Pirate Bay - Pirate Party

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Offline Monkeypox

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Pirate Bay - Pirate Party
« on: July 20, 2009, 12:26:21 AM »
http://apnews.myway.com//article/20090718/D99GUTPO2.html

By LOUISE NORDSTROM

STOCKHOLM (AP) - One of the world's largest filesharing Web sites, The Pirate Bay, is going legal through a series of give-and-take payment models that in some cases may even earn its users a bundle of cash, the new owners said Saturday.

"The more you give, the more you get," said Hans Pandeya, chief executive of Swedish software firm Global Gaming Factory X, which announced last month it was buying the site and would start paying both content providers and copyright holders.

The change in ownership was met with skepticism by the filesharing community who feared that, by taking The Pirate Bay legal, its new operators would start charging them for downloading content such as films, music and computer games, which they had previously accessed for free.

In April, four men connected with the site were sentenced to one-year prison terms for abetting violations of copyright law, and ordered to pay a fine totaling 30 million kronor ($3.8 million). At least three of the men claim they haven't owned the site for years.

Pandeya said his company bought the site from a foreign company through lawyers and he doesn't know who the current owners are, but that none of the prosecuted men seemed to be involved.

When the deal was announced, Pirate Bay spokesman and one of defendants, Peter Sunde, said however that he and his associates were pleased with GGF's plans for the site since they felt they couldn't take it any further - lacking both money and resources to do so. Sunde could not be reached for comment Saturday.

Pandeya said The Pirate Bay, whose domain name and related Web sites were bought by Global Gaming Factory X for 60 million kronor, will not become like pure pay sites, such as ITunes Store and Napster.

"For the great majority it will be free of charge, for a minority it will actually make them money, and for a small portion it will cost them," he said.

Pandeya said plans are under way to introduce a monthly fee to be able to use The Pirate Bay, but he said the fee could be worked off by, for example, sharing downloaded content or lending storage capacity to others on their PC's in exchange.

"We know that unless we're able to create revenues for the filesharers they'll just move on to the next free, site," he said. "Filesharers are our best friends."

Pandeya also said other give-and-take packages were in the works, but declined to elaborate, saying more details would revealed in the next few weeks.

The site, under its new management, is expected to be launched in about a month's time. It will also raise money through advertising and by making network data traffic cheaper and more efficient for internet service providers. This would be done by making the filesharing more local, allowing users in the same city to be interconnected as opposed to swapping data across multiple borders.

GGF claims the site will fully address the legal issues that troubled it before because income will be distributed between filesharers, copyright holders and others involved.

Pandeya said that although no deals have been struck yet, his company is currently in negotiations with some of "the world's largest players" within the music industry. "It's been positive," he said, declining to name the companies involved in the talks.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Jordan

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DCMS discussing proposals for a national web-blocking system.
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2011, 08:22:32 PM »
Web-blocking and Illegal Sites

25th July 2011 15:15 | by Will Tovey

In the last week there have been three stories in the news concerning copyright infringement and "illegal websites". In each case, a group with an interest in enforcing copyright has called for or announced measures against such websites, but this raises an important question of what makes a website illegal. In terms of copyright infringement this is a very tricky question as there is no easy way to tell whether content or a service is unlawful.
The Plans

According to the BBC, the PRS - which acts as a collecting society for those who own the copyright in songs, such as songwriters, composers and publishers - has called for search engines to implement a "traffic light" system for tagging websites. The system would work by adding a green flag to websites offering legal music downloads and red flags to those offering music unlawfully. The idea behind this is that individuals will be directed away from illegal sites to the legal ones - although it relies both on people using complicit search engines to find music, and caring whether their source of music is lawful or not.


Secondly, the IFPI - a London-based organisation which represents some of the world's recorded music companies - have announced that PayPal will be working with them and City of London Police (and their Economic Crime Directorate) by blocking payments to a list of "illegal websites" provided by the IFPI. PayPal will join MasterCard and Visa who are already blocking 24 websites with another 38 in the pipe-line. This is despite the fact that both MasterCard and Visa were threatened with legal action over taking similar action against WikiLeaks even though the website has not been found illegal.

Finally, the ORG has obtained (through a freedom of information request) minutes from a recent "secret" meeting between various copyright owner groups and ISPs, and DCMS discussing proposals for a national web-blocking system. This confirmed that the "Rightsholder Group" - including the Publishers' Association, BPI, MPA and Premier League - were proposing to implement a "voluntary" system by which ISPs would not resist legal action forcing them to block websites, identified by the copyright groups that are "substantially focused upon infringement of copyright." These meetings were only made public after a tip off, and only a single consumer representative was present (the minimum required by law).

Each of these plans, to some degree, contain a significant flaw; they rely on an interest group identifying an "illegal website."
What Makes a Site Illegal

Under copyright law, copyright is infringed by communicating a copyrighted work to the public without a licence (s20, CDPA) which would seem to include making the work available to others (via a website or P2P network). In addition, the High Court has the power (under s97A, CDPA) to grant an injunction against a service provider who has "actual knowledge" that someone using their service is doing so to infringe copyright.

The question then becomes whether or not a site involved in distributing works such as music, films or books has some form of defence to copyright infringement. Unfortunately, this can be practically impossible to determine. There are three main ways for a site to be operating legally:

    * If the works are in the public domain, no copyright claim can be made. This varies with the type of work and the jurisdiction.
    * A service will be legal if there is some statutory scheme authorising it, such as a compulsory licensing scheme. These exist in various countries and allow a service to offer copyrighted works provided they pay the right amounts to the relevant authorities.
    * Thirdly, a service will be legal if it has suitable licences to communicate the work to the public. Most "legal" sites (such as iTunes and Amazon) operate by negotiating licence agreements with all the relevant copyright owners (or collecting societies).

While this sounds fairly straightforward in theory, in practice, determining whether one or more of these three applies (either as an individual consumer or an organisation with the resources of the IFPI etc.) can be impossible.


With regard to the public domain, works in the public domain in one country (say the US) might not be in another (say the UK). This was made clear in April 2011 when the UK Music Publishers Association managed to have the IMSLP's domain name confiscated, based on a copyright claim over a work in the public domain in Canada and the US (where the website operated) but still in copyright in the UK. Fortunately this all worked out peacefully but under any of the above proposals, a mistake over jurisdiction could have serious consequences.

Similarly, in some jurisdictions merely linking to content, rather than hosting it, is not covered by copyright (as in the UK, aside from the issue with s97A) however this has not prevented some groups from taking "legal" action against sites doing so in other jurisdictions, such as when the US's ICE seized the domain name of a Spanish site that had been declared legal by Spanish courts.

Even a licence agreement does not necessarily prove a site is legal. Any licence agreement needs verifying, and only an author who has not sold or transferred any relevant parts of the copyright, or allowed anyone to give out licences will know whether or not a site has no licence. This is why in any claim for copyright infringement all copyright owners and exclusive licensees must be involved (s102, CDPA - one of the many holes in the ACS:Law/MediaCAT litigation).


Even if a licence agreement exists, this may not prove legality. Both Amazon and iTunes have allegedly distributed content unlawfully through their services under the assumption of a licence (although both took action when they became aware of the illegality, and were not taken to court). In one of the earliest major copyright cases (Donaldson v Beckett 1774) the respondents had bought the copyright in certain poems at an auction and tried to enforce them, but the House of Lords pointed out that the works had been written over 45 years earlier, so were out of copyright. Even though Beckett could prove a chain of ownership back to the original copyright, it had already expired.

The only way to verify a licence is to track down the original copyright owner and work through all licence agreements (including blanket ones such as Creative Commons licences) to see if there is a link to the website. This is likely to be impossible for the public and very difficult for anyone else.

In any event, given the excessive scope and duration of copyright, it is likely that many websites contain infringing material (through including pictures, quotes etc.) and it is hardly an exaggeration to suggest that rigorously enforcing copyright would break significant parts of the Internet. Websites such as the Internet Archive (which was declared a "pirate site" earlier this year) and Wikipedia host vast quantities of material that infringe copyright in the UK, and could easily fall victim to any of the above processes.
How Website Filtering Would Work

The question then becomes how the above groups will compile lists of "illegal sites". The most obvious way would be to list those websites that host or link to content, some of which is covered by their members, and which do not pay them.

With the PRS scheme, this might have some chance of success, as the PRS will have lists of works covered by their members. However, as noted above, merely being in the position of giving out licences is not sufficient to determine that the site is not licensed (as there may be others who can give licences). There are also issues of defamation if search engines or the PRS list websites as breaking the law when they do not.

With the copyright owner groups, it will be even harder to determine whether or not sites have appropriate licences. As such, web-blocking is likely to be used against websites that cannot be shut using legal means - such as FileSoup or TVLinks, which were shut down, but later declared legal (or, at least, had all charges against their operators dropped). It is entirely possible that the threat of being put on a blocklist may be enough to force websites to pay up for extra licences, even if the are already legal.
Where Do We Go?

In summary, these attempts to deal with "illegal websites" all suffer from the major flaw of requiring that someone identify whether or not a website is legal and only a Court, with all relevant parties present, is in a position to do this. This makes any process time-consuming and costly (for all parties), or unfair and unjust. Even with web-blocking processes there is no guarantee that web-blocking will reduce copyright infringement, and even then, that it will increase revenues to copyright owners, or increase creativity.

For now, though, the success of any of the above schemes would seem to depend on the result in the Newzbin2 case (Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation & 5 Ors v British Telecommunications Plc), currently before the High Court, in which the MPA asked the Court to force BT to add Newzbin to their blocklist (under s97A).



http://www.pirateparty.org.uk/blog/2011/jul/25/web-blocking-and-illegal-sites/

Offline Letsbereal

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Pirate Bay Founders’ Prison Sentences Final, Supreme Court Appeal Rejected
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2012, 03:14:56 AM »
Pirate Bay Founders’ Prison Sentences Final, Supreme Court Appeal Rejected
1 February 2012
, (Torrentfreak)
http://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-founders-prison-sentences-final-supreme-court-appeal-rejected-120201/

A few moments ago Sweden’s Supreme Court announced its decision not to grant leave to appeal in the long-running Pirate Bay criminal trial. This means that the previously determined jail sentences and fines handed out to Peter Sunde, Fredrik Neij, Gottfrid Svartholm and Carl Lundström will stand.


Pirate Bay blocked!!!!!! http://thepiratebay.org/
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Offline kmman1987

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Quote
Pirate Bay blocked!!!!!! http://thepiratebay.org/
http://thepiratebay.se/
HHmm? redirects to here for me?


EvadingGrid

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Works for me
It is a redirect, not the end of the world (yet)

Offline Letsbereal

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Thepiratebay.org has been blocked on my provider (Ziggo) level!
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Letsbereal

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And so is http://thepiratebay.se/ I had forgotten to say.
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Jordan

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US Threatens Sweden if they don't prosecute The Pirate bay.
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2012, 11:49:39 PM »
US threatens Sweden with watch list sanctions if they don’t prosecute The Pirate Bay.

Among the treasure troves of recently released WikiLeaks cables, we find one whose significance has bypassed Swedish media. In short: every law proposal, every ordinance, and every governmental report hostile to the net, youth, and civil liberties here in Sweden in recent years have been commissioned by the US government and industry interests.

I can understand that the significance has been missed, because it takes a whole lot of knowledge in this domain to recognize the topics discussed. When you do, however, you realize that the cable lists orders for the Swedish Government to implement a series of measures that significantly weakens Sweden’s competitive advantage in the IT field against the US. We had concluded this was the case, but had believed things had come from a large number of different sources. That was wrong. It was all coordinated, and the Swedish Government had received a checklist to tick off. The Government is described in the cables as “fully on board”.

Since 2006, the Pirate Party has claimed that traffic data retention (trafikdatalagring), the expansion of police powers (polismetodutredningen), the law proposal that attempted to introduce Three Strikes (Renforsutredningen), the political trial against and persecution of The Pirate Bay, the new rights for the copyright industry to get subscriber data from ISPs (Ipred) — a power that even the Police don’t have — and the general wiretapping law (FRA-lagen) all have been part of a greater whole, a whole controlled by American interests. It has sounded quite a bit like Conspiracies ’R’ Us. Nutjobby. We have said that the American government is pushing for a systematic dismantlement of civil liberties in Europe and elsewhere to not risk the dominance of American industry interests, in particular in the area of copyright and patent monopolies.

But all of a sudden, there it was, in black on white. It takes the description so far that the civil servants in the Justice Department, people I have named and criticized, have been on the American Embassy and received instructions.

This will become sort of a longish article, as I intend to outline all the hard evidence in detail, but for those who want the executive summary, it is this: The Pirate Party was right on every detail. The hunt for ordinary Joes who share music and movies with one another has been behind the largest dismantlement of civil liberties in modern history, and American interests have been behind every part of it.

At the middle of this, we find the US cable Stockholm 09-141, recommending Sweden to not be blacklisted by the US on the so-called Special 301 list, and outlines why. The Special 301 is a list that the United States compiles every year that names and shames countries that haven’t been friendly enough to American industries. A majority of the world’s population is on the list, Canada and Spain among them. It’s quite nice company to be in, actually.

Since the 1980s, the US has aggressively threatened trade sanctions against countries who don’t give American companies sufficiently large competitive advantages — this is described in detail in the book Information Feudalism about the origins of the TRIPs agreement and WTO, for those interested in gory details. In practice, it works like this: industry associations in the US go to the Trade Representatives, who go to the myriad offices dealing with Foreign Policy, who go to the embassies, who talk to national governments (including the Swedish one) and demand changes to national law to benefit American corporations.

This sounds like fiction, right? But here are the documents. This document comes from the copyright industry’s trade association IIPA, mainly consisting of record and movie companies. They have listed six demands on the Swedish Government, which stand to find in the linked document:

    Adopt the copyright law amendments on injunctive relief against ISPs and a “right of information” to permit rights holders to obtain the identity of suspected infringers from ISPs in civil cases
    Prosecute to the fullest extent the owners of ThePirateBay [sic]
    Increase the prosecutorial and police manpower devoted to criminal Internet piracy enforcement
    Commence a national criminal enforcement campaign to target source piracy and large scale Internet pirates
    Ensure that rights holders may pursue the new civil remedies easily and quickly
    Take an active role fostering ISP-rights holder discussions to effectively prevent protected content from being distributed without authorization over the Internet

Now, these steps are written in copyright industry legalese. Some key words that sound harmless are cause for alarm once you recognize their meaning. Translated into ordinary language, this says:

    Adopt “Three Strikes” making it possible to disconnect prople from the internet without a trial (“injunctive relief“), and implement the IPRED directive in a way that the copyright industry can get internet subscriber identities behind IP addresses (which was not mandatory, my note).
    Prosecute to the fullest extent the owners of The Pirate Bay. (This doesn’t really need translation, except that it’s very noteworthy that the executive branch is ordered to interfere with the work of the judicial one, which is illegal in Sweden too.)
    Transfer scarce police resources from investigating real crimes and devote them to safeguarding American monopolistic interests against ordinary citizens.
    Take large-scale initiatives against people sharing music, movies and porn.
     Make it possible for the copyright industry to sue people (“pursue new civil remedies“) with a minimum of hassle.
    Abolish the messenger immunity, making Internet Service Providers liable for copyright monopoly infractions happening in their wires, and force them to interfere with the traffic.

All this seems eerily familiar. With one exception, it looks like a checklist followed to the letter by the Swedish Government. The American Embassy confirms that it is, and even explains that exception.

The cable Stockholm 09-141 reads, along with my comments:

    1. (SBU) Summary. Embassy Stockholm recommends that Sweden
    continues to be placed in the Special 301 Initiative, and not be on
    the Watch List for 2009. We are aware of the differing
    recommendations of the International Intellectual Property Alliance
    (IIPA) and PhRMA. Post recommendation is based on:

    -- The progress made by the Government of Sweden (GOS) in five out
    of the six items identified in the Special 301 Initiative Action
    plan we communicated to the GOS last year; and

Here, the Embassy (“Post“) writes straight out that the Swedish government has been given a checklist.

    -- The sensitive domestic politics that the GOS needs to manage in
    order to step up internet piracy enforcement in Sweden. The GOS
    struggles, with good intentions, against a very negative media
    climate and against a vocal youth movement. For example, we want to
    highlight the risk that negative media attention on the file sharing
    issue gives the Pirate Party a boost in the EU Parliamentary
    elections in June 2009.

Apparently, it is a “vocal youth movement” that fights for basic civil liberties. Also, it is interesting that the Embassy expresses preferences on which parties should be elected by the Swedish people.

    2. (SBU) This cable reviews the progress Sweden has made on the
    Special 301 Initiative Action plan which we presented to the GOS at
    the conclusion of the Special 301 review 2008 (Ref B). Post
    continues to engage very constructively with the GOS, and has good
    access and a good working relationship with key senior and working
    level GOS officials. The actions taken since last year's review
    strengthen the legislative framework and provide better enforcement
    tools for combating piracy. The Pirate Bay trial is currently being
    heard in the district court in Stockholm. The last day of the trial
    is March 4, and the verdict can be expected on or about March 25.

The Embassy notes specifically that they have good access to civil servants. In other cables, these are named; among others, the Embassy has contact with Stefan Johansson, the civil servant in the Justice Department who drafted the IPRED legislation giving the copyright industry access to internet subscriber identities.

    3. [...] The Justice Ministry, with primary responsibility for this issue, is
    fully on board and well aware of what is at stake. It is currently
    battling with the Ministry of Enterprise, Energy, and Communication
    about the next appropriate steps to curb internet piracy. Now that
    the Enforcement Directive implementation will finally enter into
    force on April 1, and there will soon be a first District court
    decision in the Pirate Bay case -- the Justice Ministry will turn
    its attention to other key issues, primarily the ISP liability issue
    and extra resources to investigative capabilities. [...]

Here, we see in cleartext that the Justice Department is working to abolish the messenger immunity and make ISPs liable for the traffic in their networks, so that we will have a serious amount of unaccountable extrajudicial censorship. This is one of the most serious threats to the basic civil liberties and to the foundatory principles of the net today. Also, note the expression that the Justice Department are essentially American lapdogs in this area.

    4. [...] Post conveyed a Special 301 Action plan to the GOS,
    covering six items where the [US Govt] hoped to see progress during 2008.

    5. (U) The Special 301 Initiative Action plan 2008 contained
    recommendations in six specific areas. The GOS has acted, in
    various degrees, in five of those areas. A review of progress in
    the six areas follows in paras 6-11:

The Embassy says that it will go through these steps one by one and explain how the Swedish Government has done as asked.
Step-by-step walkthrough of lapdoggery

(At this point, I shuffle the cable paragraphs a bit to match the checklist from the American copyright industry’s organization IIPA, and bring its points in for reference. The numbers before the paragraphs are thus intact from the cable, and show the referenced paragraph. The IIPA checklist is quoted from the top down.)

IIPA checklist says:

1. Adopt “Three Strikes” making it possible to disconnect prople from the internet without a trial (“injunctive relief“), and…

Embassy says:

    7. (U) Injunctive relief: The one item without any progress is
    Action plan item 2, Injunctive relief. The GOS maintains that there
    are adequate provisions currently on the books in Sweden, and does
    not intend to introduce new legislation. (Note that industry claims
    to the contrary were supported by the recommendations of the Renfors
    Commission, a government study commissioned to look into the file
    sharing issue. The GOS has declared that it will not further
    implement Renfors' recommendations. End note.)

Comments: The Embassy says in cleartext that Three Strikes (“injunctive relief” in legalese) is the only point Sweden hasn’t fulfilled. The referenced Renfors Commission produced the law proposal that explicitly wanted to disconnect people from the net without trial — the infamous Three Strikes. Its secretary, Johan Axhamn, is now lobbying hard within the copyright industry’s lobby organization Netopia to introduce extrajudicial censorship through another one of IIPA’s six points. The Renfors Commission acted very lopsidedly in its directives and execution from the get-go, and now we know why.

IIPA checklist says:

…and implement the IPRED directive in a way that the copyright industry can get internet subscriber identities behind IP addresses.

Embassy says:

    8. (U) Implementation of the Enforcement Directive: The bill was
    approved by Parliament on February 25, and the new provisions will
    enter into force on April 1, 2009. The political sensitivities made
    the final handling of the Bill very delicate for the Alliance
    government. Much of the debate and negotiations have been done in
    public, and there has been tremendous pressure put on individual
    MPs. The passage of the implementing legislation is therefore a
    much greater victory for the GOS than it might appear. Major
    changes, compared to the original proposal, are:

    -- the law will not be retroactive. [...]

    -- The court will make a proportionality assessment, i. e. weigh the
    need of the rights-holder to get access to the personal identity
    against integrity aspects of the person behind the IP number. The
    law now stipulates that a certain scale of infringement will be
    needed for the court to decide that the information should be handed
    out. Normally, that would be the case when the infringement
    consists of up-loading a single film or musical piece [...]

    -- The law includes provisions that the GOS intends to observe and
    assess how the law is used [...]

Comments: This was fulfilled to the letter. But we note three things in this cable: First, it is clear that the United States were behind the controversial parts of the IPRED implementation that have become synonymous with the entire law in Swedish language — the parts giving the copyright industry access to subscriber identities behind IP addresses. This part is entirely voluntary in the directive.

Second, we should be careful whenever the government discusses “large-scale file sharing”, because it says here in cleartext what that means: uploading one single movie or music track, something that 250 million Europeans do pretty much on a daily basis.

Third, note the tone of significant disappointment over the law not being made retroactive.

IIPA Checklist says:

2. Prosecute to the fullest extent the owners of The Pirate Bay.

Embassy says:

    12. (U) After the raid on Pirate Bay on May 31, 2006, the issue of
    internet piracy was fiercely debated in Sweden. Press coverage was
    largely, and still is, unfavorable to the positions taken by
    rights-holders and the USG [US Govt]. The Pirate Bay raid was portrayed
    as the GOS [Govt of SE] caving to USG pressure. The delicate situation made it
    difficult, if not counter-productive, for the Embassy to play a
    public role on IPR issues. Behind the scenes, the Embassy has
    worked well with all stakeholders. After 18 months of
    investigation, the prosecutor filed indictments against four
    individuals for contribution to copyright infringement because of
    their activities administrating the Pirate Bay bit torrent webpage.
    The case is currently being heard in the district court in
    Stockholm, and the trial is scheduled to be completed on March 4.
    The sentence is expected on or about March 25, i.e. before the
    conclusion of the Special 301 review process. However, we fully
    expect that any outcome will be appealed to a higher court, which
    means that the final verdict will not be known for several years.

Comments: At the time of the raid against The Pirate Bay, May 31, 2006, there were clear indications of the Swedish authorities cowing to US pressure. It could only be indicated, not proven in a court of law. Here, it’s in black and white on a checklist handed to the Swedish Government, along with the notes that the Justice Department is “fully on board”.

The Embassy also notes that they have worked behind the scenes with “all stakeholders”, meaning the stakeholders in a negative outcome for The Pirate Bay and Sweden’s competitive IT industry. Some of these are named in other cables, specifically the plaintiffs’ lawyers in the Pirate Bay trial.

IIPA checklist says:

3. Transfer scarce police resources from investigating real crimes and devote them to safeguarding American monopolistic interests against ordinary citizens.

Embassy says:

    10. (SBU) Police and prosecutors: There are now two full-time
    prosecutors dedicated to IPR/copyright issues. Police officers
    have been trained, but we understand that they are not allowed to
    devote attention to IPR/copyright issues. They are back in their
    regular line of duty in their districts, where there are conflicting
    priorities. We have understood that the prosecutors have alerted
    that this is a problem for their work - they are "stuck" with a
    backlog of old errands and without the support of investigative
    officers. The prosecutors ask for investigative officers that are
    exclusively devoted to IPR issues, today there are no such
    investigative capacities. The Justice Ministry has repeatedly asked
    the Head of the Swedish Police for information about how he plans to
    come to terms with the investigation deficiencies. Although the [Govt]
    recognizes the needs, the budget bill for next year will likely not
    contain significant increases for law enforcement, given the harsh
    economic conditions. This is an area where post can work with the
    [Govt of SE] and [the copyright] industry to highlight the significant
    impact additional resources in this area might have.

Comments: Chalk another one up. News just today (September 5, 2011) announced a new national super-unit in the Swedish Police aimed only at people sharing movies, music and porn. News in Swedish here, translated here.

IIPA checklist says:

4. Take large-scale initiatives against people sharing and downloading music, movies and porn.

Embassy says:

    11. (SBU) Public education: In the fall of 2008, the GOS released a
    new information material, primarily aimed for youth, which will be
    broadly distributed in Swedish schools. Justice Minister Ask's
    staffers are currently considering the pros and cons of engaging
    Cabinet members in the public debate. Given all the negative
    attention around the Enforcement directive and the Pirate Bay trial,
    the determination thus far has been to keep a low profile. The [Govt]
    recognizes that there is a real risk that the window of opportunity
    was lost already several years ago -- when leading [politicians]
    didn't take the debate. How to engage at this point is a delicate
    matter.

Comments: The Justice department embarked on “public education” against sharing, aimed at youth. We criticized this material heavily as it was published (rough translation). The Justice Department sent “educational material” with lopsided copyright monopoly propaganda to high schools and junior highs as education material! This had never happened before, and I criticized the material on point after point for being politically biased, only tell half the story, or be directly and factually wrong. Now, we know that this action was commissioned by the United States.

IIPA checklist says:

5. Make it possible for the copyright industry to sue people (“pursue new civil remedies“) with a minimum of hassle.

Embassy says:

    9. (U) Granting police and prosecutors the right to identities
    behind IP numbers of individuals potentially implicated in copyright
    crimes of lower dignity, i.e. fines rather than prison sentences:
    The Justice Ministry has also worked towards the goal of changing
    legislation so that police and prosecutors can get access to
    information about identities behind IP numbers in cases where the
    crime could lead to a fine (rather than a prison sentence). The
    usual Swedish term for this type of crime (punishable by fine, not
    prison) is "crime of lower dignity." At present, law enforcement
    officials are only allowed to get such information if the
    infringement could lead to a prison sentence. The [Govt] has agreed to
    change the legislation, and it was made part of a study commissioned
    to propose the steps needed to implement such a change. The
    proposed changes were recently separated out from the rest of the
    study, and were reported in advance to Justice Minister Ask late
    January 2009. Although the slow legislative process is
    disappointing, the GOS has already agreed on the necessary changes
    that will strengthen the investigative tools of enforcement
    officials.

Comments: The Embassy’s text describes a lengthy process on how this mechanism for the copyright industry was moved from bill to bill. It surfaced again this winter, when Minister of Justice Beatrice Ask announced “step 2″ of traffic data retention, when its usage would expand from just combating organized heavy crime to also include combating petty-fine crimes like (specifically) file sharing. Thus, this cable is not stale by far; the government is still ticking off its checklist.

It is interesting that the Embassy notes that “the Government has agreed to change the legislation”: changing laws is Parliament’s job, not the cabinet’s. At least Parliament has the puzzle piece now that this is American-made mail-order legislation.

IIPA checklist says:

6. Abolish the messenger immunity, making Internet Service Providers liable for copyright monopoly infractions happening in their wires, and force them to interfere with the traffic.

Embassy says:

    6. (SBU) Industry consultations/ISP liability: The GOS [SE Govt] held a
    series of industry consultations in the summer/fall of 2008, with
    the explicit aim to discuss a voluntary industry agreement involving
    ISPs and right-holders organizations. Industry contacts reported
    that the ISP's were not willing (they claim they are not able) to
    take on any action on a voluntary basis. The first round of
    consultations was concluded without results during the fall of 2008.
    The Justice Ministry is currently working internally in the GOS to
    get acceptance for a second round with a clear incentive for
    progress, i.e. threatening with legislation in the absence of a
    voluntary agreement. There is some resistance in the Center party
    led Ministry of Enterprise, Energy, and Communications, and
    negotiations are on-going at senior GOS-levels.

Comments: Maybe not a full mission accomplished on the checklist, except a George Bush carrier-style one, but ordering participants to talks under a threat of legislation is at least a very good effort. This is one of the ugliest imaginable way of destroying the Net as we know it. It’s as if the Postal Service would be made responsible for the contents in a letter — for the words on the paper! — or if telecom companies would be held responsible for aiding and abetting crimes planned over the phone. If this were to come, they would only be able to allow certain predetermined, approved and harmless things to be communicated. “Press 1 to say bye.” Otherwise, they would be liable for everything said.

Needless to say, this is the American copyright industry’s dream.

The concept is completely foreign. The only thing helping somewhat against file sharing would be to kill the entire net, and this would be such an action.

The copyright industry’s lobby association Netopia is working intensely to push for exactly this, trying to spin it as “intermediary responsibility”.
Conclusion

So there it is. All in black and white, in excruciating and incriminating detail.

All the attacks on civil liberties and dismantlements of rights in Sweden, rights that have been and should be taken for granted, have been a demand from American trade interests. And these attacks continue to this date.

This takes some time to digest, as MEP Christian Engström writes (translated: “Tinfoil Hats Off for Sweden’s Puppet Government“). But now, we know that the politicians lied, all the time. Everything was mail-order legislation, violating Swedish citizens to benefit American industry. Just as we have claimed since 2006, but haven’t had the clear proof to show for it until now.



http://falkvinge.net/2011/09/05/cable-reveals-extent-of-lapdoggery-from-swedish-govt-on-copyright-monopoly/

Offline Letsbereal

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Re: US Threatens Sweden if they don't prosecute The Pirate bay.
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2012, 12:33:12 AM »
Must hear interview Max & Stacy just did with Falkvinge who started the Pirate party in Sweden: http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=227871.0
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Offline Letsbereal

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File Sharing Moves En Masse To The Darknet; Good Luck Shutting That Down
« Reply #9 on: March 05, 2012, 07:10:03 PM »
File Sharing Moves En Masse To The Darknet; Good Luck Shutting That Down
6 March 2012
, by Mike Masnick (TechDirt)
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20120305/03504817977/file-sharing-moves-en-masse-to-darknet-good-luck-shutting-that-down.shtml

from the the-industry-loses-another-generation dept

It's not like this wasn't easily predictable, but as the entertainment industry has "succeeded" in taking down Megaupload and continues to move against The Pirate Bay and others, anyone who's followed this space had to have known that file sharing would just move one step further underground.

We've seen the same thing after every single "victory" against file sharing since Napster was shut down.

Each time, it moves to a system slightly more underground and more distributed.

The early ones were still easy to takedown but as they get further underground, it just becomes worse for the industry (and makes it that much harder to win back those users).

The latest news is that there's been massive uptake of a growing number of anonymous, decentralized file-sharing tools.

As is pretty typical in these "shift" periods, it's still not clear which systems will "win" out over the others, but the leaders are starting to emerge.

The Torrentfreak article above mentions players like Tribler and RetroShare.

People in our comments have been discussing both, as well as Ares Galaxy.

Who knows if any of these apps are actually any good, but it seems pretty clear that people are continuing to file share -- they're just finding ways to do so that are even harder to track down and stop.

How long until the legacy entertainment industry starts publishing articles about these evil anonymous, decentralized file sharing systems and demanding new laws against them?
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline bento

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Yea the thing about torrents is they(industry people or contractors) get in the cluster and just start sending infringement letters to anyone there, you have to have an IP to send and receive a torrent. You can try to use VPN's but you get the same result. There are even companies contracted to get into the clusters and do mass sending.
We are all the sum of our tears. Too little and the ground is not fertile, and nothing can grow there. Too much and the best of us is washed away.

Offline Letsbereal

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International Pirate Party services
« Reply #11 on: May 10, 2012, 03:58:53 PM »
International Pirate Party services

http://tpb.piratenpartij.nl/

Deze specifieke proxy is op last van de rechter offline gehaald. Wij hadden bij de rechtbank aangegeven een kort geding te willen voeren, maar de rechter dulde helaas geen tegenspraak in deze. Wij beraden ons op verdere stappen. In de tussentijd hebben wij de beschikking van de rechter voor je online gezet op Bittorrent: http://www.mnova.eu/torrent/5220780/Beschikking_rechtbank_Piratenpartij_TPB_proxy.html

Vind je het ook belachelijk dat een site zomaar in één keer weg (http://depiratenpartij.wordpress.com/2012/04/14/aparte-ex-parte/) kan zijn?
Help ons mee om dit te veranderen en denk aan ons bij de komende verkiezingen. Tot die tijd kan je ons steunen door lid te worden en mee te doen. Je kunt ook doneren natuurlijk!
Lees ook ons partijprogramma eens!

Onze generieke proxy valt niet onder beschikking, en kan nog altijd gebruikt worden. Op ons blog kan je lezen hoe je die precies gebruikt.

International Pirate Party services:
Generieke proxy met dank aan Pirate Party Canada http://www.pirateproxy.net/
TPB proxy met dank aan Pirate Party United Kingdom http://tpb.pirateparty.org.uk/

Algemene tips:
http://www.ikwilthepiratebay.nl/
http://thepiratebayblokkade.nl/
MAFIAAFire https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/mafiaafire-piratebay-dancing
Automatically routes your website request via a random proxy for some (that you choose) sites. This has the effect of "unblocking" blocked sites (blocked via DNS/IP address at the ISP level) as well as making 'tracking' you next to impossible.
http://en.flossmanuals.net/bypassing-censorship/

Generieke Proxies:
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=nl&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.nl&sl=en&tl=nl&twu=1&u=http://wikileaks.org/ (url komt op het eind)
http://all4xs.net/repress/wikileaks.org (url komt op het eind)
http://zoekja.nl/proxy
http://anonymouse.org
http://boratproxy.com
http://www.stupidcensorship.com/
http://thepiratebay.se.ipv6.sixxs.org/ (werkt alleen als je ipv6 hebt, en dat hebben alleen xs4all abonnees en hobbyisten)

Specifieke proxies:
http://lanunbay.org
http://malaysiabay.org
http://alt.ragerik.info/
http://all4xs.net/repress/thepiratebay.se
http://thepiratebay.ee
http://labaia.ws/
http://tpb.europeancensorship.eu/nph-tpb.cgi

Lijsten van proxies:
http://www.xroxy.com/proxylist.htm
http://www.hidemyass.com/proxy-list/
http://openprox.info/
http://www.proxy4free.com/
http://proxy-list.org/en/index.php
http://proxy.org/

Lijst van lijsten van proxies:
http://www.dmoz.org/Computers/Internet/Proxying_and_Filtering/Hosted_Proxy_Services/Free/Proxy_Lists/

Lijst van VPN-aanbieders:
https://www.ipredator.se/
https://www.blackvpn.com/
http://airvpn.org/ AirVPN offers free accounts without bandwidth or traffic restrictions and without ads for activists by request.
http://strongvpn.com/
https://mullvad.net

Gratis:
https://hotspotshield.com/
http://www.ultravpn.fr/
http://www.thefreevpn.com/
http://cyberghostvpn.com/
http://www.vpnod.com/
http://www.vpnsteel.com/
http://www.projectloki.com/
http://itshidden.com/

Overige betaalde VPN-aanbieders:
Anonymizer, GhostSurf, XeroBank, HotSpotVPN, WiTopia, VPN Swiss, Steganos, Hamachi LogMeIn, Relakks, Skydur, iPig, iVPN.net, FindNot, Dold, UnblockVPN, SecureIX.
Zie ook: http://en.cship.org/wiki/VPN

Gratis shell accounts met SSH tunnel:
http://shellmix.com

I2P Proxy:
http://thepiratebay.i2p/?i2paddresshelper=ingekort gebruik de link
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Letsbereal

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Download traffic has not decreased after blockade Pirate Bay
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2012, 08:48:30 PM »
Download traffic has not decreased after blockade Pirate Bay (google trans Dutch) http://tinyurl.com/bs4eyx7
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Letsbereal

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Dutch Pirate Party getting into house with 1 seat according to poll
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2012, 08:39:37 PM »
Dutch Pirate Party getting into house with 1 seat in 150 seat parliament according to poll
(google trans from Dutch) http://tinyurl.com/c8vzcuz

ORG: http://www.duken.nl/piratenpartij-kan-volgens-peiling-de-tweede-kamer-in/

Last time I voted for the Dutch Pirate Party they didn’t make it so this is a huge progression.

->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Letsbereal

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Loose Lips Don’t Sink Pirate Ships, as ISPs Tell All That Censoring the Pirate Bay Is a Lost Cause
12 July 2012
, by Jon Partridge (GIZMODO)
http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2012/07/loose-lips-dont-sink-pirate-ships-as-isps-tell-all-that-censoring-the-pirate-bay-is-a-lost-cause/

Ahh The Pirate Bay. Its notoriety is far and wide, and the torrent site has been blocked and censored in many countries now, including our very own Blighty. Yet a mountain of evidence has been piling up that points to these blocks proving as useless as we all thought. BitTorrent traffic continues unabated, and in some cases, has actually increased.

The whole point of these blocks was to decrease online piracy, yet various pieces of evidence point to quite the contrary. Dutch ISP XS4All showed that once they started to enforce the ban on the Pirate Bay, BitTorrent traffic actually increased. Two other Dutch ISPs have also made similar statements, stating that the blockade has zero effect on BitTorrent traffic. Even researchers are finding some interesting statistics, as comparing the number of participants in a BitTorrent swarm before and after the blockade went into effect saw zero difference.

Pirates are going to pirate, no matter how many blocks are put in place, as there are countless ways to get around them. Various other torrent websites exist, plus hundreds of proxies allow users to get to blocked websites anyway. One of the most popular is operated by our very own UK Pirate Party, and as a result, it has pushed their political website to the top 500 sites in the UK — higher than any other political party.

It definitely looks like the entertainment industry needs to find better ways of giving customers what they want, legally of course, as censorship and throwing around court orders and site blocks doesn’t seem to be working. At all.
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline bento

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Re: Download traffic has not decreased after blockade Pirate Bay
« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2012, 10:29:35 AM »
They (entertainment industry) are still wed to the money changers and the old ways. The artist are just as much victims in this, as they are held hostage to the moneyed interest also. A new wave keeps moving forward and the artist may give their stuff away and get re-compensated directly by their fans who then support the artist work with out the middle men parasites. The PTB wish to try and stop this any way they can, as their parasitic interests are at stake and free will is escaping.
We are all the sum of our tears. Too little and the ground is not fertile, and nothing can grow there. Too much and the best of us is washed away.

Offline bento

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Re: Download traffic has not decreased after blockade Pirate Bay
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2012, 10:41:17 AM »
On a positive note ACTA was shot down in the EU.
We are all the sum of our tears. Too little and the ground is not fertile, and nothing can grow there. Too much and the best of us is washed away.

EvadingGrid

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Re: Download traffic has not decreased after blockade Pirate Bay
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2012, 11:51:46 AM »


EvadingGrid

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Re: Pirate Bay Docks in Peru: New System Will Make Domains “Irrelevant”
« Reply #19 on: December 18, 2013, 04:27:57 AM »
Here is the Pirate Browser

http://piratebrowser.com/

EvadingGrid

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Ok, so like they say on the Facebook page


Peru disapointed and cut the domain off without any notification. Moving on to http://thepiratebay.gy/





Offline Letsbereal

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Red Ice Insight - Pirate Bay Co-founder in Solitary Confinement
« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2013, 07:21:19 PM »
Red Ice Insight - Pirate Bay Co-founder in Solitary Confinement http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRbE280sIEg

20 December 2013, Red Ice Radio
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

EvadingGrid

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Re: Pirate Bay Docks in Peru: New System Will Make Domains “Irrelevant”
« Reply #22 on: December 22, 2013, 04:21:35 AM »
Just imagine they do the same thing to infowars.com, or prisonplanet.com or your website . . .

Offline Jacob Law

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Re: Pirate Bay Docks in Peru: New System Will Make Domains “Irrelevant”
« Reply #23 on: December 22, 2013, 10:11:21 AM »
This was a good Video little over 10 minutes; they truly are trying to shut down the truth, heads up everyone.
What do you under-stand?

Offline sab

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Re: Pirate Bay Docks in Peru: New System Will Make Domains “Irrelevant”
« Reply #24 on: December 24, 2013, 09:35:00 PM »
http://rt.com/news/pirate-bay-returns-sweden-504/

Back to .SE

Just imagine they do the same thing to infowars.com, or prisonplanet.com or your website.........
Make a TOR/Firefox custom browser, same as Pirate Bay?


EvadingGrid

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Re: Pirate Bay Docks in Peru: New System Will Make Domains “Irrelevant”
« Reply #25 on: December 25, 2013, 04:13:53 AM »
http://rt.com/news/pirate-bay-returns-sweden-504/

Back to .SE

Just imagine they do the same thing to infowars.com, or prisonplanet.com or your website.........
Make a TOR/Firefox custom browser, same as Pirate Bay?


Your right, its moved again

http://thepiratebay.se/

Offline Letsbereal

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Pirate Party runs aground in European Parliamentary elections
« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2014, 10:42:54 AM »
Pirate Party runs aground in European Parliamentary elections – Voters force Swedish Pirate MEPs to walk plank as German Pirates wins seat
26 May 2014
, by Simon Sharwood (The Register)
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2014/05/26/european_voters_make_pirate_party_walk_the_plank/

Update: Voters have not been entirely kind to The Pirate Party in elections for the European Parliament.

Sweden’s two Pirate Party European Members of Parliament have not been re-elected, with the local authorities tally suggesting a collapse in the Party’s vote to 2.2%, down from 2009′s 7.1%.

In Finland, where Pirate Bay founder Peter Sunde sought a seat, counting the Party secured just 0.7% of the vote.

But Germany’s Piraten Partei has claimed victory, with candidate Julia Reda set to take win a seat after scoring 1.4% of the vote.

She quickly set out her stall, on Twitter of course, as an opponent of the election’s big winners: parties of the right opposed to the very idea of the European Union.

The UK’s three Pirate candidates got nowhere near Reda’s vote: they appear to have collectively won fewer than 10,000 votes, or just 0.05% of those cast.

The Czech Republic’s Česká pirátská strana polled a respectable 4.78% of the vote, but that wasn’t enough to secure a seat.

Pirate Party candidates in Greece, Slovenia, Spain and Hungary appear not to have secured sufficient votes to make it out of the “other parties” column in their nations’ vote tallies.




DUTCH ‘PIRATEN PARTIJ’

Conclusion is that the Dutch Pirate Party has no seat at her first participation in the European elections. :(

It was also a difficult task, from 0 to 3.8%, while the established parties could enter.

Our members, volunteers and candidates, however, have done their best, and that paid off. 1.1% of the vote, the best result of the nationwide party so far and would yield at least one seat in parliamentary elections.

If this continues, it seems that the pirates in the next elections go boarding the Dutch parliament.
:)

https://piratenpartij.nl/europese-piratenpartij-hoopt-op-5-zetels-kiezers-bedankt/#more-889


Europe Voted: Anti-EU And Protest Parties Take Nearly A Third Of All Europarliament Seats
26 May 2014
, by Tyler Durden (Zero Hedge)
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-05-26/europe-voted-anti-eu-and-protest-parties-take-nearly-third-all-europarliament-seats
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

EvadingGrid

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Swedish Police Raid The Pirate Bay, Site Offline
« Reply #27 on: December 09, 2014, 06:55:09 PM »
Swedish Police Raid The Pirate Bay, Site Offline

Police in Sweden carried out a raid in Stockholm today, seizing servers, computers, and other equipment. At the same time The Pirate Bay and several other torrent-related sites disappeared offline. Although no official statement has been made, TF sources confirm action against TPB.

READ MORE
https://torrentfreak.com/swedish-police-raid-the-pirate-bay-site-offline-141209/

EvadingGrid

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Swedish Police Raid The Pirate Bay, Site Offline
« Reply #28 on: December 09, 2014, 06:57:32 PM »
While it seems certain that The Pirate Bay has been targeted today, it was not the only casualty. Several other torrent related sites including EZTV, Zoink, Torrage and the Istole tracker are also down.

SHTF

EvadingGrid

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Swedish Police Raid The Pirate Bay, Site Offline
« Reply #29 on: December 13, 2014, 12:48:47 PM »
So whats the latest news ?

So far as I can tell The Pirate Bay is still offline, as is EZTV !

EvadingGrid

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Pirate Bay Has Been Raided and Taken Down: Here’s What We Know
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2014, 03:34:31 PM »
Pirate Bay Has Been Raided and Taken Down: Here’s What We Know
http://www.wired.com/2014/12/pirate-bay-raided-taken-down/

The popular file-sharing service Pirate Bay was taken down today following a raid in Sweden by police who seized servers and computers.

The Pirate Bay portal went down Tuesday morning after Swedish police raided a server room in Stockholm over alleged copyright violations. In addition to its file-sharing section, Pirate Bay’s forum Suprbay.org was also down.

“There were a number of police officers and digital forensics experts there. This took place during the morning and continued until this afternoon. Several servers and computers were seized, but I cannot say exactly how many,” Swedish prosecutor Fredrik Ingblad told Radio Sweden.

Pirate Bay may not be the only target. According to TorrentFreak, other sites related to file sharing such as EZTV, Zoink, and Torrage went down today as well, though it’s not yet known if they were also raided.

Founded in 2003, Pirate Bay has been in the legal crosshairs for years, but has managed to stay afloat despite efforts by governments, anti-piracy groups and the music and film industries to close it down. Today’s raid comes after a number of recent events have occurred around the service, putting it in the spotlight once again.


READ MORE
http://www.wired.com/2014/12/pirate-bay-raided-taken-down/

EvadingGrid

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The Pirate Bay HAS NOT Been Resurrected – YET
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2014, 03:37:03 PM »
The Pirate Bay HAS NOT Been Resurrected – YET

By Andy
December 10, 2014
http://torrentfreak.com/the-pirate-bay-has-not-been-resurrected-yet-141210/


EvadingGrid

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The Pirate Bay
« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2014, 03:37:37 PM »

EvadingGrid

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ISP 's have lifted the censorship blockade on The Pirate Bay and EZTV
« Reply #33 on: December 15, 2014, 07:30:28 AM »
ISP 's have lifted the censorship blockade on The Pirate Bay and EZTV

They must be pretty confident that these sites are going to stay down . . .
Meanwhile we the people are left digging the web for scraps of rumours.

Looks like an inside job too me.

EvadingGrid

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Pirate Bay Responds to The Raid, Copies and The Future
« Reply #34 on: December 16, 2014, 09:42:40 PM »
Pirate Bay Responds to The Raid, Copies and The Future
https://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-crew-responds-to-the-raid-copies-and-the-future-141215/

he Pirate Bay crew has broken its silence for the first time since the site was knocked down hard by a raid in Sweden last week. The people behind the site are still considering their options and have no concrete comeback plans yet. Nevertheless, they encourage the public to keep the Kopimi spirit alive.

EvadingGrid

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The Open Bay: Now Anyone Can Run A Pirate Bay ‘Copy’
« Reply #35 on: December 19, 2014, 12:10:42 PM »
The Open Bay: Now Anyone Can Run A Pirate Bay ‘Copy’
http://torrentfreak.com/open-bay-now-everyone-can-run-pirate-bay-copy-141219/

The Isohunt.to team have decided to give an early Christmas present to Pirate Bay fans. They've launched "The Open Bay," an initiative that allows anyone to put a 'copy' of The Pirate Bay online, minimal technical knowledge required.


READ MORE
http://torrentfreak.com/open-bay-now-everyone-can-run-pirate-bay-copy-141219/

EvadingGrid

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Pirate Bay Domain Back Online, Waving a Pirate Flag
« Reply #36 on: December 22, 2014, 07:41:52 AM »

EvadingGrid

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Pirate Bay Domain Back Online, Waving a Pirate Flag
« Reply #37 on: December 22, 2014, 07:47:13 AM »
Pirate Bay Domain Back Online, Waving a Pirate Flag

By Ernesto
December 21, 2014
http://torrentfreak.com/pirate-bay-domain-back-online-waving-a-pirate-flag-141221/


Breaking

After nearly two weeks of downtime the official domain of The Pirate Bay is showing signs of life. For now ThePirateBay.se is only waving a pirate flag, but that's good enough to give many Pirate Bay users hope for a full recovery.



EvadingGrid

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EZTV Is Back Online After Pirate Bay Raid
« Reply #38 on: December 23, 2014, 08:01:22 AM »

EvadingGrid

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The Pirate Bay - BACK ONLINE
« Reply #39 on: January 26, 2015, 06:13:05 PM »
Count Down Time is now at 5 days