be identified if and when the case returns to the appeal court."

The evidence that linked the bombing of Pan Am 103 to Megrahi was a tiny fragment of circuit board found in a wooded area many miles from Lockerbie.

The fragment was later identified by the FBI's Thomas Thurman as being part of a sophisticated timer device used to detonate explosives.

Thurman has been revealed as a fraud who had given false evidence in American murder trials. He had little in the way of scientific qualifications.

In 2003, a retired CIA officer gave a statement to Megrahi's lawyers in which he alleged evidence had been planted.

It has long been rumoured the fragment was planted to implicate Libya for political reasons.

Following the Lockerbie Bomb trial, legal observers, including senior United Nations officials, expressed doubts about the verdict.

Internal documents emerged from the offices of the US Defence Intelligence Agency. Dated 1994, they described the PFLP-GC, and not the Libyans, as the Lockerbie bombers.

A source close to Megrahi's defence said: "Britain and the US were telling the world it was Libya, but in their private communications they acknowledged that they knew it was the PFLP-GC.

"The case is starting to unravel largely because when they wrote the script, they never expected to have to act it out. Nobody expected agreement for a trial to be reached, but it was, and in preparing a manufactured case, mistakes were made."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #10 on: August 20, 2009, 10:43:00 AM »
Lockerbie - new forensic tests suggest evidence was planted by the CIA
http://www.mathaba.net/news/?x=529089
Posted: 2006/03/02
From: aangirfan   @mathaba | Re-Tweet | FaceBook

On 19 February 2006, The Mail on Sunday reported that new forensic tests have been carried out by the lawyers representing Al Megrahi, the Libyan jailed in connection with the Lockerbie bombing.

Defence experts simulated the Lockerbie explosion. The results showed that the device which detonated the bomb could not have survived the explosion.

According to The Mail on Sunday: "Sources close to Megrahi's lawyers said the new tests pointed to the evidence having been planted at the scene of the crash...

"The source added that Megrahi's legal team claimed they had obtained 'clear proof' that investigators had 'planted and manipulated' evidence...

"He said... if there is any justice in Scotland... certain Scottish police officers will be jailed for their part in the proceedings...

"Megrahi's lawyers already have a sworn statement from a retired Scottish police officer confirming that evidence had been planted to secure the Libyan's conviction.

"A similar claim was made by a former CIA agent...

"The ex-CIA man (claimed) that the fragment of circuit board had been planted under orders from a very high level in the organisation...

"The fragment was found by two policeman during a search of a wood near Newcastleton, 35 miles from Lockerbie.

"It was later identified by the CIA's Thomas Thurman as being part of a sophisticated timer device made by the Swiss firm of Mebo.

"Thurman was later unmasked as a fraud who had given false evidence in American murder trials..."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #11 on: August 20, 2009, 10:44:51 AM »
Lockerbie police face 'bombing plot' inquiry
http://mathaba.net
Posted: 2007/06/25
From: Source   @mathaba | Re-Tweet | FaceBook

The file claims that the police investigation of Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi was ''reverse-engineered'' with evidence provided to match the thesis that he was guilty


By Mark Macaskill
(Times Online)

Allegations that police plotted to mislead the original inquiry into the Lockerbie bombing, resulting in a wrongful conviction, have been passed to official investigators, it is understood.

The file being considered by the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission claims evidence gathered at the scene of the 1988 bombing of Pan Am flight 103, which killed 270 people, was lost or destroyed.

Misleading or false evidence, it is alleged, was then provided to incriminate Abdelbaset Ali Mohmed al-Megrahi, the Libyan agent convicted of the atrocity at a trial in the Netherlands in 2001.

According to the file, the police investigation of Megrahi was “reverse-engineered” with evidence provided to match the thesis that he was guilty.

The commission is preparing on Thursday to report the results of its three-year investigation into the case. Its 800-page report is expected to conclude Megrahi’s conviction is unsafe.

If, as expected, his case is referred back to the appeal court, his legal team plans to lodge an application for him to be freed while the court decides whether to quash his conviction or to order a retrial.

The development could bring embarrassment for the government, coming the day after Tony Blair’s departure from Downing Street. The surrender of suspects by Muammar Gadaffi, the leader of Libya, was a key element in Blair’s dealings with Tripoli.

This led in 1999 to the reestablishment of diplomatic relations with Libya after a 15-year hiatus.

Details published today from hundreds of leaked documents outline some background to the commission’s decision. Its report is expected to consider allegations that clothing said to have been wrapped around the bomb and presented to the court in tatters was intact when found.

The defence argues apparently damning pages in the case against Megrahi were inserted into existing files. They also claim key statements were withheld. These included at least two by Tony Gauci, a Maltese shopkeeper who sold a shirt to the bomber.

Statements by Gauci published in part in Scotland on Sunday, show him giving different versions of events from his later identification of Megrahi. In one, he “very positively” identifies to a detective the man in his shop as Mohammed Abu Talb, a terrorist with links to the Iranian-backed Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine – General Command (PFLP-GC).

In a separate statement, Gauci tells police Megrahi “didn’t buy any shirts for sure” from him.

The commission is also in possession of a press statement, prepared by Dumfries and Galloway police in 1990, which named members of the PFLP-GC as its chief suspects but which was never released.

The commission is also understood to have investigated allegations that a police officer showed Gauci a photograph of Megrahi in a magazine shortly before he was asked to identify the Libyan at his trial.

The shopkeeper’s eventual identification of Megrahi in court was regarded as pivotal in persuading the judges of his guilt.

“There’s no doubt Megrahi was convicted because of Gauci’s identification,” said a source. “If Gauci was shown a single photograph of Megrahi shortly before he went in to give his evidence, that would be explosive.”

The quality of evidence concerning a fragment of circuit board allegedly found at the crash site – which was instrumental in convicting Megrahi – has also been questioned.

Other evidence has been given to the commission by a former senior officer in the Lockerbie inquiry, known only as “the Golfer”. He is understood to claim evidence was “interfered with”.

Megrahi’s trial was the longest and most expensive in Scottish legal history. A second defendant was acquitted. An appeal in 2002 upheld the original verdict.

It lends further weight to claims that it was “politically unacceptable” to pursue the PFLP-GC when the Gulf war in 1991 made it necessary to maintain good relations with Iran and Syria.

Robert Black, emeritus professor of Scots law at Edinburgh University, who helped broker Megrahi’s trial in the Netherlands, said: “My concerns have always been about what actually happened and getting to the truth. [Megrahi] should not have been convicted on the evidence before the trial judges.”

Dr Jim Swire, whose daughter Flora died in the bombing, said: “If the Crown Office [public prosecutors] deliberately withheld relevant material it would be a very significant development.”

Tony Kelly, who is Megrahi’s solicitor, and Dumfries and Galloway police and the Crown Office all declined to comment.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #12 on: August 20, 2009, 10:45:41 AM »
Key Lockerbie Witness Admits Perjury (Affidavit)
http://mathaba.net
Posted: 2007/09/18
From: Source   @mathaba | Re-Tweet | FaceBook

   
   In 1998, Edwin Bollier obtained a copy of a blown-up photograph that Thurman had shown on ABC in 1991. Bollier could tell from certain characteristics that the fragment was part of a board of the timers made for East Germany, and definitely not one of the timers delivered by him to Libya.

 

by Prof. Ludwig De Braeckeleer
(Global Research)


They have eyes to see but do not see
and ears to hear but do not hear

Ezekiel 12:2

The Lockerbie Affair has taken yet another extraordinary twist. On Friday August 31st, I received from Edwin Bollier, head of the Zurich-based MeBo AG, a copy of a German original of an Affidavit.

The document is dated July 18th 2007 and signed by Ulrich Lumpert who worked as an electronic engineer at MeBo from 1978 to 1994. I have scrutinized the document carefully and concluded that I have no reason to doubt its authenticity or the truthfulness of its content.

Lumpert was a key witness (N° 550) at the Camp Zeist trial, where a three Judges panel convicted a Libyan citizen of murdering 270 persons who died in the bombing of Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie.

In his testimony, Lumpert stated that: "of the 3 pieces of hand-made prototypes MST-13 Timer PC-Boards, the third MST-13 PC-Board was broken and [he] had thrown it away."

In his Affidavit, certified by Officer Walter Wieland, Lumpert admits having committed perjury.

"I confirm today on July 18th 2007, that I stole the third hand-manufactured MST-13 Timer PC-Board consisting of 8 layers of fibre-glass from MEBO Ltd. and gave it without permission on June 22nd 1989 to a person officially investigating in the Lockerbie case," Lumpert wrote. (The identity of the official is known.)

"It did not escape me that the MST-13 fragment shown [at the Lockerbie trial] on the police photograph No PT/35(b) came from the non-operational MST-13 prototype PC-board that I had stolen," Lumpert added.

"I am sorry for the consequences of my silence at that time, for the innocent Libyan Mr. Abdelbaset Al Megrahi sentenced to life imprisonment, and for the country of Libya."

In just seven paragraphs, the Lumpert affidavit elucidates the longstanding mysteries surrounding the infamous MST-13 timer, which allegedly triggered the bomb that exploded Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie on December 21st 1988.

The discovery of the MST-13 timer fragment

In the months following the bombing of Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie, someone discovered a piece of a grey Slalom-brand shirt in a wooded area located about 25 miles away from the town. According to a forensics expert, the cloth contained a tiny fragment - 4 mm square - of a circuit board. The testimony of three expert witnesses allowed the prosecutors to link this circuit board, described as part of the bomb trigger, to Megrahi.

There have been different accounts concerning the discovery of the timer fragment. A police source close to the investigation reported that it had been discovered by lovers. Some have said that it was picked up by a man walking his dog. Others have claimed that it was found by a policeman "combing the ground on his hands and knees."

At the trial, the third explanation became official. "On 13 January 1989, DC Gilchrist and DC McColm were engaged together in line searches in an area near Newcastleton. A piece of charred material was found by them which was given the police number PI/995 and which subsequently became label 168."

The alteration of the label

The officer had initially labelled the bag 'cloth (charred)' but had later overwritten the word 'cloth' with 'debris'.

The bag contained pieces of a shirt collar and fragments of materials said to have been extracted from it, including the tiny piece of circuit board identified as coming from an MST-13 timer made by the Swiss firm MeBo.

"The original inscription on the label, which we are satisfied, was written by DC Gilchrist, was “Cloth (charred)”. The word ‘cloth’ has been overwritten by the word ‘debris’. There was no satisfactory explanation as to why this was done."

The judges said in their judgement that Gilchrist’s evidence had been "at worst evasive and at best confusing".

Yet the judges went on to admit the evidence. "We are, however, satisfied that this item was indeed found in the area described, and DC McColm who corroborated DC Gilchrist on the finding of the item was not cross-examined about the detail of the finding of this item."

It has long been rumoured that a senior former Scottish officer, who has worked at the highest level of the Lockerbie inquiry, has signed a statement in which he claims that evidence has been planted. UK media have confirmed the story. Thus, the Scottish officer has confirmed an allegation previously made by a former CIA agent. The identity of the officer remains secret and he is only known as "Golfer".

"Golfer" has told Megrahi's legal team that Gilchrist had told him that he had not been responsible for changing the label.

The new page 51

According to documents obtained by the Scotland on Sunday, the entry of the discovery is recorded at widely different times by UK and German investigators. Moreover, a new page 51 has been inserted in the record of evidence.

During the Lockerbie investigation, Dr Thomas Hayes and Allan Feraday were working at the DERA Forensic laboratory at Fort Halstead in Kent.

Dr Hayes was employed at the Royal Armament Research Development Establishment (RARDE). In 1995, RARDE was subsumed into the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency (DERA). In 2001, part of DERA became the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL).

Dr Hayes testified that he collected the tiny fragment of the circuit board on May 12th 1989. He testified that the fragment was green. (Keep in mind that the board stolen from Lumpert is brown.) His colleague, Alan Feraday, confirmed his story at the Zeist trial.

The record is inserted on a loose-leaf page with the five subsequent pages re-numbered by hand. Dr Hayes could not provide a reasonable explanation for this rather strange entry, and yet the Judges concluded that: "Pagination was of no materiality, because each item that was examined had the date of examination incorporated into the notes."

The argument of the Court is illogical as the index number Dr Hayes gave to the piece is higher than some entry he made three months later.

And there is more. In September 1989, Feraday sent a Polaroid photograph of the piece and wrote in the attached memorandum that it was "the best he could do in such short time." So, are we supposed to believe that it takes forensic experts several months to take a Polaroid picture?

Dr Hayes could not explain this. He merely suggested that the person to ask about it would be the author of the memorandum, Mr Feraday.

This however was not done. At the young age of 43, Hayes resigned just a few months after the discovery of the timer fragment.

Based on the forensic Dr Hayes had supplied, an entire family [The Maguire seven] was sent to jail in 1976. They were acquitted in appeal in 1992. Sir john May was appointed to review Dr. Hayes forensic evidence.

"The whole scientific basis on which the prosecution in [the trial of the alleged IRA Maguire Seven] was founded was in truth so vitiated that on this basis alone, the Court of Appeal should be invited to set aside the conviction," said Sir john May.

In the Megrahi’s case, Dr Hayes did not even perform the basic test which would have established the presence of explosive residue on the sample. During the trial, he maintained that the fragment was too small while it is factually established that his laboratory has performed such test on smaller samples.

Had he performed such test, no residue would have been found. As noted by Lumpert, the fragment shown at the Zeist trial belongs to a timer that was never connected to a relay. In other words, that timer never triggered a bomb.

Dr Alan Feraday’s reputation is hardly better. In three separated cases,where men were convicted on the basis of his forensic evidence, the initial ruling was overturned in appeal.

After one of these cases in 2005, a Lord of Justice said that Feraday should not be allowed to present himself as an expert in the field of electronics.

According to forensic scientist, Dr Michael Scott, who was interviewed in the documentary The Maltese Double Cross – Lockerbie, Feraday has no formal qualifications as a scientist.

The identification of the MeBo timer

Thomas Thurman worked for the FBI forensics laboratory in the late 80’s and most of the 90’s. Thurman has been publicly credited for identifying the fragment as part of a MST_13 timer produced by the Swiss company Mebo.

"When that identification was made, of the timer, I knew that we had it," Thurman told ABC in 1991. "Absolute, positively euphoria. I was on cloud nine."

Again, his record is far from pristine. The US attorney General has accused him of having altered lab reports in a way that rendered subsequent prosecutions all but impossible. He has been transferred out the FBI forensic laboratory.

"He's very aggressive, but I think he made some mistakes that needed to be brought to the attention of FBI management," says Frederic Whitehurst, a former FBI chemist who filed the complaints that led to the Inspector General's report.

"We're not necessarily going to get the truth out of what we're doing here," Whitehurst concluded.

The story shed some light on his formation. The report says "Williams and Thurman merit special censure for their work. It recommends that Thurman, who has a degree in political science, be reassigned outside the lab and that only scientists work in its explosives section."

And the legal experts were just as fake as their scientific counterparts. In late 1998, Glasgow University set up the Lockerbie Trial Briefing Unit [LTBU] to provide impartial advice to the world media on the legal aspects of the complex and unique trial.

Andrew Fulton, a British diplomat, was appointed as a visiting law professor to head the Unit. Fulton has no legal experience whatsoever. Prior to his appointment as head of LTBU, Fulton was MI6 station chief in Washington DC.

The modification of the MST-13 timer fragment

Forensic analysis of the circuit board fragment allowed the investigators to identify its origin. The timer, known as MST-13, is fabricated by a Swiss Company named MeBo, which stands for Meister and Bollier.

The company has indeed sold about 20 MST-13 timers to Libyan military (machine-made 9 ply green boards), as well as a few units (hand-made 8 ply brown boards) to a Research Institute in Bernau, known to act as a front to the Stasi, the former East German secret police.

The two batches are very different but, as early as 1991, Bollier told the Scottish investigators that he could not identify the timer from a photograph alone. Yet, the Libyans were indicted in November 1991, without ever allowing Bollier to see the actual fragment, on the ground that the integrity of the evidence had to be protected.

But in 1998, Bollier obtained a copy of a blown-up photograph that Thurman had shown on ABC in 1991. Bollier could tell from certain characteristics that the fragment was part of a board of the timers made for East Germany, and definitely not one of the timers delivered by him to Libya.

In September 1999, Bollier was finally allowed to see the fragment. Unlike the one shown by Thurman on ABC, this one was machine-made, as the one sold to Libya. But, from the absence of traces of solder, it was obvious that the timer had never been used to trigger a bomb.

"As far as I'm concerned, and I told this to [Scottish Prosecutor Miriam Watson], this is a manufactured fragment," Bollier says. "A fabricated fragment, never from a complete, functional timer"

The next day, Bollier was shown the fragment once more. You may have already guessed that it now had the soldering traces. "It was different. I'm not crazy. It was different!" says Bollier.

Finally, at the trial, Bollier was presented a fragment of a circuit board completely burnt down. Thus, it was no longer possible to identify to which country that timer had been delivered. As he requested to explain the significance of the issue, Lord Shuterland told him that his request was denied.

How did the Judges account for all the mysterious changes in the appearance of the fragment? They simply dismissed Bollier as an unreliable witness.

"We have assessed carefully the evidence of these three witnesses about the activities of MEBO, and in particular their evidence relating to the MST-13 timers which the company made. All three, and notably Mr Bollier, were shown to be unreliable witnesses. Earlier statements which they made to the police and judicial authorities were at times in conflict with each other, and with the evidence they gave in court. On some occasions, particularly in the case of Mr Bollier, their evidence was self contradictory." (§ 45)

A scenario implausible on its face

"The evidence which we have considered up to this stage satisfies us beyond reasonable doubt that the cause of the disaster was the explosion of an improvised explosive device, […] and that the initiation of the explosion was triggered by the use of an MST-13 timer," wrote the three Judges. (§ 15)

Lockerbie experts, such former CIA Robert Baer, have suspected that the MST-13 timer could have been given by the Stasi to the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine – General Command [PFLP-GL], a terrorist group based in Syria, funded by Iran, and led by Ahmed Jibril.

The allegation deserves attention as it is well known that the two organizations had strong ties. Moreover, the archives of the Stasi reveal that agency had infiltrated the Swedish government and it is well documented that Jibril’s close collaborators were operating from Sweden. Yet, I never believed for a moment that the Lockerbie bomb had been triggered by a timer.

No terrorist would ever attempt to bomb an airliner with a timer triggered bomb, and definitely not during the winter season, let alone Christmas time, where the time tables are absolutely useless as delays are the norm rather than the exception.

Don’t take my word for it. Terrorists such Ahmed Jibril and counter-terrorists such Noel Koch have stated that much.

"Explosives linked to an air pressure gauge, which would have detonated when the plane reached a certain altitude or to a timer would have been ineffective," Jibril said.

"I know all about the science of explosives. I am an engineer of explosives. I will argue this with any expert that the bomb went on board in London. I do not think the Libyans had anything to do with this."

Noel Koch headed the US Defence anti-terrorism Department from 1981 to 1986. Koch ridiculed the idea that terrorist would gamble on the likelihood that an unaccompanied luggage would be successfully transferred twice, first from Malta to Frankfurt, and then from Frankfurt to London.

"I can tell you this much that I know about terrorism: it's simple," Koch says. "You don't complicate life. Life's complicated enough as it is. If you've got a target you want to get as close as you can to it and you don't go through a series of permutations that provide opportunities for failure and that provide opportunities for discovery. It doesn't work that way."

The Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission

On November 13th 1991, two Libyans were indicted for the murder of 270 people who died in the Lockerbie bombing. The indictment was the outcome of a three year US-UK joint investigation.

Although Libya never acknowledged a responsibility in the matter, a decade long UN sanctions forced Colonel Gaddafi to handover the two men accused of the worst act of terrorism in the UK. On April 5th 1999, they were transferred to camp Zeist in the Netherlands where they were judged under Scottish Law.

On January 31st 2001, a panel of three Scottish Judges acquitted one of them. They convicted the other for murder and sentenced him to life. Megrahi is serving his sentence in a prison near Glasgow.

Megrahi’s appeal was rejected on March 14th 2002. The European Court Of Human Rights declared his application inadmissible in July 2003.

In September 2003, he applied to the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission [SCCRC] for a legal review of his conviction. His request was based on the legal test contained in section 106 (3) (b) of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995.

The provision states that an appeal may be made against "any alleged miscarriage of justice, which may include such a miscarriage based on … the jury's having returned a verdict which no reasonable jury, properly directed, could have returned."

On June 28th 2007, the SCCRC has decided to grant Megrahi a second appeal and to refer his case to the High Court. An impressive 800 pages long document, stating the reasons for the decision, has been sent to the High Court, the applicant, his solicitor, and Crown Office. Although the document is not available to the public, the Commission has decided "to provide a fuller news release than normal."

Is it too much to ask why the "fuller news release than normal" lists only four of the six grounds that justify the Commission conclusion that a miscarriage of justice might have occur?

As recently pointed out by Dr. Hans Koechler, who was an international observer appointed by the United Nations at the Lockerbie trial, we may also wonder "why a supposedly independent judicial review body [the SCCRC] would try to exonerate “preventively” officials in a case which is being returned to the High Court for a second appeal because of suspicions of a miscarriage of justice."

Indeed, the SCCRC’s statement: “The Commission undertook extensive enquiries in this area but found nothing to support that allegation or to undermine the trial court’s conclusions in respect of the fragment [of the MST-13 MeBo timer]” is rather difficult to justify.

Towards a criminal investigation ?

Dr Jim Swire, who lost his daughter in the tragedy, describes the ruling of Megrahi as the most disgraceful miscarriages of justice in history, blaming both the Scottish legal system and US intelligence.

"The Americans played their role in the investigation and influenced the prosecution," Swire told the Scotsman Newspaper.

Top level UK diplomats tend to agree with him, such Oliver Miles, a former British ambassador to Libya.

"No court is likely get to the truth, now that various intelligence agencies have had the opportunity to corrupt the evidence," Miles told the BBC.

The spectacular decision of the SCCRC is certain to give a second life to the dozen of alternative theories of the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103. Nearly two decades later, the case is back to square one.

Back to square one

Let us give Lord Sutherland, Lord Coulsfield and Lord Maclean some credit. After hearing 230 witnesses and studying 621 exhibits during 84 days of evidence, spread over eight months, the three judges of the Lockerbie trial almost got correctly the date of the worst act of terror in the UK.

In the first line of the first paragraph of the most expensive verdict in history (₤80m)

http://www.scotcourts.gov.uk/library/lockerbie/index.asp, they wrote: "At 1903 hours on 22 December 1988 Pan Am flight 103 fell out of the sky." As a matter of fact, Pan Am Flight 103 exploded on December 21st 1988.

Michael Scharf is an international law expert at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio. Scharf joined the State Department’s Office of the Legal Adviser for Law Enforcement and Intelligence in April 1989. He was also responsible for drawing up the UN Security Council resolutions that imposed sanctions on Libya in 1992.

"It was a trial where everybody agreed ahead of time that they were just going to focus on these two guys, and they were the fall guys," Sharf wrote.

"The CIA and the FBI kept the State Department in the dark. It worked for them for us to be fully committed to the theory that Libya was responsible. I helped the counter-terrorism bureau draft documents that described why we thought Libya was responsible, but these were not based on seeing a lot of evidence, but rather on representations from the CIA and FBI and the Department of Justice about what the case would prove and did prove."

"It was largely based on this inside guy [Libyan defector Abdul Majid Giaka]. It wasn’t until the trial that I learned this guy was a nut-job and that the CIA had absolutely no confidence in him and that they knew he was a liar."

The magic luggage

According to the Lockerbie verdict, the bomb was hidden in a Toshiba Radio, wrapped in clothes, located in a luggage that was mysteriously boarded in Malta.

The Court has examined this allegation in depth and the matter occupies 24 paragraphs of the final verdict (§ 16 to § 34). After reviewing all the evidence and testimonies, the three judges came to the following conclusions.

"Luqa airport had a relatively elaborate security system. All items of baggage checked in were entered into the airport computer as well as being noted on the passenger’s ticket. After the baggage had passed the sniffer check, it was placed on a trolley in the baggage area to wait until the flight was ready for loading.

"When the flight was ready, the baggage was taken out and loaded, and the head loader was required to count the items placed on board. The ramp dispatcher, the airport official on the tarmac responsible for the departure of the flight, was in touch by radiotelephone with the load control office. The load control had access to the computer and after the flight was closed would notify the ramp dispatcher of the number of items checked in. The ramp dispatcher would also be told by the head loader how many items had been loaded and if there was a discrepancy would take steps to resolve it.

"In addition to the baggage reconciliation procedure, there was a triple count of the number of passengers boarding a departing flight, that is there was a count of the boarding cards, a count by immigration officers of the number of immigration cards handed in, and a head count by the crew.

"The records relating to KM180 on 21 December 1988 show no discrepancy in respect of baggage. The flight log (production 930) shows that fifty-five items of baggage were loaded, corresponding to fifty-five on the load plan.

"On the face of them, these arrangements seem to make it extremely difficult for an unaccompanied and unidentified bag to be shipped on a flight out of Luqa.

"If therefore the unaccompanied bag was launched from Luqa, the method by which that was done is not established, and the Crown accepted that they could not point to any specific route by which the primary suitcase could have been loaded.

"The absence of any explanation of the method by which the primary suitcase might have been placed on board KM180 is a major difficulty for the Crown case.

A internal 1989 FBI memo indicates that there is no indication that an unaccompanied luggage was transferred from Air Malta to Pan Am. Law authorities from Malta and Germany came to the same conclusion.

And yet, without any explanation, the judges wrote in the conclusion of the verdict that: "the absence of an explanation as to how the suitcase was taken into the system at Luqa is a major difficulty for the Crown case but after taking full account of that difficulty, we remain of the view that the primary suitcase began its journey at Luqa." (§ 82)

The Maltese storekeeper

According to the verdict, Megrahi bought the clothes, in which the bomb was wrapped, in Sliema, a small town of Malta, including the "cloth" in which the fragment was "discovered" by Dr Hayes. At first sight, the "cloth" appears to be part of a slalom shirt, indeed sold in a little shop, Mary’s House, located on the island of the Mediterranean Sea.

However, upon closer examination, the "cloth" raises a series of issues. Firstly, the colour of the label is incorrect. A blue slalom shirt label should have blue writing, not brown.

Secondly, the breast pocket size corresponds to a child shirt, not a 16 ½ sized allegedly bought by Megrahi, for the pocket would have been 2 cm wider.

Thirdly, German records show the shirt with most of the breast pocket intact while the evidence shown at Zeist has a deep triangular tear extending inside the pocket.

Fourthly, last but certainly not least, the storekeeper initially told the investigators he never sold such shirts to whoever visited him a few weeks before the Lockerbie tragedy.

Tony Gauci's (the storekeeper) testimony was pivotal in the case against Megrahi. Gauci gave a series of 19 statements to the police which are fully inconsistent. Yet, the Judges found him trustworthy. Allow me to disagree.

On January 30th 1990, Gauci stated: "That time when the man came, I am sure I did not sell him a shirt." Then, on September 10th 1990, he told the investigators that: "I now remember that the man who bought the clothing also bought a 'Slalom' shirt." And to make things worse, two of his testimonies have disappeared.

When were the clothes bought?

According to the verdict, Megrahi bought the clothes on December 7th 1989. Gauci remembered that his brother had gone home earlier to watch an evening football game (Rome vs. Dresden), that the man came just before closing time (7pm), that it was raining (the man bought an umbrella) and that the Christmas lights were on.

The game allows for only two dates: November 23 or December 7. The issue is critical for there is no indication that Megrahi was in Malta on November 23rd but is known to have been on the island on December 7th.

Malta airport chief meteorologist testified that it was raining on November 23rd but not on December 7th. Yet the judges determined the date as December 7th. This rather absurd conclusion from the judges raises two other issues.

The game Rome-Dresden on December 7th was played at 1:00 pm, not in the evening. What is more, Gauci had previously testified that the Christmas lights were not up, meaning that the date had to be November 7th.

On September 19th 1989, Gauci stated that "the [Christmas] decorations were not up when the man bought the clothing." Then, at the Lockerbie trial, Gauci told the Judges that the decoration lights were on. "Yes, they were … up."

Who was the mysterious buyer?

"We are nevertheless satisfied that his identification, so far as it went, of the first accused as the purchaser was reliable and should be treated as a highly important element in this case," wrote the judges.

In fact, Gauci never identified Megrahi. He merely stated that Megrahi resembles the man to whom he had sold the clothes, but only if he were much older and two inches taller. Gauci had however identified another man: Abu Talb.

And in case you wonder, Talb was a member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine – General Command [PFLP-GL], the terrorist group led by Ahmed Jibril.

In late October 1988, the senior bomb maker of the PFLP-GC, Marwan Khreesat, was arrested in Frankfurt in company of Hafez Dalkamoni, the leader of the organization German cell.

Dalkamoni had met Talb in Cyprus and Malta the weeks before. In their car, police found a bomb hidden in a Toshiba radio. Khreesat told the police that he had manufactured five similar IED’s.

Each device Khreesat had built was triggered by a gauge pressure that activates a timer - range from 0 to 45 minutes - when the plane reaches a cruising altitude of 11,000 meters. The timers of all recovered bombs were set on 30 minutes. It takes about 7 minutes for a 747 to reach cruising altitude. Pan Am 103 exploded 38 minutes after take-off from London.

German police eventually recovered four of the IED’s Khreesat had built. No one seems to know what ever occurred to the fifth one which was never recovered. When police raided Talb apartment in Sweden, they found his appointment notebook. Talb had circled one date: December 21st.

Contrary to Jibril’s statement, and surely he must know better, a bomb triggered by a gauge pressure set at 11,000 meters would not have detonated during the Frankfurt to London flight as the airliner does not reach cruising altitude on such short flight.

Then again, such device would not have detonated at all if it had been located in the luggage area as the hold is at the pressure of the passengers’ zone and never drops below the pressure equivalent to 2,400 meters.

This is why, when the judges were presented with the undisputable and undisputed evidence that a proper simulation of the explosion - taking proper account of the Mach stem effect – would locate the explosion outside the luggage hold, they simply decided to dismiss the existence of a scientifically well established fact.

"We do not consider it necessary to go into any detail about Mach stem formation," the judges wrote.

Had the judges deemed "necessary to go into the details regarding Mach stem formation", they would have been forced to acknowledge that the position of the bomb was fully incompatible with the indictment. That a magic unaccompanied luggage went mysteriously three times through airport security was "plausible". That it jumped on its own out of the luggage hold at London airport was a little too much to believe.

In truth, a proper simulation of the explosion locates the bomb just a few inches away from the skin of the plane, a position fully consistent with the very specific damages left by the explosion.

The truth was inconvenient. The three judges had to dismiss it in order to justify a verdict that had been decided more than a decade before the first day of the Zeist trial.

Shame on those who committed this horrific act of terror. Shame on those who have ordered the cover-up. Shame on those who provided false testimony, and those who suppressed and fabricated the evidence needed to frame Libya. And shame on the media for their accomplice silence.
And to those who seek the truth, I advise them to follow the drug trail on the road to Damascus.
#
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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #13 on: August 20, 2009, 10:51:07 AM »
this is nasty from day one: when the FBI were there at the same time as the local police.

wasn't there a decent documentary which went into the Drug Cartel aspect of this case - nobody seemed to listen.

also, I didn't know there was a 2005 former police chief on record about PLANTED EVIDENCE.

throw away a patsy, lose the key (or have him cancer'd in jail).

:(

Offline Dig

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this is nasty from day one: when the FBI were there at the same time as the local police.

wasn't there a decent documentary which went into the Drug Cartel aspect of this case - nobody seemed to listen.

also, I didn't know there was a 2005 former police chief on record about PLANTED EVIDENCE.

throw away a patsy, lose the key (or have him cancer'd in jail).

:(

What a surprise, he was not released because he was sick.

He was released to get him to shut the f**k up!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Lockerbie bomber to drop appeal
http://www.watoday.com.au/world/lockerbie-bomber-to-drop-appeal-20090818-eok5.html
August 18, 2009


The Lockerbie bomber was set to formally apply to drop his appeal on Tuesday, a move which could open the way for his transfer back to Libya 21 years after the atrocity.

Abdelbaset Ali Mohmet al-Megrahi is the only person to be convicted of murdering 270 people when Pan Am Flight 103 was blown out of the skies over the Scottish town of Lockerbie in 1988. He was jailed for at least 27 years.

A court in Edinburgh is expected to decide whether to accept an application from his lawyers to abandon his claim against conviction.

The procedure - in theory a formality, after the lawyers announced Friday their intention to drop the appeal - comes as Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill weighs whether to allow Megrahi to return to die in his homeland.

The minister is mulling two options: either to let the former Libyan agent transfer from a Scottish jail to a Libyan prison - a process which can only go ahead once his appeal is dropped - or to release him on compassionate grounds.

Media reports have suggested Megrahi, 57, who is dying of prostate cancer, would be released this week on compassionate grounds in time for the start of the Islamic holy month of Ramadan.

The Times newspaper, citing unnamed senior sources, however, said Monday that the Scottish government appeared to have buckled under pressure from Washington and abandoned plans to release him this week.

The issue sparked a political row as Scottish opposition parties slammed the government's handling of the matter and called for parliament to be recalled to debate the case.

But officials told the Guardian newspaper on Tuesday the minister would make his decision "sooner rather than later", and was making it his "clear priority over the next few days."

MacAskill is expected to meet with Cabinet colleagues in the northern city of Aberdeen on Tuesday.

The United States has made it clear it wants Megrahi to stay behind bars until he dies; reports have indicated he may only have a few months to live.

At the same time Libya - whose ties with the West have thawed since it renounced weapons of mass destruction in 2003 and agreed to compensate victims' relatives - has warned of serious economic fallout if he is not released.

Libya has the largest proven oil reserves of any African country, much of it still untapped, and British firms including BP and Shell have signed major exploration deals there in recent years, which could in theory be under threat.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown's government has insisted that the final decision rests with Scotland.

The move has dismayed some who believe Megrahi was wrongly convicted over Britain's worst ever terror attack and that there are more facts which need to emerge in the case.

But relatives of those who died are split on whether Megrahi should be set free.

Whatever the outcome, Lockerbie residents told AFP the atrocity continued to throw a shadow over their town.

"It affects you, even though it was 21 years ago. Ever since it happened there's been this big dark cloud over Lockerbie," said Stefan McCormick.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Mike Philbin

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #15 on: August 20, 2009, 11:00:25 AM »
I wonder if he'll survive long enough to tell his side of the story. We must listen out for ANY CORROBORATIVE EVIDENCE/NAMES and ignore any pro-Ghadafi propaganda I'm sure they'll mix into el-Magrahi's story.

:)

Offline donnay

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #16 on: August 20, 2009, 11:00:40 AM »
Scotland frees terminally ill Lockerbie bomber
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090820/ap_on_re_eu/eu_britain_lockerbie

  By BEN McCONVILLE, Associated Press Writer Ben Mcconville, Associated Press Writer   – 2 mins ago

EDINBURGH, Scotland – Scotland freed the terminally ill Lockerbie bomber on compassionate grounds Thursday, letting him go home to Libya to die and rejecting American pleas to show no mercy to the man responsible for the 1988 attack that killed 270 people.

As the White House declared it "deeply regrets" the Scottish decision and U.S. family members of Lockerbie victims expressed outrage, Abdel Baset al-Megrahi left Greenock Prison and flew out of Glasgow Airport on a Libyan Airbus plane.

"I think it's appalling, disgusting and so sickening I can hardly find words to describe it," said Susan Cohen of Cape May Court House, New Jersey, whose 20-year-old daughter, Theodora, died in the attack. "This isn't about compassionate release. This is part of give-Gadhafi-what-he-wants-so-we-can-have-the-oil."

Some men in Scotland made obscene gestures as al-Megrahi's prison van drove by toward the airport.

Al-Megrahi, who had served only eight years of his life sentence, was recently given only months to live after being diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer.

Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill said although al-Megrahi had not shown compassion to his victims — many of whom were American college students flying home to New York for Christmas — MacAskill was motivated by Scottish values to show mercy.

"Some hurts can never heal, some scars can never fade," MacAskill said. "Those who have been bereaved cannot be expected to forget, let alone forgive ... However, Mr. al-Megrahi now faces a sentence imposed by a higher power."

Al-Megrahi, 57, was convicted in 2001 of taking part in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 on Dec. 21, 1988. He was sentenced to life in prison. The airliner exploded over Scotland, and all 259 people aboard and 11 on the ground died when it crashed into the town of Lockerbie.

The former Libyan intelligence officer was sentenced to serve a minimum of 27 years in a Scottish prison for Britain's deadliest terrorist attack. But a 2007 review of his case found grounds for an appeal of his conviction, and many in Britain believe he is innocent.

White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said Thursday the United States disagreed with the decision to free al-Megrahi.

"We continue to believe that Megrahi should serve out his sentence in Scotland," Gibbs said. "On this day, we extend our deepest sympathies to the families who live every day with the loss of their loved ones."

"I don't understand how the Scots can show compassion. It's an utter insult and utterly disgusting," said Kara Weipz, of Mount Laurel, New Jersey, whose 20-year-old brother Richard Monetti was on board Pan Am Flight 103. "It's horrible. I don't show compassion for someone who showed no remorse."

MacAskill said he stood by al-Megrahi's conviction and the sentence for "the worst terrorist atrocity ever committed on U.K. soil."

He said he ruled out sending the bomber back to Libya under a prisoner-transfer agreement, saying the U.S. victims had been given assurances that al-Megrahi would serve out his sentence in Scotland.

But he said that as a prisoner given less than three months to live by doctors, al-Megrahi was eligible for compassionate release.

"I am conscious that there are deeply held feelings and many will disagree whatever my decision," he said. "However, a decision has to be made."

Al-Megrahi's return will be a landmark event in Libya and a cause for celebration. His countrymen see him as an innocent victim scapegoated by the West in a campaign to turn their country into an international pariah. Many will also view his release as a moral victory for their country.

It was not immediately clear exactly how al-Megrahi will be received at home. He could be taken to meet Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi or appear at an annual rally planned for Thursday night. The rally is held every year on Aug. 20 for Libyans to hear a progress report from Gadhafi's son, Saif al-Islam Gadhafi, on projects he is working on.

However, al-Megrahi may also be taken directly to a hospital if he needs immediate medical care.

Gadhafi engineered a rapprochement with his former critics following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. He renounced terrorism, dismantled Libya's secret nuclear program, accepted his government's responsibility for the Lockerbie bombing and paid compensation to the victims' families.

Western energy companies — including Britain's BP PLC — have moved into Libya in an effort to tap the country's vast oil and gas wealth.

Gadhafi lobbied hard for the return of al-Megrahi, an issue which took on an added sense of urgency when al-Megrahi was diagnosed with cancer last year.

Freeing al-Megrahi divided the Lockerbie victims' families, with many in Britain in favor of it and many in the U.S. adamantly opposed.

Al-Megrahi had been a known figure in the Scottish community near his prison, receiving regular treatment at the hospital and was visited often by his wife and children, who lived in Scotland for several years.

Briton Jim Swire, whose daughter Flora died on Flight 103, welcomed the Libyan's release, saying many questions remained about what led to the bomb that exploded in the cargo hold.

"I think he should be able to go straight home to his family and spend his last days there," Swire told the BBC. "I don't believe for a moment this man was involved in the way he was found to be involved."

Among the Lockerbie victims was John Mulroy, the AP's director of international communication, who died along with five members of his family.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If I am not mistaken a microbiologists was on this flight as well.
"Logic is an enemy and truth is a menace." ~ Rod Serling
"Cops today are nothing but an armed tax collector" ~ Frank Serpico
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Offline UK Lyn

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #17 on: August 20, 2009, 12:10:14 PM »
Glad my USA buddies here have minds of their own...

A USA talking head on our tv says we Scots should all be ashamed of ourselves.

I know how you feel losing family as much as we Scots did too.

I feel pretty bad right now.  Some bad men in suits should hang for Lockerbie, none have the name Megrahi.

Offline Dig

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #18 on: August 20, 2009, 12:12:47 PM »
Glad my USA buddies here have minds of their own...

A USA talking head on our tv says we Scots should all be ashamed of ourselves.

I know how you feel losing family as much as we Scots did too.

I feel pretty bad right now.  Some bad men in suits should hang for Lockerbie, none have the name Megrahi.

yeah i was watching all this shit on TV and the first thing I was thinking was "what are they hiding, this makes no sense".

then i saw the original post by pilikia and just did 5 minutes of searching...bingo!
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline UK Lyn

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #19 on: August 20, 2009, 12:14:25 PM »
Why now?

Is Obama gonna use this to open some door in the Middle East and become the great unifier and rebuilder of the temple and all that?


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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #20 on: August 20, 2009, 12:17:35 PM »
Why now?

Is Obama gonna use this to open some door in the Middle East and become the great unifier and rebuilder of the temple and all that?



well the media has to flood the airwaves with BS stories about scotland working an oil deal for the release.

they do not want americans to know that he dropped his appeal (which would have exposed the CIA) 2 days before his release (few posts up).

This is the same as when we released Louis Posada that blew up a plane of Cubans.  CIA said all evidence is sealed for nat sec reasons. Judge had to relaease him for lack of evidence.

Obama has little to do with this, this is all about the Bush/Rocefeller/Harriman drug/arms/child-slavery ring.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Berminator

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #21 on: August 20, 2009, 12:25:20 PM »
Glad my USA buddies here have minds of their own...

A USA talking head on our tv says we Scots should all be ashamed of ourselves.

I know how you feel losing family as much as we Scots did too.

I feel pretty bad right now.  Some bad men in suits should hang for Lockerbie, none have the name Megrahi.
are you Scots ukLyn?

Offline UK Lyn

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #22 on: August 20, 2009, 12:26:37 PM »
well the media has to flood the airwaves with BS stories about scotland working an oil deal for the release.

they do not want americans to know that he dropped his appeal (which would have exposed the CIA) 2 days before his release (few posts up).

This is the same as when we released Louis Posada that blew up a plane of Cubans.  CIA said all evidence is sealed for nat sec reasons. Judge had to relaease him for lack of evidence.

Obama has little to do with this, this is all about the Bush/Rocefeller/Harriman drug/arms/child-slavery ring.

Exactly.  Never seen the MSM on tv so desperate to be 'distracted' by other stories. Lots of focus on a little 18 year old athlete for having unusual genes and needing a 'sex test'   - my oh my, BIG news this little 18 year-old, when one of the biggest mass-murder stories of the last 20 years is being swept away under the carpet.

Offline UK Lyn

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #23 on: August 20, 2009, 12:27:24 PM »

Berminator

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #24 on: August 20, 2009, 12:28:38 PM »
Aye   :)

I'm proud, i know you're a very generous person.

Offline UK Lyn

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #25 on: August 20, 2009, 12:34:20 PM »
I'm proud, i know you're a very generous person.

Well thank you kindly...  I too am very proud of a great many of the people who post here, articulate, well read, and thoughtful, and very world-wise, totally in-the-face of many a stereotype.  I treasure this forum because of that association, however distant I live.

Offline Dig

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Lockerbie: Al Megrahi release welcomed by victims' relatives [MSM Blackout!]
« Reply #26 on: August 22, 2009, 09:03:18 AM »
Lockerbie: Al Megrahi release welcomed by victims' relatives
http://news.scotsman.com/latestnews/Lockerbie-Al-Megrahi-release-welcomed.5574557.jp
Published Date: 20 August 2009


TWO relatives of victims of the Lockerbie air disaster have welcomed the release of Abdel Basset al-Megrahi.
Martin Cadman and Jim Swire both reiterated their view that the Libyan was not guilty of the atrocity.

Martin Cadman, 84, who lives in Burnham Market, Norfolk and lost his son Bill, 32, in the bombing said the trial which convicted Al Megrahi was a "farce".

"I'm very pleased he has been released on compassionate grounds because I don't think he was the right person to be there anyway. It is just righting a wrong.

"Megrahi and Al Amin Khalifa Fhimah and others were accused together and Fhimah was not found guilty and Megrahi was, which didn't make sense. The trial was a farce.

"I think he was innocent and he was not involved.

"I don't believe he should have been in prison and I'm very pleased he will be back home with his family very soon."

Jim Swire, who lost his 23-year-old daughter Flora, has been vocal about his belief of Megrahi's innocence and had misgivings about the trial.

He said: "I don't believe for a moment that this man was involved in the way that he was found to have been involved.

"I feel despondent that the west and Scotland didn't have the guts to allow this man's second appeal to continue because I am convinced had they done so it would have overturned the verdict against him.

"It's a blow to those of us who seek the truth but it is not an ending. I think it is a splitting of the ways.

"As time goes by it will become clear that he had nothing to do with it."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Families' reaction: 'Too many questions are still unanswered'
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/families-reaction-too-many-questions-are-still-unanswered-1775215.html
By Jonathan Brown Friday, 21 August 2009



The families of the British victims called for a full independent inquiry into the bombing yesterday.

In contrast to their American counterparts, relatives on this side of the Atlantic have remained sceptical of the evidence brought against Megrahi and voiced support for the decision to release him, although they spoke of their frustration that his decision to abandon his appeal may mean the true culprits are never brought to justice.

Jean Berkley, 78, whose son Alistair, a Lockerbie resident, was 29 when he died, said: "Our big disappointment is that he had unnecessarily dropped his appeal, because he didn't need to drop the appeal in order to have compassionate release," she said.

"We were attaching a lot of importance to the appeal. The Scottish Criminal Cases Review said there were grounds for the appeal and we cannot now hear the new evidence that made them come to that decision. We know very little really and we are not in a position to make a judgement. We are left with a mystery here."

Dr Jim Swire, whose daughter, Flora, died on Flight 103, welcomed the Libyan's release and said he would now focus on other countries' roles in the attack, including Britain. "He should be able to go straight home to his family and spend his last days there," he said. "I don't believe this man was involved in the way he was found to be involved."

Martin Cadman, 84, whose son Bill, 32, was killed, said: "I'm very pleased he has been released on compassionate grounds because I don't think he was the right person to be there anyway. It is just righting a wrong."

Professor Robert Black, the Scottish barrister who helped devise the original trial format, said: "It gets him home to die, which has been his primary objective and I'm pleased – but saddened he will die a convicted man. The appeal which might have cleared his name was abandoned unnecessarily."
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Kenny MacAskill: In releasing the Lockerbie bomber, we uphold Scottish values
http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/kenny-macaskill-in-releasing-the-lockerbie-bomber-we-uphold-scottish-values-1775099.html
Friday, 21 August 2009


It is quite clear to the medical experts that Al-Megrahi has a terminal illness, and indeed that there has recently been a significant deterioration in his health... It therefore falls to me to decide whether he should be released on compassionate grounds.

I am conscious that there are deeply held feelings, and that many will disagree, whatever my decision. However a decision has to be made. Scotland will forever remember the crime that has been perpetrated against our people and those from many other lands. The pain and suffering will remain forever. Some hurt can never heal. Some scars can never fade.

Those who have been bereaved cannot be expected to forget, let alone forgive. Their pain runs deep and the wounds remain. However, Mr Megrahi now faces a sentence imposed by a higher power. It is one that no court, in any jurisdiction, in any land, could revoke or overrule. It is terminal, final and irrevocable. He is going to die.

In Scotland, we are a people who pride ourselves on our humanity. It is viewed as a defining characteristic of Scotland and the Scottish people. The perpetration of an atrocity and outrage cannot and should not be a basis for losing sight of who we are, the values we seek to uphold, and the faith and beliefs by which we seek to live.

Mr Megrahi did not show his victims any comfort or compassion. They were not allowed to return to the bosom of their families to see out their lives, let alone their dying days. No compassion was shown by him to them. But that alone is not a reason for us to deny compassion to him and his family.

Our justice system demands that judgment be imposed but compassion be available. Our beliefs dictate that justice be served, but mercy be shown. Compassion and mercy are about upholding the beliefs that we seek to live by, remaining true to our values as a people. No matter the severity of the provocation or the atrocity perpetrated.

For these reasons – and these reasons alone – it is my decision that Mr Abdelbaset Ali Mohamed al-Megrahi, convicted in 2001 for the Lockerbie bombing, now terminally ill, be released on compassionate grounds and allowed to return to Libya to die.

This is an extract from Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill's statement yesterday on the relase of the Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset al-Megrahi
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Hans Köchler: I saw the trial – and the verdict made no sense
http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/hans-kchler-i-saw-the-trial-ndash-and-the-verdict-made-no-sense-1775217.html
Friday, 21 August 2009


I am always surprised when people refer to Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi as the Lockerbie bomber. Even if he is guilty – something which, personally, I do not believe – he would only be a Lockerbie bomber, just one of many people who carried out a crime which would have taken a large network of people and lots of money to carry out. It amazes me that the British and American governments act as if the investigation into the bombing is somehow complete.

But I welcome the release of Megrahi, because I firmly believe that he is innocent of the charges made against him. Believe me, if I thought he was guilty I would not be pleased to see him released from jail.

His decision to drop his appeal, however, is deeply suspicious – I believe Megrahi made that decision under duress. Under Scottish law he did not need to abandon his appeal in order to be released on compassionate grounds. So why did he do it? It makes no sense that he would suddenly let it go.

In my time as the UN's observer at Megrahi's trial, I watched a case unfold that was based on circumstantial evidence. The indictment against him and al-Amin Khalifa Fhimah went to great lengths to explain how they supposedly planted a bomb on Flight 103, and yet Fhimah was acquitted of all the charges against him. It made no sense that Megrahi was guilty when Fhimah was acquitted.

The prosecution produced key witnesses that lacked credibility or had incentives to bear false witness against Megrahi. Tony Gauci, the Maltese shopkeeper who supposedly sold him the clothes that went around the bomb, had been fêted by the Scottish police who took him fishing. The Americans paid him cash following his testimony. The weakness of that testimony would have been a key component of Megrahi's appeal.

We will probably never really know who caused the Lockerbie bombing. So much key information was withheld from the trial. A luggage storage room used by Pan Am at Heathrow was broken into on the night of the bombing, and yet this information was withheld. The British have yet satisfactorily to explain why.

I want to know when the bomb was placed on the plane and by whom. We have to look more closely into the "London theory" – that the bomb was placed on the plane at Heathrow and not in Malta.

It would be childish to be satisfied with the conviction of just one person for a crime that clearly involved a large number of people. I find it very difficult to understand why there seems to be so little pressure from the British and American public on their governments to investigate the bombing properly.

The UK regularly talks of the need to pursue all terrorist atrocities. Yet how can the Government assure the public they really believe that, when they have virtually abandoned their investigation into the worst terrorist attack in the country's history?

We have to know what happened and the only way is a full public inquiry, either mandated by the House of Commons or by an investigative commission voted for by the UN's General Assembly. Time is of the essence. This crime is already 21 years old. To find out the truth we must act now.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Dig

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Unanswered questions: Lockerbie's legacy: 270 dead, no one behind bars
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/unanswered-questions-lockerbies-legacy-270-dead-no-one-behind-bars-1775216.html
By Jerome Taylor Friday, 21 August 2009


When Pan AM Flight 103 exploded over the skies of Lockerbie on 21 December 1988, killing all 259 passengers and a further 11 people on the ground, Scotland's police forces were suddenly thrust into the centre of the largest terrorist investigation in Britain's history. As far as the investigators were concerned, the hunt for those responsible finished 13 years later with the successful conviction of Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi, a former Libyan intelligence officer whom a jury at a special court in the Netherlands decided was the man who placed the bomb on the plane.


But while Britain and America have firmly stood by Megrahi's conviction, many people – including a number of British families who lost loved ones in the tragedy and the UN-appointed observer at the trial – who were convinced the real culprits remained at large while an innocent man was jailed.

It took more than three years for western intelligence agencies to start blaming Libya and in that time a number of disparate terrorist groups had claimed responsibility, including Islamic Jihad, the little-known Guardians of the Islamic Revolution and even, allegedly, the Ulster Defence League.

But it was the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine – General Command (PFLP-GC), a small Palestinian terror network based in Lebanon and Syria with strong links to Iran, that investigators were most keen to concentrate on in the bombing's aftermath.

Two years before Lockerbie, PFLP-GC's Syrian leader Ahmed Jibril had called a press conference warning that there would be "no safety for any traveller on an Israeli or US airliner".

Intelligence agencies took this to mean that Tehran had given Jibril the go-ahead to carry out a revenge attack for the shooting down of an Iranian Airlines passenger jet by the US warship Vincennes. Iran Air Flight 655 had been carrying 290 pilgrims to Mecca for the hajj but the captain of the USS Vincennes, who later received a medal from the US government, fired upon it believing it was a hostile Iranian jet fighter.

Two years later the very threat that Jibril had promised to carry out had happened. The PFLP-GC hastily called a press conference in Beirut denying any involvement but many believed Jibril's organisation carried out the attack on behalf of Iran in revenge.

Those who do not believe the official verdict say Libya was placed in the frame three years later because the US could not afford to alienate Iran and Syria during the build up to the first Gulf War, which had been sparked by Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.

By November 1991 two Libyan intelligence officers, Megrahi and Al Amin Khalifa Fhimah, were indicted for the bombing. The announcement sparked nearly a decade of negotiations between Britain and Libya's leader Muammar Gaddafi, who finally agreed to have his subjects tried in Dutch court under Scottish law in return for the UN lifting crippling sanctions on his nation. American and British relatives of those who died would finally face the men their governments accused of responsibility for the murders. But as the trial progressed many of the families began having doubts.

The case against Megrahi and Fhimah was largely based on the testimony of a Maltese shopkeeper, Tony Gauci, who said he had sold clothes to Megrahi, fragments of which were found around the Samsonite suitcase which allegedly carried the bomb. Megrahi was found guilty and sentenced to 27 years in a Scottish prison. Fhimah was acquitted.

As the trial closed, fresh evidence emerged that suggested the bomb could have been placed directly on to Flight 103 at Heathrow rather than at Malta where Megrahi was head of security for Libyan Arab Airlines.

In September 2001 Ray Manley, a former security guard at Heathrow, said in a sworn affidavit that he had told anti-terror police that one of Pan Am's luggage rooms had been broken into on the night of the bombing. Manley was surprised his evidence had not been presented in court. He stated: "It would have been possible for an unauthorised person to obtain tags for a particular Pan Am flight then, having broken the lock, to have introduced a tagged bag into the baggage build-up area."

From his jail cell in Greenock prison, Megrahi continued to protest his innocence and launched appeal attempts. At first they were rejected out of hand but a four-year investigation by the Scottish Criminal Case Review Commission concluded last year that Gauci's evidence against Megrahi was questionable enough to warrant an appeal which would have gone ahead had Megrahi not dropped it this week. The SCCRC's 400-page dossier will now likely never see the light of day.

Those families who hoped Megrahi's appeal would have shed new light on who was behind the murder of their loved ones have called for a full public inquiry. Reverend John Mosey, who lost his daughter in the bombing, said yesterday: "We have been denied an inquiry by Conservative and Labour governments. Robin Cook, when Foreign Secretary, refused an inquiry saying it would jeopardise the criminal investigation. That investigation has now ground to an ignominious halt, having raised more questions than it answered."

From pariah to partner: The rehabilitation of Libya

Those of us assigned as reporters to stand on a dark night in a muddy field in the Dutch countryside, eyes skyward as the helicopter hoved into view, assumed that if the two men on board were convicted, it would be a very long time before they saw their homeland again. Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi and his co-accused were that night being delivered to Camp Zeist for the start of the PanAm trial.

But a great deal of water has tumbled under the diplomatic bridge since April 1999. Megrahi flew back yesterday to a Libya he will find transformed by the rewards of international respectability. Ten years ago Libya was as isolated as Iran or North Korea are today. It was a menace, a pariah, ruled over by "Mad Dog" Colonel Muammar Gaddafi who specialised in bankrolling terror groups. By this summer, the same Gaddafi was being welcomed by Gordon Brown and other leaders on the fringes of the G8 summit in Italy. Next month he will address the UN General Assembly in New York for the first time.

What happened in the interim? The extradition of the two suspects marked the restoration of diplomatic links between London and Tripoli. By 2003, Libya had cleaned up its act further, culminating in Gaddafi's decision to reveal to the Americans what he had by way of weapons of mass destruction.

Since then, Western leaders and oil companies like BP have beaten a path to his tent, lured by the promise of supplies to reduce reliance on Russia. For Libya, rehabilitation means the promise of much-needed investment and perhaps, one day, even tourism.

Katherine Butler
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Kilika

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Yep, not going to see that side of the story in the MSM. "Wouldn't be prudent".
"For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
1 Timothy 6:10 (KJB)

Offline Dig

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People need to know that false flag terrorism with commercial airplanes has occured long before 9/11
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

kushfiend

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Wait - so who did the bombing? The CIA?


Offline Dig

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Wait - so who did the bombing? The CIA?



The CIA is the most likely, the division that the Iran-Contra criminals like Ollie North came from.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

kushfiend

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The CIA is the most likely, the division that the Iran-Contra criminals like Ollie North came from.

Ollie North ...

I still can't believe that bastard had his own show on Fox

Why isn't that drug dealing murderer in jail again?

Offline Dig

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Ollie North ...

I still can't believe that bastard had his own show on Fox

Why isn't that drug dealing murderer in jail again?

Sir George HW Bush, Knight Commander to the British Empire, who took a solemn oath to obey Queen ELizabeth II above all else.

East India Trading Company founded international drug running for profit. Ollie is just a boot licking minion fot the queen bitch and her drug running monopoly.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Anti_Illuminati

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Eric Holder was on CSPAN or something the other day expressing how pissed he was about this mans release.

Goes to show where all these pieces of trash stand on every issue pertaining to the truth of false flag, problem-reaction-solution black op attacks.

luckee1

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #38 on: August 22, 2009, 01:58:08 PM »
Oil diplomacy in Megrahi release?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8215806.stm

Megrahi is the only person convicted over the Lockerbie attack

Libyan suggestions that the UK released convicted Lockerbie bomber Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi in exchange for trade considerations has raised the spectre of Tripoli engaging in oil diplomacy, says the BBC's Rana Jawad, in the Libyan capital.

Even as the British Foreign Office denied the claims, Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi was hinting at the same allegation made by his son, Seif al-Islam, hours earlier.

"This step [Megrahi's release] is for the benefit of relations between Britain and Libya, and relations of personal friendship between me and them, and it will certainly be positively reflected in all fields of co-operation between the two countries," Col Gaddafi is reported to have said during his first meeting with the convicted Lockerbie bomber.

The UK government has vigorously denied that any under-the-table dealings were struck to secure Megrahi's release from jail on compassionate grounds.

However, this will do little to ease suspicions among its critics among the UK and US public that a deal was struck behind closed doors.


A first red flag for the families of Lockerbie's 270 victims was raised earlier this year with the ratification of the prisoner transfer agreement between the British and Libyan governments.

Some observers saw it as being rushed through parliament for ratification with no proper review.


Oil muscles

The festive welcome given to Megrahi at the Tripoli airport has triggered an angry war of words. Claims and counter-claims have ping-ponged between the US, the UK and Libya.

But indulging in wordplay may not be in the best interests of the western countries right now. Libya has proven in recent years that it can and will flex its "oil muscle" when the occasion arises.

Megrahi received an enthusiastic welcome on Thursday

On the day of Megrahi's return to Libya, Swiss President Hans-Rudolf Merz was in Tripoli apologising publicly to the Libyan people in a news conference.

The move stunned his people back home; but it seemed clear that Switzerland saw no other way out of a year-long diplomatic spat with Libya.

In 2008, Col Gaddafi's son Hannibal and his wife were arrested and detained by Swiss police for allegedly beating two of their servants.

The move infuriated the Libyan government and it was not long before Swiss companies and nationals were driven out of the country and the oil taps were half shut.

Many Libyans accuse the complaining American and British politicians of disingenuous posturing, saying that it was pretty obvious what would happen in the event of Megrahi's release.

But nevertheless a lot of questions are being asked about the potentially damaging fall-out over the freshly-released Lockerbie bomber.

Despite the rhetoric on all sides, however, it still seems like an unlikely scenario.

America and Britain see Libya as a strategic partner in the region for both its natural resources and its geographical location.

The Libyans are also aware that there is no turning back from the road to reform they embarked on five years ago - and they recognise their need for major western powers to help them along the way.


luckee1

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Re: Lockerbie "Bomber" released BECAUSE THE CIA BOMBED THE PLANE!
« Reply #39 on: August 22, 2009, 02:42:01 PM »
Page last updated at 17:16 GMT, Saturday, 22 August 2009 18:16 UK

FBI boss attacks Megrahi release
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/8216122.stm

Mr Mueller has long been involved with the Lockerbie case himself

FBI director Robert Mueller has launched a scathing attack on Scottish Justice Secretary Kenny MacAskill over the release of the Lockerbie bomber.


In a letter, dated 21 August, Mr Mueller said the decision makes "a mockery of justice" and gives comfort to terrorists around the world.

Abdelbaset Ali al-Megrahi has received a hero's welcome in Libya.

The Scottish Government said it had consulted widely in the US and UK and had made the right decision.

Mr Mueller was previously a Justice Department lawyer leading the investigation into the 1988 bombing.

The director's letter is also being sent to families of the Lockerbie victims.

Mr Mueller wrote: "Your action in releasing Megrahi is as inexplicable as it is detrimental to the cause of justice. Indeed your action makes a mockery of the rule of law.

"Your action gives comfort to terrorists around the world who now believe that regardless of the quality of the investigation, the conviction by jury after the defendant is given all due process, and sentence appropriate to the crime, the terrorist will be freed by one man's exercise of 'compassion'."


Mr MacAskill said there was no reason to deny Megrahi compassion

Mr Mueller said that he had made it a practice not to comment on the actions of other prosecutors, but that the release of terminally ill Megrahi had prompted a change of heart.

He added: "Your action makes a mockery of the emotions, passions and pathos of all those affected by the Lockerbie tragedy: the medical personnel who first faced the horror of 270 bodies strewn in the fields around Lockerbie, and in the town of Lockerbie itself; the hundreds of volunteers who walked the fields of Lockerbie to retrieve any piece of debris related to the break-up of the plane; the hundreds of FBI agents and Scottish police who undertook an unprecedented global investigation to identify those responsible; the prosecutors who worked for years - in some cases a full career - to see justice done."

The FBI director said he was outraged by the move, and criticised the MSP for failing to consult "partners in the investigation and prosecution of those responsible for the Lockerbie tragedy".

   
Compassionate release is not part of the US justice system but it is part of Scotland's
Scottish Government spokesman

He wrote: "You have given those who sought to assure that the persons responsible would be held accountable the back of your hand. You have given Megrahi a 'jubilant welcome' in Tripoli, according to the reporting. Where, I ask, is the justice?"

A Scottish Government spokesman said the minister had made the right decision for the "right reasons" on the basis of due process, clear evidence, and recommendations from the parole board and prison governor.

He said: "Compassionate release is not part of the US justice system but it is part of Scotland's.

"Mr MacAskill could not have consulted more widely - he spoke with the US families, the US Attorney General, Secretary of State Clinton and many others.

"The US authorities indicated that although they were opposed to both prisoner transfer and compassionate release, they made it clear that they regarded compassionate release as far preferable to the transfer agreement, and Mr Mueller should be aware of that."

The spokesman said that Mr Mueller should also be aware that while many families have opposed Mr MacAskill's decision many others have supported it.

He added that the justice secretary would reply to Mr Mueller in due course.