North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold

Author Topic: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold  (Read 80745 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Brocke

  • Eleutherophiliac & Drapetomaniac
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,784
  • I am not a number, I am a free man!
    • Vimeo page
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #240 on: July 01, 2009, 07:49:54 AM »

Four Companies Hit by Treasury Freeze

By Chris Green
[2009-07-01 15:40 ]      

In what appears to be the opening gambit in what could turn out to be a long, drawn out game of financial and nuclear poker, the U.S. Department of the Treasury has frozen the assets of four entities accused of facilitating the proliferation of North Korean arms and weapons technologies.

The companies targeted for censure are Tanchon Commercial Bank, Korea Mining Development Trading Corporation (KOMID), Namchongang Trading Corporation (NCG) and an Iranian company called Hong Kong Electronics.

According to the Treasury, the stated aim of the asset freeze is to isolate the selected companies from the U.S. financial and commercial systems.

A Treasury press release briefly explained the roles of the various targeted companies. According to intelligence, Hong Kong Electronics has been responsible for transferring funds on the behalf of KOMID, which it calls “North Korea’s premier arms dealer,” and Tanchon Commercial Bank, which is characterized as the “commercial arm of KOMID.” Tanchon has, according to the release, provided financing for sales of missiles by KOMID to Iran.

NCG, meanwhile, has “been involved in the purchase of aluminum tubes and other equipment specifically suitable for a uranium enrichment program since the late 1990s,” according to a U.S. State Department press release also dated June 30th.

Announcing the new measures, which were issued under Executive Order 13382 but are also authorized by UN Resolution 1718, Treasury Under Secretary for Terrorism and Financial Intelligence Stuart Levey commented, "North Korea uses front companies like Hong Kong Electronics and a range of other deceptive practices to obscure the true nature of its financial dealings, making it nearly impossible for responsible banks and governments to distinguish legitimate from illegitimate North Korean transactions.”

He continued, “Today's action is a part of our overall effort to prevent North Korea from misusing the international financial system to advance its nuclear and missile programs and to sell dangerous technology around the world."

The measures were not, according to State Department Spokesman Ian Kelly, designed to coordinate with today’s visit of Ambassador Philip Goldberg to Beijing. Ambassador Goldberg was handed the task of ensuring that UN Resolution 1874 is applied in full by all countries earlier this week.

http://www.dailynk.com/english/read.php?cataId=nk00100&num=5117


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline Dok

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,269
    • end times and current events
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #241 on: July 01, 2009, 09:33:41 AM »
Suspected NKorean ship changes course
By PAULINE JELINEK – 17 hours ago

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials said Tuesday that a North Korean ship has turned around and is headed back toward the north where it came from, after being tracked for more than a week by American Navy vessels on suspicion of carrying illegal weapons.

The move keeps the U.S. and the rest of the international community guessing: Where is the Kang Nam going? Does its cargo include materials banned by a new U.N. anti-proliferation resolution?

The ship left a North Korean port of Nampo on June 17 and is the first vessel monitored under U.N. sanctions that ban the regime from selling arms and nuclear-related material.

The Navy has been watching it — at times following it from a distance. It traveled south and southwest for more than a week; then, on Sunday, it turned around and headed back north, two U.S. officials said on condition of anonymity to discuss intelligence.

Nearly two weeks after the ship left North Korea, officials said Tuesday they still don't know where it is going. But it was some 250 miles south of Hong Kong on Tuesday, one official said.

Though acknowledging all along that the Kang Nam's destination was unclear, some officials said last week that it could be going to Myanmar and that it was unclear whether it could reach there without stopping in another port to refuel.

The U.N. resolution allows the international community to ask for permission to board and search any suspect ship on the seas. If permission for inspection is refused, authorities can ask for an inspection in whichever nation where the ship pulls into port.

North Korea has said it would consider any interception of its ships a declaration of war.

Two officials had said earlier in the day Tuesday that the Kang Nam had been moving very slowly in recent days, something that could signal it was trying to conserve fuel.

They said they didn't know what the turnaround of the ship means, nor what prompted it.

The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, said Sunday that Washington was "following the progress of that ship very closely," but she would not say whether the U.S. would confront the Kang Nam.

The sailing of the vessel — and efforts to track it — set up the first test of a new U.N. Security Council resolution that authorizes member states to inspect North Korean vessels. The sanctions are punishment for an underground nuclear test the North carried out in May in defiance of past resolutions.

Meanwhile on Tuesday, the Obama administration imposed financial sanctions on a company in Iran that is accused of involvement in North Korea's missile proliferation network.

In the latest move to keep pressure on Pyongyang and its nuclear ambitions, the Treasury Department moved against Hong Kong Electronics, a company located in Kish Island, Iran. The action means that any bank accounts or other financial assets found in the United States belonging to the company must be frozen. Americans also are prohibited from doing business with the firm.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gPE2T6srY36AqSumfp9KStLWUnAQD9956V482
HOW TO BE SAVED
http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/how_to_be_saved.html

Ye Must Be Born Again!
http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Basics/ye_must_be_born_again.htm

True Salvation & the TRUE Gospel/Good News!
http://www.contendingfortruth.com/?p=1060

how to avoid censorship ;)

Offline skyfind

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 712
  • in Santiago, Chile
    • My website in spanish about the new world order and more
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #242 on: July 02, 2009, 11:34:04 PM »
Here we come, more propaganda about "Obama save us...!"

Quote
If you haven´t read it:

Who Will Stand Up to America and Israel?
Doublespeak on North Korea
http://www.counterpunch.org/roberts05272009.html

N. Korea test fires missiles — a prelude?
JAE-SOON CHANG Associated Press

Thursday, July 2, 2009

http://www.gosanangelo.com/news/2009/jul/02/n-korea-test-fires-missiles-8212-a-prelude/

SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea fired a barrage of short-range missiles off its east coast Thursday, a possible prelude to the launch of a long-range missile toward Hawaii over the July Fourth holiday.

Firing a ballistic missile on Independence Day would be a challenge to Washington, which has been rallying international support for enforcement of U.N. sanctions imposed against Pyongyang following a May 25 nuclear test. North Korea is banned from testing ballistic missiles under U.N. resolutions.

Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary Takeo Kawamura said Thursday that a long-range missile launch this weekend was possible. “We cannot rule out the possibility,” he said, citing Pyongyang’s past behavior.

In 2006, North Korea launched its most advanced Taepodong 2 missile while the U.S. celebrated Independence Day, though the rocket fizzled shortly after takeoff and fell into the ocean.

Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman said the United States remains concerned about North Korea’s missile and nuclear programs but called Thursday’s launches “not unexpected.”

------------

Outside missile experts think NKorea missile can reach US West Coast
2/07/2009 10:21 PM


http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/world/breakingnews/Outside-missile-experts-think-NKorea-missile-can-reach-US-West-Coast-49776012.html

WASHINGTON - With concerns rising about another North Korean long-range missile test, two independent scientists say Kim Jong Il's government may be using an old Soviet ballistic missile to boost a rocket capable of reaching the West Coast of the United States.

North Korea is not known to have nuclear warheads and faces years of research and testing before it could build such a reliable weapon.

But the scientists say that if North Korea does have such a Russian-made ballistic missile in its arsenal, it could modify the rocket into a two-stage missile that could reach across the Pacific Ocean to Seattle, Washington, carrying a 900-kilogram warhead, or San Francisco, California, with a 700-kilogram charge.

The design of a long-range missile tested by North Korea last April "represents a very significant advance in rocket technology," said Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Ted Postol and Union of Concerned Scientists' David Wright in a June 29 assessment published in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists.

Using data and imagery from North Korea's April 4 launch, Postol and Wright calculated that the second stage of the North Korean rocket had the external dimensions, engine power and key features of an SS-N 6, a Soviet submarine-launched ballistic missile first deployed in 1968.

Their theory is at odds with U.S. officials' skepticism of the recent North Korean long-range missile launch, which they dismissed as a failure.

Missile expert and former U.N. arms inspector Mike Elleman cautioned against assuming that the similarities between the external dimensions of the North Korean second stage and the SS-N 6 mean that the two are the same technology.

But Elleman added that the coincidence is hard to explain.

Geoffrey Forden, another missile expert with MIT, sees merit in the Russian missile theory and believes North Korea may have its own production line for SS-N 6 missile components.

Info in spanish against the New world order and more: http://verdadahora.cl

-

COMPLETE BASIC NEW WORLD ORDER GUIDE
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=99606.0

Offline skyfind

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 712
  • in Santiago, Chile
    • My website in spanish about the new world order and more
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #243 on: July 04, 2009, 01:10:15 AM »
North Korea Launches 3 Missiles Off Its East Coast
Saturday, July 4, 2009; 1:00 AM

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/07/04/AR2009070400061.html

TOKYO, July 4 -- Defying the United States on Independence Day, North Korea fired three missiles on Saturday into the sea off its east coast.

The test-firings came two days after North Korea, which is being squeezed by the U.S. government and other countries for its recent nuclear test, fired four short-range missiles into the sea.

North Korea had warned ships to avoid waters near its east coast through July 10 because of military exercises, and the test-firing were widely predicted.

The South Korea military confirmed that three missiles had been fired on Saturday morning, but declined to say what type they were.

Military officials told South Korea's Yonhap news agency that they appeared to be Scud-type missiles with a range of up to 310 miles and described them as more dangerous than the short-range weapons fired Thursday.

North Korea is the largest manufacturer of Scud-type missiles in the developing world and is working on long-range ballistic missiles that may one day be able to strike the United States. It made no comment about the missile launches.

But the secretive communist state has a provocative history of launching missiles on the Fourth of July.

In 2006, it fired several short and mid-range missiles and, most notably, a long-range Taepodong II that exploded shortly after takeoff. Later that year, it tested its first nuclear device.

In Tokyo, the chief of U.S. Naval operation said Saturday the United States was ready for any North Korean missile tests. "Our ships and forces here are prepared for the tracking of the missiles and observing the activities that are going on," Adm. Gary Roughead told reporters after meeting with Japanese military officials.

South Korea said it is "fully ready to counter any North Korean threats and provocations based on strong South Korea-U.S. combined defense posture." The U.S. military has about 28,500 troops in South Korea.

Japan criticized the latest missile launch as "a serious act of provocation against the security of neighboring countries, including Japan, and is against the resolution of the U.N. Security Council."

Government sources in Japan and South Korea told the Japanese Kyodo news agency that missiles fired Saturday may have been Nodongs.
Info in spanish against the New world order and more: http://verdadahora.cl

-

COMPLETE BASIC NEW WORLD ORDER GUIDE
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=99606.0

Offline bs

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #244 on: July 04, 2009, 08:51:49 AM »
Testing....testing...one, two,WWIII ;)

Offline Georgiacopguy

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,497
  • 'Cause it's a revolution for your mind...K?!
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #245 on: July 04, 2009, 11:52:25 AM »
Oh they are just getting an early start with the fireworks like those punk kids down the street who have been firing fireworks since the middle of June.
The resistance starts here. Unfortunately, the entire thing is moving beyond the intellectual infowar. I vow I will not make an overt rush at violent authority, until authority makes it's violent rush at me and you. I will not falter, I will not die in this course. For that is how they win.

Offline bs

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #246 on: July 04, 2009, 12:07:44 PM »
Clint Eastwood liked em in the end!

Offline wolfman86

  • Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 220
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #247 on: July 04, 2009, 01:56:12 PM »
Let's see Mumbai, Gaza, Tehran, Georgia, and North Korea. The bastards are sure trying to kick things off but so far people haven't fallen for it.

North Korea is kind of a wild card. I'm here in Pohang (southeast coast) and we had a big invasion drill by combined SK and U.S. forces a couple months ago. I guess that's part of the reason Kim Jung Il is feeling so "wonewy" and attention starved.

Offline skyfind

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 712
  • in Santiago, Chile
    • My website in spanish about the new world order and more
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #248 on: July 05, 2009, 10:17:06 PM »
Top China adviser sees Korean war likely

Monday, 06 July 2009


http://asiasentinel.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1960&Itemid=179

This time Kim Jong-Il may not be bluffing

In an alarming analysis in an official Chinese publication, a senior advisor to the Chinese government expects North Korea to launch a war on the South in the belief that it has overwhelming military superiority.

Zhang Lianggui, a professor of International Strategy at the Central Communist Party School in Beijing, also write that he regards its nuclear program as posing a danger the like of which China has never experienced in its history.

Zhang , who has been at the school since 1989, is a specialist on North Korea, where he studied at Kim Il-Sung university in Pyongyang from 1964-1968. His analysis, in the June 16 issue of World Affairs magazine, is one of the most critical of the North ever to appear in an official publication. It reflects Beijing's rising anger with its ‘gangster' neighbor and frustration that it can do so little to change its nuclear policy – despite the fact that the country relies upon it for supplies of food and oil.

The first generation of Communist leaders had strong sympathy for Kim Il-Sung, who studied at secondary school in northeast China, spoke Mandarin and fought with them against the Japanese. The current leaders have no such feeling for his son, whom they regard as a bandit.

In the magazine, Zhang wrote that the world underestimates the magnitude of the risk on the Korean peninsula.

"If we look at the situation as it is, the likelihood of a military confrontation on the Korean peninsula is very high," he wrote. "It will start on the sea and then could spread to the 38th parallel. If a war breaks out, it is very difficult to forecast how it would develop. North Korea believes it now has nuclear weapons and has become stronger. It believes that it has overwhelming military superiority over the south and would certainly win a war," he said.

Since the end of the Korean war in June 1953, the North has never recognized the Northern Limit Line (NLL) which the South has designated as the sea boundary between the two sides. On January 17, it repeated its refusal to recognize the boundary. This area contains 2,500 islands which are rich in fishing resources, with an annual catch of about 100 million yuan.

There has been a gradual escalation since January, when the North announced ‘a state of total war' with the south. It has since then tested long-range missiles and a nuclear bomb.

Zhang said that the North's nuclear tests posed for China ‘a risk that it had never faced for thousands of years'. Nuclear tests by the US, Russia, China, Britain and France were carried out in deserts or remote places far from population centers. But the North's tests are just 85 km from the Chinese border, Changbai county in Jilin province and 180 km from Yanji, a city of 400,000 people.

"The tests are close to densely populated areas of east Asia. If there were an accident, it would not only make the Korean nation homeless but also turn to nothing plans to revive the northeast of China," he wrote, asking why the tests were far from Pyongyang but not far from China.

"The danger for China is extremely grave. We have not paid sufficient attention to this risk. If we cannot bring about a denuclearization of the Korean peninsula, mankind will pay a heavy price, especially the countries bordering Korea," he wrote.

Pyongyang, he said, has never liked the six-party talks, which aim to end its nuclear program, because it regards the matter as a bilateral issue to be settled with the United States alone and would not return to them.

"North Korea has turned from being a non-nuclear state into a nuclear one. In addition, it has at least 800,000 tonnes of heavy fuel. The six-party talks have fulfilled their historical mission."

Zhang said that Kim Jong-Il is racing to fulfil the mission given to him by his father before he hands over power to his successor, expected to be his youngest son Kim Jong-woon, 25.

This mission includes making North Korea a nuclear state, a symbol of a powerful country: developing short-, medium- and long-range missiles capable of delivering these nuclear weapons, to act as a proper deterrent: re-negotiating the NLL and obtaining possession of the five major islands in western seas and their rich fishing grounds: using nuclear weapons to create a new international environment and achieve reunification.

Zhang's assessment of Pyongyang is one of the most critical ever published in China. It reflects Beijing's anger against North Korea and inability to influence policy there.

"Negotiating with North Korea is like negotiating with the mafia which is blackmailing you," said Wang Wen, a veteran Chinese journalist. "Beijing continues to supply the North with food, oil, consumer goods and other items it needs. The North does not pay. It could cut off the supply, which would lead to a collapse of the regime. That would mean a unified Korea, dominated by the United States. Pyongyang knows this and continues to blackmail China, like the mafia."

He said that, to prevent this scenario, Beijing has continued to supply the North with a minimum to keep the regime afloat. "For years, it has been pushing the North to follow its example of reform in economy and not in politics. The Kaesong industrial park is a small step in this direction, but there is nothing else."

The park, 10 km north of the demilitarized zone, employs 40,000 North Korean workers in more than 75 South Korean factories as of July last year. In June, the North demanded new average salaries of US$300 a month, up from US$75, which the South has ruled as unacceptable.

"Beijing understands very well the mind-set of Kim Jong-Il," said Wang. "It is the same as that of Mao Zedong when he built China's nuclear bomb in the 1960s, when his people were starving. The Soviet Union did not help and the US wanted to bomb the site, but it built the bomb anyway. North Korea today is more isolated than China was then, so it needs the bomb even more."
Info in spanish against the New world order and more: http://verdadahora.cl

-

COMPLETE BASIC NEW WORLD ORDER GUIDE
http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=99606.0

Offline bs

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 365
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #249 on: July 19, 2009, 09:04:17 AM »
It sounds like he is dying from all reports...fear most the dying tyrant.......

Offline Cryptvill

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 654
Source: Obama writes letter to N. Korean leader
« Reply #250 on: December 16, 2009, 05:37:14 PM »
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/34441755/ns/world_news-asiapacific/

Source: Obama writes letter to N. Korean leader
No word on whether Kim Jong Il has responded

WASHINGTON - President Barack Obama has written a personal letter to North Korean leader Kim Jong Il as part of an intense effort to draw the reclusive nation back to nuclear disarmament talks, a senior State Department official said Tuesday.

The letter was delivered to North Korean officials last week by Obama's special envoy for North Korea, Stephen Bosworth, during a visit to Pyongyang aimed at restarting the stalled negotiations, the official said.

The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the diplomacy, would not describe the contents of the letter but said they fit with Bosworth's general message.
Babylon-->Battycon-->Batikon-->Vatican

Offline Brocke

  • Eleutherophiliac & Drapetomaniac
  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,784
  • I am not a number, I am a free man!
    • Vimeo page
South Korea Cites Torpedo Attack in Ship Sinking - Tonkin II?
« Reply #251 on: April 25, 2010, 09:59:00 AM »
South Korea Cites Torpedo Attack in Ship Sinking

By CHOE SANG-HUN
Published: April 25, 2010

SEOUL, South Korea — A torpedo attack was the most likely cause of the sinking of a South Korean warship near a disputed sea border with North Korea last month that killed at least 40 South Korean sailors, the South Korean defense chief said Sunday.

Defense Minister Kim Tae-young was the first South Korean official to publicly blame a torpedo as a likely cause of the March 26 explosion that split the 1,200-ton corvette, the Cheanan, in half. There has been a growing suspicion that the ship may have been hit by a North Korean torpedo or mine, although South Korea has not yet blamed the North and Pyongyang has denied any involvement.

“A bubble jet caused by a heavy torpedo is thought to be the most likely thing to be blamed, but various other possibilities are also under review,” Mr. Kim told reporters on Sunday.

A bubble jet effect occurs when a torpedo or mine detonates near or under a ship. The change of pressure creates a “bubble” underwater whose tremendous force as it expands and collapses can break the ship apart, according to defense ministry officials.

This theory appeared to be supported by Yoon Duk-yong, head of the government team of military and private investigators, who said on Sunday that the ship was likely broken in half “by a non-contact explosion, rather than a contact explosion.”

Mr. Yoon added that no soot, melting or any explosion holes were found on the ship. These were often damage left when a ship suffered a direct hit, rather than an explosion at close range, he said. But he did not clarify what type of explosion — torpedo or mine — caused the sinking.

Mr. Yoon made the comment after inspecting the wreck of the ship. The rear half of the ship was salvaged on April 15 and the remaining half on Saturday.

Speculation on what caused the blast has ranged from a North Korean torpedo to an uncollected mine from the 1950-53 Korean War floating around.

Also Sunday, Prime Minister Chung Un-chan declared a five-day “national mourning period” for 40 Cheanan sailors found dead and six missing and presumed dead. Public mourning stations will be set up in Seoul and major cities where citizens can pay tribute.

Although his government has not presented any evidence of North Korean involvement, President Lee Myung-bak of South Korea has vowed “stern” or “unwavering” measures and spoke harshly of North Korea in recent days.

Over the weekend, he played host to a lunch with former South Korean Presidents Chun Doo-hwan and Kim Young-sam, both of them staunch hardliners on North Korea. After the lunch Friday, Mr. Lee’s office released comments from Mr. Chun and Mr. Kim, who both believed that the ship was attacked by North Korea and harshly criticized the North.

During the briefing by Mr. Lee’s office, the former leaders’ personal, scarring experiences with the North were detailed. According to the local media, Mr. Kim noted that his mother was killed in 1960 by a North Korean agent who attacked his island village on the south coast.

Mr. Chun, meanwhile, spoke of a spectacular bomb attack on South Korea’s leaders in 1983 that killed several cabinet ministers during a presidential visit to Yangon, Myanmar.

Such recriminations were rare during the decade from 1998 to 2008, when liberals ruled Korea and pursued a “Sunshine Policy” of aid and joint ventures meant to eventually reunite North and South Korea.

Mr. Lee came to power in 2008 promising to take a tougher line with the North, which had continued with a nuclear arms program despite the many overtures from the South. The meeting Friday — with its tough sound bites on the North — can be expected to continue to shore up Mr. Lee’s standing with conservative voters.

On Friday, the two former presidents suggested dismantling some of the results of the Sunshine Policy, shutting down a joint industrial park in the North and denying permission to some North Korean ships to ply South Korean waters to save time and fuel as they travel abroad.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/26/world/asia/26korea.html?ref=world


That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons of history.
~Aldous Huxley

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - ~Friedrich Nietzsche

Offline TahoeBlue

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18,069
Re: North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« Reply #252 on: April 28, 2017, 12:53:42 PM »
bump for tension
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5