MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground

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thenewsonsofliberty

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MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« on: May 24, 2009, 11:34:09 PM »
just watching a little netcrimes and a special report pops up saying that north korea just set off nukes under ground.. and that is pretty much gathered in the title. anyone else hear anything on that??

Offline Revolt426

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2009, 11:35:51 PM »
Looks like MI6 is trying to sink Asian stocks for a few weeks.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=acEawzZgNFk4&refer=home

Asian Stocks Decline After North Korea Conducts Nuclear Test

May 25 (Bloomberg) -- Asian stock markets fell after North Korea said it conducted a nuclear test, erasing an earlier rally that was fueled by gains in mining and shipping companies.

Samsung Electronics Co. sank 2.2 percent in Seoul, helping push the Kospi Index down 3.2 percent. Goodman Group, Australia’s largest industrial real estate investment trust, sank 4.2 percent after regulators lifted an eight-month ban on short selling financial companies.

“This move by North Korea came out of the blue, and it introduces geopolitical risk into the equation again,” Michiya Tomita, who helps manage $61 billion at Mitsubishi UFJ Asset Management Co. in Hong Kong. “We’ve had an incredibly steep rally since March, so markets are bound to take a breather.”

The MSCI Asia Pacific Index fell 0.2 percent to 99.14 at 12:10 p.m. in Tokyo, extending a two-day, 0.9 percent retreat. The gauge has climbed 40 percent since slumping to a more than five-year low on March 9. Stocks included in the measure were valued at an average 1.4 times the book value of assets at the end of last week, 17 percent higher from the end of 2008.

North Korea conducted a nuclear test today, the communist nation’s official Korean Central News Agency said. The underground test was “successful,” according to the report.

To contact the reporter for this story: Jonathan Burgos in Singapore at jburgos4@bloomberg.net.
"Liquidate labor, liquidate stocks, liquidate the farmers, liquidate real estate … It will purge the rottenness out of the system..." - Andrew Mellon, Secretary of Treasury, 1929.

Offline andrenym00

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2009, 11:50:42 PM »
Looks like MI6 is trying to sink Asian stocks for a few weeks.

MI6?

I guess your a full blown conspiracy theorist?

Offline sharpsteve

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2009, 11:52:55 PM »
Yen, Dollar Rise as North Korea Nuclear Test Spurs Haven Demand
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aFYk8ojUoHT8&refer=home

 May 25 (Bloomberg) -- The yen and the dollar rose after North Korea said it held a nuclear test today, boosting demand for the relative safety of the U.S. and Japanese currencies.

The two currencies strengthened on concern tension between North Korea and the rest of Asia will increase, damping investor appetite for riskier assets. South Korea’s won fell the most in a week and Asian stocks declined after North Korea’s official state media said the underground test was successful.

“The report may lead to greater geopolitical risk,” said Lee Wai Tuck, a currency strategist at Forecast Pte in Singapore. “This is causing risk aversion and buying of the yen. The dollar is also being bought as it is still viewed as a safe- haven currency.”

The yen advanced to 132.29 per euro as of 12:18 p.m. in Tokyo from 132.67 last week in New York. Japan’s currency strengthened to 94.50 per dollar from 94.78. The dollar traded at $1.3997 per euro from $1.3998, and advanced to $1.5883 versus the British pound from $1.5934.

The won fell 1.2 percent to 1,262.50 per dollar, according to Seoul Money Brokerage Services Ltd. The currency rose to 1,225.97 on May 11, the strongest level since October.

The MSCI Asia Pacific excluding Japan Index declined 1.2 percent after earlier rising as much as 0.5 percent.

North Korea’s underground nuclear test was “successful,” according to the official Korean Central News Agency report. North Korea held its first nuclear test in 2006.


North Korea Says It Conducts Successful Nuclear Test (Update1)
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aq42uc2ae4Hs&refer=home

 May 25 (Bloomberg) -- North Korea said it conducted a “successful” nuclear test today, carrying out a threat made last month after the United Nations condemned the communist country’s ballistic missile launch.

“The current nuclear test was safely conducted on a new higher level in terms of its explosive power and technology,” the official Korean Central News Agency said in a statement. It was the second time Kim Jong Il’s regime detonated a nuclear device. The first was in 2006.

A magnitude 4.7 earthquake was recorded in northeastern North Korea at 9:54 a.m. local time today, the U.S. Geological Survey said on its Web site. The quake struck 10 kilometers (6 miles) below the surface about 375 kilometers northeast of Pyongyang.

A USGS duty officer said agency seismologists couldn’t determine what caused the release of energy.




Offline andrenym00

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2009, 11:56:22 PM »

Offline Revolt426

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2009, 11:57:11 PM »
MI6?

I guess your a full blown conspiracy theorist?

Well, when Kim Jong Il dissapears for over a year then shows up in a few pictures i sort of get skeptical that he is still in charge of his country. Then he starts making threats through newspapers!  That and the British have owned South East Asia for hundreds of years (Now Covertly).

They also own the middle east. Look up the sikes picot agreement.
"Liquidate labor, liquidate stocks, liquidate the farmers, liquidate real estate … It will purge the rottenness out of the system..." - Andrew Mellon, Secretary of Treasury, 1929.

Offline abrhim

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2009, 11:58:18 PM »
And Godzilla is Born...

thenewsonsofliberty

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2009, 11:58:50 PM »
i love this forum. fast results.. great work guys.


Offline Mr.C

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2009, 12:00:23 AM »
on OUR memorial day? OH NO THEY DIDNT !  >:(
The rich. You know why they're so odd. Because they can afford to be
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This Country Needs An Enema !

Offline Cryptvill

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2009, 12:00:49 AM »
Interesting, thanks for the thread
Babylon-->Battycon-->Batikon-->Vatican

Offline andrenym00

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2009, 12:02:03 AM »
South Korean market down 4%. I wonder if the North Koreans shorted the market on Friday?

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,521616,00.html

Offline chrsswtzr

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N. Korea's Nuclear Timeline
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2009, 01:05:05 AM »
Timeline: N. Korea nuclear dispute

(CNN) -- Below is a chronology of the development of North Korea's nuclear weapons program.


A North Korean soldier scans the southern side of the border at Panmunjom along the Demilitarized Zone.

Five nations -- the United States, South Korea, Russia, China and Japan -- are applying pressure on Pyongyang to get the secretive nation to give up its nuclear weapons ambitions.

1993

North Korea says it has quit the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty amid suspicions that it is developing nuclear weapons. It later reverses that decision.

1994

North Korea and the United States sign an agreement where Pyongyang pledges to freeze and eventually dismantle its nuclear weapons program in exchange for international aid to build two power-producing nuclear reactors.

1998

August: North Korea fires a multistage missile over Japan and into the Pacific Ocean, proving it can strike any part of Japan's territory.

November: The United States and North Korea hold the first round of high-level talks in Pyongyang over North Korea's suspected construction of an underground nuclear facility. The United States demands inspections.

1999

May: Former Defense Secretary William Perry visits North Korea and delivers a U.S. disarmament proposal.

September 13: North Korea pledges to freeze long-range missile tests.

September 17: President Bill Clinton eases economic sanctions against North Korea.

December: A U.S.-led consortium signs a $4.6 billion contract for two Western-developed light-water nuclear reactors in North Korea.

2000

July: North Korea threatens to restart its nuclear program if Washington doesn't compensate for the loss of electricity caused by delays in building nuclear power plants.

2001

June: North Korea warns it will reconsider its moratorium on missile tests if the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush doesn't resume contacts aimed at normalizing relations.

July: U.S. State Department reports North Korea is going ahead with development of its long-range missile. A Bush administration official says North Korea conducts an engine test of the Taepodong-1 missile.

December: U.S. President Bush warns Iraq and North Korea that they would be "held accountable" if they developed weapons of mass destruction "that will be used to terrorize nations."

2002

January 29: Bush labels North Korea, Iran and Iraq an "axis of evil" in his State of the Union address. "By seeking weapons of mass destruction, these regimes pose a grave and growing danger," he says.

October: The Bush administration reveals that Pyongyang had admitted operating a secret nuclear weapons program in violation of the 1994 agreement. North Korean officials acknowledged the program after U.S. officials confronted them with evidence.

November: The United States, Japan and South Korea halt oil supplies to North Korea promised under a 1994 deal.

December: North Korea removes IAEA monitoring seals and cameras from its nuclear facilities and expels the watchdog agency's inspectors.

2003

January 10: North Korea withdraws from the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty.

February 5: North Korea's official news agency says the nation has reactivated its nuclear power facilities.

February 12: The 35-member International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) board of governors declares North Korea in breach of atomic safeguards and refers the case to the U.N. Security Council.

February 24: North Korea test fires a land-to-ship missile into the sea between the Korean Peninsula and Japan.

February 26: The United States says North Korea has reactivated its five-megawatt nuclear reactor at Yongbyon.

March: North Korea test fires a land-to-sea anti-ship missile into the Sea of Japan.

July: A senior U.S. official says North Korea has begun reprocessing spent nuclear fuel rods, suggesting the communist country intends to produce nuclear weapons.

August: The U.S., North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan and Russia take part in talks about the crisis in North Korea.

2004

February: The six nations hold a second round of talks but report little progress, other than agreement to meet again.

June: The U.S., North Korea, South Korea, China, Japan and Russia take part in a third round of talks.

August: North Korea says it will not attend working meetings to prepare for the proposed six-nation summit scheduled in September. North Korea offers to freeze its nuclear program in exchange for aid, easing of sanctions and being removed from the U.S. list of state sponsors of terrorism. The United States wants North Korea to disclose all nuclear activities and allow inspections.

September: Further proposed six-nation talks are postponed indefinitely as the United States and North Korea blame each other for the impasse.

2005

February: North Korea says it will "bolster its nuclear weapons arsenal," in response to what it says are U.S. efforts to topple its government. It is Pyongyang's first public admission it has nuclear weapons.

March: U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice says if efforts to persuade North Korea to give up its nuclear weapons program fail, Washington and the international community will pursue "other ways." Meanwhile the head of the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency, Mohammed ElBaradei, says North Korea poses more of a nuclear threat than Iran because it already has nuclear material that could go into a weapon.

May: North Korea, in a statement identical to one issued two years earlier, says it has finished extracting 8,000 fuel rods from its reactor at Yongbyon, which it shut down a month ago.

June: North Korea says it has a stockpile of nuclear weapons and is building more, even as it discusses a return to six-party talks on its nuclear program.

July: North Korea says it will return to the talks, due to be held in the week of July 25. Pyongyang joins fourth round of six-party talks, saying it is willing to work towards the denuclearization of the Korean peninsula.

August: After meeting for 13 straight days, diplomats from the U.S., the two Koreas, China, Japan and Russia decide to take a recess from talks. Prospects for a deal on scrapping North Korea's nuclear program are uncertain, U.S. negotiator Christopher Hill says. Pyongyang hints at compromise after saying it may be willing to offer proof that it does not have a uranium-based weapons program. Talks are put on hold until September.

September: North Korea and the U.S. remain at odds as talks resume, after Pyongyang reiterates its demands to maintain a civilian nuclear program. North Korea agrees to give up its entire nuclear program, including weapons, in return for aid and security guarantees. Later, North Korea says it will only do so if the U.S. provides a light-water reactor for civilian power. The U.S. and Russia reject Pyongyang's demand.

November: The talks hit an impasse after North Korea is angered by U.S. financial restrictions against banks and North Korean companies for their alleged involvement in currency counterfeiting and other illicit activities.

2006

April: North Korea offers to resume talks if U.S. releases frozen North Korean assets originating from a bank in Macau.

July: North Korea test-fires six missiles, including a long-range Taepodong-2 rocket believed capable of reaching western United States. Taepodong rocket fails after 40 seconds, but U.S. denounces tests as "provocative."

October 9: North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) reports the country has performed a successful underground nuclear test.

October 14: The U.N. Security Council votes unanimously to impose a wide set of sanctions on North Korea as punishment for the Asian nation's claimed nuclear weapons test. North Korea rejects the resolution and walks out of the security council chamber.

2007

January 22: Envoys to the six-party talks on North Korean nuclear disarmament sound rare notes of optimism, raising hopes for progress after their expected return to the bargaining table in coming weeks.

January 27: North Korea expresses outrage at a British newspaper's report that Pyongyang was sharing its nuclear weapons technology with Iran, dismissing it as a "bid to mislead public opinion."

January 31: Pyongyang will feel compelled to announce plans for another nuclear test if a financial dispute with Washington is not resolved, a source says, a sign of Pyongyang's impatience with a lack of progress in talks.

February 13: North Korea agrees to take first steps toward nuclear disarmament and shut down its main reactor within 60 days before eventually dismantling its atomic weapons program after six-party talks in Beijing.

June: U.S. envoy Christopher Hill travels to North Korea for two days of talks with North Korea's nuclear negotiator in the highest-level U.S. visit to Pyongyang in more than four years. Days earlier, $25 million in North Korean funds that had been frozen since late 2005 were transferred from a Macau, China, bank to a Russian bank where North Korea has an account, as agreed to in February.

September 30: In an agreement signed at the six-party talks in Beijing, North Korea agrees to begin disabling its nuclear weapons facilities and allow a U.S. team, including technical experts, to take the lead in doing so.

October 2-4: North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and Korean President Roh Moo-hyun open talks in Pyongyang, North Korea, in the first summit between the split nations in seven years. Both sides pledge to seek talks to formally end the Korean war.

October: North Korea agrees to disable three nuclear facilities and to declare all of its nuclear programs by the end of the year.

November: The prime ministers of North and South Korea hold a rare meeting.

2008

January: The U.S. declares Pyongyang's failure to declare its nuclear activities after the deadline passes at the end of 2007.

February: South Korea's President Lee Myung-bak stipulates the conditions of nuclear disarmament and improvements in human rights in return for aid to the North.

March 26: South Korean diplomats leave an industrial park their country runs with North Korea after Pyongyang demands their withdrawal.

June 26: Pyongyang declares its nuclear assets, turning over a 60-page document to China that is written in English, detailing several rounds of plutonium production at its Yongbyon plant dating back to 1986.

August 26: North Korea declares it has stopped disabling its nuclear plants and will consider restoring them since the U.S. has not removed it from a list of states that sponsor terrorism.

October 11: The United States removes North Korea from its list of states that sponsor terrorism. December: Following a move by the U.S. to halt energy aid, Pyongyang reduces efforts to dismantle its nuclear program.

2009

January: The North accuses South Korea of "hostile intent" and revokes all military and political agreements with Seoul.

April 5: North Korea initiates what it calls a peaceful launch of a satellite, but the U.S. State Department declares it a "provocative act in violation" of a 2006 Security Council resolution prohibiting North Korea from conducting ballistic missile launches.

April 9: North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il is reappointed as chairman of the National Defense Commission, which oversees the country's military.

April 10: Japan announces it will tighten economic sanctions against North Korea to punish the communist regime for its launch of a rocket.

April 13: The U.N. Security Council adopts a declaration condemning North Korea for launching a long-range rocket, demanding that North Korea make no more launches.

April 14: North Korea vows to walk out on international talks to end its nuclear program after the U.N. Security Council criticizes its launch of a rocket.

April 18: North Korea says any sanctions or pressure applied against it following its recent rocket launch would be considered a "declaration of war."

April: The U.S. vows consequences after Pyongyang expels U.S. nuclear experts, along with U.N. nuclear inspectors following the United Nations' condemnation of North Korea's rocket launch.

April 21: Government officials from South Korea arrive in the North for the first inter-Korean talks in more than a year.

May 25: North Korea conducts its second nuclear bomb test, the country's state news agency says.

[source article]
-----------------------------------------------

CNN Live says that the 'man-made' earthquake registered a 4.7 on the Richter scale, and they've also test fired missiles to boot.

Offline andrenym00

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2009, 01:07:02 AM »
CNN is also reporting that north korea possibly conducted a test of short range missiles.

Offline chrsswtzr

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Re: N. Korea's Nuclear Timeline
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2009, 01:12:28 AM »
North Korea Says It Conducts Successful Nuclear Test (Update2)

By Bomi Lim and Heejin Koo

May 25 (Bloomberg) -- North Korea said it conducted a “successful” nuclear test today, carrying out a threat made last month after the United Nations condemned the communist country’s ballistic missile launch.

“The current nuclear test was safely conducted on a new higher level in terms of its explosive power and technology,” the official Korean Central News Agency said in a statement. It was the second time Kim Jong Il’s regime detonated a nuclear device. The first was in 2006.

South Korean President Lee Myung Bak convened a meeting with his top security officials to respond and Japan set up a crisis task force. A White House spokesman declined comment.

Kim’s government expelled UN nuclear inspectors last month and pulled out of disarmament talks after the UN Security Council censured North Korea for its missile launch. Today’s test is the latest blow to efforts to persuade the impoverished country to abandon nuclear weapons development in exchange for economic aid.

“We’re going to need major carrots and major sticks to bring North Korea back to the negotiating table,” said Cheong Seong Chang, a research fellow at the Sejong Institute in Seoul. “The U.S., South Korea and Japan will likely push for stronger sanctions at the UN Security Council.”

North Korean Earthquake

A magnitude 4.7 earthquake was recorded in northeastern North Korea at 9:54 a.m. local time today, the U.S. Geological Survey said on its Web site. The quake struck 10 kilometers (6 miles) below the surface about 375 kilometers northeast of Pyongyang.

A USGS duty officer said agency seismologists couldn’t determine what caused the release of energy.

U.S. and South Korean intelligence officials are closely watching developments, South Korean presidential spokesman Lee Dong Kwan told reporters in Seoul. The U.S. is aware of the reports and is consulting with its allies, a State Department spokesman said on the condition of anonymity.

Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso ordered government officials to prepare a request for the UN Security Council to discuss North Korea’s nuclear test, Kyodo News reported, citing Japanese government officials it didn’t identify.

Calling the Shots

Today’s launch demonstrates that North Korea’s generals are calling the shots on foreign policy, said Kenneth Quinones, former U.S. State Department director of North Korean affairs and a professor at Japan’s Akita International University.

“They’ve convinced Kim to bulk up their military capabilities in advance of any diplomacy,” Quinones said. “But they’re painting themselves into a corner.”

U.S. President Barack Obama last month called North Korea’s missile test, which Kim’s government maintains was a satellite launch, a “provocation” and demanded “a strong international response.” Stephen Bosworth, Obama’s special envoy for North Korea, this month visited Beijing, Seoul and Tokyo to drum up support for pressuring North Korea back to the negotiating table.

To contact the reporters on this story: Bomi Lim in Seoul at blim30@bloomberg.net; Heejin Koo in Seoul at hjkoo@bloomberg.net

Last Updated: May 25, 2009 00:37 EDT

[source article]

Offline chrsswtzr

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2009, 01:13:46 AM »
CNN is also reporting that north korea possibly conducted a test of short range missiles.
Quite right, they have been for awhile now.

This directly correlates with controlling the stocks/commodities/currencies, especially in the asian markets (most notably). It's all about money & power folks.

Offline sharpsteve

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2009, 02:15:07 AM »
NKorea says it conducted 2nd nuclear test
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D98D2P8G0&show_article=1&catnum=0

LEAD: N. Korea fires short-range missile in tandem with nuclear test: Yonhap+
http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D98D2PNG1&show_article=1&catnum=0


Offline barndoor77

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2009, 03:13:38 AM »


DIG OUT THE GOOD OLD FEAR CLUB...

Obviously another round of public scare mongering... Its not really working anymore nobody cares about North Korea...  If they haul off and level a Japanese city or something risque then they could probably garner some world attention...

There was some website talking about a Rothschilds Asian Dialectic plan... If I remember right it was something like US / Taiwan / Japan against China / North Korea...  They would sink a US carrier, and get the dialectic going hard, while they would own the industries on both sides of the fight..   Hmm sounds like IG Farben and his interests in Germany and Britian during WWII..  I have no idea where that site is...

It seems the latest conflicts like Gulf War II, and the Afghanistan Sink-Hole are all specially designed to drag on forever, and burn as much resources as possible while the US taxpayer foots the bill.. Hell they might as well say they have 100 Quadrillion in bad Derivatives, and well we are just going to put it on the deficit, and the US taxpayer will have to pay for it....


Offline heavyhebrew

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2009, 03:56:09 AM »
What better way for Big Business to kick start another round of debt financing, of elevating America's credit rating and keep the Death Machine rolling other than a good old fashioned land war in Asia?

Hey, China, worried about U.S.A financing its debt? Not anymore!

We work jobs we hate to pay for stuff we don't need to impress people we don't like. Am I the crazy one here?

Offline Bountaker

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http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2009/05/25/north-korea-nuclear-test-reaction.html




North Korea's nuclear test poses 'grave threat' to world: Obama
UN Security Council to hold emergency meeting
Last Updated: Monday, May 25, 2009 | 12:09 PM ET Comments235Recommend143
CBC News

U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement about North Korea in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on Monday.U.S. President Barack Obama makes a statement about North Korea in the Rose Garden at the White House in Washington on Monday. (Charles Dharapak/Associated Press)The world must "stand up to" North Korea and demand it abandon its nuclear program, U.S. President Barack Obama said Monday.

Obama addressed reporters gathered at the White House as the UN Security Council prepared to hold an emergency meeting to discuss reports that North Korea has successfully conducted its second nuclear test since 2006.

World leaders denounced the test on Monday, saying that Pyongyang was threatening global security and was in blatant defiance of international law.

The nuclear test and the subsequent firing of three short-range missiles "pose a grave threat to the peace and security of the world and I strongly condemn [North Korea's] reckless action," Obama said.

The Rose Garden comments were the president's second statements regarding the nuclear test. He had released a written statement immediately following North Korea's state news agency reporting the test.

In that statement, Obama called the test "a blatant violation of international law" and said that it contradicted North Korea's "own prior commitments."

"North Korea will not find security and respect through threats and illegal weapons," the president told reporters on Monday morning. "We will work with our friends and allies to stand up to this behavior. The United States will never waver from our determination to protect our people and the peace and security of the world."
Emergency meeting

The 15-nation UN Security Council will convene an emergency meeting at 4:30 p.m. ET in New York.

A South Korean official explains about the seismic wave after North Korea's apparent nuclear test.A South Korean official explains about the seismic wave after North Korea's apparent nuclear test. (Yonhap/Lee Sang-hak/Associated Press)North Korea's official KCNA news agency reported Monday that an underground nuclear test had been successfully conducted.

Russia's Defence Ministry later confirmed that a test occurred about 80 kilometres northwest of the city of Kilchu and estimated its yield at 10 to 20 kilotons, a size comparable to the bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki at the end of the Second World War.

The U.S. State Department is still analyzing data from the alleged nuclear test. But the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed that a seismic event took place at about 9:50 a.m. local time in the northeast area of North Korea that was consistent with a test.

The Japan Meteorological Agency also measured the seismic activity at magnitude 5.3. Meanwhile, the Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources in Seoul reported seismic activity in Kilju in North Hamgyong Province, the same area where North Korea carried out a nuclear test in October 2006.

Later in the day, North Korea launched three short-range missiles.
Japan to seek new resolution

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon issued a statement on Monday, saying he was "deeply worried" by the reports.
South Korean protesters shout slogans during a rally Monday in Seoul, South Korea, against North Korea's apparent nuclear test. South Korean protesters shout slogans during a rally Monday in Seoul, South Korea, against North Korea's apparent nuclear test. (Lee Jin-man/Associated Press)

"I sincerely hope that the Security Council will take necessary corresponding measures," Ban told The Associated Press during a visit to Copenhagen, declining to specify what further measures, or sanctions, he would urge council members to take.

North Korea has been under UN sanctions that bar it from nuclear and ballistic activity since its first atomic test in 2006.

Tokyo will seek a new UN resolution to condemn the test, said Japanese Prime Minister Taro Aso.

"North Korea's nuclear test poses a grave challenge to nuclear non-proliferation and clearly violates UN Security Council resolutions," he said. "We are not tolerating this at all."

In a written statement, China, the North's closest ally, also said it is "resolutely opposed" to the nuclear weapons test and urged North Korea to return to the six-nation process aimed at dismantling its nuclear program.

EU external relations commissioner Benita Ferreo-Waldner was scheduled to meet with leaders in Southeast Asia in Hanoi on Monday to discuss the nuclear test.

South Korea called the test a threat to world peace.

"We are seriously concerned about North Korea's second test of a nuclear device," said South Korean Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan. "It's a direct threat against the peace and stability in the region as well as the world."
'Danger to the world'

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown also condemned the test as "erroneous, misguided and a danger to the world."

European Union foreign policy chief Javier Solana said the EU would be joining with the international community to "discuss appropriate measures."

Pyongyang has been engaged in years of on-off negotiations, which have been pressing the impoverished state to give up its nuclear ambitions in return for massive aid and an end to the country's pariah status.

North Korea announced in April that it was withdrawing from the six-nation disarmament talks and said it would restore partly disabled nuclear facilities.

Some analysts said Monday's test reflected North Korea's defiance in the face of criticism that it had launched a long-range rocket from a base on the country's northeast coast. North Korea said that was not a missile test, but a satellite launch.

Analysts believe North Korea has enough weaponized plutonium for at least six atomic bombs. However, experts say scientists have not yet mastered the miniaturization needed to mount a nuclear device onto a long-range missile.


With files from The Associated Press
The ability to speak is not a sign of intelligence !

Offline chrisfromchi

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Its nice how these events + holiday clears the entire news cycle of anything they wouldn't want to talk about.

Offline Dewk

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   We should offer some of our data so they don't have to test  :)
I took the red pill. I can handle the truth !!?

Offline Bountaker

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its a pretext to invade North korea and to unite lot of country togheter and to create a .......... did anyone said it takes a catastrophe to scare human so you can impose anything after ,  like 9/11
The ability to speak is not a sign of intelligence !

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The 15-nation council has called an emergency session on the matter for later Monday at U.N. headquarters in New York.

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,521681,00.html



Offline Hawkwind

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NK is going apeshit...kim jong il is a pathological psychopath, hes not looking well these days, ive got a bad feeling hes going to try and unleash hell before he croaks.

Offline TheHouseMan

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In other words, a nuke is coming.


Offline Stan

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The United States will never waver from our determination to protect our people and the peace and security of the world."

I don't know how these people can spew such shit with a straight face.

"North Korea's nuclear test poses a grave challenge to nuclear non-proliferation and clearly violates UN Security Council resolutions," he said. "We are not tolerating this at all."

North Korea aren't signatories of the non-proliferation treaty.

Offline Optimus

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NoKo test-fires short-range missile
http://www.tempo.com.ph/news.php?aid=47735

SEOUL (AFP) - North Korea appears to have test-fired a short-range missile on Monday, the same day it conducted an underground nuclear test, South Korea’s Yonhap news agency reported.

‘’A single ground-to-air missile with a range of 130 kilometres (81 miles) was fired from Musudan-ri, Hwadae County,’’ it quoted a diplomatic source as saying.

“The Constitution is not an instrument for the government to restrain the people,
it's an instrument for the people to restrain the government.” – Patrick Henry

>>> Global Gulag Media & Forum <<<

Offline agentbluescreen

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Well Britain's Anglican-Zionists won't be attacking their Red Chinese puppet's Marxist religious-socialist labor union mafia Korean cut-out operation anytime soon!  Nice to know those long awaited nukes are finally ready for sale and shipment to noble imperial established national-religious-socialist Taliban Saudi Arabia for their Wahabbi Sunni extremists to use to finish Herr Hitler's "good" work for the racist-eugenic Noble Rothschild's houses of Euro-Noble Mafia tyranny now, though!

 Buy some Alaskan and Russian oil stocks boyos!


Offline chrsswtzr

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #30 on: May 25, 2009, 04:24:21 PM »
What better way for Big Business to kick start another round of debt financing, of elevating America's credit rating and keep the Death Machine rolling other than a good old fashioned land war in Asia?

Hey, China, worried about U.S.A financing its debt? Not anymore!


Excellent point.... spot on.

Offline agentbluescreen

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #31 on: May 25, 2009, 04:29:03 PM »
What a waste of a perfectly good loose nuke!

Offline Bountaker

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Re: MSNBC reports North Korea sets off nukes underground
« Reply #32 on: May 25, 2009, 04:47:25 PM »
of what ive been reading in the news this morning :  there is a war , afghanistan , iraq, war everywhere in africa and now somalia needs help ,

the usa and uk cant get into NKorea and Iran , in canada we dont have enough soldier to help everywhere so its up to other to join , so my question is , is it the rise of the NWO there cant be a better time then now so what will happen next ???
The ability to speak is not a sign of intelligence !

Offline marra

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Re: N. Korea's Nuclear Timeline
« Reply #33 on: May 25, 2009, 06:27:36 PM »
All you have to do is hold the world hostage with a nuke and bam:

September 17: President Bill Clinton eases economic sanctions against North Korea.
If we simply got together and used our heads, we could have whatever our hearts desired

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: N. Korea's Nuclear Timeline
« Reply #34 on: May 25, 2009, 07:01:10 PM »
http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=6975
...
Expanding Nuclear Power Globally
More than 90 percent of Bechtel's commercial nuclear work is in the U.S.68 but the company is also involved in a few infamous nuclear projects abroad. For instance, Bechtel International Systems Corp. leads the international consortium with the management contract for containing the damaged Chernobyl reactor and its intense radioactivity.

Bechtel is also involved in a project to build two reactors in North Korea69, where nuclear issues recently came into the spotlight following the decision of the country's leadership to begin reprocessing commercial nuclear waste to support a nuclear weapons program.

Another example is the Tarapur nuclear plant in India built by Bechtel. The plant emitted high levels of radioactivity directly into the Arabian Sea, and large quantities of radioactive material including open drums of radioactive waste were found strewn around the facility. In one area, 3,000 to 4,000 gallons of radioactive fuel were leaking per day. In 1974, the Indian government used plutonium produced by the Tarapur reactor to detonate an atomic bomb.70


http://www.fas.org/nuke/guide/dprk/nuke/index.html

History
North Korea maintains uranium mines with an estimated four million tons of exploitable high-quality uranium ore. Information on the state and quality of their mines is lacking, but it is estimated that the ore contains approximately 0.8% extractable uranium. In the mid-1960s, it established a large-scale atomic energy research complex in Yongbyon and trained specialists from students who had studied in the Soviet Union. Under the cooperation agreement concluded between the USSR and the DPRK, a nuclear research center was constructed near the small town of Yongbyon. In 1965 a Soviet IRT-2M research reactor was assembled for this center. From 1965 through 1973 fuel (fuel elements) enriched to 10 percent was supplied to the DPRK for this reactor.

In the 1970s it focused study on the nuclear fuel cycle including refining, conversion and fabrication. In 1974 Korean specialists independently modernized Soviet IRT-2M research reactor in the same way that other reactors operating in the USSR and other countries had been modernized, bringing its capacity up to 8 megawatts and switching to fuel enriched to 80 percent. Subsequently, the degree of fuel enrichment was reduced. In the same period the DPRK began to build a 5 MWe research reactor, what is called the "second reactor." In 1977 the DPRK concluded an agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency [IAEA], allowing the latter to inspect a research reactor which was built with the assistance of the USSR.

The North Korean nuclear weapons program dates back to the 1980s. In the 1980s, focusing on practical uses of nuclear energy and the completion of a nuclear weapon development system, North Korea began to operate facilities for uranium fabrication and conversion. It began construction of a 200 MWe nuclear reactor and nuclear reprocessing facilities in Taechon and Yongbyon, respectively, and conducted high-explosive detonation tests. In 1985 US officials announced for the first time that they had intelligence data proving that a secret nuclear reactor was being built 90 km north of Pyongyang near the small town of Yongbyon. The installation at Yongbyon had been known for eight years from official IAEA reports. In 1985, under international pressure, Pyongyang acceded to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). However, the DPRK refused to sign a safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), an obligation it had as a party to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

In July 1990 The Washington Post reported that new satellite photographs showed the presence in Yongbyon of a structure which could possibly be used to separate plutonium from nuclear fuel.

In a major initiative in July 1988, South Korean President Roh Tae Woo called for new efforts to promote North-South exchanges, family reunification, inter-Korean trade, and contact in international forums. Roh followed up this initiative in a UN General Assembly speech in which South Korea offered for the first time to discuss security matters with the North. Initial meetings that grew out of Roh's proposals started in September 1989. In September 1990, the first of eight prime minister-level meetings between North Korean and South Korean officials took place in Seoul, beginning an especially fruitful period of dialogue. The prime ministerial talks resulted in two major agreements: the Agreement on Reconciliation, Nonaggression, Exchanges, and Cooperation (the "basic agreement") and the Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula (the "joint declaration").

In late 1991 North and South Korea signed the Agreement on Reconciliation, Non-aggression, Exchanges and Cooperation and the Joint Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. The Joint Declaration called for a bilateral nuclear inspection regime to verify the denuclearization of the peninsula. The Declaration, which came into force on 19 February 1992, states that the two sides "shallnot test, manufacture, produce, receive, possess, store, deployor use nuclear weapons," and that they "shall not possess nuclear reprocessing and uranium enrichment facilities." A procedure for inter-Korean inspection was to be organized and a North-South Joint Nuclear Control Commission (JNCC) was mandated with verification of the denuclearization of the peninsula.


On 30 January 1992 the DPRK also signed a nuclear safeguards agreement with the IAEA, as it had pledged to do in 1985 when acceding to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. This safeguards agreement allowed IAEA inspections to begin in June 1992. In March 1992, the JNCC was established in accordance with the joint declaration, but subsequent meetings failed to reach agreement on the main issue of establishing a bilateral inspection regime.

When North Korean Deputy Prime Minister Kim Tal-Hyon visited South Korea for economic talks in July 1992, President Roh Tae Woo announced that full North-South Economic Cooperation would not be possible without resolution of the North Korean nuclear issue. There was little progress toward the establishment of an inspection regime, and dialogue between the South and North stalled in the fall of 1992.

The North's agreement to accept IAEA safeguards initiated a series of IAEA inspections of North Korea's nuclear facilities. This promising development was halted by the North's refusal in January 1993 to allow special inspections of two unreported facilities suspected of holding nuclear waste. Ignoring the South-North Joint Declaration of the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, North Korea refused IAEA inspections and operated nuclear reprocessing facilities, making the world suspicious of its nuclear intentions.

Lack of progress on implementation of the denuclearization accord triggered actions on both sides that led to North Korea's March 12, 1993, announcement of its withdrawal from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). The North's threat to withdraw from the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) brought North-South progress to an abrupt halt. Tensions ran high on the Korean Peninsula as the confrontation between North Korea and the United States deepened.

The UN Security Council on 11 May 1993 passed a resolution urging the DPRK to cooperate with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and to implement the 1991 North-South denuclearization accord. It also urged all member states to encourage the DPRK to respond positively to this resolution and to facilitate a solution.

The US responded by holding political-level talks with the DPRK in early June 1993 that led to a joint statement outlining the basic principles for continued US-DPRK dialogue and North Korea's "suspending" its withdrawal from the NPT. A second round of talks was held July 14-19, 1993, in Geneva. The talks set the guidelines for resolving the nuclear issue, improving U.S.-North Korean relations, and restarting inter-Korean talks, but further negotiations deadlocked.

The US responded by holding political-level talks with the DPRK in early June 1993 that led to a joint statement outlining the basic principles for continued US-DPRK dialogue and North Korea's "suspending" its withdrawal from the NPT. A second round of talks was held July 14-19, 1993, in Geneva. The talks set the guidelines for resolving the nuclear issue, improving U.S.-North Korean relations, and restarting inter-Korean talks, but further negotiations deadlocked.

Following the DPRK's spring 1994 unloading of fuel from its five-megawatt nuclear reactor and the resultant US push for UN sanctions, former President Carter's visit to Pyongyang in June 1994 helped to defuse tensions and resulted in renewed South-North talks. A third round of talks between the US and the DPRK opened in Geneva on July 8, 1994. However, the sudden death of North Korean leader Kim Il Sung on July 8, 1994 halted plans for a first ever South-North presidential summit and led to another period of inter-Korean animosity. The talks were recessed upon news of the death of North Korean President Kim Il Sung, then resumed in August. These talks concluded with the Agreed Framework.

Under the framework agreement, the North would freeze and eventually dismantle its existing suspect nuclear program, including the 50 MW and 200 MW graphite-moderated reactors under construction, as well as its existing 5 MW reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In return, Pyongyang would be provided with alternative energy, initially in the form of heavy oil, and eventually two proliferation-resistant light water reactors (LWR). The two 1,000 MW light-water nuclear reactors would be safer and would produce much less plutonium, in order to help boost the supply of electricity in the North, which is now in a critical shortage. The agreement also included gradual improvement of relations between the US and the DPRK, and committed North Korea to engage in South-North dialogue.

A few weeks after the signing of the Agreed Framework, President Kim loosened restrictions on South Korean firms desiring to pursue business opportunities with the North. Although North Korea continued to refuse official overtures by the South, economic contacts appeared to be expanding gradually.

A close examination by the IAEA of the radioactive isotope content in the nuclear waste revealed that North Korea had extracted about 24 kilograms of Plutonium. North Korea was supposed to have produced 0.9 gram of Plutonium per megawatt every day over a 4-year period from 1987 to 1991. The 0.9 gram per day multiplied by 365 days by 4 years and by 30 megawatts equals to 39 kilograms. When the yearly operation ratio is presumed to be 60 percent, the actual amount was estimated at 60% of 39 kilograms, or some 23.4 kilograms. Since 20-kiloton standard nuclear warhead has 8 kilograms of critical mass, this amounts to mass of material of nuclear fission out of which about 3 nuclear warheads could be extracted.

Estimates vary of both the amount of plutonium in North Korea's possession and number of nuclear weapons that could be manufactured from the material. South Korean, Japanese, and Russian intelligence estimates of the amount of plutonium separated, for example, are reported to be higher -- 7 to 22 kilograms, 16 to 24 kilograms, and 20 kilograms, respectively -- than the reported US estimate of about 12 kilograms. At least two of the estimates are said to be based on the assumption that North Korea removed fuel rods from the 5-MW(e) reactor and subsequently reprocessed the fuel during slowdowns in the reactor's operations in 1990 and 1991. The variations in the estimates about the number of weapons that could be produced from the material depend on a variety of factors, including assumptions about North Korea's reprocessing capabilities -- advanced technology yields more material -- and the amount of plutonium it takes to make a nuclear weapon. Until January 1994, the Department of Energy (DOE) estimated that 8 kilograms would be needed to make a small nuclear weapon. Thus, the United States' estimate of 12 kilograms could result in one to two bombs. In January 1994, however, DOE reduced the estimate of the amount of plutonium needed to 4 kilograms--enough to make up to three bombs if the US estimate is used and up to six bombs if the other estimates are used.

On 22 April 1997, U.S. Defense Department spokesman Kenneth Bacon officially stated, "When the U.S.-North Korea nuclear agreement was signed in Geneva in 1994, the U.S. intelligence authorities already believed North Korea had produced plutonium enough for at least one nuclear weapon." This was the first time the United States confirmed North Korea's possession of plutonium.

In accordance with the terms of the 1994 framework, the US Government in January 1995 responded to North Korea's decision to freeze its nuclear program and cooperate with US and IAEA verification efforts by easing economic sanctions against North Korea in four areas through:

Authorizing transactions related to telecommunications connections, credit card use for personal or travel-related transactions, and the opening of journalists' offices;
Authorizing D.P.R.K. use of the U.S. banking system to clear transactions not originating or terminating in the United States and unblocking frozen assets where there is no D.P.R.K. Government interest;
Authorizing imports of magnesite, a refractory material used in the U.S. steel industry--North Korea and China are the world's primary sources of this raw material; and
Authorizing transactions related to future establishment of liaison offices, case-by-case participation of U.S. companies in the light water reactor project, supply of alternative energy, and disposition of spent nuclear fuel as provided for by the agreed framework, in a manner consistent with applicable laws.

Smooth implementation of the 1994 agreed framework was obstructed for a time by North Korea's refusal to accept South Korean-designed LWR model reactors. US and DPRK negotiators met for three weeks in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and on June 12, 1995, reached an accord resolving this issue. North Korea agreed to accept the decisions of the Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO) with respect to the model for the LWRs and agreed that KEDO would select a prime contractor to carry out the LWR project. The KEDO executive board announced that it had selected the South Korean-designed Ulchin 3-4 LWR as the reference model for the project and that a South Korean firm would be the prime contractor. The South Korean prime contractor would be responsible for all aspects of the LWR project including design, manufacture, construction, and management. In this Kuala Lumpur accord to the 1994 Geneva agreed framework, the DPRK also agreed to negotiate directly with KEDO on all outstanding issues related to the LWR project. On December 15, 1995, KEDO and the DPRK signed the Light Water Reactor Supply Agreement. KEDO teams have also made a number of trips to North Korea to survey the proposed reactor site; in the spring of 1996, KEDO and the DPRK began negotiations on implementing protocols to the supply agreement.

Pyongyang is cooperating with Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization, whose leading members are South Korea, the United States and Japan. KEDO has reached an agreement on the provision of the light-water nuclear reactors by 2003, and, in return, North Korea has frozen its nuclear program. South Korea, which has promised to bear the lion's share of the reactor project cost estimated at US$4.5 billion, is asking the United States to put up at least a symbolic amount. The US administration, however, has said it can make no contribution to the construction cost as Congress has not appropriated the necessary budget. An official in Seoul, however, said that South Korea cannot drop its demand simply because of domestic problems in the United States. The US Congress has been delaying approval of the cost for the reactor project. South Korean officials said the U.S. refusal to share the reactor cost would make it difficult for them to obtain approval from the National Assembly for the South Korean share.

Since the conclusion of the Supply Agreement in December 1995, six related protocols have come into effect and three rounds of expert-level negotiations have produced solid results. The ROK power company, Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO), is the prime contractor for this project and has as its responsibility the design, manufacture, procurement, construction and management of the reactors. On 19 August 1997 KEDO and North Korea held a groundbreaking ceremony to begin construction of two light-water reactors.

In October 2002, North Korean officials acknowledged the existence of a clandestine program to enrich uranium for nuclear weapons that is in violation of the Agreed Framework and other agreements.

On October 9, 2006, North Korea announced it had conducted a nuclear test. The USGS reported a magnitude of 4.2 on the Richter Scale with a location at 41.29N 129.09E +/- 8.1 km. Initial speculations about the yield ranged from less than 1 kt up to 15 kt. On October 16, 2006, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence announced that analysis of air-samples conducted on October 11 had confirmed that the event had been an underground nuclear explosion near P'unggye on October 9, 2006. DNI concluded that the "explosion yield was less than a kiloton."
Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline BlueBaron

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Re: N. Korea's Nuclear Timeline
« Reply #35 on: May 25, 2009, 08:38:54 PM »
Go Kim  ;D

Online TahoeBlue

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Re: N. Korea's Nuclear Timeline
« Reply #36 on: May 25, 2009, 10:41:30 PM »
Go Kim  ;D

Korean War Casualty Stats
http://www.centurychina.com/history/krwarcost.html

Country        KIA+        Wounded        MIA           Captured        Total        Comments
S Korea        227,800   717,100        43,500                  ?         984,400 Captured included in MIA?
US                54,229   103,248          8,142            3,746         169,365 KIA included the 20,600 accidental fatality


Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth: therefore despise not thou the chastening of the Almighty: For he maketh sore, and bindeth up: he woundeth, and his hands make whole ; He shall deliver thee in six troubles: yea, in seven there shall no evil touch thee. - Job 5

Offline Mr.C

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forum concensus concerning mil action against NK
« Reply #37 on: May 26, 2009, 12:49:39 AM »
was wondering if this forum participants support millitary airstrikes on north korea but not boots on the ground

just let me know and ill tell obama for everyone...ive got a lot of pull..obama said mr.c...what would you do with north korea

and i thought i would ask you wonderful people your thoughts

disclaimer: ofcourse obama wouldnt give someone with a genius mind as myself the time of day so dont get all pissy....im JUST JOKING

but am curious if airstrikes only would be a viable option..no boots on the ground...just looking to promote discussion cuz somethings gonna give somewher..either NK or iran

"the only way out of this depression is either through war or revolution " KRS ONE

and i agree and most likely one of them are gonna happen
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Offline freeflying

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Re: forum concensus concerning mil action against NK
« Reply #38 on: May 26, 2009, 01:51:35 AM »
Leave them alone. Who the hell is this country to decide who gets what weapons.

Offline marra

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Re: forum concensus concerning mil action against NK
« Reply #39 on: May 26, 2009, 01:58:11 AM »
Anyone notice that Kim Jon Il whatever his name is looks a little crackheadish lately?  Someone needs to put the pills and booze down

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If we simply got together and used our heads, we could have whatever our hearts desired