North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold

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Offline Nailer

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North Korea - High Alert - War on the Threshold
« on: May 27, 2009, 06:00:25 AM »
who will fire the first shot to start WWIII



May 27 (Bloomberg) -- North Korea threatened a military response to South Korean participation in a U.S.-led program to seize weapons of mass destruction, and said it will no longer abide by the 1953 armistice that ended the Korean War.

“The Korean People’s Army will not be bound to the Armistice Agreement any longer,” the official Korean Central News Agency said in a statement today. Any attempt to inspect North Korean vessels will be countered with “prompt and strong military strikes.”

South Korean President Lee Myung Bak ordered his government to take “calm” measures on the threats, his office said in a statement today. Japan’s Chief Cabinet Secretary, Takeo Kawamura, echoed those remarks and called on North Korea to “refrain from taking actions that would elevate tensions in Asia.”

The threats are the strongest since North Korea tested a nuclear weapon on May 25, drawing international condemnation and the prospect of increased sanctions against the communist nation. South Korea dispatched a warship to its maritime border and is prepared to deploy aircraft, Yonhap News reported, citing military officials it didn’t identify.

“This rapid-fire provocation indicates a more aggressive shift in the Kim Jong Il regime,” said Ryoo Kihl Jae, a professor at the University of North Korean Studies in Seoul. “Kim is obviously using a strategy of maximum force.”

Markets Fall

South Korea’s benchmark Kospi stock index fell for a fifth day, the longest losing streak since February. The index declined 0.7 percent to 1,362.02. The won weakened 0.5 percent to 1,269.35 per dollar as of the 3 p.m. close of trade in Seoul.

The yield on government debt due in March 2014 rose six basis points to 4.58 percent, while the three-year yield added five basis points to 3.79 percent, according to data compiled by Bloomberg News.

North Korea can’t guarantee the safety of ships passing through its western waters, KCNA said. The statement specified five islands controlled by the South that were the site of naval skirmishes in 1999 and 2002.

“What they are saying is that they will take military action if there is any action taken on behalf of the program such as boarding their ships, stopping and searching and so on,” said Han Sung Joo, a former South Korean foreign minister.

South Korea’s Defense Ministry hasn’t raised the military’s alert status but has ordered it to strengthen readiness, according to a ministry official who requested anonymity for security reasons.

Weapons Shipments

South Korea yesterday agreed to join the Proliferation Security Initiative, or PSI, set up to locate and seize shipments of equipment and materials used to make weapons of mass destruction.

President Lee had resisted joining the PSI until the nuclear test, even after North Korea fired a ballistic missile on April 5. His predecessor, Roh Moo Hyun, had said that joining the initiative would be too provocative.

North Korea has also fired five short-range missiles in two days in a further display of military defiance. The United Nations Security Council agreed in an emergency session on May 25 to condemn the nuclear test and missile launches.

Under the July 27, 1953 armistice that ended the Korean War, both sides agreed to “a complete cessation of all hostilities” and pledged to accept the demarcation line that has become the world’s most-heavily mined demilitarized zone.

Nuclear Reactor

North Korea may be preparing to reprocess spent fuel rods at its Yongbyon nuclear reactor, the Chosun Ilbo newspaper reported earlier today, citing an unidentified South Korean official. Steam has been rising from the facilities, the newspaper said.

Kim is 68 according to research groups including the U.S. Army War College’s Strategic Studies Institute, while the regime says he is a year younger. He likely suffered a stroke last August, according to U.S. intelligence officials, and disappeared from public view before presiding over a parliamentary session in April, when he looked gaunt and aged.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aS17xp.yHokM&refer=home
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Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2009, 06:10:33 AM »
North Korea fires sixth missile in defiance of US demands for end of aggression

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/northkorea/5390593/North-Korea-fires-sixth-missile-in-defiance-of-US-demands-for-end-of-aggression.html


North Korea fires sixth missile in defiance of US demands for end of aggression
North Korea has fired another short-range missile in defiance of warnings from the United States, bringing the total numbers of launches in the past three days to six.
 
By Malcolm Moore in Seoul, Peter Foster in Beijing and Alex Spillius in Washington
Last Updated: 12:59AM BST 27 May 2009

The defiance of the North has prompted the US to warn that it will "pay the price" for continuing to ignore the international community.

Susan Rice, the US ambassador to the United Nations, said the UN Security Council was united in its determination to punish North Korea and that Pyongyang would learn that its actions "have consequences".


A South Korean official told Yonhap, the news agency, that a night-time launch had been carried out on Tuesday and that there are signs of imminent further launches along the rogue state's west coast.

"The North appears to have launched a ground-to-ship missile into the East Sea shortly after 9pm Tuesday," said the unnamed defence official. Pyongyang had already launched two missiles from its east coast earlier on Tuesday, after firing three on Monday.

It is unclear whether the missiles are test-launches, or whether North Korea is seeking to dissuade South Korean and US spy planes from hovering over its military installations in order to verify its claim of a nuclear test.

North Korea triggered global condemnation on Monday after detonating a nuclear bomb in a bunker six miles underground in the country's north east.

Experts are now scaling down their estimates of the size of the nuclear device, and a precise analysis will take days or weeks. However, a senior White House official said on Tuesday that the explosion was "several kilotons", a major advance on the North's test in 2006.

The United Nations Security Council met on Tuesday to begin work on a response to North Korea's actions, and Mrs Rice said a new resolution "will indeed take some time".

Mrs Rice said the US wanted "a strong resolution with teeth. Those teeth could take various different forms. They are economic levers, they are other levers that we might pursue."

The Security Council is expected to produce its plan in the next fortnight, although it is likely to face opposition from China on any major sanctions. China is the only country with major economic ties with the pariah state.

The Chinese government said that it was "resolutely opposed" to the nuclear test, but weakened the tone of its statement from the strong words it issued in response to North Korea's first nuclear test in October 2006. It also called for a "calm response" to the crisis and expressed hope that the issue would be resolved through dialogue.

China is North Korea's biggest source of food and fuel, but receives access to North Korean minerals in return.

With tensions on the Korean peninsula high, South Korea said it would join a US-led initiative to intercept ships suspected of carrying weapons of mass destruction, a move that Pyongyang has previously warned it would consider "AN ACT OF WAR".
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2009, 06:25:14 AM »
 NK can put a shell every 3 feet are something crazy like that for like 12 miles. They don't need a nuke for that area.

This doesn't sound like the normal stuff coming out of NK!!


US General Walter Sharp, seen here in February 2009, says North Korea has t...

The top US commander in South Korea said on Wednesday that North Korea has the world's largest artillery force and could rain fire on Seoul should the communist state decide to provoke all-out conflict.

General Walter Sharp's comments came amid rising tensions on the peninsula.

Last Saturday the North's military reminded South Korea that its densely populated capital is "only 50 km away" from the border.

Sharp, commander of some 28,500 US troops in South Korea, said the North has "an old but very large military that is positioned in a very dangerous place, very close" to South Korea.

"They have a very large special operating force. It has the world's largest artillery force that is positioned as far south as possible and that can rain on Seoul today," he told local business leaders.

The North maintains 80,000 special forces and is believed to have some 13,000 artillery pieces deployed along the border, Sharp said.

Cross-border relations are at their worst in a decade after South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak abandoned his predecessors' policy of providing almost unconditional aid to the North.

Pyongyang is also angry at Seoul's announced intention to join a US-led initiative against shipments of weapons of mass destruction.

It says any move by its neighbour to join the Proliferation Security Initiative would be seen as a declaration of war.

Sharp said US and South Korean troops are prepared to "fight and win" at any moment, stressing they "have operational plans prepared in order to be able to meet any contingencies".






rockman928 0p · 4 weeks ago
If the North Koreans truely believe they can win because of more artillery,than they are in for a tough tough lesson if they attack.The M1A2 Abrams will roll over any known artillery they have.The shells will quite literally bounce off the armor.This AP report shows a concerned general,as he should be.But in his head he knows he can win,and our Boys would kick their a** if they think shooting a few shells will win them a war.
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Joe_D 57p · 4 weeks ago
The leader of North Korea has got to be one of the least intelligent leaders in the world. For all intents and purposes North Korea has no hostile enemies. South Korea has a large military contingent, but they are in a purely defensive mode because of the hostile actions and rhetoric of North Korea. It is remarkable that a country would devote so much of its resources to military purposes when no other country gives a crap if they even exist, let alone attack them without provocation. Why feed the starving people in your country or install an electrical grid when you can use the money to go out and buy another weapon.
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AirborneOne 0p · 4 weeks ago
First, how many of you have actually been to South Korea, or more specifically, Seoul? I've been there and also visited Camp Bonifas. When briefed by commanders of the 8th Army (granted, this was in 1998) they informed us that NK anti-aircraft fire can take out commercial flights (our flight) into Seoul, granted, until we take them out. He also said that the artillery mentioned in this article COULD decimate Seoul. RobertX was correct, it would only take a few minutes to do the damage, again, until we took them out. But the damage would be done with most likely tens of thousands of dead and injured. As for Flyoverman, yes, we would take them out, but not after they've done their damage. And you folks can just forget about nukes, ain't gonna happen. In the end, this is just another tin pot dictator taking advantage of limp wrist obama to get fuel and food, which I'm sure he'll succeed.

I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
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Offline Unintelligable Name

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2009, 06:27:25 AM »
They shoot off a missile or two and all the sudden they think they're Billy Badass on the block.

Those idiots don't even have enough fuel reserves to move their army more than 300 miles...

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2009, 06:33:02 AM »
They shoot off a missile or two and all the sudden they think they're Billy Badass on the block.

Those idiots don't even have enough fuel reserves to move their army more than 300 miles...

6 Missiles now and testing nukes.   Fuel reserves I know nothing about but things are getting heated up .
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #5 on: May 27, 2009, 06:36:03 AM »
N. Korea threatens military response after S. Korea joins PSI

SEOUL, May 27 (Yonhap) -- North Korea said Wednesday that it will no longer be bound to the Korean War armistice and will militarily respond to any foreign attempt to inspect its ships, denouncing South Korea's participation in a U.S.-led security campaign as a "declaration of war."

"As declared to the world, our revolutionary forces will consider the full participation in the Proliferation Security Initiative (PSI) by the Lee Myung-bak group of traitors as a declaration of war against us," the North's permanent military mission to the joint security area said.

It said the North Korean military "will be no longer bound to the armistice agreement" that ended the 1950-53 war, and the peninsula will soon be "returned to the state of war" as long as the armistice remains ineffective, the mission said in a statement carried by the Korean Central News Agency.
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #6 on: May 27, 2009, 07:35:43 AM »
 Monitoring of N. Korea to be bolstered during ASEAN summit: official
 
 S. Korea vows stern response to N. Korean provocation in western waters
 
 (3rd LD) N. Korea threatens military response after S. Korea joins PSI
 
 (LEAD) N. Korean committee reinforces threat against Seoul's PSI participation
 
 (LEAD) S. Korean, Russian presidents agree on 'strong' measure against N. Korea
 
 (LEAD) S. Korea vows to repel any N. Korean provocation near sea border
 
 S. Korean, Russian presidents agree on 'strong' measure against N. Korea
 
 S. Korea vows to repel any N. Korean provocation near sea border
 
 (2nd LD) Top S. Korean, U.S. diplomats seek to meet over N. Korea: source
 
 (LEAD) President calls for calm reaction to N. Korean threats
 
 N. Korean committee reinforces threat against Seoul's PSI participation 
 
 President calls for calm reaction to N. Korean threats
 
 (LEAD) Top S. Korean, U.S. diplomats to meet over N. Korea: source
 
 (2nd LD) N. Korea threatens military response after S. Korea joins PSI
 
 Top S. Korean, U.S. diplomats to meet over N. Korea: source
 
 (LEAD) N. Korea threatens military response after S. Korea joins PSI
 
 N. Korea threatens military response after S. Korea joins PSI
 
 (URGENT) North Korea says it is no more bound to Korean War armistice
 
 (URGENT) North Korea says it will respond militarily to South Korea's joining in U.S.-led PSI


http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/northkorea/0400000001.html
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Unintelligable Name

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #7 on: May 27, 2009, 07:42:31 AM »
http://blogs.usatoday.com/ondeadline/2008/12/un-north-korean.html

Quote
In a joint statement, the Food and Agriculture Organization and the World Food Program report that 8.7 million residents of the Hermit Kingdom "will urgently need food assistance" because of fertilizer and fuel shortages.

The country is thought to have a food deficit of 836,000 tons.

"With such a large food gap, accessing enough food and a balanced diet will be almost impossible, particularly for families living in urban areas or in the remote food-deficit provinces in the Northeast," Torben Due, WFP's representative in Pyongyang, says. "This could have grave consequences for the health of the most vulnerable groups."

They're Government claims they're ready to rock and roll though.... while their nation starves and is without power or running water... Gotta love Communism...

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #8 on: May 27, 2009, 07:52:41 AM »
North Korea Military Guide


http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/dprk/

this is a small list of N Koreas resources.


d) North Koreans are combat ready

One cannot fight war without military preparedness. North Korea's regular army is for offensive actions whereas its militias are homeland defense. North Korea's regular army consists of 4 corps in the front area, 8 corps in the rear area, one tank corps, 5 armored corps, 2 artillery corps, and 1 corps for the defense of Pyongyang, South Korea has 19 infantry divisions whereas North Korea has 80 divisions and brigades.

A North Korean infantry division has 3 infantry regiments, 1 artillery regiment (3 battalions of 122 mm rocket launchers and 1 battalion of 152 mortars), one tank battalion of 31 tanks, one anti-tank battalion, one anti-aircraft battalion, one engineer battalion, one communication battalion, one light-infantry battalion, one recon battalion, and one chemical warfare battalion.

North Korea's militias consist of 1.6 million self-defense units, 100,000 people's guards, 3.9 million workers militia, 900,000 youth guard units. These militias are tasked to defend the homeland. The militias are fully armed and undergo military trainings regularly.

i) Artillery

North Korea has 2 artillery corps and 30 artillery brigades equipped with 120mm self-propelled guns, 152mm self-propelled mortars, 170mm guns with a range of 50 km, 240 mm multiple rocket launchers with a range of 45 km, and other heavy guns. North Korea has about 18,000 heavy guns. North Korea's 170mm Goksan gun and 240mm multiple-tube rocket launchers are the most powerful guns of the world. These guns can lob shells as far south as Suwon miles beyond Seoul. The big guns are hidden in caves. Many of them are mounted on rails and can fire in all directions. They can rain 500,000 conventional and biochemical shells per hour on US troops near the DMZ. The US army bases at Yijong-bu, Paju, Yon-chun, Munsan, Ding-gu-chun, and Pochun will be obliterated in a matter of hours.

The US army in Korea is equipped with Paladin anti-artillery guns that can trace enemy shells back to the guns and fire shells at the enemy guns with pin-point accuracy. However, it takes for the Paladins about 10 min to locate the enemy guns, during which time the Paladins would be targeted by the enemy guns Gen. Thomas A Schwartz, a former US army commander in Korea, stated that the US army in Korea would be destroyed in less than three hours.

ii). Blitz Klieg

North Korea has tanks, armored cars, and self-propelled artillery for blitz klieg. North Korea has one tank corps and 15 tank brigades. The tank corps has 5 tank regiments, each of which has 4 heavy tank battalions, 1 light-tank battalion, one mechanized infantry battalion, 2 self-propelled artillery battalions.

US tanks are designed to operate in open fields. In 1941, Rommel of Germany defeated British troops in North Africa with tanks. The largest tank battle was fought at Kursk in 1943, in which the Soviets defeated Germans. In 1973, Egypt defeated Israeli tanks with anti-tank missiles. All of these tank battles were fought in open fields. The Gulf War and the recent war in Iraq saw US tanks in open fields. American and Western tank commanders do not know how to fight tank battles in rugged terrains like those of Korea. Tank battles in Korea will be fought on hilly terrains without any close air cover, because North Korean fighters will engage US planes in close dog fights.

North Korea has developed tanks ideally suited for the many rivers and mountains of Korea. These tanks are called "Chun-ma-ho", which can navigate steep slopes and cross rivers as much as 5.5 m deep. North Korea's main battle tanks - T-62s - have 155 mm guns and can travel as fast as 60 km per hour. The US main tanks - M1A - have 120 mm guns and cannot travel faster than 55 km per hour. North Korean tanks have skins 700 mm thick and TOW-II is the only anti-tank missile in the US arsenal that can penetrate this armored skin.

North Korea began to make anti-tank missiles in 1975 and has been improving its anti-tank missiles for the past 30 years. North Korea's anti-tank missiles are rated the best in the world and several foreign nations buy them. The US army in Korea relies on 72 AH-64 Apache attack helicopters to kill North Korean tanks. Each Apache has 16 Hell-Fire anti-tank missiles. As shown in the recent Iraq war, Apaches are fragile and can be easily shot down even with rifles. North Korea has about 15,000 shoulder-fired anti-air missiles ("wha-sung") and Apaches will be easy targets for wha-sung missiles. On December 17, 1994, a wha-sung missile brought down an American OH-58C spy helicopter which strayed north of the DMZ.

North Korea has 4 mechanized corps and 24 mechanized brigades. Each brigade has 1 tank battalion (31 tanks), 1 armored battalion (46 armored cars), 4 infantry battalions, one 122mm battalion (18 guns), one 152 mm battalion (18 guns), one anti-aircraft battalion (18 guns), anti-tank battalion (9 armored cars with anti-tank missiles and 12 anti-tank guns), one armored recon company (3 light armored cars, 7 armored cars, and 8 motor-cycles), one mortar company (6 mortars), one engineer company, one chemical company, and one communication company. The US army has A-10 attack planes to counter North Korea's mechanized units. In case of war, the skies over Korea will be filled with fighters in close dog-fights and the A-10s would be ineffective.

The bulk of North Korea's mechanized and tank units are positioned to cross the DMZ at a moment's notice and run over the US and South Korean defenders. The attackers will be aided by SU-25 attack planes and attack helicopters. In addition, North Korea has 600 high-speed landing crafts, 140 hovercrafts, and 3,000 K-60 and other pontoon bridges for river-crossing. North Korea has 700,000 troops, 8,000 heavy guns, and 2,000 tanks placed in more than 4,000 hardened bunkers within 150 km of the DMZ.

iii. Underground Tunnel Warfare

North Korea is the world most-tunneled nation. North Korea's expertise in digging tunnels for warfare was demonstrated during the Vietnam War. North Korea sent about 100 tunnel warfare experts to Vietnam to help dig the 250 km tunnels for the North Vietnamese and Viet Gong troops in South Vietnam. The tunnels were instrumental in the Vietnamese victory.

North Korea's army runs on company-size units. Tunnel warfare is conducted by independent company-size units. Tunnel entrances are built to withstand US chemical and biological attacks. Tunnels run zig-zag and have seals, air-purification units, and safe places for the troops to rest. It is believed that North Korea has built about 20 large tunnels near the DMZ. A large tunnel can transport 15,000 troops per hour across the DMZ and place them behind the US troops.

iv. Special Forces

North Korea has the largest special forces, 120,000 troops, in the world. These troops are grouped into light infantry brigades, attack brigades, air-borne brigades, and sea-born brigades - 25 brigades in total. These troops will be tasked to attack US military installations in Korea, Japan, Okinawa and Guam.

North Korea has the capacity to transport 20,000 special force troops at the same time. North Korea has 130 high-speed landing crafts and 140 hovercrafts. A North Korean hovercraft can carry one platoon of troops at 90 km per hour. Western experts pooh-pooh North Korea's ancient AN-2 transport planes as 1948 relics, but AN-2 planes can fly low beneath US radars and deliver up to 10 troops at 160 km per hour. North Korea makes AN-2s and has about 300 in place. In addition, North Korea has hang-gliders that can carry 5-20 men each for short hops.

North Korea has developed special bikes for mountain warfare. Special forces use these bikes for fast deployments on mountains. Switzerland is the only other nation that has bike-mounted special forces trained for mountain warfare. The rugged terrains of the Korean Peninsula are ideally suited for special forces operations. North Korea's special forces will attack US targets in Japan, Okinawa, and Guam as well. Japan's self defense units are being reorganized to counter this threat.

How good are North Korea's special forces? In September 1996, a North Korean submarine was stranded near Kang-nung and the crew were forced to abandon the ship and land on South Korea. The sub had two special forces agents who had finished a mission in South Korea and were picked up by the sub before the sub ran into a rock. The two men fought off an army of South Korean troops and remained at large for 50 days, during which they killed 11 of the pursuers.
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
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Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #9 on: May 27, 2009, 11:03:28 AM »
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090527/ap_on_re_as/as_koreas_nuclear_70

NKorea threatens to attack US, SKorean warships

By HYUNG-JIN KIM, Associated Press Writer Hyung-jin Kim, Associated Press Writer – 1 hr 11 mins ago
SEOUL, South Korea – North Korea threatened military action Wednesday against U.S. and South Korean warships plying the waters near the Koreas' disputed maritime border, raising the specter of a naval clash just days after the regime's underground nuclear test.

Pyongyang, reacting angrily to Seoul's decision to join an international program to intercept ships suspected of aiding nuclear proliferation, called the move tantamount to a declaration of war.

"Now that the South Korean puppets were so ridiculous as to join in the said racket and dare declare a war against compatriots," North Korea is "compelled to take a decisive measure," the Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea said in a statement carried by state media.

Seoul's decision comes at a time when "the state of military confrontation is growing acute and there is constant danger of military conflict," the statement warned.

South Korea's military said Wednesday it was prepared to "respond sternly" to any North Korean provocation.

North Korea's latest belligerence comes as the U.N. Security Council debates how to punish the regime for testing a nuclear bomb Monday in what President Barack Obama called a "blatant violation" of international law.

Ambassadors from the five permanent veto-wielding council members — the United States, Russia, China, Britain and France — as well as Japan and South Korea were working out the details of a new resolution.

South Korea, divided from the North by a heavily fortified border, had responded to the nuclear test by joining the Proliferation Security Initiative, a U.S.-led network of nations seeking to stop ships from transporting the materials used in nuclear bombs.

Seoul previously resisted joining the PSI in favor of seeking reconciliation with Pyongyang, but pushed those efforts aside Monday after the nuclear test in the northeast.

North Korea warned Wednesday that any attempt to stop, board or inspect its ships would constitute a "grave violation."

The regime also said it could no longer promise the safety of U.S. and South Korean warships and civilian vessels in the waters near the Korea's western maritime border.

"They should bear in mind that the (North) has tremendous military muscle and its own method of strike able to conquer any targets in its vicinity at one stroke or hit the U.S. on the raw, if necessary," it said.

The maritime border has long been a flashpoint between the two Koreas. North Korea disputes the line unilaterally drawn by the United Nations at the end of the Koreas' three-year war in 1953, and has demanded it be redrawn further south.

The truce signed in 1953 and subsequent military agreements call for both sides to refrain from warfare, but doesn't cover the waters off the west coast.

North Korea has used the maritime border dispute to provoke two deadly naval skirmishes — in 1999 and 2002.

On Wednesday, the regime promised "unimaginable and merciless punishment" for anyone daring to challenge its ships.

Pyongyang also reportedly restarted its weapons-grade nuclear plant, South Korean media said.

The Chosun Ilbo newspaper said U.S. spy satellites detected signs of steam at the North's Yongbyon nuclear complex, an indication it may have started reprocessing nuclear fuel. The report, which could not be confirmed, quoted an unidentified government official. South Korea's Yonhap news agency also carried a similar report.

The move would be a major setback for efforts aimed at getting North Korea to disarm.

North Korea had stopped reprocessing fuel rods as part of an international deal. In 2007, it agreed to disable the Yongbyon reactor in exchange for aid and demolished a cooling tower at the complex.

The North has about 8,000 spent fuel rods which, if reprocessed, could allow it to harvest 13 to 18 pounds (six to eight kilograms) of plutonium — enough to make at least one nuclear bomb, experts said. North Korea is believed to have enough plutonium for at least a half dozen atomic bombs.

Further ratcheting up tensions, North Korea test-fired five short-range missiles over the past two days, South Korean officials confirmed.

A North Korean newspaper, Minju Joson, said in commentary Wednesday that Pyongyang does not fear repercussions for its actions.

"It is a laughable delusion for the United States to think that it can get us to kneel with sanctions," it said. "We've been living under U.S. sanctions for decades, but have firmly safeguarded our ideology and system while moving our achievements forward. The U.S. sanctions policy toward North Korea is like striking a rock with a rotten egg."
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2009, 11:08:44 AM »
Seventy percent of their active force, including approximately 700,000 troops, over 8,000 artillery systems, and 2,000 tanks, is postured within 90 miles of the Demilitarized Zone. This percentage continues to rise despite the June 2000 summit. Most of this force in the forward area is protected in over 4,000 underground facilities, out of over 11,000 nationwide. From their current locations, these forces can attack with minimal preparations or warning. The protracted southward deployment follows a tactic of “creeping normalcy”—a significant movement over a period of many years that would attract too much international attention if accomplished over weeks or months.


North Korea has organized a grand total of seven million men and women into reserve units. Reserve Military Training Unit, Worker-Peasant Militia, and the Young Red Guards make up most of the number. The units are managed by the Party Civil Defense Department in peacetime, but are placed under the Ministry of Defense in contingencies. War mobilization measures usually assign Reserve Military Training Unit to the front or regional defense in war, while the other two units are assigned to maintain security in the rear, guard duty for important facilities, etc. About 30% of all North Koreans between the ages fifteen to sixty are mobilized for reserve units:

The Reserve Military Training Unit consist of approximately 1.7 million persons (men 17-45 and unmarried women 17-30) who are not either in active duty or important rear area personnel. They are mobilized under supervision of provincial military units, for a total of forty days' training out of the year.

The Worker-Peasant Militia is a combination of older men aged 45-60, along with men ages 17-45 and unmarried women ages 17-30 who are not included in Reserve Military Training Unit. They train for a total of thirty days out of the year. Their current numbers stand at 4.1 million.

The Young Red Guards consist of 1.2 million male and female Higher Middle (High) School students aged 14-16. They are subject to a mandatory four-hour drill session every Saturday and a total of 160 hours of on-campus drills annually. A total of 450 hours of off-campus training is also mandatory.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/world/dprk/army.htm
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Offline zeke105

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #11 on: May 27, 2009, 11:09:50 AM »
Am I the only that thinks it's pretty damn hypocritical and condescending to tell other nations not to test or have nuclear weapons when we are the only nation to use them to annihilate people??

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Offline IridiumKEPfactor

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #12 on: May 27, 2009, 11:21:03 AM »
Am I the only that thinks it's pretty damn hypocritical and condescending to tell other nations not to test or have nuclear weapons when we are the only nation to use them to annihilate people??



When North Korea got their reactor(s) from ABB facilitated by the demon lieutenant Donald Rumsfeld,you know it is a setup. The way things are going, the U.S. wants to let the Nuclear Cat out of the bag. Crazy North Korea is their convienent excuse. If North Korea lets one loose the world would be "rebroken in" to having them happen more often.


- Pick up the gun.
- I don't wanna pick it up, Mister. You'll shoot me.
- Pick it up.
- Look Mister, I don't want no trouble. I just came into town to get some hard rock candy for my kids and some gingham for my wife.
- Pick up the gun.
[BANG! BANG! BANG!]
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Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2009, 11:24:22 AM »
Am I the only that thinks it's pretty damn hypocritical and condescending to tell other nations not to test or have nuclear weapons when we are the only nation to use them to annihilate people??

I think that as well, so you're not the only one.

       http://www.doug-long.com/quotes.htm
       http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v16/v16n3p-4_Weber.html
       http://www.antiwar.com/henderson/?articleid=9443

What makes this even more hypocritical is the fact that the U.S. paid for North Korea's nukes:

-------------------------------------

http://www.prisonplanet.com/north-koreas-nukes-paid-for-by-the-us-government.html

North Korea’s Nukes: Paid For By The U.S. Government

Clinton, Rumsfeld and Bush played key role in arming Stalinist state, CIA asset AQ Khan helped provide means for Stalinist state to build nuclear arsenal, with the protection of Uncle Sam

Paul Joseph Watson
Prison Planet.com
Monday, May 25, 2009


Amidst the cacophony of condemnation from all sides following North Korea’s second nuclear bomb test, there has been no mention whatsoever of how the secretive Stalinist state got its weapons in the first place - they were paid for by the U.S. government.

Both the Clinton and Bush administrations played a key role in helping Kim Jong-Il develop North Korea’s nuclear prowess from the mid 1990’s onwards.

The hypocrisy being spewed forth from all sides in reaction to today’s news that North Korea tested an underground nuclear device equivalent to 10 times the power of their first test in October 2006 is akin to when the U.S. cited Iraq’s possession of chemical and biological weapons as a reason to invade in 2003, having first checked the receipt of course, since it was Donald Rumsfeld who brokered the deal to supply Saddam with those weapons in the first place.

Rumsfeld was also the man who presided over a $200 million dollar contract to deliver equipment and services to build two light water reactor stations in North Korea in January 2000 when he was an executive director of ABB (Asea Brown Boveri). Wolfram Eberhardt, a spokesman for ABB confirmed that Rumsfeld was at nearly all the board meetings during his involvement with the company.

[Continued...]

-------------------------------------
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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #14 on: May 27, 2009, 12:43:13 PM »
Quote
North Korea’s Nukes: Paid For By The U.S. Government
[/b]

From their own web site:

http://www.abb.com/cawp/seitp202/C1256C290031524B4125686C00433604.aspx

ABB to deliver systems, equipment to North Korean nuclear plants
US$ 200 million in orders awarded under multi-government framework agreement

Zurich, Switzerland, January 20, 2000 – ABB, the global technology group, said today it has signed contracts to deliver equipment and services for two nuclear power stations at Kumho, on the east coast of North Korea. The contracts, with a value of US$ 200 million, were awarded by HANJUNG (Korea Heavy Industries and Construction Co. Ltd.) and KOPEC (Korea Power Engineering Corp.).

The two nuclear plants are being supplied to North Korea under a Supply Agreement with KEDO (Korean Energy Peninsula Development Organization), a consortium formed in 1995 by the governments of the United States, Japan, South Korea and the European Union. KEDO is to provide the stations under the Agreed Framework signed by the U.S. and North Korea in 1994.

Under the terms of the contracts, ABB will provide engineering, design and components for the two 1,000-megawatt (Mwe) light water nuclear steam supply systems. The systems are an advanced version of ABB’s System 80 design, which is being employed under license in eight reactors in South Korea. The two power stations are scheduled to begin commercial operation by 2007 and 2008, respectively.

ABB and BNFL announced in late December of 1999 that British-based BNFL will acquire ABB’s nuclear business, pending regulatory approval.

ABB <http://www.abb.com> is a global technology company serving customers in power transmission and distribution; automation; oil, gas, and petrochemicals; industrial products and contracting; and in financial services. Power generation customers are served by the joint venture ABB ALSTOM POWER. The ABB Group employs about 170,000 people in more than 100 countries. (End)

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=3487

Rumsfeld Was On ABB Board During North Korea Nuke Deal
by Jacob Greber
Global Research, October 15, 2006

Report first published  21 Feb 2003 by Swissinfo.org

Donald Rumsfeld, the US secretary of defense, was on the board of technology giant Asea Brown Bovery (ABB) when it won a deal to supply North Korea with two nuclear power plants.

Weapons experts say waste material from the two reactors could be used for so-called 'dirty bombs'.

The Swiss-based ABB on Friday told swissinfo that Rumsfeld was involved with the company in early 2000, when it netted a $200 million (SFr270million) contract with Pyongyang. The ABB contract was to deliver equipment and services for two nuclear power stations at Kumho, on North Koreaís east coast.

Rumsfeld - who is one of the Bush administration's most strident 'hardliners' on North Korea - was a member of ABB's board between 1990 and February 2001, when he left to take up his current post.

Wolfram Eberhardt, a spokesman for ABB, told swissinfo that Rumsfeld was at nearly all the board meetings during his decade-long involvement with the company.

Maybe, Maybe Not

However, he declined to indicate whether Rumsfeld was made aware of the nuclear contract with North Korea.

"This is a good question, but I couldn't comment on that because we never disclose the protocols of the board meetings,' Eberhardt said. "Maybe this was a discussion point of the board, maybe not."

The defense secretary's role at ABB during the late 1990s has become a bone of contention in Washington.

The ABB contract was a consequence of a 1994 deal between the US and Pyongyang to allow construction of two reactors in exchange for a freeze on the North's nuclear weapons programme.

North Korea revealed last year that it had secretly continued its nuclear weapons programme, despite its obligations under the deal with Washington. The Bush government has repeatedly used the agreement to criticise the former Clinton administration for being too soft on North Korea. Rumsfeld's deputy, Paul Wolfowitz, has been among the most vocal critics of the 1994 weapons accord.

Dirty Bombs

Weapons experts have also speculated that waste material from the two reactors could be used for so-called 'dirty bombs'.

Rumsfeld's position at ABB could prove embarrassing for the Bush administration since while he was a director he was also active on issues of weapons proliferation, chairing the 1998 congressional Ballistic Missile Threat commission. The commission suggested the Clinton-era deal with Pyongyang gave too much away because "North Korea maintains an active weapons of mass destruction programme, including a nuclear weapons programme."

>From Zurich To Pyongyang

At the same time, Rumsfeld was travelling to Zurich for ABB's quarterly board-meetings.

Eberhardt said it was possible that the North Korea deal never crossed the ABB boardroom desk.

"At the time, we generated a lot of big orders in the power generation business [worth] around $1 billion - [so] a $200 million contract was, so to speak, a smaller one."

When asked whether a deal with a country such as North Korea - a communist state with declared nuclear intentions - should have been brought to the ABB board's attention, Eberhardt told swissinfo:

"Yes, maybe. But so far we haven't any evidence for that because the protocols were never disclosed. So maybe it was a discussion point, maybe not," says Eberhardt. A Pentagon spokeswoman, Victoria Clark, recently told Newsweek magazine that "Secretary Rumsfeld does not recall it being brought before the board at any time."

It Was A Long Time Ago

Today, ABB says it no longer has any involvement with the North Korean power plants, due to come on line in 2007 and 2008. The company finalised the sale of its nuclear business in early 2000 to the British-based BNFL group.
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Bountaker

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #15 on: May 27, 2009, 01:03:35 PM »
Iran send its ship in int water , NKorea ready to play cowboys , are we talking about the '' axies of evil ''

loll i guess we will be the '' allies '' so yes i guess we can confirm that wee are on the verge of a WWIII

or its a pretty good spookie movie !

someone said it takes a catastrophe to impose stuff lolll here wee are now a the catastrophe or your depopulation !
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Offline ChristSavage

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #16 on: May 27, 2009, 01:09:37 PM »
All of this mention about N Korea, and with the caller that reported on the recent assasination of the S Korean president makes me think of the Bond Film Die Another Day (2002).  Although assasinating presidents is not in the film, the fact of the Koreas holding the world hostage, and combined with MI6 / CIA involvement (Bond and the character played by Halle Berry), sure is scary enough. 

Offline Wintermute

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #17 on: May 27, 2009, 01:16:25 PM »
Yahoo News has AP fear-mongering...

Quote
North Korea threatens to attack American and South Korean warships
http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/090527/world/koreas_nuclear

I knew before I read that the story that there wouldn't be any such threats in there... and sure enough, NK is just making defensive noises about retaliation if their ships are boarded.


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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #18 on: May 27, 2009, 01:17:03 PM »

Albright - Kim
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Bountaker

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #19 on: May 27, 2009, 01:21:19 PM »
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/8068567.stm

What is North Korea's game plan?


Page last updated at 15:42 GMT, Tuesday, 26 May 2009 16:42 UK
E-mail this to a friend    Printable version


By Aidan Foster-Carter
Korea analyst

North Korean leader Kim Jong-il, in undated image released on 9 June by state news agency KCNA
Is Kim Jong-il sending a hard-line message or covering for internal strife?

Even by its own shrill standards, North Korea's recent behaviour is hyper-militant. But why?

Last month's launch of a long-range dual-use rocket - maybe a satellite, certainly a potential missile - prompted censure by the UN Security Council.

North Korea must have expected this, having been similarly rebuked twice for missile and nuclear launches in 2006.

Yet Pyongyang professed high dudgeon at what was in truth mild UN Security Council remonstrance: just a statement, not a full resolution.

On this flimsy pretext, in a fine show of pique it repudiated the six-party talks and said it would resume its nuclear programme.

Monday's nuclear test showed this to be no idle threat. But why? Why now? What is really going on?

Less well known is that four separate high-level US delegations - nominally private but including Stephen Bosworth, now the Obama administration's point man on North Korea - visited Pyongyang earlier this year.

All got a frosty reception. Their hosts professed no interest in full relations with the US, long regarded as the ultimate prize sought by Kim Jong-il.

So how does this latest North Korean jigsaw - with too few and misshapen pieces, as always - fit together?

Stringing along

There are two broad possibilities and variants within either of those.

What message is Kim Jong-il trying to send, and to whom? Getting Obama's attention is one widely-touted suggestion. Yet on closer inspection this hardly adds up.
   
Barking louder than ever may be their way of scaring us off while they effect a delicate transition

Everyone knew, because he told us, that Barack Obama was ready to engage with America's foes. He means it, and he is doing it. With Cuba and others, change is already under way.

So surely this is the US President Kim Jong-il has been waiting for? True, Obama is busy with the Middle East and the financial crisis. But his door, and mind, are open.

It did not need a bomb or rocket to blast a way in and get a hearing in Washington. To the contrary, these were bound to backfire.

There have to be more Security Council resolutions and maybe sanctions, however ineffectual, when a rogue state makes a mockery of international law.

Kim Jong-il is no fool. So we must conclude, definitively now, that he has no intention of emulating Libya's Colonel Gaddafi and ever giving up his weapons of mass destruction.

The six long years of the six-party talks were just stringing us along. Without nuclear weapons, North Korea would be just another miserable tyranny. With them, it commands attention - if not respect.

Or maybe Kim Jong-il would have made peace, but hardliners used his illness last year to seize the helm and batten down the hatches.

Yet abandoning diplomacy altogether is hardly a serious long-term option, for a failed state reliant on Chinese aid to feed its hungry people.
Farmers till the land in North Korea, seen from China, on 26 May 2009
Making peace would bring financial rewards to the impoverished state

Provoking Beijing is a risky game. A patient patron hitherto, China may finally snap and pull the plug on so tiresome a client - as Moscow did in 1991, devastating the North's economy.

Is the new turn merely tactical? If so, it is a dire miscalculation. Mr Kim's old game of militant mendicancy - doing bad things, to be paid to stop - will no longer wash. Everyone is fed up.

More exactly, the Dear Leader could have cleaned up if (and only if) he stuck with the six-party talks.

Peace and real disarmament would bring North Korea huge financial rewards: $10bn (£6.3bn) for full relations with Japan, and surely much more from a relieved Seoul.

One faint hope is that they may not really mean all this. That brings us to the second broad hypothesis.

Succession plan?

Rather than being any kind of odd signal to the wider world, North Korea's new militancy might be primarily driven by internal events, largely invisible to outside eyes.

Perverse as it sounds, barking louder than ever may be their way of scaring us off while they effect a delicate transition.

This could be a smokescreen behind which, not before time, one of Kim's mysterious and untried sons is being wheeled into place as his eventual successor.

If so, we may get more sense out of Pyongyang once such internal ructions settle down. But to speculate thus may be clutching at straws.

The view that North Korea is a rational actor - if only we are patient and avoid upsetting them - looks, let's face it, increasingly threadbare.

My fear is that defining itself against the world is hardwired into North Korea's outlook.

For over a decade, Bill Clinton, former South Korean President Kim Dae-jung, China, Russia and others strove to lead this most stubborn and suspicious of mules to water. But none could make it drink, beyond a few sips.

A toe in the water is as far as Kim Jong-il will ever go, on economic reform and peace alike. When it comes to the crunch, he refuses the fence.

At the risk of flogging equine metaphors to death, some blame the likes of George W Bush - before his U-turn to engagement - for frightening the horses with "axis of evil" rhetoric, so reinforcing Pyongyang's paranoia.

But ultimately, the choice and fault is Kim's. China and Vietnam show there is another way - the only way. North Korea is on a road to nowhere.

Aidan Foster-Carter is honorary senior research fellow in sociology and modern Korea at Leeds University
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Offline iceman2

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #20 on: May 27, 2009, 01:44:09 PM »
For my part, reading all the bits and threads on this, this could well be, as others have said, be the BIG one. If it's going to kick off, it's going to happen within the next week or two. Fill up those fuel cans and make sure your food stocks are good. the match is out of the box, the fuel has been spilt, and all we need is some retard to strike the match! Question is will the net keep running? EMP, no power,


IS ANYONE OUT THERE< COME BACK!!  ::)

Offline Cpl744

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #21 on: May 27, 2009, 01:51:59 PM »
NK rattles the worlds cage every now and then when KJI feels he isn't getting enough attention or foreign aid.

He makes a big fuss and a lot of empty threats, but that's pretty much all they are.  He isn't suicidal like Iran's leaders are.

Besides, they can't afford food, clothing or electricity... how can they afford a war?

This will die down in a couple of weeks like it did last time, and the time before that, and the time before that...  ::)

KJI's little outbursts are the equivalent of a child's temper tantrum, nothing more.

Offline iceman2

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #22 on: May 27, 2009, 01:56:55 PM »
NK rattles the worlds cage every now and then when KJI feels he isn't getting enough attention or foreign aid.

He makes a big fuss and a lot of empty threats, but that's pretty much all they are.  He isn't suicidal like Iran's leaders are.

Besides, they can't afford food, clothing or electricity... how can they afford a war?

This will die down in a couple of weeks like it did last time, and the time before that, and the time before that...  ::)

KJI's little outbursts are the equivalent of a child's temper tantrum, nothing more.


Well I hope your so right and I am wrong: please make me look like a dork! I can live with that.

but have you seen this from today in NK.
Choe Thae Bok, alternate member of the Political Bureau and secretary of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea, in a speech said that the nuclear test was a grand undertaking to protect the supreme interests of the DPRK and defend the dignity and sovereignty of the country and nation in face of the U.S. imperialists' unabated threat to mount a preemptive nuclear attack and sanctions and pressure upon it.


The army and people of the DPRK defending the destiny of the country and the nation and socialism and opening a great heyday of prosperity unprecedented in the history spanning 5,000 years demonstrated the dignity of the nation and the strong national power through the successful nuclear test,


Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #23 on: May 27, 2009, 01:58:02 PM »
NK rattles the worlds cage every now and then when KJI feels he isn't getting enough attention or foreign aid.

He makes a big fuss and a lot of empty threats, but that's pretty much all they are.  He isn't suicidal like Iran's leaders are.

Besides, they can't afford food, clothing or electricity... how can they afford a war?

This will die down in a couple of weeks like it did last time, and the time before that, and the time before that...  ::)

KJI's little outbursts are the equivalent of a child's temper tantrum, nothing more.

last time they did not threaten war with the USA if the US boarded a NK ship/vessel.
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Offline Bountaker

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #24 on: May 27, 2009, 01:58:34 PM »
did anyone in North Korea confirm the missle launch or the nuclear test because the way i see that the news only come from the Uk and Usa or the '' ALLIES "

it might a pretext to invade Nk because the usa did invent stuff to get in the 1st ww and the 2nd ww
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Offline Cpl744

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2009, 02:01:45 PM »
Quote
last time they did not threaten war with the USA if the US boarded a NK ship/vessel.

True, but I still just see this as NK/KJI rhetoric... same style, different flavor.

Offline iceman2

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #26 on: May 27, 2009, 04:40:07 PM »
did anyone in North Korea confirm the missle launch or the nuclear test because the way i see that the news only come from the Uk and Usa or the '' ALLIES "

it might a pretext to invade Nk because the usa did invent stuff to get in the 1st ww and the 2nd ww

Yes the last info I gave was from NK news system


Offline Bountaker

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #27 on: May 27, 2009, 05:11:56 PM »
thank you iceman   , well i guess alex is right wee are about to have the famous catastrophe thats been talk about
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Offline Libertarian Perspective

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2009, 05:22:09 PM »

Those idiots don't even have enough fuel reserves to move their army more than 300 miles...

They only need to get to Seoul which is 50 miles from the border and it would be seen by the North Koreans as a "major victory" and a slap in the face for Japan and America.
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his property, and I probably would have done the
same thing in his position. This has certainly stopped
me committing any more crime.” - British burglar elaborating robbery

Offline thadividedsky

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2009, 10:31:02 PM »
this could be the start of WWIII, but I'm more concerned about what's going on here at home in the states. All day it was NK this and NK that. Not a mention of the SCOTUS vote on Miranda. WTF. I see WWIII, in the least to justify the Obama nazi brigade he's forming. NK isn't a pushover either. they don't need sophisticated weapons to rain fire down onto the populaces of SK. Shock and awe won't do much since NK just don't give a damn what happens to them. Can anyone honestly believe the US won't get involved thus forcing China to get involved? Once the US intervenes, China will surely intervene likewise and let's not forget they are our banker right now. Don't bite the hand that feeds you. Is this really happening?
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Offline thrashbassist

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2009, 10:53:52 PM »
Sounds to me like Kim Jong Il is very pissed off because he's so short. Napoleon complex I suppose.

My question is, what parts would Russia and China play in this if SHTF?
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Offline thadividedsky

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #31 on: May 28, 2009, 01:18:28 AM »
it would be an opportunity for China to invade Taiwan and give us the finger saying we gave them precedent. Anyway at that point we couldn't protect Taiwan. As for Russia, they would be justified in taking out our defenses in Europe and with the EU in disarray and collapsing financially, they couldn't fight back. You just need 1 little spark to set this powder keg off and I thought the powder keg was Iran. Never mind the news of a south Korean president or something being assassinated Saturday, just like WWI with Franz ferdinand who was assassinated preceding that war. In other words, this could escalate fast and likely could get out of control. We all need to pray
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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #32 on: May 28, 2009, 03:57:46 AM »
Hmmm, right on time for an international crisis to test our President.

How fitting.

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #33 on: May 28, 2009, 05:41:11 AM »
Korean War truce over, says North Korea

From correspondents in Seoul, South Korea

May 28, 2009 08:24am
NORTH Korea has abandoned the truce that ended the Korean War and warned it could launch an attack on the South, two days after a second atomic test.

The announcement came amid reports that the secretive North, which outraged the international community with its bomb test on Monday, was restarting work to produce more weapons-grade plutonium.

The North's latest display of anger was prompted by the South's decision to join a US-led international security initiative.

Defying global condemnation, the regime of Kim Jong-Il said it could no longer guarantee the safety of US and South Korean ships off its west coast and that the Korean peninsula was veering back towards war.

"Those who have provoked us will face unimaginable merciless punishment,'' a military spokesman said, blaming Washington and Seoul for the latest turn of events.

It said its military would "no longer be bound'' by the 1953 armistice that ended hostilities in the Korean War, in which the United States fought with the South.

With no binding ceasefire, it said, "the Korean peninsula will go back to a state of war''.

It also said the North "will not guarantee the legal status'' of five South Korean islands near the disputed inter-Korean border in the Yellow Sea, which was the scene of bloody naval clashes in 1999 and 2002.

Analysts played down the likelihood of a full-scale conflict between North and South Korea but said clashes near the sea border were possible.

The White House said it viewed Pyongyang's threats as "sabre-rattling and bluster'' that would only deepen its isolation, with spokesman Robert Gibbs saying that "threats won't get North Korea the attention it craves''.

Analysts say Kim Jong-Il, 67, is likely carrying out shows of strength to reassert his control in the impoverished state.

He reportedly had a stroke in August, which has renewed questions about who might succeed him.

Meanwhile, South Korean reports said that steam was seen coming from a plant at the North's main nuclear facility at Yongbyon - a sign it was trying to produce more plutonium.

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http://www.news.com.au/perthnow/story/0,21598,25550244-948,00.html
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Offline iceman2

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #34 on: May 28, 2009, 05:41:59 AM »
Hmmm, right on time for an international crisis to test our President.

How fitting.


Do you all recall the pre election comment by the vic president about his presidency will be greatly tested within 6 months of his election?  Very odd!   ???

Offline Nailer

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #35 on: May 28, 2009, 06:41:17 AM »

Do you all recall the pre election comment by the vic president about his presidency will be greatly tested within 6 months of his election?  Very odd!   ???

yes I recall that.  sounds almost like this has been planned for some time .
I am a realist that is slightly conservative yet I have some republican demeanor that can turn democrat when I feel the urge to flip independant.
 
The truth shall set you free, if not a 45ACP round will do the trick.. HEHE

Offline Spark of Truth Inc.

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #36 on: May 28, 2009, 06:43:10 AM »
From a neutral strategic analysis angle, North Korea couldn't be better prepared for an artillery/special ops campaign. KJI is getting old and I'm in no means an expert in advanced dictatorial psychology, but if I were to be the leader of North Korea, getting older...I would be concerned with my legacy and the continuation of my dream. Then I would realize, that my army is equipped and trained to defeat the South and the US Army within the first day. I mean, North Korea uses a window of opportunity in this latent conflict.

Why should North Korea behave like it does?

Pro

+ strong army (specialized in mountain warfare, fit for purpose, massive troop strength, outdated equipment, but reliable and effective)
+ a quick victory would strengthen the belief of the general population in KJI leadership
+ people will starve anyways (160k t of food shortage due to a lack of fertilizers)
+ nuclear potential (proven technology, combination potential in sophisticated rocket technology)
+ nothing to loose (population starves, no economy, no GDP increase on the horizon)
+ weak position of the US armed forces (engaged in two ground wars and committed around the globe)    
+ weak position of the US economy (dependence on the ally China to buy US debt)
+ insufficient conventional US firepower stationed nearby, little rapid deployment capabilities
+ strategic Chinese interest in keeping the US armed forces below the DMZ, as opposed to, on their own border
+ having a different historical understanding of the conflict of 1953 (UN attack, defensive battle and 'victory' over the aggressor USA)
+ tactical terrain advantage against a fragile and outnumbered high tech army, which might prove inefficient in mountain warfare
+ wipe out US presence in Japan and Guam
+ take over and annex the south, even against civil resistance
+ technological advantage of intact infrastructure and means of production (if still in operational status)
+ sparking WW3 and remain unaffected

Con

- partial exposure of key military resources
- total international isolation, even from china
- nuclear annihilation more than likely
- massive 'collateral damage'
- destroyed infrastructure
- end of the personal vision of the future of North Korea  
- sparking WW3 and getting wiped out


If this thing goes nuclear, China would be forced to respond in some way. By taking over Taiwan and concentrate troops at the border, for example. And maybe this is the British/NWO plan. To provoke a short and intense conventional war along the DMZ. Seol gets shelled to kingdom come and the US bases cease to exist along the DMZ, on Guam and Japan. (Unlikely for the North Koreans to break through maritime surveillance and defensive positions off shore, but it's still a possibility via mini-subs and the massive special ops contingent) Then the US would retaliate with a couple of smaller nukes dropped by the USAF. Japan, Russia, EU, Israel would condemn the 'unjustified aggression' from the North Korean side and would form the alliance for WW3. Then, after months of ground war, China might enter North Korean territory and push the Allies back to the DMZ. Russia would falter and become militarily neutral in the conflict to later join China in the conventional phase of WW3, to which the pretext has been set by the Korea conflict.

All it takes now to spark a not too different scenario is one North Korean ship which gets stopped/threatened by the US Navy or the South Korean Navy. This is what KJI is waiting for. His days are biologically numbered and he wants the victory over the enemies of his belief system.

res ipsa loquitur
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Offline Renaissance

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #37 on: May 28, 2009, 07:24:07 AM »
If war really starts between the two Korea's, I can almost predict the the first offensive move 'would be' by the North, so the US warmongers claim; which in actual fact any skirmishes would be started by the US framing North Korea for the offensive.
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Offline grapecrusher1

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #38 on: May 28, 2009, 07:53:42 AM »
Having the American navy cordoning off the NK seaports, apparently to stifle the flow of more weaponry (what a farce), is the perfect way to provoke them.  Moronic.
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Offline iceman2

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Re: North Korea Threatens Armed Strike, End to Korean War Armistice
« Reply #39 on: May 28, 2009, 08:29:53 AM »
As you all say it's there waiting for the match to be struck. As I said before nothing definate of course, but all the right bits are there. It could well be the BIG one we have been suspecting for some time. So if it does kick off are we all prepared?????????????? got those food stuffs in, fox holes dug, survival hand book, weapons, and ammo in stock! And don't forget that NBC suit and tie !!!!