WORLD WIDE WEB

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Offline Monkeypox

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WORLD WIDE WEB
« on: May 03, 2009, 04:43:19 PM »
http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/an-invention-that-could-change-the-internet-for-ever-1678109.html

Revolutionary new web software could put giants such as Google in the shade when it comes out later this month. Andrew Johnson reports

The biggest internet revolution for a generation will be unveiled this month with the launch of software that will understand questions and give specific, tailored answers in a way that the web has never managed before.

The new system, Wolfram Alpha, showcased at Harvard University in the US last week, takes the first step towards what many consider to be the internet's Holy Grail – a global store of information that understands and responds to ordinary language in the same way a person does.

Although the system is still new, it has already produced massive interest and excitement among technology pundits and internet watchers.

Computer experts believe the new search engine will be an evolutionary leap in the development of the internet. Nova Spivack, an internet and computer expert, said that Wolfram Alpha could prove just as important as Google. "It is really impressive and significant," he wrote. "In fact it may be as important for the web (and the world) as Google, but for a different purpose.

Tom Simpson, of the blog Convergenceofeverything.com, said: "What are the wider implications exactly? A new paradigm for using computers and the web? Probably. Emerging artificial intelligence and a step towards a self-organising internet? Possibly... I think this could be big."

Wolfram Alpha will not only give a straight answer to questions such as "how high is Mount Everest?", but it will also produce a neat page of related information – all properly sourced – such as geographical location and nearby towns, and other mountains, complete with graphs and charts.

The real innovation, however, is in its ability to work things out "on the fly", according to its British inventor, Dr Stephen Wolfram. If you ask it to compare the height of Mount Everest to the length of the Golden Gate Bridge, it will tell you. Or ask what the weather was like in London on the day John F Kennedy was assassinated, it will cross-check and provide the answer. Ask it about D sharp major, it will play the scale. Type in "10 flips for four heads" and it will guess that you need to know the probability of coin-tossing. If you want to know when the next solar eclipse over Chicago is, or the exact current location of the International Space Station, it can work it out.

Dr Wolfram, an award-winning physicist who is based in America, added that the information is "curated", meaning it is assessed first by experts. This means that the weaknesses of sites such as Wikipedia, where doubts are cast on the information because anyone can contribute, are taken out. It is based on his best-selling Mathematica software, a standard tool for scientists, engineers and academics for crunching complex maths.

"I've wanted to make the knowledge we've accumulated in our civilisation computable," he said last week. "I was not sure it was possible. I'm a little surprised it worked out so well."

Dr Wolfram, 49, who was educated at Eton and had completed his PhD in particle physics by the time he was 20, added that the launch of Wolfram Alpha later this month would be just the beginning of the project.

"It will understand what you are talking about," he said. "We are just at the beginning. I think we've got a reasonable start on 90 per cent of the shelves in a typical reference library."

The engine, which will be free to use, works by drawing on the knowledge on the internet, as well as private databases. Dr Wolfram said he expected that about 1,000 people would be needed to keep its databases updated with the latest discoveries and information.

He also added that he would not go down the road of storing information on ordinary people, although he was aware that others might use the technology to do so.

Wolfram Alpha has been designed with professionals and academics in mind, so its grasp of popular culture is, at the moment, comparatively poor. The term "50 Cent" caused "absolute horror" in tests, for example, because it confused a discussion on currency with the American rap artist. For this reason alone it is unlikely to provide an immediate threat to Google, which is working on a similar type of search engine, a version of which it launched last week.

"We have a certain amount of popular culture information," Dr Wolfram said. "In some senses popular culture information is much more shallowly computable, so we can find out who's related to who and how tall people are. I fully expect we will have lots of popular culture information. There are linguistic horrors because if you put in books and music a lot of the names clash with other concepts."

He added that to help with that Wolfram Alpha would be using Wikipedia's popularity index to decide what users were likely to be interested in.

With Google now one of the world's top brands, worth $100bn, Wolfram Alpha has the potential to become one of the biggest names on the planet.

Dr Wolfram, however, did not rule out working with Google in the future, as well as Wikipedia. "We're working to partner with all possible organisations that make sense," he said. "Search, narrative, news are complementary to what we have. Hopefully there will be some great synergies."

What the experts say

"For those of us tired of hundreds of pages of results that do not really have a lot to do with what we are trying to find out, Wolfram Alpha may be what we have been waiting for."

Michael W Jones, Tech.blorge.com

"If it is not gobbled up by one of the industry superpowers, his company may well grow to become one of them in a small number of years, with most of us setting our default browser to be Wolfram Alpha."

Doug Lenat, Semanticuniverse.com

"It's like plugging into an electric brain."

Matt Marshall, Venturebeat.com

"This is like a Holy Grail... the ability to look inside data sources that can't easily be crawled and provide answers from them."

Danny Sullivan, editor-in-chief of searchengineland.com
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

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zafada

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Re: An invention that could change the internet for ever
« Reply #1 on: May 03, 2009, 04:45:41 PM »
Google does this and it has an ajax search field so you know whether or not that shit's been asked before.

Today I asked, "Should I renew my business license?".

I got an exact answer...

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: An invention that could change the internet for ever
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2009, 04:48:24 PM »
Google does this and it has an ajax search field so you know whether or not that shit's been asked before.

Today I asked, "Should I renew my business license?".

I got an exact answer...

The Magic 8 Ball will give you an exact answer, too.

 ;D
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline Monkeypox

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War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

zafada

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Re: An invention that could change the internet for ever
« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2009, 04:50:00 PM »
LMAO, I was going to say after I submitted the post that I really didn't word that correctly.  What I mean was "Am I SUPPOSED to renew my business license..."

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OpenDNS
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2009, 05:51:23 PM »
opendns.com/

I use it and it works!!!!!!!!
I got myself 2.50Mb/s from a 1Mb/s connection........

Offline Letsbereal

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Website directory system is most vulnerable to attack
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2009, 09:21:29 AM »
Website directory system is most vulnerable to attack
26 Aug 2009
, by Joseph Menn (The Financial Times)
http://blogs.ft.com/techblog/2009/08/website-directory-system-is-most-vulnerable-to-attack/

The part of US information technology most at risk from a serious attack is the directory service that steers internet users to the websites they want, according to a federal  report issued Tuesday after more than a year of study.

The report from the Department of Homeland Security and private information technology leaders rated the chances of something serious going wrong with six key functions as part of the IT sector “baseline risk assessment.” Those assessments are being published for 18 sectors deemed critical to the country’s national security.

After an exhaustive discussion of  potential hazards to functions ranging from computer manufacturing to the providing the ability to connect to the internet, the report concluded that everything nefarious hatched by man was at little risk of occurring, of little consequence if it did occur, or both. The exception was for an assault on the internet’s techniques for telling people that a website they are seeking is at a numeric internet address.

The process behind the  Domain Name System is invisible to regular users, who simply type the words in an address or click on a link, letting the computer handle the rest. But at many levels, DNS still relies on trust that other computers specializing in giving out that reference information aren’t deliberately providing false leads.

In the past, some hackers have taken advantage of that class of vulnerabilities and directed users to impostor sites that installed data-stealing programs. A security upgrade to the DNS system is underway but will take years to complete, according to the new report.

For now, the likelihood of a broader DNS attack with a “high” level of consequences is “medium,” the report said. In part because DNS depends on the same sort of unpredictable software, processes and people that occasionally trip up other parts of the industry, malicious actors could take down a top-level domain such as .com or .gov for political reasons or as part of a mass fraud or extortion scheme.

Unspecified “foreign military organisations” it said, have already tried.


Internet assault: Tech blog (Joseph Menn): The part of US information technology most at risk from a serious att.. http://bit.ly/13r5zY

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Offline aharvnz

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Infowars DNS
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2010, 03:25:47 PM »
Hi, has this changed in the lat day or so. My ISP seems to have stale records which means I can only get on if I use my Globalist company's network client and I would rather not have them know where I am going?

Regards
Andy

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Re: Infowars DNS
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2010, 03:29:24 PM »
Hi, has this changed in the lat day or so. My ISP seems to have stale records which means I can only get on if I use my Globalist company's network client and I would rather not have them know where I am going?

Regards
Andy

Just for information, but DNS can and does take 24 hours to update. However, the suggestion of finding an alt DNS service is a good idea, as looking at the DNS records provides a compact simple log for Big Brother to snoop.


Offline aharvnz

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Re: Infowars DNS
« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2010, 02:27:32 PM »
ahh, here is the reason.
http://www.infowars.com/internet-censorship-major-truth-providing-websites-blocked-by-asia-netcom-to-new-zealand-users/
I am on my companies network at the mo.
I may have to put in some host entries on my PC and see if that works.

Offline aharvnz

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Re: Infowars DNS
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2010, 01:11:02 AM »
got this from Telecom, had probs with Youtube as well.
Dear Andrew

Thank you for contacting Telecom.

We have identified a problem with Youtube at the moment, along with several other websites that appear to be having DNS type issues. We are currently investigating this and hope to have it resolved soon. I apologise, but I do not have an ETA regarding this problem. Your patience in the meantime is very much appreciated.

Please let me know if you have any other queries regarding any of your Telecom products and services, and I will be happy to help.

Kind regards,


Malcolm
Customer Care Online

Infowars seems to be working again now. Same IP as before so must have been blocked.
We'll see for how long.

Offline Brocke

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Using alternate DNS servers to bypass censorship
« Reply #11 on: February 08, 2010, 11:02:50 PM »

Not a perfect solution, but we need to start thinking about it.



Using alternate DNS servers to bypass censorship

http://quillem.com/node/920

Submitted by Karthik on 26 December, 2006

DNS constitutes one of the primary underpinnings of the Internet. Its fundamental use is to translate (or resolve) easily identifiable domains names to their inscrutable IP address counterparts.

Usually, when you click on a link or type in a URL, your computer contacts your ISP's DNS servers and asks it to get the IP address of the link, so that you can make contact with it. When your ISP decides to block a certain website, it might prefer to block/poison DNS requests for the site, rather than blocking the entire IP address. In such circumstances, using alternate, uncensored or "open" DNS servers can turn out to be an easy workaround.

Open or public DNS servers are something of a rarity due to reasons of security and frequent abuse. But, nevertheless there are still a few of them around. The most popular and reliable of the lot are the ones provided by opendns.com. They are a free (albeit commercial) DNS service that will allow you to bypass querying your ISP's DNS servers, and thereby avoid any censors placed therein.

To use this service, change the DNS servers for your Internet connection to:

    * 208.67.222.222
    * 208.67.220.220

OpenDNS has a page detailing the steps to be followed on your operating system to point your connection to their DNS servers.

Depending on the state of your ISP, you will very likely also notice quicker load times when you are browsing.


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Offline pikeaero

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Alternate DNS root
« Reply #12 on: November 28, 2010, 09:38:25 AM »
I started a comment thread on Infowars dot com, and decided to move it here to see if we can't get a few people to participate in a pilot project.

# pikeaero Says:
November 27th, 2010 at 11:05 am

They can do this now because ICANN is effectively being absorbed into the criminal globalist U.N. so the ICANN now takes it’s marching order from the global establishment.

Maybe we aught to be bashing around some ideas about setting up a grass roots DNS (Domain Name Service), sort of a competing name space sort of deal.

We all know why they want to seize control of the ICANN and DNS, so they get to control who can publish and who can’t, so everyone will have to have a sub-domain of abc.com, nbc.com, rogers.com, etc., and will thus be subject to content restriction rules forced by the domain owner, and of course only mega-media corporations will be able to get top level domains because you will need a license that will be prohibitively expensive and you will have to sign onto the sensorship program.

That, what they are doing now, is testing the mechanisms for shutting down entire domain name spaces at will…..clearly we see where this is going.

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4wardlight Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 2:57 pm

I said this same thing. It’s time for a p2p DNS chain where EVERYONE is a DNS backup. So if they take down one, we’re still all up. DC++ did this awesomely, if we could learn from their mistakes and make it better, we could all be hosting as many or few sites as we want of our local “shares”.

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pikeaero Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 6:11 pm

The trouble is that to make it effective against the globalist name space takeover, you would have to tie into the existing DNS architecture so that all existing software would still work as expected.

It is both an administrative challenge and a bit of a technical challenge, but mostly administrative I should think.

I’m just sort of tossing out ideas here, but what you might do to get it sort of bootstrapped is something like launch a bunch of root name servers for a new domain name space, let’s say “.free”, and initially require that users have an extra DNS entry in their hosts file that pints to one or more of these new DNS servers. So at first you have a group of “insiders” who are enjoying the freedom of the .free name space…

In other words, you just start doing it, just like they just start doing it, you just fire up some root DNS servers and administer the registration of domain names under that root, and you put a bunch of good patriot websites on it, get a little bit of industry buzz going about it (word like this would spread like wild-fire through the tech circles), and before you know it, everyone will wonder what’s going on with the .free root domain space, and will want to get on it, and you just sort of grow it into existence.

It

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pikeaero Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 6:22 pm

Just some type-Os…

“users have an extra DNS entry in their hosts file that pints to one or more of these new DNS servers”

should read something like…

“users have an extra DNS entry in their DNS resolver hosts file (e.g. /etc/resolv.conf, etc..) file that points to one or more of these new DNS servers”.

Reply

SAB Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 6:34 pm

That sounds pretty good pikearo, that would take a while to build up, and need a lot of technical people to help out. Would it be easier to do a p2p software that can hold up websites, something like i2p?

Reply

pikeaero Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 6:54 pm

Yeah, there are two sort of fundamentally different approaches you can take as I see it. A) As I sort of sketched out, you battle it out on the conventional DNS front, where it becomes primarily a battle of mind share, the technology is already widely in use. and B) splitting off into a completely separate name resolution protocol, and this could be further extended into supporting a whole parallel web-like publishing medium..indeed, this would be my favored approach.

In the long term, I think option B is very attractive because it provides a means for making the DNS more P2P-like where you don’t have the ability to seize control from a centralized point like you do now with the current DNS system.

Boy…there is so, so much to discuss around this topic, and this box is so small. Really what we need is some sort of a patriot-nerd summit to address this specific issue….I think that is what we should be calling for at this stage….some sort of summit or forum to address this specific issue. Maybe we can put our heads together on this one and get the jump on the enemy.

pikeaero Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 9:08 pm

Or maybe you develop sort of a hybrid, where you talk traditional DNS style protocol on the front end (the name resolution side) so we maintain compatibility with all the existing legacy software (gethostbyname()), but on the back-end you’re doing a sort of p2p amongst the other DNS peers. You could actually roll out a new root domain in a manner similar to what I first proposed (above) using the existing DNS architecture, and as you progress, begin re architecting the backend to be more distributed. You would still maintain the same tree style data structure (domain structure), but you would then distribute the record keeping in such a way that the records can not be centrally controlled, I know, that then becomes the challenge, developing a workable registration system that is fully distributed.

In any case, it could be launched with existing technology, a couple of little server farms, and a fair number of people willing to participate in the bootstrap, and people just getting the buzz out there.

Or am I missing something?

4wardlight Reply:
November 28th, 2010 at 7:31 am

No, it all sounds great! We take “FaceBook” and “MySpace” and form…”FreeSpace” ;-) . Like you said, this isn’t the place to discuss. But I am a programmer, so I understand the software side. I have worked heavily in the distributed / synchronization side of things as well. I understand a good deal about DNS stuff, but I have been out of the admin side of things for a while. Would Linux “root kits” (non-hidden) or something be helpful in this scenario where we could essentially install a “mini” server on each PC and the user controls which “hosts” he will sync with and/or become a host. This might be a more minimal setup for the user since they won’t need to muck with HOST files and such. I keep thinking back to DC++, it had it’s own root domain and anyone could setup themselves as a server. But they had some mistakes with it as well.

pikeaero Reply:
November 28th, 2010 at 9:32 am

Sure, you could have a Windows, and Mac little download installer that sets you up to use the new DNS root. Perhaps we shuold start a thread on forum dot prisonplanet dot com ?

I could not sleep last night thinking about this. Yeah, I can see a distributed DNS system something like BOINC, but instead of number crunching, your spare cycles participate in responding to name resolution requests, and performing record keeping chores….I’m kind of thinking longer term.

In the mean while, if we could get a few people to participate in a pilot project…..

Shall we move this to forum dot prisonplanet dot com?
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #13 on: November 28, 2010, 09:39:38 AM »
# SAB Says:
November 27th, 2010 at 10:13 pm

pikeaero, I think it would be best to use p2p software, and in the future, to add p2pDNS into the code, (evolution), and this would save time and work, while something already works.

Their are a few out their ready: i2p, freenet, Netsukuku, turtle, gnunet, osiris, etc.

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MontgomeryScott Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 10:46 pm

‘Point to Point’ software is the basis of the ATTACK upon the free-net.
BIT-TORRENT software and handlers are the WHOLE focal point, NOT ‘illegal file-sharers’, or ‘pirarated downloads’, or even ‘knockoff trademark’ spammers…

I respectfully DISAGREE with your advice, ‘SAB’.

Reply

pikeaero Reply:
November 27th, 2010 at 11:03 pm

Yeah, don’t get me wrong I love the idea of P2P architecture, a new distributed DNS protocol, and all of that, and I particularly like the Netsukuku concept, in fact I was a developer of a well known P2P system some time ago.

What I’m driving at is how do you drive it into the main stream? What you are talking about is not just about a simple new root domain (that’s difficult enough for an average schmuck to grasp — dot what?), you’re talking about an entirely new architecture replacement….which I agree is what’s needed in the long run. The thing is, we have a critical situation here with the UN and the establishment seizing control of the DNS root, and it won’t be long before people will not be able to randomly stumble upon P2P projects on the web and so forth because that sort of material will be unauthorized material and not permitted to reside below the big media top level domains.

Like Alex is always saying, we need to fight the battle on the main battlefield. I would say certainly keep pushing P2P solutions in case the globalists succeed in shutting the web and DNS off for all practical purposes, then P2P will likely be one of the best backup plans, and who knows, that just might end up being the path of natural evolution.

I guess my thoughts on this boils down to the fact that there are billions of web browsers already deployed out there that call the gethostbyname() function to open a website, so wouldn’t it be easier to tie into that mechanism than to try and deploy billions of Netsukuku compliant browsers onto everybody’s desktops?…that’s basically what I’m driving at.

Reply

pikeaero Reply:
November 28th, 2010 at 12:38 am

Search “Competing DNS root”, “AlterNIC”, “rfc2826″.

A good paper on the subject is “Competing DNS Roots: Creative Destruction or Just Plain Destruction? Dr. Milton L Mueller”.

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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #14 on: November 28, 2010, 09:55:12 AM »
So as you can see, what I am proposing is starting up a competing DNS root, and try to get a little bit of momentum behind it.

We just need a couple of people with sys admin experience on a Unix/Linux style environment, and some people willing to host and publish websites on the new root domain(s).

I can host a DNS root server, any others that can host backups?

I'll just sort of summarize what I think we would need:

1) DNS root mirrors.
2) Authoritive branch level DNS hosts.
3) Web server hosts.
4) Pick some root domains (I like ".free") Maybe we aught to stick with just one to maintain focus?
5) Decide on registration policy (free?, donations?, expiry?, domain squatting?, abuse prevention?, etc...)
6) Registration mechanism (e.g. a self serve registration website, etc...? )
7) Make a .org (or whatever) information website.
8) Make some sort of installers for Windows and Mac to make it a one-click operation to participate.

Anything else?
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #15 on: November 28, 2010, 11:50:36 AM »
Pinched from http://www.templetons.com/brad/dns/wrong.html
---clipity clip---
NEW.NET and other alternate ICANNs

Many parties have attempted to set up their own alternate NICs to supplant the ICANN/NSI one, and offer new TLDs within that. Most have been small ventures. They tend to create new TLDs and leave the others alone rather than attempt to replace .com. Only sites that use their new list of root servers can see these new TLDs, the rest of the world can't.

One new venture to do this is new.net, which is selling domains in a lot of new TLDs. Their hook is that they partnered with a series of major ISPs to make sure that many people could use the new TLDs from day one, and all people could use them by appending ".new.net" to access through the ICANN domains. Still, their names are far from universal and not yet popular.

But these efforts are just a power grab. Most of these parties just want the chance to own and sell domains in generic TLDs. They're a new ICANN, possibly with nicer policies, but really just another group trying to own what shouldn't be owned.

Some of them also will lead to splintering the net. If two TLDs with the same name exist (as is already the case with some of the new TLDs ICANN is adopting) and get any serious use, you get a fractured net, where site.biz for some users is different from site.biz for others. This benefits almost nobody.
--- clipity clip ---

This is what we don't want in the long run, just another ICANN. It might be a good way to bootstrap a competing DNS, just to keep things simple, but then along the way, re architecting the record keeping to fit into a more distrubuted model.

Lots of good insight here, somebody has obviously given this a lot of thought:

http://www.templetons.com/brad/dns/fix.html
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #16 on: November 29, 2010, 12:15:28 AM »

There is a project called OpenNIC that is doing pretty much what I've been proposing. There is already a .free top level domain even.

Go to http://www.opennicproject.org/ for info.

Go to http://www.opennicproject.org/index.php/start-here/51-migrate-to-opennic to get hooked up.


___ You have to be pointing to a participating OpenNIC DNS server to see these domains... _____

Once you're hooked up you should be able to see sites like http://grep.geek

I just put up a video site at http://www.youtube.free :)

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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #17 on: November 29, 2010, 06:12:46 PM »
Exactly what I've been talking about. The folks operating OpenNIC have basically been starting to do everything I've been talking about... Let's get on board and give out support....they need websites in the .free and .geek domains. We need some ideas for perhaps social website or some things that would give people a string incentive to want to have access to the .free, .geek, .indy, etc.. top level domains.

---- clipity clip ----

Also found here: http://wiki.opennic.glue/dotP2PTLD


OpenNIC .p2p Charter

.p2p is chartered for use with our peer to peer based DNS concept. (
http://dot-p2p.org/ ) The primary service will allow people to use a
decentralized open DNS system. The purpose of this TLD is to allow people
using traditional methods of DNS to gather information about this new
concept and to also control domain registrations through the use of
http://nic.p2p

.p2p domain names are first come, first serve, excluding those reserved
for .p2p operational matters (www.p2p, nic.p2p, opennic.p2p) for domain
spam prevention, to qualify for a domain you must own at least one domain
of the same name in the existing TLD scope (eg: test.p2p requires you to
own test.com/.net/.org/etc)

To prevent domain fraud on commonly used domains (eg: google.*) alexa
top1000 will be locked to the owner of the highest ranking domain that
appears on the alexa rankings ...

Reselling of domains/subdomains, as a domain is controlled by a member, we
have no direct say in how it's operations are handled. All domains handled
through nic.p2p will be freely available to all members.

Contacts

TiAMO - tiamo@tfr.org
NovaKing - novaking@eztv.se

#dot-p2p @ efnet.org
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #18 on: November 29, 2010, 06:16:27 PM »
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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #20 on: November 30, 2010, 10:09:58 AM »
P2P DNS Brainstorming site...

http://dns-p2p.openpad.me/1?
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #21 on: November 30, 2010, 10:35:22 AM »
An excellent paper worth a read here:

http://crisp.cs.du.edu/node/79
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #22 on: November 30, 2010, 11:48:26 AM »
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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2010, 02:37:07 PM »
Git repo is now here:

https://github.com/DNS-P2P/
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #26 on: December 01, 2010, 02:35:35 AM »
Main page seems to be here now: http://dot-p2p.org/index.php?title=Main_Page
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Offline pikeaero

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #27 on: December 01, 2010, 03:03:14 AM »
Just in from OpenNic:

----clipity clip----

Due to the tremendous amount of coverage OpenNic is getting at the
moment, one thing that concerns me is the state of domain registration. 
We know we're trying to move to a setup like reg.for.free eventually,
with the information distributed between all of the T1 servers, but
we're still a ways away from that goal.

Since domain registration is probably the second thing people see of
opennic (after figuring out how to get connected), I've been talking to
Julian about the possibility of moving all TLD domain registrations over
to reg.for.free.  The TLD masters would still retain control of their
zones, but zone generation would be handled by galium/fred as people
create new domains.

The idea behind this is to show everyone that we have a well-formed
registration process, and a seamless transition between all parts of
opennic.  The eventual setup will provide the same registration page
from each one of the TLD websites, capable to registering domains under
any TLD, and we will have some method of redirecting traffic for
reg.for.free between each of the TLD sites (whether by a simple
round-robin, or a more complicated load-balancing setup) to distribute
the load among each of us.  Once the code is stable to distributing the
TLD database between servers, we would each be added to the registry
pool as we get galium/fred running on our respective servers, and regain
actual full control of our TLD zones.

Since most of us don't really have a working registration website
anyway, I think moving all the TLD registries over to Julian for the
moment would be a good move to really clean up our zones and get control
over automated expirations of domains.  Does anyone have any objections
to this move?  If so, what do you suggest?

----clipity clip----
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uswgo

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Re: Alternate DNS root
« Reply #28 on: December 01, 2010, 03:32:05 AM »
great idea! When this comes out USWGO will get themselves on this since they fear a shut down especially with what arvixe is doing to them.

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p2p DNS
« Reply #29 on: December 01, 2010, 11:11:20 AM »

There is some proof of concept code now.

Follow along here http://dot-p2p.org/index.php?title=Main_Page
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Wikileaks mirror on alternate DNS root (OpenNic)
« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2010, 03:33:24 PM »

BTW: Wikileaks mirror @ http://ljsf.ing

--
Go to http://www.opennicproject.org/ to find out how to get on the OpenNic alternate DNS root.
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Offline pikeaero

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P2P DNS Projects Update
« Reply #31 on: December 07, 2010, 01:02:30 PM »
Okay, I've recently committed some code code here:

QtDNSP2P Project
-----------------
https://sourceforge.net/projects/qtdnsp2p

It's designed to be a cross platform P2P DNS experimentation platform that will allow experimenting with various trust based models, and various P2P topologies in order to evaluate real world issues such as latency, enemy infiltration, and so on. It utilizes a MySQL database backend in order to facilitate real-time data monitoring and potentially controlling by external applications.

The object oriented design is intended to allow a developer to reconfigure the P2P model and data models with relative ease comparing to an application that is tightly bound to a particular mode of operation.

QtDNSP2P is an object oriented, cross platform, C++ framework utilizing a cipher stream protected protocol between peers base on an RSA public key exchange.

Current status is, peers can bootstrap themselves from a bootrap table in the database, perform RSA key exchange with a peer, and begin encrypted stream communications.

QtDNSP2P project is seeking experienced object oriented C++ developers.


Some other projects that are quite active:

Trust 4 is a C# community project:
---------------------------------
http://code.google.com/p/trust4/

FFFF-DNSP2P is a 'C' based community project:
---------------------------------------------

https://github.com/HarryR/ffff-dnsp2p
http://bb.hades.name/waterfall
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U.S. seeks veto powers over new domain names!
« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2011, 07:03:01 PM »
The Obama administration is quietly seeking the power for it and other governments to veto future top-level domain names, a move that raises questions about free expression, national sovereignty, and the role of states in shaping the future of the Internet.

At stake is who will have authority over the next wave of suffixes to supplement the venerable .com, .org, and .net. At least 115 proposals are expected this year, including .car, .health, .nyc, .movie, and .web, and the application process could be finalized at a meeting in San Francisco next month.

Some are likely to prove contentious among more conservative nations. Two different groups--the dotGAY Initiative and the .GAY Alliance--already have announced they will apply for the right to operate the .gay domain; additional controversial proposals may surface in the next few months. And nobody has forgotten the furor over .xxx, which has been in limbo for seven years after receiving an emphatic thumbs-down from the Bush administration.

When asked whether it supports or opposes the creation of .gay and .xxx, an official at the U.S. Commerce Department replied that "it is premature for us to comment on those domain names." The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), a nonprofit based in Marina del Rey, Calif., that has a contract with the U.S. government to manage Internet addresses, is overseeing the process of adding new domain suffixes.

A statement sent to CNET over the weekend from the Commerce Department's National Telecommunications and Information Administration, or NTIA, said its proposed veto procedure "has merit as it diminishes the potential for blocking of top level domain strings considered objectionable by governments. This type of blocking harms the architecture of the DNS and undermines the goal of universal resolvability (i.e., a single global Internet that facilitates the free flow of goods and services and freedom of expression)."

Another way of phrasing this argument, perhaps, is: If less liberal governments adopt technical measures to prevent their citizens from connecting to .gay and .xxx Web sites, and dozens of nations surely will, that will lead to a more fragmented Internet.

In addition, giving governments more influence inside ICANN may reduce the odds of an international revolt that would vest more Internet authority with the not-exactly-business-friendly United Nations. Last year, China and its allies objected to the fact that "unilateral control of critical Internet resources" had been given to ICANN and suggested that the U.N. would be a better fit.

Submitting an application to create and operate a new domain suffix is expected to cost $185,000, ICANN says.

The Obama administration is proposing (PDF) that domain approval procedures be changed to include a mandatory "review" by an ICANN advisory panel comprised of representatives of roughly 100 nations. The process is open-ended, saying that any government "may raise an objection to a proposed (suffix) for any reason." Unless at least one other nation disagrees, the proposed new domain name "shall" be rejected.

This would create an explicit governmental veto over new top-level domains. Under the procedures previously used in the creation of .biz, .name, and .info, among others, governments could offer advice, but the members of the ICANN board had the final decision.

"It's the U.S. government that's proposing this procedure, and they've shown absolutely no interest in standing up for free expression rights through this entire process," says Milton Mueller, a professor of i...
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http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-20030809-281.html

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U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites 'By Mistake'...
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2011, 11:41:21 PM »
The US Government has yet again shuttered several domain names this week. The Department of Justice and Homeland Security’s ICE office proudly announced that they had seized domains related to counterfeit goods and child pornography. What they failed to mention, however, is that one of the targeted domains belongs to a free DNS provider, and that 84,000 websites were wrongfully accused of links to child pornography crimes.

As part of “Operation Save Our Children” ICE’s Cyber Crimes Center has again seized several domain names, but not without making a huge error. Last Friday, thousands of site owners were surprised by a rather worrying banner that was placed on their domain.

“Advertisement, distribution, transportation, receipt, and possession of child pornography constitute federal crimes that carry penalties for first time offenders of up to 30 years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine, forfeiture and restitution,” was the worrying message they read on their websites.

As with previous seizures, ICE convinced a District Court judge to sign a seizure warrant, and then contacted the domain registries to point the domains in question to a server that hosts the warning message. However, somewhere in this process a mistake was made and as a result the domain of a large DNS service provider was seized.

The domain in question is mooo.com, which belongs to the DNS provider FreeDNS. It is the most popular shared domain at afraid.org and as a result of the authorities’ actions a massive 84,000 subdomains were wrongfully seized as well. All sites were redirected to the banner below.

The FreeDNS owner was taken by surprise and quickly released the following statement on their website. “Freedns.afraid.org has never allowed this type of abuse of its DNS service. We are working to get the issue sorted as quickly as possible.”

Eventually, on Sunday the domain seizure was reverted and the subdomains slowly started to point to the old sites again instead of the accusatory banner. However, since the DNS entries have to propagate, it took another 3 days before the images disappeared completely.

Most of the subdomains in question are personal sites and sites of small businesses. A search on Bing still shows how innocent sites were claimed to promote child pornography. A rather damaging accusation, which scared and upset many of the site’s owners.

One of the customers quickly went out to assure visitors that his site was not involved in any of the alleged crimes.

“You can rest assured that I have not and would never be found to be trafficking in such distasteful and horrific content. A little sleuthing shows that the whole of the mooo.com TLD is impacted. At first, the legitimacy of the alerts seems to be questionable — after all, what reputable agency would display their warning in a fancily formatted image referenced by the underlying HTML? I wouldn’t expect to see that.”

Even at the time of writing people can still replicate the effect by adding...
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http://torrentfreak.com/u-s-government-shuts-down-84000-websites-by-mistake-110216/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Torrentfreak+%28Torrentfreak%29

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Re: U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites 'By Mistake'...
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2011, 11:45:53 PM »
Wow. Some of those people are probably talking to some defamation lawyers
"No man can put a chain about the ankle of his fellow man without at last finding the other end fastened about his own neck."  -Frederick Douglass

Offline Real Pilgrim

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Re: U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites 'By Mistake'...
« Reply #35 on: February 17, 2011, 12:58:04 AM »
Quote
Wow. Some of those people are probably talking to some defamation lawyers

And well they should be! Yikes! Can you imagine how they must have felt? I'd certainly be spitting nails and ready to sue.

Offline birther truther tenther

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Re: U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites 'By Mistake'...
« Reply #36 on: February 17, 2011, 01:08:45 AM »
bump

Offline Ninjaman

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Re: U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites 'By Mistake'...
« Reply #37 on: February 17, 2011, 01:27:16 AM »
My brother's friends website was shut down (it was a simple video game server website) its weird really. from the mooo.com subdomain

Offline citizenx

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Re: U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites 'By Mistake'...
« Reply #38 on: February 17, 2011, 01:44:09 AM »
Beta test for internet shutdown?

Could be.

(It would also mean they have lost what is left of their G-D minds, but I don't put that beyond them.)

Offline Real Pilgrim

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Re: U.S. Government Shuts Down 84,000 Websites 'By Mistake'...
« Reply #39 on: February 17, 2011, 02:40:16 AM »
Quote
Beta test for internet shutdown?

Now that's scary.