Robotics Revolution Slashing Need For Human Labor - Changing Global Industry

Author Topic: Robotics Revolution Slashing Need For Human Labor - Changing Global Industry  (Read 99980 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Letsbereal

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 58,615
  • Know Thyself
One step for a robot, a giant leap for tin-mankind
4 April 2009,
Leo Lewis in Tokyo From The Times
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/gadgets_and_gaming/article6032128.ece

Photo: Robots may be able to walk - but Japan wants them to do it on the Moon

The cutting-edge models can lumber around a room without falling over. A few can play the trumpet or serve tea. The truly sophisticated ones can just about manage the washing-up.

But by 2020, Japan predicts, humanoid robots will be ready to colonise the Moon. Other metallic brethren of these mechanical pioneers, said scientists in Tokyo, will be engaged in the bigger, more prosaic mission of cleaning Earth’s orbit of junk.

The first draft of the ambitious plan emerged yesterday from a Japanese task force on space and lunar exploration – a team of experts from various fields answering directly to Taro Aso, the country’s cartoon-loving Prime Minister, and charged with beefing up Japan’s space programme.

The group’s remit was to draft a five-year plan on the development and exploitation of space – a programme for action that was initially to have included the goal of putting a human Japanese astronaut on the Moon within the next 20 years. In the latest plans, though, robots have inherited the prime position in Japan’s first – and still unconstructed – lunar lander.Experts have been arguing for years that the country’s aim should be to develop humanoid robots to the point where they are capable of everything people can do, and more.

For fans of Japanese manga comics it also makes perfect sense: space colonisation by robots is depicted in dozens of titles every week. And yet Japan’s leading robotics experts are painfully aware of how immature the science really is. The Honda engineer Masato Hirose endured 20 years of frustration before making the Asimo robot walk upright on two legs.

Tomomasa Sato, the head of Tokyo University’s faculty of mechano-informatics and the current chairman of the Japan Robotics Association, was equally realistic about how far robots can go with current technology.

“The next stage is to be able to tell a robot to go and fetch something from somewhere in the house and bring it back without breaking it,” he said. “It is at the limit of our science.”

The panel will continue to work on the proposals until later this month, with the final recommendations likely to be formalised next month. The eye-catching plans to land robots on the Moon, though, are likely to be joined by a series of more pragmatic proposals relating to the use of space for defence. The panel has already mooted building a space-based sensor system to detect the launch of a ballistic missile, and has suggested that satellites be used to help to track natural disasters in Asia.

Japan’s renewed fascination with space has generated a rich flow of ideas. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said recently that it was working on a satellite-based robot that could start work on cleaning up some of the 10,000 pieces of man-made space debris circling in orbit and threatening the wellbeing of passing satellites. The proposed robot janitor would extend conductive cable several kilometres in length into the void and fish it back for burning.

Related Links

    * Robot scientist solves genetic problems
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/science/article6024880.ece

    * Honda demonstrates robot controlled by mind power
http://technology.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/tech_and_web/article6012364.ece
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Letsbereal

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 58,615
  • Know Thyself
Robot achieves scientific first
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2009, 06:54:20 PM »
Robot achieves scientific first
2 April 2009,
By Clive Cookson, Science Editor
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f2b97d9a-1f96-11de-a7a5-00144feabdc0.html

A laboratory robot called Adam has been hailed as the first machine in history to have discovered new scientific knowledge independently of its human creators.

Adam formed a hypothesis on the genetics of bakers’ yeast and carried out experiments to test its predictions, without intervention from its makers at Aberystwyth University.

The result was a series of “simple but useful” discoveries, confirmed by human scientists, about the gene coding for yeast enzymes. The research is published in the journal Science.

Professor Ross King, the chief creator of Adam, said robots would not supplant human researchers but make their work more productive and interesting.

“Ultimately we hope to have teams of human and robot scientists working together in laboratories,” he said.

Adam is the result of a five-year collaboration between computer scientists and biologists at Aberystwyth and Cambridge universities.

The researchers endowed Adam with a huge database of yeast biology, automated hardware to carry out experiments, supplies of yeast cells and lab chemicals, and powerful artificial intelligence software.

Although they did not intervene directly in Adam’s experiments, they did stand by to fix technical glitches, add chemicals and remove waste.

The team has just completed a successor robot called Eve, which is about to work with Adam on a series of experiments designed to find new drugs to treat tropical diseases such as malaria and schistosomiasis.

“Adam is a prototype,” says Prof King. “Eve is better designed and more elegant.”

In the new experiments, Adam and Eve will work together to devise and carry out tests on thousands of chemical compounds to discover antimalarial drugs.


Read more:

* Scientists a step closer to ‘reading minds’ - Mar-12
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/6652c3cc-0f27-11de-ba10-0000779fd2ac.html
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline TheHouseMan

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,837
Robot to create Facebook profile

Facebook could soon be helping bridge the divide between humans and robots.

Researchers are giving a robot its own Facebook profile page to help foster meaningful relationships with people.

The page will be populated with interactions the robot has with people as well as photos of the time it spends in human company.

Its creators hope that embedding it in a social web will give rise to a sustainable friendship can grow up between man and machine.

Ancient scholar

The coupling of robot and social network is the idea of Dr Nikolaus Mavridis and co-researchers as they look into ways of overcoming the reluctance of people to stay in touch with robots.

While robots that can engage people have been produced before now, research suggests that humans lose interest at most a few weeks after being introduced as the behavioural repertoire of the machine is exhausted.

In a paper on the pre-print website Archive.org server, the researchers say they want to find out if this can be thwarted by giving humans and robots a pool of shared memories and if they are part of the same social circle of friends.

The platform for exploring the problem is a robot that can recognise faces created by Dr Mavridis and colleagues from the Interactive Robots and Media Lab (IRML) at the University of the United Arab Emirates plus co-workers in Germany and Greece

The prototype is based around a PeopleBot machine from ActivRobots to which they have added a range finder, touch screen and stereo camera. The current prototype is called "Sarah" but when the project begins this will be swapped for a machine with the face of Arabic scholar Ibn Sina aka Avicenna.

Under the hood the machine has three software modules to help it interact with people it meets at IRML. One module recognises the faces of real people or the images they place of themselves on Facebook.

It also has a language module so the machine can carry on real-time conversations and it will maintain a database of its friends and their social relationships based on information in Facebook. This social database will also keep its own Facebook profile up to date.

In a month-long trial, Dr Mavridis aims to let Ibn Sina wander around IRML talking to people it meets and trying to get to know those that it does not. When it meets anyone for the first time it will check on Facebook to see if they have a profile page and use what it finds there as the starting point for a conversation.

----------------

Erm... why are we supposed to be "staying in touch" with robots and "bridging the divide"??

This is just stupid. Who fed the BBC this story?

Offline jesqueal

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,065
Hmmm I may be making a mountain out of a molehill but doesn't this tie in 100% with Anti_Illuminati's work? Internet 2.0 being an artificial intelligence?

Offline America2

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9,299
  • Romans 10:9-10 King James Version
Wasn't there a Will Smith movie by the title of "I Robot" recently?(Where robots were fighting to become the dominant species) And, of course, there's the 4 "Terminator" movies.

Offline jesqueal

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,065
Erm... why are we supposed to be "staying in touch" with robots and "bridging the divide"??
Yes its like saying we should bridge the gap with our CD players or toasters

Offline Overcast

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,133
Yes its like saying we should bridge the gap with our CD players or toasters

Shall we play a game?
And dying in your beds, many years from now, would you be willin' to trade ALL the days, from this day to that, for one chance, just one chance, to come back here and tell our enemies that they may take our lives, but they'll never take... OUR FREEDOM!

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,939
Hmmm I may be making a mountain out of a molehill but doesn't this tie in 100% with Anti_Illuminati's work? Internet 2.0 being an artificial intelligence?
I agree - this is 100% part of the program - it's a training environment; learning how to interact with humans, tracking responses & calculating 'successful' responses (where success might be an interaction that elicits another response from the human under study). As it learns how to interact, it will add that info to the database. The unwary Facebook people will enjoy it - if they are aware of it - it will be fun. Shall we play a game indeed.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Hardware 952

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 538
Panasonic breaks into robotics with drug dispensing robot
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2009, 10:58:00 AM »
http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/A/AS_TEC_JAPAN_PANASONIC_ROBOT?SITE=SCCHA&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT



Jul 7, 7:27 AM EDT


Panasonic breaks into robotics with medical robot



TOKYO (AP) -- Panasonic Corp. said Tuesday has developed a medical robot that dispenses drugs to patients, the Japanese electronics giant's first step into robotics.

Panasonic will sell the robot to Japanese hospitals next March and will market it in the United States and Europe later. Panasonic spokesman Akira Kadota said the robot will cost several tens of millions of yen (hundreds of thousands of dollars).

"This robot is the first in our robotics project. It sorts out injection drugs to patients, saving time for pharmacists," said Kadota.

The robot does not look humanoid. "It looks like a cabinet with lots of small drawers," he said.

Pharmacists put drugs into the robot, which stores medical data for patients. The robot will then sort out drugs for each patient and place them into respective drawers bearing the names of patients.

Osaka-based Panasonic hopes annual revenue from the robot and other medical robotics will reach 30 billion yen ($315 million) in the financial year to March 2016.

Japan boasts one of the leading robotics industries in the world, and the government is pushing to develop the industry as a road to growth. Automaker Honda Motor Co. has developed the child-sized Asimo, which can walk and talk.

Earlier this year, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, a government-backed organization, revealed a walking, talking robot with a female face. But it hasn't cleared safety standards and cannot yet help humans with daily chores.
Don't believe me. Don't believe anyone. Go look for yourself.

Offline Dok

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 21,269
    • end times and current events
Re: Panasonic breaks into robotics with drug dispensing robot
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2009, 11:38:42 AM »


HOW TO BE SAVED
http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/how_to_be_saved.html

Ye Must Be Born Again!
http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/Basics/ye_must_be_born_again.htm

True Salvation & the TRUE Gospel/Good News!
http://www.contendingfortruth.com/?p=1060

how to avoid censorship ;)

Offline Monkeypox

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,844
  • He Loved Big Brother
    • Monkeypox
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline thought_criminal

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 577
  • Conspiracy of one.
    • my myspace page about building 7
Stumbled upon this while reading about EATR robots

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/08/ncsu_robot_bat_concept/

DARPA is also developing something called SELF in witch robots would not only replicate and make copies of themselves, but also improve upon their own design in a sort of mechanical evolution.

Am I the only one that realizes how freakin dangerous this is!?!?
"It is the first responsibility of every citizen to Question Authority." - Benjamin Franklin

Offline Monkeypox

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,844
  • He Loved Big Brother
    • Monkeypox
Re: Robot bat
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2009, 02:58:25 PM »
Stumbled upon this while reading about EATR robots

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07/08/ncsu_robot_bat_concept/

DARPA is also developing something called SELF in witch robots would not only replicate and make copies of themselves, but also improve upon their own design in a sort of mechanical evolution.

Am I the only one that realizes how freakin dangerous this is!?!?


It's as if they're deliberately trying to create machines that will destroy humanity and take over the world.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline infowarrior_039

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 789
  • explosions in the sky
    • Truth Archive
Re: Robot bat
« Reply #13 on: July 22, 2009, 04:34:35 PM »
yes, creepy. check out this thread i just wrote:

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=120284.0

Godfather77

  • Guest
Bacteria modified to act as computers
« Reply #14 on: July 25, 2009, 10:08:49 AM »
Bacteria make computers look like pocket calculators
24 July 2009
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2009/jul/24/bacteria-computer

Computers are evolving – literally. While the tech world argues netbooks vs notebooks, synthetic biologists are leaving traditional computers behind altogether. A team of US scientists have engineered bacteria that can solve complex mathematical problems faster than anything made from silicon.

The research, published today in the Journal of Biological Engineering, proves that bacteria can be used to solve a puzzle known as the Hamiltonian Path Problem. Imagine you want to tour the 10 biggest cities in the UK, starting in London (number 1) and finishing in Bristol (number 10). The solution to the Hamiltonian Path Problem is the the shortest possible route you can take.

This simple problem is surprisingly difficult to solve. There are over 3.5 million possible routes to choose from, and a regular computer must try them out one at a time to find the shortest. Alternatively, a computer made from millions of bacteria can look at every route simultaneously. The biological world also has other advantages. As time goes by, a bacterial computer will actually increase in power as the bacteria reproduce.

Programming such a computer is no easy task, however. The researchers coded a simplified version of the problem, using just three cities, by modifying the DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria. The cities were represented by a combination of genes causing the bacteria to glow red or green, and the possible routes between the cities were explored by the random shuffling of DNA. Bacteria producing the correct answer glowed both colours, turning them yellow.

The experiment worked, and the scientists checked the yellow bacteria's answer by examining their DNA sequence. By using additional genetic differences such as resistance to particular antibiotics, the team believe their method could be expanded to solve problems involving more cities.

This is not the only problem bacteria can solve. The research builds on previous work by the same team, who last year created a bacterial computer to solve the Burnt Pancake Problem. This unusually named conundrum is a mathematical sorting process that can be visualised as a stack of pancakes, all burnt on one side, which must be ordered by size.

In addition to proving the power of bacterial computing, the team have also contributed significantly to the field of synthetic biology. Just as electronic circuits are made from transistors, diodes and other devices, so too are biological circuits. Synthetic biologists have worked together to create the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, and this new research has contributed more than 60 new components to the list.

Offline Letsbereal

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 58,615
  • Know Thyself
Bacteria make computers look like pocket calculators
« Reply #15 on: July 25, 2009, 08:15:17 PM »
Bacteria make computers look like pocket calculators
24 July 2009
, by Jacob Aron Friday (Guardian.co.uk - Science Blog)
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2009/jul/24/bacteria-computer

Biologists have created a living computer from E. coli bacteria that can solve complex mathematical problems



Photograph: Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli) Getty; Scanning electron micrograph of E. coli bacteria. A rapidly growing colony can be programmed to act as a hugely powerful parallel computer.

Computers are evolving – literally. While the tech world argues netbooks vs notebooks, synthetic biologists are leaving traditional computers behind altogether. A team of US scientists have engineered bacteria that can solve complex mathematical problems faster than anything made from silicon.

The research, published today in the Journal of Biological Engineering http://www.jbioleng.org/content/3/1/11/abstractv , proves that bacteria can be used to solve a puzzle known as the Hamiltonian Path Problem http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamiltonian_path_problem . Imagine you want to tour the 10 biggest cities in the UK, starting in London (number 1) and finishing in Bristol (number 10). The solution to the Hamiltonian Path Problem is the the shortest possible route you can take.

This simple problem is surprisingly difficult to solve. There are over 3.5 million possible routes to choose from, and a regular computer must try them out one at a time to find the shortest. Alternatively, a computer made from millions of bacteria can look at every route simultaneously. The biological world also has other advantages. As time goes by, a bacterial computer will actually increase in power as the bacteria reproduce.

Programming such a computer is no easy task, however. The researchers coded a simplified version of the problem, using just three cities, by modifying the DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria. The cities were represented by a combination of genes causing the bacteria to glow red or green, and the possible routes between the cities were explored by the random shuffling of DNA. Bacteria producing the correct answer glowed both colours, turning them yellow.

The experiment worked, and the scientists checked the yellow bacteria's answer by examining their DNA sequence. By using additional genetic differences such as resistance to particular antibiotics, the team believe their method could be expanded to solve problems involving more cities.

This is not the only problem bacteria can solve. The research builds on previous work by the same team, who last year created a bacterial computer to solve the Burnt Pancake Problem http://www.jbioleng.org/content/2/1/8 . This unusually named conundrum is a mathematical sorting process that can be visualised as a stack of pancakes, all burnt on one side, which must be ordered by size.

In addition to proving the power of bacterial computing http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/computing , the team have also contributed significantly to the field of synthetic biology. Just as electronic circuits are made from transistors, diodes and other devices, so too are biological circuits. Synthetic biologists have worked together to create the Registry of Standard Biological Parts http://partsregistry.org/Main_Page , and this new research has contributed more than 60 new components to the list.

For more information on the expanding field of synthetic biology, download the latest edition of the Guardian's Science Weekly podcast http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/audio/2009/jul/20/science-weekly-podcast-synthetic-biology . Alok Jha and James Randerson were joined in the pod by synthetic biologist Paul Freemont, professor of protein crystallography at Imperial College London, to discuss a future of biological machines.


To get daily news updates from Guardian Science, follow us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/guardianscience

A bacterial computer that can solve complex mathematical problems http://bit.ly/V0lmz

->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Letsbereal

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 58,615
  • Know Thyself
'Bacterial Computers': Genetically Engineered Bacteria Have Potential To Solve Complicated Mathematical Problems
24 July 2009
, (Science Daily)
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/07/090723194321.htm



LARGE IMAGE: http://www.sciencedaily.com/images/2009/07/090723194321-large.jpg

Credit: iStockphoto/Sebastian Kaulitzki: 3-D illustration of bacteria. Researchers have engineered the DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria, creating bacterial computers capable of solving a classic mathematical problem known as the Hamiltonian Path Problem.

ScienceDaily (July 24, 2009) — US researchers have created 'bacterial computers' with the potential to solve complicated mathematics problems. The findings of the research demonstrate that computing in living cells is feasible, opening the door to a number of applications. The second-generation bacterial computers illustrate the feasibility of extending the approach to other computationally challenging math problems.
See also:

A research team made up of four faculty members and 15 undergraduate students from the biology and mathematics departments at Missouri Western State University in Missouri and Davidson College in North Carolina, USA engineered the DNA of Escherichia coli bacteria, creating bacterial computers capable of solving a classic mathematical problem known as the Hamiltonian Path Problem.

The research extends previous work published last year in the same journal to produce bacterial computers that could solve the Burnt Pancake Problem.

The Hamiltonian Path Problem asks whether there is a route in a network from a beginning node to an ending node, visiting each node exactly once. The student and faculty researchers modified the genetic circuitry of the bacteria to enable them to find a Hamiltonian path in a three-node graph. Bacteria that successfully solved the problem reported their success by fluorescing both red and green, resulting in yellow colonies.

Synthetic biology is the use of molecular biology techniques, engineering principles, and mathematical modeling to design and construct genetic circuits that enable living cells to carry out novel functions. "Our research contributed more than 60 parts to the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, which are available for use by the larger synthetic biology community, including the newly split red fluorescent protein and green fluorescent protein genes," said Jordan Baumgardner, recent graduate of Missouri Western and first author of the research paper. "The research provides yet another example of how powerful and dynamic synthetic biology can be. We used synthetic biology to solve mathematical problems; others find applications in medicine, energy and the environment. Synthetic biology has great potential in the real world."

According to Dr. Eckdahl, the corresponding author of the article, synthetic biology affords a new opportunity for multidisciplinary undergraduate research training. "We have found synthetic biology to be an excellent way to engage students in research that connects biology and mathematics. Our students learn firsthand the value of crossing traditional disciplinary lines."


Journal references:

   1. Jordan Baumgardner, Karen Acker, Oyinade Adefuye, Samuel THOMAS Crowley, Will DeLoache, James O Dickson, Lane Heard, Andrew T Martens, Nickolaus Morton, Michelle Ritter, Amber Shoecraft, Jessica Treece, Matthew Unzicker, Amanda Valencia, Mike Waters, A. M. Campbell, Laurie J. Heyer, Jeffrey L. Poet and Todd T. Eckdahl. Solving a Hamiltonian Path Problem with a bacterial computer. Journal of Biological Engineering, (in press) [link] http://www.jbioleng.org/
   2. Haynes et al. Engineering bacteria to solve the Burnt Pancake Problem. Journal of Biological Engineering, 2008; 2 (1): 8 DOI: 10.1186/1754-1611-2-8 http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1754-1611-2-8

Adapted from materials provided by BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/ , via EurekAlert! http://www.eurekalert.org/ , a service of AAAS.


'Bacterial Computers': Genetically Engineered Bacteria Have Potential To Solve Complicated Mathematical Problems http://tinyurl.com/nb2eor
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Monkeypox

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,844
  • He Loved Big Brother
    • Monkeypox
Re: Bacteria modified to act as computers
« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2009, 10:59:26 PM »
Jeez, I hope I didn't just wash a 3 GHz computer off my hands.

 :-\
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2009, 03:52:20 AM »
Japan developing remote control for humans
http://wireheading.com/robohuman/index.html
By Yuri Kageyama Associated Press
Date: 25 October 2005

A special headset designed by Nippon Telegraph
& Telephone Corp. can control human movement.

"We call this a virtual dance experience although some people have
mentioned it's more like a virtual drug experience"
Taro Maeda, senior research scientist at NTTY

ATSUGI, Japan (AP) -- We wield remote controls to turn things on and off, make them advance, make them halt. Ground-bound pilots use remotes to fly drone airplanes, soldiers to maneuver battlefield robots. But manipulating humans?

Prepare to be remotely controlled.

Just imagine being rendered the rough equivalent of a radio-controlled toy car.

Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp., Japans top telephone company, says it is developing the technology to perhaps make video games more realistic.

A special headset was placed on my cranium by my hosts during a recent demonstration at an NTT research center. It sent a very low voltage electric current from the back of my ears through my head -- either from left to right or right to left, depending on which way the joystick on a remote-control was moved.

I found the experience unnerving and exhausting: I sought to step straight ahead but kept careening from side to side. Those alternating currents literally threw me off.

The technology is called galvanic vestibular stimulation -- essentially, electricity messes with the delicate nerves inside the ear that help maintain balance.

I felt a mysterious, irresistible urge to start walking to the right whenever the researcher turned the switch to the right. I was convinced -- mistakenly -- that this was the only way to maintain my balance.

The phenomenon is painless but dramatic. Your feet start to move before you know it. I could even remote-control myself by taking the switch into my own hands.

There's no proven-beyond-a-doubt explanation yet as to why people start veering when electricity hits their ear. But NTT researchers say they were able to make a person walk along a route in the shape of a giant pretzel using this technique.

It's a mesmerizing sensation similar to being drunk or melting into sleep under the influence of anesthesia. But it's more definitive, as though an invisible hand were reaching inside your brain.

NTT says the feature may be used in video games and amusement park rides, although there are no plans so far for a commercial product.

Some people really enjoy the experience, researchers said while acknowledging that others feel uncomfortable.

I watched a simple racing-car game demonstration on a large screen while wearing a device programmed to synchronize the curves with galvanic vestibular stimulation. It accentuated the swaying as an imaginary racing car zipped through a virtual course, making me wobbly.

Another program had the electric current timed to music. My head was pulsating against my will, getting jerked around on my neck. I became so dizzy I could barely stand. I had to turn it off.

NTT researchers suggested this may be a reflection of my lack of musical abilities. People in tune with freely expressing themselves love the sensation, they said.

"We call this a virtual dance experience although some people have mentioned it's more like a virtual drug experience," said Taro Maeda, senior research scientist at NTT. "I'm really hopeful Apple Computer will be interested in this technology to offer it in their iPod."

Research on using electricity to affect human balance has been going on around the world for some time.

James Collins, professor of biomedical engineering at Boston University, has studied using the technology to prevent the elderly from falling and to help people with an impaired sense of balance. But he also believes the effect is suited for games and other entertainment.

"I suspect they'll probably get a kick out of the illusions that can be created to give them a more total immersion experience as part of virtual reality," Collins said.

The very low level of electricity required for the effect is unlikely to cause any health damage, Collins said. Still, NTT required me to sign a consent form, saying I was trying the device at my own risk.

And risk definitely comes to mind when playing around with this technology.

Timothy Hullar, assistant professor at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Mo., believes finding the right way to deliver an electromagnetic field to the ear at a distance could turn the technology into a weapon for situations where "killing isn't the best solution."

"This would be the most logical situation for a nonlethal weapon that presumably would make your opponent dizzy," he said via e-mail. "If you find just the right frequency, energy, duration of application, you would hope to find something that doesn't permanently injure someone but would allow you to make someone temporarily off-balance."

Indeed, a small defense contractor in Texas, Invocon Inc., is exploring whether precisely tuned electromagnetic pulses could be safely fired into people's ears to temporarily subdue them.

NTT has friendlier uses in mind.

If the sensation of movement can be captured for playback, then people can better understand what a ballet dancer or an Olympian gymnast is doing, and that could come handy in teaching such skills.

And it may also help people dodge oncoming cars or direct a rescue worker in a dark tunnel, NTT researchers say. They maintain that the point is not to control people against their will.

If you're determined to fight the suggestive orders from the electric currents by clinging to a fence or just lying on your back, you simply won't move.

But from my experience, if the currents persist, you'd probably be persuaded to follow their orders. And I didn't like that sensation. At all.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Unintelligable Name

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,630
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2009, 04:03:17 AM »
Men! Don your tin foil hats!

Offline ConcordeWarrior

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,346
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2009, 04:12:40 AM »
Japan is the most advanced country in the world when it comes to science and technology.
No one can match them. Also they are NOT afraid of working hard unlike their lazy European counterparts.

If they had the same financial means as the U.S. for research they would be in the 23rd Century so far ahead of the rest of the world.
The Sky is My Home

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2009, 04:14:58 AM »
I have read the article 3x.  Every word, phrase, sentence, hidden meaning still shocks me.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline Unintelligable Name

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,630
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2009, 04:21:34 AM »
"Indeed, a small defense contractor in Texas, Invocon Inc., is exploring whether precisely tuned electromagnetic pulses could be safely fired into people's ears to temporarily subdue them."

Soon it'll be when you think Anti-Government thoughts the new chip in your brain emits pain signals.


Offline lavosslayer

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 774
  • This is what happens after cats watch Obama...
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #23 on: August 05, 2009, 09:42:22 AM »
See http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=122326.msg760994#msg760994 I knew they were up to something...this just clarifies it!
"Those who would trade freedom for security deserve neither" -- Benjamin Franklin

Offline Dig

  • All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man.
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63,090
    • Git Ureself Edumacated
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #24 on: August 05, 2009, 09:53:21 AM »
See http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=122326.msg760994#msg760994 I knew they were up to something...this just clarifies it!

that article is almost 4 years old.
All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. The general spread of the light of science has already laid open to every view the palpable truth, that the mass of mankind has not been born with saddles on their backs, nor a favored few booted and spurred, ready to ride them legitimately

Offline lavosslayer

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 774
  • This is what happens after cats watch Obama...
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #25 on: August 05, 2009, 09:58:05 AM »
that article is almost 4 years old.

I see that...however it still answered my assertion quite satisfactorily. I hadn't read it until now, but I'm glad I did...means they are closer to what these movies are indicating then not!
"Those who would trade freedom for security deserve neither" -- Benjamin Franklin

Offline abrhim

  • Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 334
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #26 on: August 05, 2009, 10:05:26 AM »
sweet lawnmower man and stranges days are becoming more and more of a reality.  I like going into the woods for entertainment.  Soon i can just put the do-hicky on my head and fully experience the forest from the safety and comfort of my living room.  this thing and the master chief military (other post somewhere on here) sounds like a distopian nightmare.

Offline Letsbereal

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 58,615
  • Know Thyself
Bami making Robots
« Reply #27 on: August 05, 2009, 06:33:45 PM »
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline A Who

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,057
    • 12.160Mhz
Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #28 on: August 10, 2009, 03:33:58 PM »
http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/blog/2009/aug/07/dna-nanotechnology-machine-components

Nanotechnology: Scientists create miniature machine parts from DNA



In the latest phase of the nanotechnology revolution, scientists have built a collection of minuscule objects from DNA, including toothed gears, curved tubes, and a wireframe beach ball five millionths of a centimetre in diameter.

As well as being able to hold vast amounts of information, DNA is tough and flexible, making it an attractive candidate for use as a nanomaterial. Advances in molecular biology in recent decades have meant that scientists are well equipped to work with DNA and program it to do whatever they want.

"The main advantage of DNA is that we understand it," said Hendrik Dietz, now head of the Laboratory for Biomolecular Nanotechnology at München Technical University in Germany. "DNA is the only material that we can program at the nanoscale."

The building blocks of DNA can be made to assemble themselves, piece by piece, into a structure designed by the researcher.

"We have a bunch of small parts that are floating around in solution, bumping into each other," explains William Shih of Harvard University, who also worked on the study. "Sometimes when they bump into each other in the way that we want them to they don't let go, and through many cycles of this bumping into each other and sticking, eventually we end up with the desired shape – if we've programmed the structure of the molecules correctly."

Dietz, Shih and their colleague Shawn Douglas used this method to build tiny components that could, in principle, be assembled into more complex functional devices. A commentary accompanying their paper in the journal Science observes: "It is as if DNA has been subjected to the practice of yoga to display a variety of different postures at the nanoscale."

The structures are made from bundles of double-helix DNA strands. By altering the length, number and arrangement of strands, the scientists were able to construct several 3D shapes.






To make the bundle bend, for example, they added pairs of nucleotides – the basic building blocks of DNA – on one side of the bundle, making that side slightly longer, and deleted nucleotide pairs on the other. This allowed them to finely control the curvature of their structures.

This is the first time that scientists have created truly curved DNA nanostructures. Previously scientists have only managed to make straight or kinked structures.

The next step was to put together a number of curved subunits to make more complex 3D structures, which the researchers designed with the help of a graphical software tool they developed specially for the task. Finally, they photographed the nanostructures using an electron microscope to confirm they had achieved the desired shapes.

Dietz is confident that DNA nanostructures will come into their own in a range of applications.

"In the short term, I would say that the immediate applications are in basic science research. Now we have a biomaterial that we can program at the nanoscale to address questions in biophysics or nanochemistry."

In the longer term, he envisages constructing medical devices "that could get into cells and might be capable of performing some job there".

Like any sensible scientist working at the cutting edge, he acknowledged there was some way to go. "We're still struggling with defects, but I'm optimistic that there are a lot of applications that we can use in the future."
"Build A Great Tomorrow, Hear My Words Today."

http://snardfarker.ning.com/profile/Awho

Offline A Who

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,057
    • 12.160Mhz
Robots to receive their own operating system based on their personality
« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2009, 03:38:17 PM »
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20327206.300-robots-to-get-their-own-operating-system.html




THE UBot whizzes around a carpeted conference room on its Segway-like wheels, holding aloft a yellow balloon. It hands the balloon to a three-fingered robotic arm named WAM, which gingerly accepts the gift.

Cameras click. "It blows my mind to see robots collaborating like this," says William Townsend, CEO of Barrett Technology, which developed WAM.

The robots were just two of the multitude on display last month at the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI) in Pasadena, California. But this happy meeting of robotic beings hides a serious problem: while the robots might be collaborating, those making them are not. Each robot is individually manufactured to meet a specific need and more than likely built in isolation.

This sorry state of affairs is set to change. Roboticists have begun to think about what robots have in common and what aspects of their construction can be standardised, hopefully resulting in a basic operating system everyone can use. This would let roboticists focus their attention on taking the technology forward.

One of the main sticking points is that robots are typically quite unlike one another. "It's easier to build everything from the ground up right now because each team's requirements are so different," says Anne-Marie Bourcier of Aldebaran Robotics in Paris, France, which makes a half-metre-tall humanoid called Nao (pictured).

Some robots, like Nao, are almost autonomous. Others, like the UBot, are semi-autonomous, meaning they perform some acts, such as balancing, on their own, while other tasks, like steering, are left to a human operator.

Also, every research robot is designed for a specific objective. The UBot's key ability is that it can balance itself, even when bumped - crucial if robots are to one day work alongside clumsy human beings. The Nao, on the other hand, can walk and even perform a kung-fu routine, as long as it is on a flat, smooth surface. But it can't balance itself as robustly as the UBot and won't easily be able to learn how.

On top of all this, each robot has its own unique hardware and software, so capabilities like balance implemented on one robot cannot easily be transferred to others.

Bourcier sees this changing if robotics advances in a manner similar to personal computing. For computers, the widespread adoption of Microsoft's Disk Operating System (DOS), and later Windows, allowed programmers without detailed knowledge of the underlying hardware and file systems to build new applications and build on the work of others.
Programmers could build new applications without detailed knowledge of the underlying hardware

Bringing robotics to this point won't be easy, though. "Robotics is at the stage where personal computing was about 30 years ago," says Chad Jenkins of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. Like the home-brew computers of the late 70s and early 80s, robots used for research today often have a unique operating system (OS). "But at some point we have to come together to use the same resources," says Jenkins.

This desire has its roots in frustration, says Brian Gerkey of the robotics research firm Willow Garage in Menlo Park, California. "People reinvent the wheel over and over and over, doing things that are not at all central to what they're trying to do."

For example, if someone is studying object recognition, they want to design better object-recognition algorithms, not write code to control the robot's wheels. "You know that those things have been done before, probably better," says Gerkey. But without a common OS, sharing code is nearly impossible.

The challenge of building a robot OS for widespread adoption is greater than that for computers. "The problems that a computer solves are fairly well defined. There is a very clear mathematical notion of computation," says Gerkey. "There's not the same kind of clear abstraction about interacting with the physical world."

Nevertheless, roboticists are starting to make some headway.The Robot Operating System or ROS is an open-source set of programs meant to serve as a common platform for a wide range of robotics research. It is being developed and used by teams at Stanford University in California, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Technical University of Munich, Germany, among others.

ROS has software commands that, for instance, provide ways of controlling a robot's navigation, and its arms, grippers and sensors, without needing details of how the hardware functions. The system also includes high-level commands for actions like image recognition and even opening doors. When ROS boots up on a robot's computer, it asks for a description of the robot that includes things like the length of its arm segments and how the joints rotate. It then makes this information available to the higher-level algorithms.

A standard OS would also help researchers focus on a key aspect that so far has been lacking in robotics: reproducibility.

Often, if a team invents, say, a better navigation system, they will publish the results but not the software code. Not only are others unable to build on this discovery, they cannot independently verify the result. "It's useful to have people in a sense constrained by a common platform," says Giorgio Metta, a robotics researcher at the Italian Insitute of Technology in Genoa. "They [will be] forced to do things that work, because somebody else can check. I think this is important, to make it a bit more scientifically oriented."

ROS is not the only robotic operating system vying to be the standard. Microsoft, for example, is trying to create a "Windows for robots" with its Robotics Developer Studio, a product that has been available since 2007.

Gerkey hopes to one day see a robot "app store" where a person could download a program for their robot and have it work as easily as an iPhone app. "That will mean that we have solved a lot of difficult problems," he says.
"Build A Great Tomorrow, Hear My Words Today."

http://snardfarker.ning.com/profile/Awho

Offline Monkeypox

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,844
  • He Loved Big Brother
    • Monkeypox
Re: Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2009, 09:52:09 PM »
I wonder what Hell they'll unleash on the human race?
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline Unintelligable Name

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,630
Re: Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2009, 09:53:58 PM »
I wonder what Hell they'll unleash on the human race?

Dunno but it is quite the scientific feat. I can think of a worst case scenario... but I'd rather not.

Offline Monkeypox

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,844
  • He Loved Big Brother
    • Monkeypox
Re: Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #32 on: August 10, 2009, 09:56:01 PM »
Dunno but it is quite the scientific feat. I can think of a worst case scenario... but I'd rather not.

It's frightening, manipulating DNA, and then injecting it into people?

Take this along with gene splicing and it's frightening. Who knows what mutations or viruses could be created? And the problems might not even show up for years or even generations.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline Unintelligable Name

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,630
Re: Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #33 on: August 10, 2009, 09:58:22 PM »
It's frightening, manipulating DNA, and then injecting it into people?
Take this along with gene splicing and it's frightening. Who knows what mutations or viruses could be created? And the problems might not even show up for years or even generations.

Yes well they'd have to be placed in food/water/injections -- or I suppose blown right into your face. So essentially it's like any other virus/bacteria -- but it may end up more programmable... or maybe not. The question is: Can it replicate from organic material!?

luckee1

  • Guest
Re: Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #34 on: August 10, 2009, 10:02:58 PM »
Jesus!!!  I had a nightmare about this years ago!!  OMG!  This is a borg like thing on the most miniscule form!!  **Shuddering!

Offline egypt

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,504
  • Love: A Wish to bestow the fullness of Joyous Life
Re: Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #35 on: August 10, 2009, 10:13:45 PM »
Nanobot replacement parts.  Nice.

Will they replicate themselves, too?

Offline Satyagraha

  • Global Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8,939
Re: Scientists create minature machine parts from DNA
« Reply #36 on: August 10, 2009, 10:30:19 PM »
MILITARY APPLICATIONS OF NANOTECHNOLOGY:
CHALLENGES FOR ARMS CONTROL (by David HAY-EDIE, IPB Consultant)


Dr Jurgen Altmann,( Professor of Experimental Physics, University of Dortmund,
Germany)
The Geneva Forum, 28 November, 2007
http://www.ipb.org/newsletters/docs/MilApplicat%20NanoTech.pdf

Dr Altmann gave an overview of the potentially dangerous military applications of
current progress in nanotechnology research – and the consequent need to
develop new arms control arrangements. A technological revolution is on the
horizon, brought about by the prospect of engineering at the sub-microscopic level
of the atom. While not immediately imminent, the first full applications of the new
technology could become reality in one or two decades. However, already
“miniaturisation” is gathering pace. The new technology is based on very lightweight,
and formidably strong, materials such as carbon.

While most of the research into military applications of nanotechnology is taking
place in the US, most other major countries have some such research. It is in the
interests of the US, although so far ahead, to agree on international constraints since
even “assymetrical” threats to the US from developing countries would be
destabilizing.

Dr Altmann stressed that there are a variety of positive potential benefits from
nanotechnology outside the military sphere. The most obvious is medical, in
microsurgery and in fighting against diseases such as cancer. Some of the benefits
will be to improve human physical performance. Much of this will come from microrobots
– microscopic machines which will be placed in the bloodstream. These
“micro-robots” are also one of the main potential military developments.


Dr Altmann described a wide variety of military applications. Amongst those he cited
were: microscopic “self destruct” robots that, inserted into enemy weapons or
information technology, could neutralize or destroy them; miniature missiles about 30
cm long, that could be carried in women’s handbags; tiny self-replicating
destructive machines; microscopic agents for insertion into “enemy” bodies and
brains that would turn those persons, eg soldiers, into robots controllable for military
purposes;
miniature lasers capable of destroying satellites; and miniature military
satellites. The potential for terrorist, as well as conventional military, application is
obvious.

It will be a complex task to devise the right sort of arms control arrangements to meet
these threats. Certain existing treaties, which already have rudimentary provisions on
nanotechnology, could be developed further, through eg Final Statements in
Review Conferences. Such treaties include the Biological Weapons Convention
(BWC) and the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). The Conventional Forces in
Europe (CFE) Treaty could also be adapted.

Some of these threats, in Dr Altmann’s view, require outright bans (in a similar manner
to space weapons), or moratoria. One problem is that the boundaries are blurred
between the sciences involved – physics, biology and chemistry. The option of a
comprehensive treaty would run into such problems. Some of the rationale will be
“preventive arms control”, ie banning military applications before they leave the
research stage. Some Treaty models exist, eg the Inhumane Weapons Convention’s
ban on certain laser weapons, the Test ban Treaty, the Landmines Treaty and the
(defunct) ABM Treaty. Miniaturisation makes treaty verification more difficult, and
could mean that verification needs to be more intrusive – another potential problem.
It may be more difficult to achieve transparency.

Aside from the military threats of nanotechnology, Dr Altmann added that there are
fears that the creation of self-replicating robots could run amok. These machines
could turn against their masters, take over, and destroy the earth. Science Fiction
could come true. Moreover, there are many ethical reasons to oppose a variety of
potential developments of nanotechnology. Tampering with human genes and
organisms can easily be used for evil purposes.


There was a lively Question-And-Answer session after Dr Altmann’s talk. Amongst the
points raised were the following: the immediate priority is to raise public awareness
of the threats - Dr Altmann is one of the very few in this field; an early ban could be
achieved (on strong ethical grounds) on any application that could involve the
physical and mental manipulation of human beings, and deliberate killing of humans
by controlled machines; a UN Review Panel could be set up, to help raise awareness
and propose ways ahead; more scientists could be encouraged to engage
themselves in this and similar arms control/disarmament fields – there is a lack of
interplay between the relevant scientists and the political leaders, political
representatives, civil society institutions and bureaucrats involved.

A report by Dr Altmann on this topic can be downloaded at:
http://www.bundesstiftung-friedensforschung.de/pdf-docs/berichtaltmann.pdf.
And  the King shall answer and say unto them, Verily I say unto you, 
Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren,  ye have done it unto me.

Matthew 25:40

Offline Letsbereal

  • Moderator
  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 58,615
  • Know Thyself
THE DON’T NEED HUMANS ANYMORE FOR LABOUR!
« Reply #37 on: August 12, 2009, 02:19:32 PM »

THE DON’T NEED HUMANS ANYMORE FOR LABOUR!

UK scientists are developing intelligent harvesting to save thousands a year. http://bit.ly/1bDsZq
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline Monkeypox

  • Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 16,844
  • He Loved Big Brother
    • Monkeypox
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #38 on: August 19, 2009, 03:26:08 AM »
sweet lawnmower man and stranges days are becoming more and more of a reality.  I like going into the woods for entertainment.  Soon i can just put the do-hicky on my head and fully experience the forest from the safety and comfort of my living room.  this thing and the master chief military (other post somewhere on here) sounds like a distopian nightmare.

The Hell with the forest!  How about some VR sex action?

 :P
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Berminator

  • Guest
Re: Japan developing remote control for humans
« Reply #39 on: August 19, 2009, 09:03:40 AM »
sweet lawnmower man and stranges days are becoming more and more of a reality.  I like going into the woods for entertainment.  Soon i can just put the do-hicky on my head and fully experience the forest from the safety and comfort of my living room.  this thing and the master chief military (other post somewhere on here) sounds like a distopian nightmare.

Do you visit Pan in the woods?