Dr Kelly WAS murdered and there has to be a new inquest, say six top doctors

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Offline David Rothscum

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http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/topstories/2007/10/15/fingerprint-doubt-over-kelly-suicide-89520-19952329/
http://digg.com/politics/Police_Now_Suspect_Murder_in_Apparent_Suicide_of_Iraq_Wistle_Blower
Please digg it!

Fingerprint doubt over Kelly 'suicide'
Secret knife evidence points to murder, says MP
By Stewart Whittingham And Graham Brough 15/10/2007
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Newly released evidence adds to the theory that MoD scientist Dr David Kelly was murdered and did not commit suicide, an MP has claimed.

Norman Baker revealed that the penknife Dr Kelly apparently used to slash his wrist did not carry his own fingerprints.

Lib Dem Mr Baker said: "The angle you pick up a knife to kill yourself means there would be fingerprints.

"Someone who wanted to kill themselves wouldn't go to the lengths of wiping the knife clean of fingerprints.
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"It is just very suspicious. It is one of the things that makes me think Dr Kelly was murdered. The case should be re-opened."

UN weapons inspector Dr Kelly, 59, was found dead near his Oxfordshire home in 2003, days after he was named as the source of a BBC story that claimed the Government had "sexed up" a dossier on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction.

The dossier said Saddam Hussein could launch conventional nuclear or biological weapons within 45 minutes.

Independent doctors have said neither the cut to Dr Kelly's wrist nor the drugs found in his body were enough to kill him.

And they claimed the official cause of death, a severed ulnar artery in the wrist, was extremely unlikely to be fatal.

Mr Baker, who is writing a book on Dr Kelly, used the Freedom of Information Act to discover from Thames Valley police that no fingerprints were on the penknife. The MoD germ warfare expert was not wearing gloves nor were any found at the scene.

An inquest ruled his death was suicide and the Hutton Inquiry exonerated then-PM Tony Blair.

Dr Kelly's former colleague, UN weapons expert Richard Spertzel, claimed the scientist was on Saddam's hitlist because his work in the 90s had forced Iraq to admit to a secret biological arsenal.

A Thames Valley police spokeswoman said: "There were no fingerprints on the knife.

"This, however, does not change the official explanation for his death."

Dr Kelly's wife Janice has said she is certain he committed suicide.

She refused to comment on Mr Baker's murder theory.

Offline DAVIDENGLAND

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2008, 08:17:29 pm »
‘It would have taken him a long time to reach the artery that was severed and it would have been very painful.

‘As a scientist, David had no need to kill himself that way. I don’t understand why the British Government isn’t thoroughly investigating this. Logically, he cannot have committed suicide.’


David Kelly's closest female confidante on why he COULDN'T have killed himself

31st August 2008


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1050919/David-Kellys-closest-female-confidante-COULDNT-killed-himself.html
The question isn't whether we are right or wrong, the question is, are we even in the conversation??

Offline DAVIDENGLAND

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2008, 08:20:43 pm »
Why did a heat-seeking helicopter fly over the exact spot
where David Kelly’s body was found - and detect nothing?

Police failed to find the body of missing Government scientist David Kelly despite using a helicopter with heat-seeking equipment and flying over the exact spot where his corpse was later discovered.

Dr Kelly’s body was found in July 2003 at the height of the controversy over Britain’s invasion of Iraq.

Unusually, no inquest into his death has ever been held. Instead, the Hutton Inquiry was set up by Tony Blair to investigate the circumstances surrounding his death.



http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1048585/Why-did-heat-seeking-helicopter-fly-exact-spot-David-Kelly-8217-s-body--detect-nothing.html


The question isn't whether we are right or wrong, the question is, are we even in the conversation??

EvadingGrid

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2008, 08:27:36 pm »
Dr Kelly was murdered.


Offline DAVIDENGLAND

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2008, 07:08:48 am »
This is starting to become a little clearer. It seems to me that there will be another probe and I'm sure they'll find that he was murdered, by the Iraqi's. Another mystery solved by our loving government. Nothing to see here move along folks ...


MP calls for new Kelly death probe after MoS revelations cast doubt on whether he was able to kill himself

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1053040/MP-calls-new-Kelly-death-probe-MoS-revelations-cast-doubt-able-kill-himself.html
The question isn't whether we are right or wrong, the question is, are we even in the conversation??

Offline mapko

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2008, 07:34:57 am »
I never believed it in the first place, its just so sad to see how far my government (all our governments) will go.
Dictatorship naturally arises out of democracy, and the most aggravated form of tyranny and slavery out of the most extreme liberty - Plato

Offline FRANKLIN

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2008, 05:04:36 am »
I don't trust his wife's opinions.  A lot of wives speak very matter of factly about dead husbands in these sort of cases, as if being their wives gives them the final word.  They could be just protecting themselves from a similar fate.

Look at Christine Kubrick.  She has spoken out about conspiracy theories regarding Stanley Kubrick.  However, she has been proven wrong on many of the things she has said for simply not being aware of what her own husband had previously said in interviews.  She also appeard in that moon landing documentary, which, both, got all the facts of the common theory wrong and placed her along side some people who Kubrick had been very outspoken against over the years.

Offline Dig

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2008, 02:21:55 pm »
I don't trust his wife's opinions.  A lot of wives speak very matter of factly about dead husbands in these sort of cases, as if being their wives gives them the final word.  They could be just protecting themselves from a similar fate.

Look at Christine Kubrick.  She has spoken out about conspiracy theories regarding Stanley Kubrick.  However, she has been proven wrong on many of the things she has said for simply not being aware of what her own husband had previously said in interviews.  She also appeard in that moon landing documentary, which, both, got all the facts of the common theory wrong and placed her along side some people who Kubrick had been very outspoken against over the years.

I have no idea why the wives go along with it.  Maybe they are the first to be targeted and controlled.  Who knows.  I would not relate this wife who has been reported to give a one line response to Christine.  (sorry for this being O/T) What Christine did in that moon farce video was really low. She appeared in side by side clips with Kissinger and Rumsfeld.  This disinfo movie's agenda was to subvert any rational discussion concerning what NASA is actually up to. I almost puked when I saw it and realized its implications.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline BlueBaron

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2008, 02:37:55 pm »
I tell you how I known why he didn't kill his self. The reason is because he took his dog out for a walk. Now most people love their animals and I'm sure he loved his dog, if he knew he we was going to commit suicide in a forest, he would have known the dog may have wandered off and got lost and never be found or worse. Knowing he loved his dog, he would have gone for a walk alone.

BUT HE NEVER, HE TOOK THE DOG ! ! !, No way you bastards killed him, Blair and the Queens are murders.

Our Learders are Psychotic Nazi scum shit.

Offline L2Design

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #9 on: January 20, 2009, 07:57:41 pm »
concerning what NASA is actually up to. I almost puked when I saw it and realized its implications.

John Lear said the biggest gaseous thing in the universe is NASA

LMAO! youtube john lear

Offline DAVIDENGLAND

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Re: New evidence David Kelly was suicided
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2009, 06:46:03 am »
This guy has been on Alex's show. He's promoting the theory that Dr Kelly was killed by Iraqi's who were keen to make sure the Iraq War went ahead without any problems. So basically he's telling part of the truth but he switches MI5/MI6 for Iraqis. He's a shill simple as that.



Why I know weapons expert Dr David Kelly was murdered, by the MP who spent a year investigating his death

By NORMAN BAKER


For Tony Blair it was a glorious day. He was in the United States being feted by the U.S. Congress and President Bush.
Their adulation was such that he was being offered the rare honour of a Congressional Gold Medal.
Naturally enough, Bush and his administration were hugely grateful for Blair's decision to join the United States in its invasion of Iraq.

That invasion was supposed to lead to the discovery and disposal of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and make the world a safer place.
But as Blair was lapping up the grateful plaudits from the U.S. Congress on July 17, 2003, the man who had done more than almost any other individual on earth to contain the threat from WMD lay dead in the woods at Harrowdown Hill in Oxfordshire.

For Dr David Kelly, the UK's leading weapons inspector, there was to be no adulation, no medal, no standing ovation.
His life ended in the cold, lonely wood where he was found the next morning, his left wrist cut open, and three nearly-empty blister packs of painkillers in his jacket pocket.
His death was, of course, sensational front-page news. Dr Kelly, unknown to almost everybody at the beginning of that July, had in recent days barely been absent from media headlines.

Much to his chagrin he had been thrust into the harsh glare of publicity, accused of being the mole who expressed to the BBC deep concerns about the Government's "sexing up" of its dossier on weapons of mass destruction.
For Blair - accused of misusing, exaggerating or even inventing intelligence in order to justify the overthrow of Saddam Hussein - the stakes could not have been higher.
This was undoubtedly the greatest crisis of his premiership to date.
To add fuel to the flames, his director of communications, Alastair Campbell, had launched an unprecedented and vitriolic attack on the BBC, questioning its integrity and professionalism in the way it reported the story.
Suddenly finding himself under tremendous personal pressure, it seemed that Dr Kelly had buckled and decided to commit suicide.

That, at least, was the official version of events, as decided by the Hutton inquiry, set up by the Government with lightning speed within hours of Dr Kelly's body being found.
The media, the political establishment, indeed almost everybody accepted Lord Hutton's verdict. But the more I examined it, the more it became clear to me that Hutton's judgment was faulty and suspect in virtually all important respects.
I was not alone in these suspicions. Letters began to appear in the press from leading medical specialists, in which they queried the suicide verdict.

The letters were well argued, raising profound and disturbing questions that remain unanswered to this day.
Increasingly concerned, I decided to give up my post on the Liberal Democrat front bench to look into Dr Kelly's death.
My investigations have since convinced me that it is nigh- on clinically impossible for Dr Kelly to have died by his own hand and that both his personality and the other circumstantial evidence strongly militate against suicide.
Given that his death was clearly not an accident, that leaves only one alternative - that he must have been murdered.
This is not a conclusion I have come to lightly. I simply set out to examine the facts, to test the evidence, and to follow the trail wherever it took me.
The account I give in this series may not be correct in all respects, but I suggest that it is rather more credible than the verdict reached by Lord Hutton.

I certainly believe there are enough doubts, enough questions, enough of a smell of stinking fish to justify re-opening this episode officially.

My investigations have been a journey into the unknown, and one that has taken many peculiar turns. Perhaps the most sinister came soon after starting my inquiries last year.
After writing a newspaper article outlining my early concerns, I found myself on a train speeding towards Exeter to see a man who had agreed to meet me only on condition of anonymity and after some rather circuitous arrangements.
These involved much complicated use of public telephone boxes to minimise the chance that his contact with me could be traced.
Finally, we talked over a glass of wine in a rather nondescript club.
He told me that he had recently retired but had connections to both the police and the security services, a claim which I subsequently verified through careful checks.
Like me, he had many doubts about the true circumstances surrounding Dr Kelly's death and he had begun making his own surreptitious inquiries around Southmoor, the Oxfordshire village which was Dr Kelly's home.
Posing as a freelance journalist, he had attempted to contact the key policemen involved in investigating the case. In this he was unsuccessful but within an hour he received an unexpected return call.
The person on the other end of the line did not bother with formalities, but instead cut to the quick. How would my contact welcome a full tax inspection of his business, VAT, national insurance, the lot?
Life could be made very difficult, he was told. How did he fancy having no money?
Naturally, this prospect did not appeal, and there he left matters until, at a wedding, he chanced upon an old friend whom he described to me initially as a very senior civil servant, but later as a "spook" from MI6.
He told his friend of his interest in the Kelly affair and also of the threatening phone call he had received.

His friend's reply was a serious one: he should be careful, particularly when using his phone or his computer. Moreover, he should let the Kelly matter drop.
But my contact did not do so. Two weeks later he met his friend again, this time in a pub, and pressed him on the matter.
>{? His friend took him outside, and as they stood in the cool air, told him Dr Kelly's death had been "a wet operation, a wet disposal".
He also warned him in very strong terms to leave the matter well alone. This time he decided to heed the warning.
I asked my contact to explain what he understood by the terms his friend had used. Essentially, it seems to refer to an assassination, perhaps carried out in a hurry.
A few months later, I called my contact to check one or two points of his story. He told me that three weeks after our meeting in Exeter, his house had been broken into and his laptop - containing all his material on Kelly - had been stolen. Other valuable goods, including a camera and an LCD television, had been left untouched.
It was sobering to be given such a clear indication that Dr Kelly had been murdered, but the scientist himself appears to have been fully aware that his work made him a target for assassins.
British diplomat David Broucher told the Hutton inquiry that, some months before Dr Kelly's death, he had asked him what would happen if Iraq were invaded.
Rather chillingly, Dr Kelly replied that he "would probably be found dead in the woods".


At the inquiry, this was construed as meaning that he had already had suicidal thoughts. That, of course, is patently absurd.
Nobody can seriously suggest that he was suicidal at the time the meeting took place - yet Lord Hutton seems to have made his mind up about the way in which DrKelly died before the inquiry even began.
The result is a series of gaping, unresolved anomalies.
Crucially, in his report, Hutton declared that the principal cause of death was bleeding from a selfinflicted knife wound on Dr Kelly's left wrist.

Yet Dr Nicholas Hunt, the pathologist who carried out the post-mortem examination on DrKelly, stated that he had cut only one blood vessel - the ulnar artery.
Since the arteries in the wrist are of matchstick thickness, severing just one of them does not lead to life-threatening blood loss, especially if it is cut crossways, the method apparently adopted by DrKelly, rather than along its length.
The artery simply retracts and stops bleeding.
As a scientist who would have known more about human anatomy than most, DrKelly was particularly unlikely to have targeted the ulnar artery. Buried deep in the wrist, it can only be accessed through the extremely painful process of cutting through nerves and tendons.
It is not common for those who commit suicide to wish to inflict significant pain on themselves as part of the process.
In Dr Kelly's case, the unlikelihood is compounded by the suggestion that his chosen instrument-was a blunt pruning knife.
This would only have increased the pain and would have failed to cut the artery cleanly, thereby hastening the clotting process.
Statistics bear out the extremely low incidence of individuals dying by cutting the ulnar artery, with only one recorded case in Britain during the entire year of Dr Kelly's death.

Given that the average human body contains ten pints of blood, and that about half of these must be lost before death ensues, we must also ask ourselves why there were clear signs at the postmortem-that Dr Kelly had retained much of his blood.
We cannot be sure exactly how much since, inexplicably, the pathologist's report does not provide an estimate of the residual volume, but what he did record was the appearance of "livor mortis" on Dr Kelly's body.

This purplish-red discolouration of the skin occurs when the heart is no longer pumping and blood begins to settle in the lower part of the body. But if Dr Kelly had bled to death, as we are led to believe, then significant livor mortis would not have occurred. Put simply, there would not have been enough blood in his body.

More significant still, while the effects of five pints of blood spurting from a body could not easily be hidden, the members of the search party who found his body did not even notice that Dr Kelly had apparently incised his wrist with a knife.

Their arrival was followed by that of paramedics who pointedly referred to the fact that there was remarkably little blood around the body.

If the idea that blood loss brought about Dr Kelly's death is flawed, still less plausible is the suggestion that he chose an overdose to quicken his end.

Mai Pederson, a close friend of DrKelly's, has confirmed that he hated all types of tablets and had an aversion even to swallowing a headache pill.
Yet we are told that he removed from his house three blister packs, each containing ten of the co-proxamol painkillers which his wife Janice took for her arthritis.
Each of these oval pills was about half an inch long. Since there was only one tablet left, the implication is that he had swallowed 29 of them. If this is right, we are being asked to believe that Dr Kelly indulged in a further masochistic act in an attempt to take his life.
A further objection is that police evidence states there was a halflitre bottle of Evian water by the body which had not been fully drunk.
Common sense tells us that quite a lot of water would be required to swallow 29 large tablets. It is frankly unlikely, with only a small bottle of water to hand, that any would have been left undrunk.
Stranger still, tests revealed the presence of only the equivalent of a fifth of one pill in Dr Kelly's stomach.
Even allowing for natural metabolising, this cannot easily be reconciled with the idea that he swallowed 29 of them.
Forensic toxicologist Alexander Allan told the Hutton inquiry that although the levels of co-proxamol in Dr Kelly's blood were higher than therapeutic levels, they were less than a third of what would normally be found in a fatal overdose.
Furthermore, it is generally accepted that concentrations of a drug in the blood can increase by as much as tenfold after death, leaving open the possibility that he consumed only a thirtieth of the dose necessary to kill him.
As for Dr Kelly's state of mind, in the eyes of those who knew him well he was the last person who might be expected to take his own life.
A recent convert to the Baha'i faith which expressly forbids suicide, he was a strong character who had survived many difficult situations in the past.
Just a day before his 20th birthday in May 1964, his own mother had killed herself with an overdose. Though this had naturally affected him deeply at the time, there was nothing to suggest that it was on his mind at this point in his life.
His friend Mai Pederson recalled a conversation they once had about his mother's death. Would he ever contemplate suicide himself, she asked. 'Good God no, I couldn't ever imagine doing that," he is said to have replied. "I would never do it."
Later many people would conclude that the seeds of his suicide lay in his uncomfortable appearance before MPs on the Foreign Affairs Committee on Tuesday, July 15, just three days before his death.
Grilled for more than an hour during this televised hearing, he was clearly under considerable pressure and yet one journalist recalled him smiling afterwards.

By the time he gave evidence before the Intelligence and Security Committee the following day, he was even managing to crack a joke or two.
His emotional state certainly did not appear to give any major cause for alarm on the morning of the Thursday he disappeared.
His wife Janice later described him as "tired, subdued but not depressed" and the e-mails he sent from his home during those hours suggested that his mood, if anything, was upbeat.

"Many thanks for your thoughts," he wrote to one colleague. "It has been difficult. Hopefully will all blow over by the end of the week and I can travel to Baghdad and get on with the real work."
Indeed, so keen was Dr Kelly to get back to Iraq that he spoke to Wing Commander John Clark at the Ministry of Defence about when he could return.
A trip was booked for him the following Friday and his diary, recovered by the police, shows that the trip had been entered for that day. People about to kill themselves do not generally first book an airline ticket for a flight they have no intention of taking.
Since none of this fits the profile of a man about to commit suicide, we are faced with an obvious question. If Dr Kelly did not kill himself, then who might have been responsible for his death?
There are, it must be admitted, a number of possible suspects. In the course of a long career in the shadowy world of arms control, Dr Kelly had made powerful enemies.
Back in 1991, for example, he was part of a team that exposed Russia's tests of biological weapons for offensive purposes - a field in which they had invested huge sums of money. This could easily have sparked a desire for revenge, if not from the state itself then from individual Russians.
Dr Kelly also had intimate knowledge of biological weapons research in apartheid-era South Africa that some might have preferred not to see the light of day.
It has also been suggested that he had dealings with Mossad, the Israeli secret service, about illegal bacterial weapon activity.
But it seems very unlikely that the anger of old foes would have simmered for years and then exploded just as Dr Kelly emerged in the political spotlight in 2003.
Quite simply, it would qualify as an astonishing coincidence if the cause of his death were not rooted in the furore over Iraq.
At this point, it has to be asked whether there were elements in the British intelligence services, or indeed within 10 Downing Street itself, who would have wanted Dr Kelly dead.
This is a possibility I have seriously considered. But it is difficult, frankly, to think that anyone in the Government could have thought DrKelly's death to be in their interest, even were they morally prepared to bring it about.
After all, the death of Dr Kelly presented Tony Blair with his greatest political challenge, and put the political focus firmly onto the whole Iraq debacle, which cannot be where the Government would have wanted it.
The more I investigated this affair, the more I realised that people who had worked with David Kelly suspected some kind of link with the Iraqis themselves.

Diplomat David Broucher told the Hutton inquiry that he interpreted Dr Kelly's remark about being found "dead in the woods" to mean that "he was at risk of being attacked by the Iraqis in some way".
Dr Kelly's friend Mai Pederson confirmed to the police that the scientist had received death threats from supporters of Saddam Hussein, who regarded him as an enemy on account of his past success at uncovering their weapons programmes.
This was something Dr Kelly privately acknowledged but refused to be cowed by, in a very British, stiff upper lip kind of way.
The theory that he may have been murdered by elements loyal to Saddam is supported by Dick Spertzel, America's most senior biological weapons inspector, who worked closely with Dr Kelly in Iraq.
"A number of us were on an Iraqi hit list," he told me matter-of-factly. "I was number three, and David was a couple behind that."
But Saddam loyalists are not the only Iraqis we need to consider. There are others, too, with rather closer links to the West.
Much of the information about Saddam's supposed weapons of mass destruction, on which Britain and America based their case for war, was provided by Iraqi dissidents eager to see his overthrow.
This information was sensational and, as events turned out, wildly distorted and in most regards plain false.
One of the central figures here was Ahmed Chalabi, leader of the so-called Iraqi National Congress and the CIA's favourite Iraqi opposition politician.
A financier with a decidedly chequered past - he was found guilty of embezzlement and forgery after $158 million disappeared from a bank he founded in Jordan - Chalabi made no secret of his wish to drag the United States into war with Saddam and was apparently prepared to say anything to achieve that end.
A key Iraqi informer codenamed "Curveball" - who claimed to have led a team equipping mobile laboratories to produce biological weapons for Saddam, but was later entirely discredited - is believed to have been the brother of one of Chalabi's aides.
Chalabi's fingerprints can also be found on the now notorious claims by another defector that Saddam had 20 or more secret sites where weapons of mass destruction could be found. Subsequent searches showed this allegation to be utterly without foundation.
Naturally, those like Dr Kelly who, by sticking to the facts, weakened the case for invasion beforehand and discredited those who had exaggerated it afterwards, were unhelpful to Chalabi and his colleagues. The last thing they wanted was the sober truth to prevail.
Another important figure here is Iyad Allawi, leader of the Iraqi National Accord, another organisation created to oppose Saddam. Before they parted ways, he was Saddam's supporter and friend.
There are many who tell of Allawi's violent history. As a young man, he is alleged to have been present at the torture of Iraqi communists who were hung from the ceiling and beaten.
While living in London in the Seventies, he was allegedly the head of Iraq's intelligence operation in Europe, informing on opponents of Saddam who will have faced torture and death when they returned home.
Allawi went on to develop a fruitful relationship with MI6 and the CIA. After the Iraq invasion, he was appointed Prime Minister in the country's interim government - only to face allegations (which he strongly denied) that he had personally shot seven insurgents in the head with a pistol at Baghdad's Al-Amariyah security centre.
"This is how we must deal with terrorists," Allawi is alleged to have told a stunned audience of close to 30 onlookers. "We must destroy anyone who wants to destroy the Iraqi people."
The new Prime Minister's actions are said to have prompted one U.S. official to comment: "What a mess we're in - we got rid of one son of a bitch only to get another."
The Americans apparently referred to Allawi as "Saddam lite".

Before the Iraq invasion, Allawi's organisation - just like Ahmed Chalabi's - was responsible for eye- catching but groundless intelligence exploited by supporters of war. #
In the case of Allawi's group, it was reports passed to MI6 in the spring and summer of 2002, including the false claim that Saddam had weapons of mass destruction which he could deploy at 45 minutes' notice.
This now infamous "45-minute claim" fed through to the dossier of intelligence which was used as the justification for our involvement in the invasion of Iraq.
It was this dossier, and the 45-minute claim in particular, that David Kelly challenged in his crucial interview with the BBC.
By doing so, did he sign his own death warrant?
 
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-488667/Why-I-know-weapons-expert-Dr-David-Kelly-murdered-MP-spent-year-investigating-death.html


The question isn't whether we are right or wrong, the question is, are we even in the conversation??

Offline frenchlifeboat

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13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2009, 07:06:38 pm »
Lucky 13 eh ?

full article here - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1199109/13-doctors-demand-inquest-Dr-David-Kellys-death.html

Highlights - 'I think it is highly likely he was assassinated'  He could not have died from loss of blood, say the experts

The death of Government scientist David Kelly returned to haunt Labour today as a group of doctors announced that they were mounting a legal challenge to overturn the finding of suicide.
Dr Kelly's body was found six years ago this week in woods close to his Oxfordshire home, shortly after he was exposed as the source of a BBC news report questioning the grounds for war in Iraq.
Unusually, no coroner's inquest was held into his death.

The only official verdict has come from the Hutton Inquiry, commissioned by Tony Blair, which concluded that Dr Kelly, 59, died from loss of blood after cutting his wrist with a blunt gardening knife.
Critics regarded the report as a 'whitewash', and Mr Blair remains acutely sensitive to the accusation that he has 'blood on his hands' over the scientist's death.
But now a team of 13 specialist doctors has compiled a detailed medical dossier that rejects the Hutton conclusion on the grounds that a cut to the ulnar artery, which is small and difficult to access, could not have caused death.
It will be used by their lawyers to demand a formal inquest and the release of Dr Kelly's autopsy report, which has never been published. It will also be sent to Sir John Chilcot's forthcoming inquiry into the Iraq War.
The 12-page opinion, a copy of which has been seen by The Mail on Sunday, concludes: 'The bleeding from Dr Kelly's ulnar artery is highly unlikely to have been so voluminous and rapid that it was the cause of death.
'We advise the instructing solicitors to obtain the autopsy reports so that the concerns of a group of properly interested medical specialists can be answered.'
The doctors do not say how, or why, they believe Dr Kelly did die but they have worked closely with campaigning Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker, who believes that the scientist was murdered by enemies he made in the course of his work as a weapons inspector.
And two of the doctors have added to the sense of persistent intrigue surrounding Dr Kelly by claiming that thousands of emails relating to the case had 'vanished' from their computers, in what one claimed was an act of 'state-sponsored sabotage'.
A coroner's inquest into Dr Kelly's death was suspended before it could begin by order of the then Lord Chancellor Lord Falconer. He used the Coroners Act to designate the Hutton Inquiry as 'fulfilling the function of an inquest', but as a judicial investigation it had no power to make witnesses give evidence under oath.
After taking evidence from - but not cross-examining - Dr Nicholas Hunt, the pathologist who carried out the post-mortem examination, Lord Hutton concluded that 'the principal cause of death was bleeding from incised wounds to the left wrist' combined with the consumption of painkillers and 'silent coronary artery disease'.
The doctors also say that the level of the painkiller co-proxamol in Dr Kelly's blood was about one third of that required to produce death and point to Dr Hunt's comments at the end of giving evidence to Lord Hutton.
Asked if there was anything further he would like to say on the circumstances leading to Dr Kelly's death, he said: 'Nothing I could say as a pathologist, no.'
After the report was published, Dr Hunt added to the doctors' suspicions by telling Channel 4 that he thought a full coroner's inquest should be held.
The doctors have hired solicitor Martin Day, of Leigh Day and Co, and received advice from barrister Richard Hermer, QC, both of whom have a strong track record in civil liberties actions, including winning nearly £3million in compensation from the British Government for the family of Iraqi Baha Mousa, who died while being detained by UK troops.
They intend to use the Coroners Act to challenge Lord Falconer's suspension of the inquest.
One of the doctors, David Halpin, told The Mail on Sunday that they had argued their case in the legal document in 'microscopic' detail.
He said: 'We reject haemorrhage as the cause of death and see no contrary opinion which would stand its ground. I think it is highly likely he was assassinated.'
Mr Baker said: 'The fact that eminent medical experts feel so strongly that the official explanation for Dr Kelly's death cannot be sustained and are now taking legal action against the Government to secure a proper inquest demonstrates both how suspect Lord Hutton's conclusions were and how this dark chapter cannot be closed unless Sir John Chilcott's inquiry into the Iraq war addresses this issue.
'A proper inquest into Dr Kelly's death must take place.'
Among the doctors is Christopher Burns-Cox, 71, the former senior consultant physician for the Frenchay Healthcare Trust, Bristol, and current co-chairman of the NHS consultants' association.
Mr Halpin, 69, meanwhile, is a former lecturer in anatomy at King's College, London, and a former consultant in orthopaedic and trauma surgery at Torbay Hospital. He continued in general practice until 2005.
Mr Halpin said that he lost more than 6,000 pieces of correspondence - many relating to Dr Kelly - during his investigation, explaining that the mystery began when the 'firewall' on his computer, which all similar machines are fitted with as a security measure, became inactive without warning.
His emails started disappearing as though they were being sifted remotely. 'I believe this will have been done by a state-sponsored agency and not by an amateur acting singly,' he said.
A close associate of Mr Halpin's who has also taken an active interest in the case confirmed to The Mail on Sunday that at around the same time he, too, fell victim to what he believes was a rogue agent, losing 'somewhere in the region of 2,000 emails', many of which discussed Dr Kelly.
For professional reasons, the individual concerned, a civil servant, said that he could not be identified by name.
He said: 'I have no doubt that my computer was hacked into and I also have reason to believe that both my mobile telephone and my landline have been bugged until fairly recently. It echoes on the end of the line, things like that.
'But if I made an accusation like that in public without being able to prove it, it would compromise me and for the sake of my children I do not want to enter that territory. I cannot say any more about it at the moment.'
Mr Baker, who published a book about Dr Kelly's death in 2007, also believes that his computer was hacked into remotely, leading to the loss of sensitive files about David Kelly from his constituency office in Lewes, East Sussex.

'I think it is highly likely he was assassinated'And Mr Halpin added that Rowena Thursby, who helped establish the Kelly Investigation Group which has campaigned for the inquest into Dr Kelly's death to be reopened on several occasions, has also lost scores of emails in a similar, suspicious manner.
The developments come as investigative journalist Bob Coen prepares to screen a 90-minute documentary, Anthrax War, in London on the sixth anniversary of Dr Kelly's death, this Friday.
The film claims that Dr Kelly's death may have been linked to the secret world of germ warfare research.
Until his death Dr Kelly was privy to some of the state's most sensitive information and worked closely with the intelligence services of all the major industrialised countries.
Among notable claims in the film, which was made over four years, is Dr Kelly's connection with Dr Walter Basson, whose work for the South African apartheid regime used chemical and biological weapons research destined for extrajudicial execution, and whose goals included ethnic cleansing.
The film also suggests that Dr Kelly was preparing to write a book that would have breached the Official Secrets Act.


He could not have died from loss of blood, say the expertsThe draft version of the doctors’ dossier – a final version, including diagrams and a copy of Dr Kelly’s death certificate, is being prepared for lawyers this week – concentrates on the ulnar artery, a blood vessel in the forearm.
The Hutton Report quoted Dr Nicholas Hunt, the forensic pathologist who examined
Dr Kelly’s corpse, as seeing ‘evidence of a significant incised wound to his left wrist, in the depths of which his left artery had been completely severed...

‘The arterial injury had resulted in the loss of a significant volume of blood, as noted at
the scene.’

But the doctors draw on their specialist knowledge of human anatomy to argue in detail that a wound to this artery could not have resulted in enough blood loss to cause his death.

‘This artery has the width of a matchstick in its constricted state,’ they write.

‘It is not easily felt on the little finger side of the wrist... on the contrary, the radial artery
pulse is easily felt beneath the skin on the opposite side of the wrist. It is thus more
difficult to cut the ulnar artery.’

They go on to argue that, according to the evidence given by Dr Hunt to Lord Hutton’s
inquiry, Dr Kelly’s blood would have quickly clotted, thus stemming the flow and preventing his death.

They write: ‘Dr Hunt describes complete severance of this artery, ie transection. This
means the elasticity of the artery would have caused it to retract within its sheath.

‘Contraction of the circular smooth muscle within the arterial wall would have narrowed the artery, thus reducing or stopping blood flow.

Blood clots would have formed in the wound, but also within the narrowed artery.

‘That clotting within the artery would have happened more speedily because the cutting was done with considerable trauma, thus causing more damage to the lining membrane, the intima.

Damage to the cells of the intima causes aggregation of blood platelets, thus
hastening clotting within the vessel.’

The doctors cite a number of studies which they say prove for ‘all practical purposes’ that suicide using the means allegedly adopted by Dr Kelly ‘does not exist in Britain’.

Although the doctors do not believe the painkillers taken by Dr Kelly contributed to his
death in any way – as argued by Lord Hutton – they have restricted the scope of their dossier to refute the reasoning he used on the question of haemorrhage

PM B-Liars face said it all when he got off a plane in Japan as the Dr's death was announced..
 

luckee1

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2009, 07:33:32 pm »
You got any vid links to the reaction?

Great find BTW

Offline able

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2009, 08:23:19 pm »
tomorrows headline....

13 doctors commit suicide, government finds the deaths unrelated and claim multiple head shots  and lack of fingerprints common. 
my kids are not cannon fodder for the n.w.o!

Offline Philip King

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #14 on: July 12, 2009, 12:30:39 am »
You got any vid links to the reaction?

Great find BTW

I too, need to see this one again.

Offline ren

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2009, 06:20:40 pm »
Thank God, if there is any justice the truth will out.
This has always been not quite right, for most people and if the official findings are true then the governmentare complacent, in pushing a man to his death because as history has now pointed out he chose to tell the truth!!! ???
"You fool! You're thirty cents away from having a quarter! Where the f**k you gonna get a boat? " Sweet Dick Willie.

Offline frenchlifeboat

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2009, 02:08:16 pm »
I too, need to see this one again.

I remember seeing Blair on tv in Japan look ashen faced when confronted with the bad news. (in a guilty but surprised way, like someone ordering a hitman to do a job, but being surpised when the hit actually happens)   

At a press conference Saturday in Japan, Blair stood stony-faced and speechless when a journalist asked, “Have you got blood on your hands, prime minister? Are you going to resign over this?”
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/07/20/iraq/main564097.shtml


The dangers were apparent when the operation to control the fallout from Kelly's death, masterminded by Alastair Campbell in London, fell apart. Mr Blair, advised to express his sorrow as soon as he left his Tokyo bedroom on Saturday morning, found himself hounded throughout the day.

The low point was the press conference with the Japanese prime minister, Junichiro Koizumi, on Saturday when a Mail on Sunday reporter asked whether he had "blood on his hands". Outraged he froze to the spot and refused to respond.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2003/jul/21/uk.japan

Another good read
http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/news/article-563789/Lord-Levy-Terrible-news-weapons-experts-death-left-Blair-crying-When-end.html the comments at the end of this article say it all..

Video is more elusive..
http://www.itnsource.com/compilations/datesanddecades/2000s/?lr=S26100603 clips 52 to 54, although ITN want £149  to listen to the audio, and it's not clear.


Kelly was snuffed out, maybe Blair was totally innocent and it was Bush or Iraqi's or the easter bunny who had the problem go away, either way another dead innocent scientist.

Offline Biggs

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2009, 04:56:51 pm »
good to see these doctors taking a a stand, at least millions of people are reminded of the case and the clear coverup, and who knows perhaps the media will pursue this one...........a bit anyway.............as it is deemed obvious enough to do so and nobody will be able to trace the killers............................ so the real perps who ordered them to do it get off scot free.

But it still gets in the minds of people that this kind of thing goes on which can only be a good thing.
STOP THE KILLING NOW
END THE CRIMINAL SIEGE OF GAZA - FREE PALESTINE!!!!!!!

Offline PhoenixRising

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2009, 05:18:01 pm »
good to see these doctors taking a a stand, at least millions of people are reminded of the case and the clear coverup, and who knows perhaps the media will pursue this one...........a bit anyway.............as it is deemed obvious enough to do so and nobody will be able to trace the killers............................ so the real perps who ordered them to do it get off scot free.

But it still gets in the minds of people that this kind of thing goes on which can only be a good thing.

Well said, Biggs, never a truer word spoken...   If it instil's doubt in even a few more people and hence wakes them up...   well then, it's a few more of us...   and a few less of them!

Offline Sub-X

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2009, 05:36:58 pm »
I remember seeing Blair on tv in Japan look ashen faced when confronted with the bad news. (in a guilty but surprised way, like someone ordering a hitman to do a job, but being surpised when the hit actually happens)   


You mean something like this :


“If you strike at,imprison,or kill us,out of our prisons or graves we will still evoke a spirit that will thwart you,and perhaps,raise a force that will destroy you! We defy you! Do your worst!”-James Connolly 1909


DARK HALF-END GAME

Offline frenchlifeboat

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2009, 05:47:36 pm »

You mean something like this :



Spot on !

and at least the Daily Express are trying to keep the story going - 


KELLY’S BOOK OF SECRETS
WEAPONS inspector David Kelly was writing a book exposing highly damaging government secrets before his ­mysterious death.


He was intending to reveal that he warned Prime Minister Tony Blair there were no weapons of mass destruction anywhere in Iraq weeks before the ­British and American invasion.

He had several discussions with a publisher in Oxford and was seeking advice on how far he could go without breaking the law on secrets.

Following his death, his computers were seized and it is still not known if any rough draft was discovered by investigators and, if so, what happened to the material.

Dr Kelly was also intending to lift the lid on a potentially bigger scandal, his own secret dealings in germ warfare with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

US television investigators have spent four years preparing a 90-minute documentary, Anthrax War, suggesting there is a global black market in anthrax and exposing the mystery “suicides” of five government germ warfare scientists from around the world.

Director Bob Coen said: ‘‘The deeper you look into the murky world of governments and germ warfare, the more worrying it becomes.

“We have proved there is a black ­market in anthrax. David Kelly was of particular interest to us because he was a world expert on anthrax and he was involved in some degree with assisting the secret germ warfare programme in apartheid South Africa.”

Dr Kelly was found dead in woods near his Oxfordshire home on July 17 2003. His apparent suicide came two days after he was interrogated in the ­Commons over his behind-the-scenes role in exposing the flaws in the “sexed-up” Number 10 dossier which justified Britain going to war with Iraq.
Conspiracy theorists have claimed he was murdered.

British author Gordon Thomas said last night: ‘‘I knew David Kelly very well and he called me because he was working on a book.

“He told me he had warned Tony Blair there were no weapons of mass destruction. I advised him that as he had signed the Official Secrets Act life could get ­difficult for him.

“I gained the impression that he was prepared to take the flak as he wanted his story to come out.”

Anthrax War will be screened ­privately in London on July 17, the sixth anniversary of Dr Kelly’s death.

http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/111971/Kelly-s-book-of-secrets

Check out the comments on this site too !

for example -
"I ALSO BELIEVE DR KELLY WAS MURDERED
05.07.09, 5:55pm

Remember when bliar appeared on tv in response to the announcement that Dr Kelly was found dead, not only did he look very shocked, he was also mostly speechless.
I think the USA, or another country, had Dr Kelly murdered, and I believe that bliar knows a LOT more than what he has said. bliar stinks to high heaven for being responsible for so many deaths."

(and no that wasn't me, just someone else who came to the same conclusion, maybe there is hope.) 

Anthrax expert eh.. thats a whole other subject.


   

Offline ren

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2009, 06:57:41 pm »
Cook's resignation speech 
 Tuesday, 18 March 2003, 10:41 GMT

 
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/2859431.stm

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
This is the first time for 20 years that I have addressed the House from the back benches.

I must confess that I had forgotten how much better the view is from here.

None of those 20 years were more enjoyable or more rewarding than the past two, in which I have had the immense privilege of serving this House as Leader of the House, which were made all the more enjoyable, Mr Speaker, by the opportunity of working closely with you.

It was frequently the necessity for me as Leader of the House to talk my way out of accusations that a statement had been preceded by a press interview.

On this occasion I can say with complete confidence that no press interview has been given before this statement.

I have chosen to address the House first on why I cannot support a war without international agreement or domestic support.

Backing Blair

The present Prime Minister is the most successful leader of the Labour party in my lifetime.

I hope that he will continue to be the leader of our party, and I hope that he will continue to be successful. I have no sympathy with, and I will give no comfort to, those who want to use this crisis to displace him.

I applaud the heroic efforts that the prime minister has made in trying to secure a second resolution.

I do not think that anybody could have done better than the foreign secretary in working to get support for a second resolution within the Security Council.

But the very intensity of those attempts underlines how important it was to succeed.

Now that those attempts have failed, we cannot pretend that getting a second resolution was of no importance.

French intransigence?

France has been at the receiving end of bucket loads of commentary in recent days.

It is not France alone that wants more time for inspections. Germany wants more time for inspections; Russia wants more time for inspections; indeed, at no time have we signed up even the minimum necessary to carry a second resolution.

We delude ourselves if we think that the degree of international hostility is all the result of President Chirac.

The reality is that Britain is being asked to embark on a war without agreement in any of the international bodies of which we are a leading partner - not NATO, not the European Union and, now, not the Security Council.

To end up in such diplomatic weakness is a serious reverse.

Only a year ago, we and the United States were part of a coalition against terrorism that was wider and more diverse than I would ever have imagined possible.

'Heavy price'

History will be astonished at the diplomatic miscalculations that led so quickly to the disintegration of that powerful coalition.

The US can afford to go it alone, but Britain is not a superpower.

Our interests are best protected not by unilateral action but by multilateral agreement and a world order governed by rules.

Yet tonight the international partnerships most important to us are weakened: the European Union is divided; the Security Council is in stalemate.

Those are heavy casualties of a war in which a shot has yet to be fired.

I have heard some parallels between military action in these circumstances and the military action that we took in Kosovo. There was no doubt about the multilateral support that we had for the action that we took in Kosovo.

It was supported by NATO; it was supported by the European Union; it was supported by every single one of the seven neighbours in the region. France and Germany were our active allies.

It is precisely because we have none of that support in this case that it was all the more important to get agreement in the Security Council as the last hope of demonstrating international agreement.

Public doubts

The legal basis for our action in Kosovo was the need to respond to an urgent and compelling humanitarian crisis.

Our difficulty in getting support this time is that neither the international community nor the British public is persuaded that there is an urgent and compelling reason for this military action in Iraq.

The threshold for war should always be high.

None of us can predict the death toll of civilians from the forthcoming bombardment of Iraq, but the US warning of a bombing campaign that will "shock and awe" makes it likely that casualties will be numbered at least in the thousands.

I am confident that British servicemen and women will acquit themselves with professionalism and with courage. I hope that they all come back.

I hope that Saddam, even now, will quit Baghdad and avert war, but it is false to argue that only those who support war support our troops.

It is entirely legitimate to support our troops while seeking an alternative to the conflict that will put those troops at risk.

Nor is it fair to accuse those of us who want longer for inspections of not having an alternative strategy.

For four years as foreign secretary I was partly responsible for the western strategy of containment.

Over the past decade that strategy destroyed more weapons than in the Gulf war, dismantled Iraq's nuclear weapons programme and halted Saddam's medium and long-range missiles programmes.

Iraq's military strength is now less than half its size than at the time of the last Gulf war.

Threat questioned

Ironically, it is only because Iraq's military forces are so weak that we can even contemplate its invasion. Some advocates of conflict claim that Saddam's forces are so weak, so demoralised and so badly equipped that the war will be over in a few days.

We cannot base our military strategy on the assumption that Saddam is weak and at the same time justify pre-emptive action on the claim that he is a threat.

Iraq probably has no weapons of mass destruction in the commonly understood sense of the term - namely a credible device capable of being delivered against a strategic city target.

It probably still has biological toxins and battlefield chemical munitions, but it has had them since the 1980s when US companies sold Saddam anthrax agents and the then British Government approved chemical and munitions factories.

Why is it now so urgent that we should take military action to disarm a military capacity that has been there for 20 years, and which we helped to create?

Why is it necessary to resort to war this week, while Saddam's ambition to complete his weapons programme is blocked by the presence of UN inspectors?

Israeli breaches

Only a couple of weeks ago, Hans Blix told the Security Council that the key remaining disarmament tasks could be completed within months.

I have heard it said that Iraq has had not months but 12 years in which to complete disarmament, and that our patience is exhausted.

Yet it is more than 30 years since resolution 242 called on Israel to withdraw from the occupied territories.

We do not express the same impatience with the persistent refusal of Israel to comply.

I welcome the strong personal commitment that the prime minister has given to middle east peace, but Britain's positive role in the middle east does not redress the strong sense of injustice throughout the Muslim world at what it sees as one rule for the allies of the US and another rule for the rest.

Nor is our credibility helped by the appearance that our partners in Washington are less interested in disarmament than they are in regime change in Iraq.

That explains why any evidence that inspections may be showing progress is greeted in Washington not with satisfaction but with consternation: it reduces the case for war.

Presidential differences

What has come to trouble me most over past weeks is the suspicion that if the hanging chads in Florida had gone the other way and Al Gore had been elected, we would not now be about to commit British troops.

The longer that I have served in this place, the greater the respect I have for the good sense and collective wisdom of the British people.

On Iraq, I believe that the prevailing mood of the British people is sound. They do not doubt that Saddam is a brutal dictator, but they are not persuaded that he is a clear and present danger to Britain.

They want inspections to be given a chance, and they suspect that they are being pushed too quickly into conflict by a US Administration with an agenda of its own.

Above all, they are uneasy at Britain going out on a limb on a military adventure without a broader international coalition and against the hostility of many of our traditional allies.

From the start of the present crisis, I have insisted, as Leader of the House, on the right of this place to vote on whether Britain should go to war.

It has been a favourite theme of commentators that this House no longer occupies a central role in British politics.

Nothing could better demonstrate that they are wrong than for this House to stop the commitment of troops in a war that has neither international agreement nor domestic support.

I intend to join those tomorrow night who will vote against military action now. It is for that reason, and for that reason alone, and with a heavy heart, that I resign from the government.
 
"You fool! You're thirty cents away from having a quarter! Where the f**k you gonna get a boat? " Sweet Dick Willie.

Offline Philip King

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2009, 09:26:13 pm »
Thank you for the links. 

http://www.itnsource.com/compilations/datesanddecades/2000s/?lr=S26100603 clips 52 to 54.

Strange that they won't let you hear the audio on the preview downloads.  £149 per clip! That's ridiculous.
It's the one looking like Bush on 9/11 that I remember as well. But this appears to have gone missing!

Offline Dewk

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2009, 02:30:21 pm »
       We got to be sure to remember the guys who pay the ultimate price.
I took the red pill. I can handle the truth !!?

Offline phasma

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2009, 02:31:36 pm »
tomorrows headline....

13 doctors commit suicide, government finds the deaths unrelated and claim multiple head shots  and lack of fingerprints common. 
LMAO

And about bloody time too !

Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

Offline frenchlifeboat

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #25 on: July 17, 2009, 04:57:07 am »
WOW  Now the Daily Mail are on the trail..

It's a long read..but worth it.
 

  Did MI5 kill Dr David Kelly?
Just another crazy conspiracy theory? But, amid claims he wrote tell-all book that vanished after his death, it's one that refuses to go away

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1200004/Did-MI5-kill-Dr-David-Kelly-Another-crazy-conspiracy-theory-amid-claims-wrote-tell-book-vanished-death.html

The day Dr David Kelly took a short walk to his death in the Oxfordshire countryside, an unopened letter lay on the desk of his book-lined study.

Sent from the heart of the British Government, the pages were marked 'personal' and threatened the world-renowned microbiologist with the sack if he ever publicly opened his mouth again.
The letter remained unopened for the seven days during the drama that would pitch Dr Kelly into the spotlight and end in his death at just 59.


No one has ever explained why the eminent scientist and UN weapons inspector did not open the letter, but everyone close to him is convinced he knew its contents.

It was designed to silence him because his Ministry of Defence bosses had discovered that not only was he secretly talking to journalists, but was also preparing to write an explosive book about his work.
It was six years ago tomorrow, on July 17, 2003, that Dr Kelly was found dead under a tree on Harrowdown Hill half a mile from his family home in Southmoor. His fate has become one of the most contentious issues of recent political history and has raised profound questions about the moral integrity of the New Labour government.

The former grammar school boy had celebrated his 36th wedding anniversary just a few days before.

The questions of why and how he died  -  and if he was murdered  -  have never gone away.
Dr Kelly had examined the Government's 'sexed up dossier' which declared that Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction which could be activated in just 45 minutes. The claim was used by Tony Blair in 2002 as the central justification for the Iraq war


When Dr Kelly secretly revealed his doubts about the dossier to BBC reporters, all hell broke loose.

After he was unmasked as the BBC mole, he was marched before the television cameras of a House of Commons committee and, later, taken away to a safe house to be interviewed by the British intelligence services.

In one final phone conversation he told a caller he wouldn't be surprised 'if my body was found in the woods'.
And so it was to be. The official inquiry into his death later decided that he committed suicide  -  by slashing his wrist and consuming a cocktail of painkillers.
But this week, 13 respected doctors declared that it was medically impossible for Dr Kelly to have died in this manner. They are mounting a legal battle to overturn the suicide verdict.
A new film, Anthrax War, to be released in London this weekend, also asserts that Dr Kelly had spent hours writing a tell-all book which would violate the Official Secrets Act by exposing Britain's dubious authority for toppling Saddam Hussein.
The film, directed by New York-based documentary maker Bob Coen, states that Dr Kelly, head of biological defence at the Government's secretive military research establishment of Porton Down, Wiltshire, was the brain behind much of the West's germ warfare programmes. Quite simply, the film says, Dr Kelly 'knew too much'.
In further unsubstantiated and hard-to-believe claims, the film alleges he may have been embroiled in apartheid South Africa's Project Coast programme to develop an ethnic germ weapon programme to target the black population.
Coen also says Dr Kelly had links to illegal human experiments on British servicemen at Porton Down, which sparked the largest ever investigation by Wiltshire Police.


Officers recommended charges against some scientists at the germ warfare establishment  -  but dropped the idea just days after Dr Kelly was found dead.
Whatever the veracity of all this, the film's central thrust  -  that he was writing a sensational book  -  has been confirmed by Gordon Thomas, a British intelligence expert, who had met Dr Kelly.
Thomas told me: 'I visited Dr Kelly as part of research into a book I was writing. But he told me that he was writing his own book, which intended to show that Tony Blair had lied about his reasons for going to war with Iraq.

He had told the Prime Minister categorically that there were no weapons of mass destruction.'
Thomas, in his own book, states: 'Dr Kelly was not a man given to exaggeration or showing off; he was the absolute expert in his field and if he said there no weapons of mass destruction, then there were none.
'I told Dr Kelly he would never be allowed to publish his book in Britain. I told him he would put himself into immense danger.

His plan was to resign from Porton Down and move with his wife to the United States where he could make more money from his revelations.'
Can this possibly be true? Certainly, Dr Kelly lived a double life. At home in Oxfordshire with wife Janice, he was the perfect husband.

The couple would have supper together in the garden after he had spent hours in what she called 'his secret world'  -  the book-lined study off the hallway.
Here, computers linked him to the Britain's intelligence services MI5 and MI6, GCHQ, the Ministry of Defence (MoD), the Foreign Office and foreign spy agencies  -  including Israel's notorious Mossad (for whom he had worked since 1995 as an advisor with the blessing of Whitehall).
Although he had an office in London  -  Room 2/35 in the MoD's Proliferation and Arms Control Secretariat  -  and another at Porton Down, Dr Kelly kept his secret data at home, including tens of thousands of documents and photographs; some show human victims of anthrax poisoning, as well as animal 'guinea pigs' poisoned with anthrax and other germs in labs across the world. For a man who was not a spy, it was an impressive collection.
From all round the globe he was consulted on biological weaponry, in particular the use of anthrax

Thomas takes up the story. 'Each intelligence organisation had installed its own computer for Dr Kelly to use on its behalf and to exchange encrypted messages. But Dr Kelly always said that most important information was filed in his head.'
However, perhaps fatally for Dr Kelly, his book was not only in his head. It was on hard-disk in one of his computers, which have all been seized by MI5 and are unlikely ever to see the light of day.
By any standards, the book would have been hugely contentious. In addition to Tony Blair and the British Government, there are any number of foreign intelligence agencies who would not want a public airing of the explosive information which they shared with Dr Kelly over the years.
His book was also expected to expose a black market trade in anthrax which was being exploited, and thus condoned, by many governments.
But it has now come to light that there may be another compelling reason why Dr Kelly might have been murdered.
Amazingly, 12 other well-known micro-biologists linked with germ warfare research have died in the past decade, five of them Russians investigating claims that the Israelis were working on viruses to target Arabs.

The Russian plane in which they were travelling from Tel Aviv to Siberia was shot down on October 2001 over the Black Sea by an 'off-course' Ukrainian surface-to-air missile.
Dr Kelly knew the victims and asked MI6 to find out more details. However, they drew a blank.
Five weeks later, Dr Benito Que, a cell biologist known to Dr Kelly, was found in a coma near his Miami laboratory.

The infectious diseases expert had been investigating how a virus like HIV could be genetically engineered into a biological weapon.
Dr Que, 52, was found unconscious outside in the car park of his lab and died in hospital. Officially, he suffered a heart attack  -  although his family say he was struck on the head. Police refused to re-open the case.
Ten days after Dr Que's death, another friend of Dr Kelly died. Dr Don Wiley, 57, one of America's foremost microbiologists, had a U.S. Government contract to create a vaccine against the killer Ebola fever and other so-called doomsday germs.
His rental car was found abandoned on a bridge across the Mississippi. The keys were in the ignition and the petrol tank full. There had been no crash, but Dr Wiley had disappeared.
The FBI visited Wiley's laboratory and removed most of his work. A month later his body was found 300 miles downstream, with evidence of severe head injuries. No forensic examination was performed and his death was ruled 'accidental'.
Little wonder, then, that Dr Kelly had begun talking about his body being 'found in the woods'.
And there is more. The most mysterious death of them all happened to Dr Vladimir Pasechnik  -  a Soviet defector Dr Kelly knew well.
The biochemist had left a drugs industry fair in Paris in 1989, just before the collapse of Communism, saying he wanted to buy souvenirs for family. Instead, he went to the British Embassy where he announced to a startled receptionist that he was a Russian scientist who wanted to defect.
Pasechnik was whisked secretly back to Britain, and Dr Kelly was brought in to verify his claims that the Soviets were adapting cruise missiles armed with germs to help spread killer diseases such as plague and smallpox.
As chief director of the Institute for Ultra-Pure Biological preparations in St Petersburg, Pasechnik had developed killer germs. 'I want the West to know of this. There must be a way to stop this madness,' he told Dr Kelly in a safe house.
Dr Kelly later told the author Gordon Thomas that he believed Pasechnik. 'I knew that he was telling the truth. There was no waffle. It was truly horrifying.'
The two scientists became friends. And soon Vladimir had set up the Regma Biotechnologies laboratory, near Porton Down. He seemed healthy when he left work on the night of November 21, 2001.

Returning home, the 64-year-old cooked supper and went to sleep. He was found dead in bed the next day.

Officially, the reason given was a stroke. However the Wiltshire police later said his demise was 'inexplicable'.
It is against this extraordinary background of highly suspicious deaths that Dr Kelly's own death occurred.
As we know, an inquest on his body was ruled out by Oxfordshire's coroner, a highly unusual move.

Instead, Tony Blair ordered an inquiry by Lord Hutton. It heard evidence from 74 witnesses and concluded that Dr Kelly killed himself by slashing the ulnar artery of his left wrist with a garden knife after swallowing painkillers  -  although none had been prescribed by his GP.
A detailed medical dossier by the 13 British doctors, however, rejects the Hutton conclusion on the grounds that a cut to the small ulnar artery is not deadly.
The dossier is being used by lawyers to demand a proper inquest and the release of Dr Kelly's autopsy report, which has never been made public. Their evidence will be sent to Sir John Chilcot's forthcoming Iraq War inquiry.
One of the doctors, David Halpin, former consultant in trauma at Torbay Hospital, Devon, told me: ' Arteries in the wrist are of matchstick thickness and severing them does not lead to life-threatening blood loss.'
He and the other doctors say: 'To die from haemorrhage, Dr Kelly would have had to lose about five pints of blood.

It is unlikely from his stated injury that he would have lost more than a pint.' A lack of blood at the death scene was also confirmed by the search team who found Dr Kelly and the paramedics who tried to treat him.
One of the country's most respected vascular surgeons, Martin Birnstingl, also says that it would be virtually impossible for Dr Kelly to have died by severing the ulnar artery on the little finger side of his inner wrist.
'I have never, in my experience, heard of a case where someone has died after cutting their ulnar artery.

The minute the blood pressure falls, after a few minutes, this artery would stop bleeding. It would spray blood about and make a mess but it would soon stop.'
He believes that if Dr Kelly was really intent on suicide he would have cut the artery in his groin.
Dr Kelly was also right-handed  -  which meant he would have to slash awkwardly from left to right on his opposite wrist to have cut into the ulnar artery to any depth.
And what of the tablets? The almost empty packet of Co-Proxamol found by the dead scientist's side suggested he had taken 29.

But he had vomited and only a fragment of one remained in his stomach. The level of painkillers in his blood was a third of what is required to cause death.
As David Halpin says: 'The idea that a man like Dr Kelly would choose to end his life like that is preposterous. This was a scientist, an expert on drugs.'
So what really happened to Dr Kelly? The gardening knife that Lord Hutton said killed him was blunt and  -  although the scientist was not wearing gloves  -  had no fingerprints on it.
Which brings us back to that unopened letter found on Dr Kelly's desk, which had been sent to him at his home by MoD bosses and signed by Richard Hatfield, the ministry's personnel chief.


It emerged at the Hutton inquiry into Dr Kelly's death that it contained threats demanding his future silence.
At the time, Dr Kelly had received a number of warning phone calls at his home from the MoD about his indiscreet behaviour  -  and he will have been in no doubt that the official letter was written confirmation of these admonishments.
But he would not be put off. He saw his book as a guarantee of his financial future, which he often worried about.
On what he felt was a lowly £58,000 a year, the scientist fretted that his Government pension (based on his final salary) would not finance a decent retirement for him and his wife.
On the day he died, Janice has confirmed her husband was a distressed man. Dr Kelly lunched with her, before going out for a walk on Harrowdown Hill at 3.30pm.
It was a walk he made regularly at the same time of day  -  something anyone watching his movements would have been well aware of.
That day, events were already in motion elsewhere. An hour before, at 2.30pm, a senior policeman sat down at his computer at Thames Valley Police headquarters in Oxfordshire.

He began to create a restricted file on his secure computer. Across the top he typed a code name: Operation Mason. Although its contents have never been made public, it would detail the overnight search for Dr Kelly.
Incredibly, he created this file an hour before the scientist even left home.
After Dr Kelly's corpse was found at 8.30am by the volunteer searchers, the senior policeman made his last Operation Mason entry. It simply states: '9.00am. 18.07.03. Body recovered'.
Most intriguingly, at 8am, half an hour before Dr Kelly's body was discovered under the tree, three officers in dark suits from MI5's Technical Assessment Unit were at his house.
The computers and the hard-disk containing the 40,000 words of the explosive book were carried away. They have never been seen since.








Offline phasma

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Re: 13 doctors demand inquest into Dr David Kelly's death
« Reply #26 on: July 17, 2009, 05:08:28 am »
Good find !#and BASTARDS!!!!

The infectious diseases expert had been investigating how a virus like HIV could be genetically engineered into a biological weapon.
Dr Que, 52, was found unconscious outside in the car park of his lab and died in hospital. Officially, he suffered a heart attack  -  although his family say he was struck on the head. Police refused to re-open the case.
Ten days after Dr Que's death, another friend of Dr Kelly died. Dr Don Wiley, 57, one of America's foremost microbiologists, had a U.S. Government contract to create a vaccine against the killer Ebola fever and other so-called doomsday germs.
His rental car was found abandoned on a bridge across the Mississippi. The keys were in the ignition and the petrol tank full. There had been no crash, but Dr Wiley had disappeared.
The FBI visited Wiley's laboratory and removed most of his work. A month later his body was found 300 miles downstream, with evidence of severe head injuries. No forensic examination was performed and his death was ruled 'accidental'. Little wonder, then, that Dr Kelly had begun talking about his body being 'found in the woods'.
And there is more. The most mysterious death of them all happened to Dr Vladimir Pasechnik  -  a Soviet defector Dr Kelly knew well.
The biochemist had left a drugs industry fair in Paris in 1989, just before the collapse of Communism, saying he wanted to buy souvenirs for family. Instead, he went to the British Embassy where he announced to a startled receptionist that he was a Russian scientist who wanted to defect.
Pasechnik was whisked secretly back to Britain, and Dr Kelly was brought in to verify his claims that the Soviets were adapting cruise missiles armed with germs to help spread killer diseases such as plague and smallpox.
As chief director of the Institute for Ultra-Pure Biological preparations in St Petersburg, Pasechnik had developed killer germs. 'I want the West to know of this. There must be a way to stop this madness,' he told Dr Kelly in a safe house.
Dr Kelly later told the author Gordon Thomas that he believed Pasechnik. 'I knew that he was telling the truth. There was no waffle. It was truly horrifying.'
The two scientists became friends. And soon Vladimir had set up the Regma Biotechnologies laboratory, near Porton Down. He seemed healthy when he left work on the night of November 21, 2001.

Returning home, the 64-year-old cooked supper and went to sleep. He was found dead in bed the next day.

Officially, the reason given was a stroke. However the Wiltshire police later said his demise was 'inexplicable'.
It is against this extraordinary background of highly suspicious deaths that Dr Kelly's own death occurred.
As we know, an inquest on his body was ruled out by Oxfordshire's coroner, a highly unusual move.

Unbelievable ! What happened to Dr. Kellys wife?
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

Offline frenchlifeboat

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Dr Kelly WAS murdered and there has to be a new inquest, say six top doctors
« Reply #27 on: December 05, 2009, 02:19:36 am »
Six doctors who believe government scientist David Kelly was murdered have launched a ground-breaking legal action to demand the inquest into his death is reopened.

They are to publish a hard-hitting report which they claim proves the weapons expert did not commit suicide as the Hutton Report decided.

They have also engaged lawyers to write to Attorney General Baroness Scotland and the coroner Nicholas Gardiner calling for a full re-examination of the circumstances of his death.

The doctors are asking for permission to go to the High Court to reopen the inquest on the grounds that it was improperly suspended. If Baroness Scotland rejects that demand, or the court turns them down, their lawyers say they will have grounds to seek judicial review of the decision.

Dr Kelly was found dead at a beauty spot near his Oxfordshire home in 2003, days after he was exposed as the source of a story that Tony Blair's government 'sexed-up' its dossier on Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction to justify invading Iraq.

In one final phone conversation, he told a caller he wouldn't be surprised 'if my body was found in the woods'.

The inquest into Dr Kelly's death was suspended before it could begin by order of the then Lord Chancellor Lord Falconer. He used the Coroners Act to designate the Hutton Inquiry as 'fulfilling the function of an inquest'.

Lord Falconer, a former flatmate of Tony Blair, was also responsible for picking Lord Hutton to run the inquiry.


But the doctors claim that the original inquest was never formally closed and should now be allowed to hold a proper inquiry.

The six are Michael Powers, a QC and former coroner; trauma surgeon David Halpin; Andrew Rouse, an epidemiologist who established that deaths from cutting the ulnar artery – as claimed in Dr Kelly's case – are extremely rare; Martin Birnstingl, another surgeon; plus Stephen Frost and Chris Burns-Cox.

Lord Hutton concluded that Dr Kelly killed himself by severing an ulnar artery in his left wrist after taking an overdose of prescription painkillers but he skated over the controversies about the causes of death.


The bulk of his report was dedicated to the political row between Downing Street and the BBC, which revealed the sexing-up of the dossier.

Dr Kelly's death certificate states that he died of a haemorrhage, but the results of a post mortem examination have never been made public.

Crucially, the doctors say that Lord Hutton had no witnesses on oath and did not have to make a finding, as the coroner does, beyond a reasonable doubt.

The doctors tried to persuade the coroner to reopen his inquest in 2004 but were rejected because they were not judged to be 'properly interested persons' with the authority to demand an inquiry.

Now they have hired human rights lawyers Leigh Day & Co to challenge the use of the Coroners Act to close the inquest.

A source close to the doctors said: 'Lord Falconer is on record saying this is a "useful little law" but it was set up to avoid multiple inquests in cases where there were multiple deaths.

It has been used for victims of train crashes and the Harold Shipman case but Dr Kelly's was not a multiple death.

'We argue that that's an abuse of due process. The lawyers have sent the letters this week.

We have concentrated on the finding on the death certificate that the primary cause of death was a haemorrage. We are spelling out why he could not have died from a cut to the small ulnar artery.'

One of the doctors, who preferred not to be named, added: 'When the Romans committed suicide they would slit all four arteries in a warm bath, which keeps the blood flowing. The arteries would close up in the open air and you would not lose that much blood.'

A book on the unanswered questions surrounding the case by Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker concluded that Dr Kelly may have been murdered by Iraqi exiles – but the finger has also been pointed at MI5 and the CIA.

Dr Kelly's family have never commented publicly on his death.





http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1233330/Dr-David-Kelly-Six-doctors-demand-inquest-death-weapons-expert-prove-murdered.html

Offline UK Lyn

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Wow, this is pretty big news, who knows where this can of worms will lead.

Thanks for flagging this up.

Offline Sara2019

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The truth needs to be uncovered. 

In regards to the change in the position of the body...When you report a death, emergency operators sometime ask you to try to perform resuciation.  That would require you to put the person on their back and do compressions. 

The subversion of legitimate government authority in ways which interfere with constitutional rights is perhaps the greatest internal threat to our system that American faces.-----Sam Ervin, Jr December 1974 writes about a secret IRS group that he investigated.

Offline worcesteradam

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Somebody on another site said, why did he take his dog with him if he was planning to commit suicide
"I will never apologize for the United States — I don't care what the facts are." - George Bush

Mike Philbin

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about time ... we need to ride the back off this momentum-4-truth and have the files re-opened on 7-7 and our part in the War (of terror) in Iraq which led to the MURDER of this innocent doctor. The truth must prevail against global tyranny.

Mike