RFID

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Offline Neo

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RFID
« on: April 23, 2009, 09:03:58 PM »
http://www.rfidnews.org/2009/04/15/florida-deploys-rfid-monitoring-for-i-95-hot-lanes

The Florida Department of Transportation has turned to an RFID-enabled solution to create the state’s first variably priced toll lanes. The project, known as “95 Express” turns two lanes of I-95 in Miami-Dade county into high-occupancy tolling (HOT) lanes, available for use by both high-occupancy vehicles and single drivers, with the single drivers tolled at variable rates based on traffic congestion patterns.

I-95 between Miami and Fort Lauderdale is one of the most heavily traveled highways in the U.S., carrying over 290,000 vehicles per day and with traffic volumes predicted to exceed 360,000 vehicles per day by 2030. Widening the highway was cost-prohibitive, so planners turned to alternate solutions to manage the congestion.

The 95 Express project was designed to create non-stop, express toll lanes. Two lanes in the northbound direction were outfitted with RFID-enabled open-road tolling apparatus. In the HOT lanes, variable pricing is used during peak travel times to manage capacity and help maintain traffic flow at speeds greater than 45 miles per hour.

The RFID applications were provided by TransCore, a division of Roper Industries. TransCore installed HOT lane readers, antennas, violation enforcement systems and violation detection systems to enable roadside identification of violators by the Florida highway patrol. TransCore also installed all the necessary roadside equipment and connectivity between FDOT Districts 6 Traffic Management Center and Florida’s Turnpike Enterprise operations, located in Boca Raton. This system enables the department to assess variable tolling as necessary as well as monitor the condition of roadside equipment. TransCore will also provide maintenance and monitoring of the system to ensure accurate revenue collection.

Funding for the 95 Express project came from the U. S. Department of Transportation as part of the Urban Partnership Agreement to fight traffic gridlock. The project will expand the express lanes throughout the region in the next year. Similar deployments are also under way in San Diego, Houston, Minneapolis, and Seattle.
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Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: Florida deploys RFID monitoring for I-95 "HOT" lanes
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2009, 09:10:41 PM »
All hail the Scientific Dictatorship!
Better to beg for forgiveness, than to ask for permission

Offline DAVIDENGLAND

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Saudi files for 'killer' tracking chip patent
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2009, 03:23:55 PM »
Published: 15 May 09 17:13 CET
Online: http://www.thelocal.de/sci-tech/20090515-19313.html

A Saudi Arabian inventor has filed for a patent on a potentially lethal science fiction-style human tracking microchip, the German Patent and Trademark Office (DPMA) told The Local on Friday.


But the macabre innovation that enables remote killing will likely be denied copyright protection.

“While the application is still pending further paperwork on his part, the invention will probably be found to violate paragraph two of the German Patent Law – which does not allow inventions that transgress public order or good morals,” spokeswoman Stephanie Krüger told The Local from Munich.

The patent application – entitled “Implantation of electronic chips in the human body for the purposes of determining its geographical location” – was filed on October 30, 2007, but was only published until last week, or 18 months after submission as required by German law, she said.

“In recent times the number of people sought by security forces has increased,” the Jeddah-based inventor wrote in his summary.

The tiny electronic device, dubbed the “Killer Chip” by Swiss daily Tagesanzeiger, would be suited for tracking fugitives from justice, terrorists, illegal immigrants, criminals, political opponents, defectors, domestic help, and Saudi Arabians who don’t return home from pilgrimages.

“I apply for these reasons and for reasons of state security and the security of citizens,” the statement reads.

After subcutaneous implantation, the chip would send out encrypted radio waves that would be tracked by satellites to confirm the person’s identity and whereabouts. An alternate model chip could reportedly release a poison into the carrier if he or she became a security risk.

“Foreigners are allowed to apply for patents in Germany through a native representative, in this case it was a Munich law firm,” Krüger told The Local. “Most people apply for a patent in several countries, and this inventor probably did too.”

But the law firm, DTS Munich, is no longer responsible for the application.

"We resigned from representation of this case last week," a spokesman said without stating why.

Kristen Allen (kristen.allen@thelocal.de)

The question isn't whether we are right or wrong, the question is, are we even in the conversation??

Puff1

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Re: Saudi files for 'killer' tracking chip patent
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2009, 03:33:46 PM »
Has been discussed here:

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=105635.0

A more recent article (from Fox News, see above link) revealed that a patent wouldn't be issued for this abomination.

Offline DAVIDENGLAND

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Re: Saudi files for 'killer' tracking chip patent
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2009, 03:38:31 PM »
Cool cheers :)
The question isn't whether we are right or wrong, the question is, are we even in the conversation??

jimwill

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Re: Saudi files for 'killer' tracking chip patent
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2009, 03:40:42 PM »
Has been discussed here:

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=105635.0

A more recent article (from Fox News, see above link) revealed that a patent wouldn't be issued for this abomination.

Just curious - is there a patent for the atomic bomb? Does the government make them?

Puff1

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Re: Saudi files for 'killer' tracking chip patent
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2009, 03:46:42 PM »
Just curious - is there a patent for the atomic bomb? Does the government make them?

Read the posts on the thread linked above (and other threads here, as well as information elsewhere) about this.  No doubt they've been experimenting and playing around with this crap technology for years.   

I concur with what you're saying, obviously. 

Offline Rainchild

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IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #7 on: June 19, 2009, 11:44:19 PM »
My dad works at IBM so for the sake of discernment I'm paraphrasing what he told me about IBM's involvement in Nazi Germany. I'm not defending anything IBM Germany did I just want to give the perspective of My Dad who works at IBM

What he says is that at the time of holocaust IBM Germany wasn't part of IBM anymore.

He says that IBM provided an identification system for the holocaust, but at the time IBM Germany had been Nationalized by the German Government and that the company had no choice, but to use their technology for something it was not made for.

http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=5498

So although this article says that "IBM made the process of identifying Jews easier and more efficient by means of the technology it eagerly provided for the Nazi regime." Watson of IBM New york didn't want the Nazi government to control his company

Quote
Most readers will probably approach Black's book with the assumption that IBM's operations in Germany at the outbreak of the War were nationalized by the totalitarian Nazi government. But the book shows that Watson was not about to let this happen. He struggled to maintain control using every means available to him, including his powerful political connections. Watson was acutely aware of the economic value of his  investment in the Third Reich. Even if America entered the war against Germany, which he fully expected, Watson so arranged the power structures of his multinational corporation that IBM New York would always remain in control of its German  "enterprise."

I don't see how it makes sense that Watson of IBM wanted the third Reich to happen because if Watson wasn't about to let IBM take over his company then it wouldn't make sense for him to support the third Reich unless he was part of the New world order. However even though IBM provided technology it seems to look more like a take over than Watson eagerly providing for the German government.

The one thing Corperations fear is socialism, one of the most graphic examples being the days of FDR. So I don't see how corporations would have any interest in the NAZI take over of their business.

If anyone has any documents or perspectives that challenge this please provide them. I am very disturbed that people think that corporations would have an interest in supporting socialism.

Offline TimeLady

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #8 on: June 20, 2009, 03:09:06 AM »
Oh, it wasn't unwillingly. IBM Germany and the mother corporation had contact via Switzerland.

Although I'm not sure if they knew it was for the camps or not.
Hanlon's razor: Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.

deconstructmyhouse

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2009, 03:12:34 AM »
Edwin Black wrote the definitive book on this:
IBM and the Holocaust
He is an indefatigable researcher, his books on eugenics are the best anywhere.
He hires teams of data researchers to comb libraries and archives all over the world to compile his facts.
Incredible resource.
This book should answer any question anyone ever had about IBM's involvement.
if you're really interested.

Offline pizzedoff

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #10 on: June 20, 2009, 03:13:42 AM »
IBM did All their own maintenance on the machines, and were big into eugenics.
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Offline portuguese anarchist

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #12 on: June 21, 2009, 01:22:24 AM »


Picture: Researcher Edwin Black holding a 1942 contract between IBM (New York) and the German government (America declared war on Germany at the end of 1941).


Like "pizzedoff" said, Edwin Black claims that the machines were not sold, but leased, and that IBM was responsible for their maintenance.
I haven't read Black's book, but remember watching one of this videos on youtube some months ago:


"IBM and the Holocaust"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5dtxmt43v8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gNXfrMR_Lw


Also, according to the best research I've come across, the US corporations' interest in supporting Hitler was, among others, to use him as an attack dog against the Soviet Union, so that Stalin would strike back and invade Eastern Europe and spread Communism throughout this part of the world. And although there is some similarity with their ultimate goals, they were not interested in the kind of (National) Socialism practiced by Hitler. What they're interested in is in a One-World (International) synthesis between Super-Capitalism and Communism, that is also often called a "Socialist Dictatorship", but in which (unlike in Nazi Germany and other Fascist regimes) there is no room for the "middle class".

http://forum.prisonplanet.com/index.php?topic=43336.0

Offline TimeLady

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #13 on: June 21, 2009, 01:38:23 AM »


Also, according to the best research I've come across, the US corporations' interest in supporting Hitler was, among others, to use him as an attack dog against the Soviet Union, so that Stalin would strike back and invade Eastern Europe and spread Communism throughout this part of the world. And although there is some similarity with their ultimate goals, they were not interested in the kind of (National) Socialism practiced by Hitler. What they're interested in is in a One-World (International) synthesis between Super-Capitalism and Communism, that is also often called a "Socialist Dictatorship", but in which (unlike in Nazi Germany and other Fascist regimes) there is no room for the "middle class".

If that were so, then why was there a Marshall Plan and US backing in the Greek and Vietnamese Civil Wars?
Hanlon's razor: Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity.

Offline Infokrieger

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #14 on: June 21, 2009, 04:48:51 AM »
Everyone cooperated with Hitler, and everyone says the didn't have a choice. But that's BS, everyone had a choice, they just happen to make the one that helped killing innocent people.

Offline portuguese anarchist

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #15 on: June 21, 2009, 06:55:45 AM »
If that were so, then why was there a Marshall Plan and US backing in the Greek and Vietnamese Civil Wars?

The Marshall Plan was about Western European economic integration, that laid the foundations for a future political integration - the EU. The money was given on the condition that the recovery was made on an collaborative basis. (Carroll Quigley)
The Vietnam War was a war for profit. (Daniel Estulin)
Concerning the Greek Civil War, given the fact that the source of money, and consequently power, for the Venetian Black Nobility - of which the Greek Royal Family is one of the most important members - is their private ownership of the means of production (a huge amount of income comes through ground rents), I suppose (like King Constantine's involvement in the 1967 coup d'etat showed) that the House of Oldenburg was not interested in having Communism in that particular country. (Read Dr. Coleman's monograph about the Venetian Black Nobility)
They didn't want Communism in Western Europe, where their source of income and power is. Only Eastern. (Like many people, I consider Greece to be West.)



But still about the original subject - and this is how I found out one of the "IBM and the Holocaust" videos - guess who's involved in the RFID chips, with code numbers, to be implanted in everyone's hand:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eob532iEpqk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAvQcYcvyaw

(Remember, the numbers tattooed on Nazi concentration camps' victims were the IBM codes used in their machines.)



More about RFID chips, already present in some of our products:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0Maj1I6kH0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1IXIoDFsgQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7A6uHNT2eUk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZwpkA3R3S0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQABh2FXKfQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJjbwMW_Vqs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjhJNNvCUIM

Offline Monkeypox

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Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2009, 07:48:35 PM »
http://apnews.myway.com//article/20090711/D99CEKD80.html

By TODD LEWAN

Climbing into his Volvo, outfitted with a Matrics antenna and a Motorola reader he'd bought on eBay for $190, Chris Paget cruised the streets of San Francisco with this objective: To read the identity cards of strangers, wirelessly, without ever leaving his car.

It took him 20 minutes to strike hacker's gold.

Zipping past Fisherman's Wharf, his scanner detected, then downloaded to his laptop, the unique serial numbers of two pedestrians' electronic U.S. passport cards embedded with radio frequency identification, or RFID, tags. Within an hour, he'd "skimmed" the identifiers of four more of the new, microchipped PASS cards from a distance of 20 feet.

Embedding identity documents - passports, drivers licenses, and the like - with RFID chips is a no-brainer to government officials. Increasingly, they are promoting it as a 21st century application of technology that will help speed border crossings, safeguard credentials against counterfeiters, and keep terrorists from sneaking into the country.

But Paget's February experiment demonstrated something privacy advocates had feared for years: That RFID, coupled with other technologies, could make people trackable without their knowledge or consent.

He filmed his drive-by heist, and soon his video went viral on the Web, intensifying a debate over a push by government, federal and state, to put tracking technologies in identity documents and over their potential to erode privacy.

Putting a traceable RFID in every pocket has the potential to make everybody a blip on someone's radar screen, critics say, and to redefine Orwellian government snooping for the digital age.

"Little Brother," some are already calling it - even though elements of the global surveillance web they warn against exist only on drawing boards, neither available nor approved for use.

But with advances in tracking technologies coming at an ever-faster rate, critics say, it won't be long before governments could be able to identify and track anyone in real time, 24-7, from a cafe in Paris to the shores of California.

The key to getting such a system to work, these opponents say, is making sure everyone carries an RFID tag linked to a biometric data file.

On June 1, it became mandatory for Americans entering the United States by land or sea from Canada, Mexico, Bermuda and the Caribbean to present identity documents embedded with RFID tags, though conventional passports remain valid until they expire.

Among new options are the chipped "e-passport," and the new, electronic PASS card - credit-card sized, with the bearer's digital photograph and a chip that can be scanned through a pocket, backpack or purse from 30 feet.

Alternatively, travelers can use "enhanced" driver's licenses embedded with RFID tags now being issued in some border states: Washington, Vermont, Michigan and New York. Texas and Arizona have entered into agreements with the federal government to offer chipped licenses, and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security has recommended expansion to non-border states. Kansas and Florida officials have received DHS briefings on the licenses, agency records show.

The purpose of using RFID is not to identify people, says Mary Ellen Callahan, the chief privacy officer at Homeland Security, but rather "to verify that the identification document holds valid information about you."

Likewise, U.S. border agents are "pinging" databases only to confirm that licenses aren't counterfeited. "They're not pulling up your speeding tickets," she says, or looking at personal information beyond what is on a passport.

The change is largely about speed and convenience, she says. An RFID document that doubles as a U.S. travel credential "only makes it easier to pull the right record fast enough, to make sure that the border flows, and is operational" - even though a 2005 Government Accountability Office report found that government RFID readers often failed to detect travelers' tags.

Such assurances don't persuade those who liken RFID-embedded documents to barcodes with antennas and contend they create risks to privacy that far outweigh the technology's heralded benefits. They warn it will actually enable identity thieves, stalkers and other criminals to commit "contactless" crimes against victims who won't immediately know they've been violated.

Neville Pattinson, vice president for government affairs at Gemalto, Inc., a major supplier of microchipped cards, is no RFID basher. He's a board member of the Smart Card Alliance, an RFID industry group, and is serving on the Department of Homeland Security's Data Privacy and Integrity Advisory Committee.

Still, Pattinson has sharply criticized the RFIDs in U.S. driver's licenses and passport cards. In a 2007 article for the Privacy Advisor, a newsletter for privacy professionals, he called them vulnerable "to attacks from hackers, identity thieves and possibly even terrorists."

RFID, he wrote, has a fundamental flaw: Each chip is built to faithfully transmit its unique identifier "in the clear, exposing the tag number to interception during the wireless communication."

Once a tag number is intercepted, "it is relatively easy to directly associate it with an individual," he says. "If this is done, then it is possible to make an entire set of movements posing as somebody else without that person's knowledge."

Echoing these concerns were the AeA - the lobbying association for technology firms - the Smart Card Alliance, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the Business Travel Coalition, and the Association of Corporate Travel Executives.

Meanwhile, Homeland Security has been promoting broad use of RFID even though its own advisory committee on data integrity and privacy warned that radio-tagged IDs have the potential to allow "widespread surveillance of individuals" without their knowledge or consent.

In its 2006 draft report, the committee concluded that RFID "increases risks to personal privacy and security, with no commensurate benefit for performance or national security," and recommended that "RFID be disfavored for identifying and tracking human beings."

For now, chipped PASS cards and enhanced driver's licenses are optional and not yet widely deployed in the United States. To date, roughly 192,000 EDLs have been issued in Washington, Vermont, Michigan and New York.

But as more Americans carry them "you can bet that long-range tracking of people on a large scale will rise exponentially," says Paget, a self-described "ethical hacker" who works as an Internet security consultant.

Could RFID numbers eventually become de facto identifiers of Americans, like the Social Security number?

Such a day is not far off, warns Katherine Albrecht, a privacy advocate and co-author of "Spychips," a book that is sharply critical of the use of RFID in consumer items and official ID documents.

"There's a reason you don't wear your Social Security number across your T-shirt," Albrecht says, "and beaming out your new, national RFID number in a 30-foot radius would be far worse."

There are no federal laws against the surreptitious skimming of Americans' RFID numbers, so it won't be long before people seek to profit from this, says Bruce Schneier, an author and chief security officer at BT, the British telecommunications operator.

Data brokers that compile computer dossiers on millions of individuals from public records, credit applications and other sources "will certainly maintain databases of RFID numbers and associated people," he says. "They'd do a disservice to their stockholders if they didn't."

But Gigi Zenk, a spokeswoman for the Washington state Department of Licensing, says Americans "aren't that concerned about the RFID, particularly in this day and age when there are a lot of other ways to access personal information on people."

Tracking an individual is much easier through a cell phone, or a satellite tag embedded in a car, she says. "An RFID that contains no private information, just a randomly assigned number, is probably one of the least things to be concerned about, frankly."

Still, even some ardent RFID supporters recognize that these next-generation RFID cards raise prickly questions.

Mark Roberti, editor of RFID Journal, an industry newsletter, recently acknowledged that as the use of RFID in official documents grows, the potential for abuse increases.

"A government could do this, for instance, to track opponents," he wrote in an opinion piece discussing Paget's cloning experiment. "To date, this type of abuse has not occurred, but it could if governments fail to take privacy issues seriously."

---

Imagine this: Sensors triggered by radio waves instructing cameras to zero in on people carrying RFID, unblinkingly tracking their movements.

Unbelievable? Intrusive? Outrageous?

Actually, it happens every day and makes people smile - at the Alton Towers amusement park in Britain, which videotapes visitors who agree to wear RFID bracelets as they move about the facility, then sells the footage as a keepsake.

This application shows how the technology can be used effortlessly - and benignly. But critics, noting it can also be abused, say federal authorities in the United States didn't do enough from the start to address that risk.

The first U.S. identity document to be embedded with RFID was the "e-passport."

In the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks - and the finding that some of the terrorists entered the United States using phony passports - the State Department proposed mandating that Americans and foreign visitors carry "enhanced" passport booklets, with microchips embedded in the covers.

The chips, it announced, would store the holder's information from the data page, a biometric version of the bearer's photo, and receive special coding to prevent data from being altered.

In February 2005, when the State Department asked for public comment, it got an outcry: Of the 2,335 comments received, 98.5 percent were negative, with 86 percent expressing security or privacy concerns, the department reported in an October 2005 notice in the Federal Register.

"Identity theft was of grave concern," it stated, adding that "others expressed fears that the U.S. Government or other governments would use the chip to track and censor, intimidate or otherwise control or harm them."

It also noted that many Americans expressed worries "that the information could be read at distances in excess of 10 feet."

Those concerned citizens, it turns out, had cause.

According to department records obtained by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, under a Freedom of Information Act request and reviewed by the AP, discussion about security concerns with the e-passport occurred as early as January 2003 but tests weren't ordered until the department began receiving public criticism two years later.

When the AP asked when testing was initiated, the State Department said only that "a battery of durability and electromagnetic tests were performed" by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, along with tests "to measure the ability of data on electronic passports to be surreptitiously skimmed or for communications with the chip reader to be eavesdropped," testing which "led to additional privacy controls being placed on U.S. electronic passports ... "

Indeed, in 2005, the department incorporated metallic fibers into the e-passport's front cover, since metal can reduce the range at which RFID can be read. Personal information in the chips was encrypted and a cryptographic "key" added, which required inspectors to optically scan the e-passport first for the chip to communicate wirelessly.

The department also announced it would test e-passports with select employees, before giving them to the public. "We wouldn't be issuing the passports to ourselves if we didn't think they're secure," said Frank Moss, deputy assistant Secretary of State for passport services, in a CNN interview.

But what of Americans' concerns about the e-passport's read range?

In its October 2005 Federal Register notice, the State Department reassured Americans that the e-passport's chip - the ISO 14443 tag - would emit radio waves only within a 4-inch radius, making it tougher to hack.

Technologists in Israel and England, however, soon found otherwise. In May 2006, at the University of Tel Aviv, researchers cobbled together $110 worth of parts from hobbyists kits and directly skimmed an encrypted tag from several feet away. At the University of Cambridge, a student showed that a transmission between an e-passport and a legitimate reader could be intercepted from 160 feet.

The State Department, according to its own records obtained under FOIA, was aware of the problem months before its Federal Register notice and more than a year before the e-passport was rolled out in August 2006.

"Do not claim that these chips can only be read at a distance of 10 cm (4 inches)," Moss wrote in an April 22, 2005, e-mail to Randy Vanderhoof, executive director of the Smart Card Alliance. "That really has been proven to be wrong."

The chips could be skimmed from a yard away, he added - all a hacker would need to read e-passport numbers, say, in an elevator or on a subway.

Other red flags went up. In February 2006, an encrypted Dutch e-passport was hacked on national television, with researchers gaining access to the document's digital photograph, fingerprint and personal data. Then British e-passports were hacked using a $500 reader and software written in less than 48 hours.

The State Department countered by saying European e-passports weren't as safe as their American counterparts because they lacked the cryptographic key and the anti-skimming cover.

But recent studies have shown that more powerful readers can penetrate even the metal sheathing in the U.S. e-passport's cover.

John Brennan, a senior policy adviser at the State Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, concedes it may be possible for a reader to overpower the e-passport's protective shield from a distance.

However, he adds, "you could not do this in any large-scale, concerted fashion without putting a bunch of infrastructure in place to make it happen. The practical vulnerabilities may be far less than some of the theoretical scenarios that people have put out there."

That thinking is flawed, says Lee Tien, a senior attorney and surveillance expert with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, which opposes RFID in identity documents.

It won't take a massive government project to build reader networks around the country, he says: They will grow organically, for commercial purposes, from convention centers to shopping malls, sports stadiums to college campuses. Federal agencies and law enforcement wouldn't have to control those networks; they already buy information about individuals from commercial data brokers.

"And remember," Tien adds, "technology always gets better ... "

---

With questions swirling around the e-passport's security, why then did the government roll out more RFID-tagged documents - the PASS card and enhanced driver's license, which provide less protection against hackers?

The RFIDs in enhanced driver's licenses and PASS cards are nearly as slim as paper. Each contains a silicon computer chip attached to a wire antenna, which transmits a unique identifier via radio waves when "awakened" by an electromagnetic reader.

The technology they use is designed to track products through the supply chain. These chips, known as EPCglobal Gen 2, have no encryption, and minimal data protection features. They are intended to release their data to any inquiring Gen 2 reader within a 30-foot radius.

This might be appropriate when a supplier is tracking a shipment of toilet paper or dog food; but when personal information is at stake, privacy advocates ask: Is long-range readability truly desirable?

The departments of State and Homeland Security say remotely readable ID cards transmit only RFID numbers that correspond to records stored in government databases, which they say are secure. Even if a hacker were to copy an RFID number onto a blank tag and place it into a counterfeit ID, they say, the forger's face still wouldn't match the true cardholder's photo in the database, rendering it useless.

Still, computer experts such as Schneier say government databases can be hacked. Others worry about a day when hackers might deploy readers at "chokepoints," such as checkout lines, skim RFID numbers from people's driver's licenses, then pair those numbers to personal data skimmed from chipped credit cards (though credit cards are harder to skim). They imagine stalkers using skimmed RFID numbers to track their targets' comings and goings. They fear government agents will compile chip numbers at peace rallies, mosques or gun shows, simply by strolling through a crowd with a reader.

Others worry more about the linking of chips with other identification methods, including biometric technologies, such as facial recognition.

The International Civil Aviation Organization, the U.N. agency that sets global standards for passports, now calls for facial recognition in all scannable e-passports.

Should biometric technologies be coupled with RFID, "governments will have, for the first time in history, the means to identify, monitor and track citizens anywhere in the world in real time," says Mark Lerner, spokesman for the Constitutional Alliance, a network of nonprofit groups, lawmakers and citizens opposed to remotely readable identity and travel documents.

Implausible?

For now, perhaps. Radio tags in EDLs and passport cards can't be scanned miles away.

But scientists are working on technologies that might enable a satellite or a cell tower to scan a chip's contents. Critics also note advances in the sharpness of closed-circuit cameras, and point out they're increasingly ubiquitous. And more fingerprints, iris scans and digitized facial images are being stored in government databases. The FBI has announced plans to assemble the world's largest biometric database, nicknamed "Next Generation Identification."

"RFID's role is to make the collection and transmission of people's biometric data quick, easy and nonintrusive," says Lerner. "Think of it as the thread that ties together the surveillance package."
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Offline birgit

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Re: Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2009, 08:10:38 PM »
And Neapolitano's PASS ACT  (S.1261) will make sure we all have the chip  soon
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2kE8xDMokpM
TRUTH  is  INCONTROVERTIBLE

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Ignorance  may  deride it
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Offline portuguese anarchist

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2009, 11:37:58 AM »




***



"IBM, the company behind VeriChip"

(...)

"implantable chips"

(...)

"injectable beneath the skin that will substitute our identity cards. Without it, no one will be permitted to buy or sell."

(...)

"the two best places to implant it would be, first the right hand, and then the forehead."

(...)

"the microchip for humans will store (...) 18 digits (...) grouped in three sections of six numbers each."



--- from Daniel Estulin's book about the Bilderberg Club



***



16 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads:
17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.
18 Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six.


--- New Testament, Revelation, Chapter 13



***



http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=verichip


Offline Geolibertarian

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2009, 12:37:57 PM »
"Unwillingly" my ass!

-----------------------------------

http://www.ibmandtheholocaust.com



IBM and the Holocaust is the stunning story of IBM's strategic alliance with Nazi Germany -- beginning in 1933 in the first weeks that Hitler came to power and continuing well into World War II. As the Third Reich embarked upon its plan of conquest and genocide, IBM and its subsidiaries helped create enabling technologies, step-by-step, from the identification and cataloging programs of the 1930s to the selections of the 1940s.

Only after Jews were identified -- a massive and complex task that Hitler wanted done immediately -- could they be targeted for efficient asset confiscation, ghettoization, deportation, enslaved labor, and, ultimately, annihilation. It was a cross-tabulation and organizational challenge so monumental, it called for a computer. Of course, in the 1930s no computer existed.

But IBM's Hollerith punch card technology did exist. Aided by the company's custom-designed and constantly updated Hollerith systems, Hitler was able to automate his persecution of the Jews. Historians have always been amazed at the speed and accuracy with which the Nazis were able to identify and locate European Jewry. Until now, the pieces of this puzzle have never been fully assembled. The fact is, IBM technology was used to organize nearly everything in Germany and then Nazi Europe, from the identification of the Jews in censuses, registrations, and ancestral tracing programs to the running of railroads and organizing of concentration camp slave labor.

IBM and its German subsidiary custom-designed complex solutions, one by one, anticipating the Reich's needs. They did not merely sell the machines and walk away. Instead, IBM leased these machines for high fees and became the sole source of the billions of punch cards Hitler needed.

IBM and the Holocaust takes you through the carefully crafted corporate collusion with the Third Reich, as well as the structured deniability of oral agreements, undated letters, and the Geneva intermediaries -- all undertaken as the newspapers blazed with accounts of persecution and destruction.

Just as compelling is the human drama of one of our century's greatest minds, IBM founder Thomas Watson, who cooperated with the Nazis for the sake of profit.

Only with IBM's technologic assistance was Hitler able to achieve the staggering numbers of the Holocaust. Edwin Black has now uncovered one of the last great mysteries of Germany's war against the Jews -- how did Hitler get the names?

-----------------------------------
"Abolish all taxation save that upon land values." -- Henry George

"If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill." -- Thomas Edison

http://schalkenbach.org
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Offline Monkeypox

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Re: Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2009, 06:34:15 PM »
It's coming people, bend over.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

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Offline Bethmattsix33

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Is Gillette putting RFID chips in its packaging?
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2009, 10:09:46 PM »
I stumbled upon this a few minutes ago
http://www.boycottgillette.com/spychips.html

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: Is Gillette putting RFID chips in its packaging?
« Reply #23 on: July 13, 2009, 12:13:35 AM »
I wonder how much that adds to the absolutely ridiculous cost of the replacement blades?
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline infowarrior_039

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Re: Is Gillette putting RFID chips in its packaging?
« Reply #24 on: July 13, 2009, 03:15:50 AM »
Ive seen a Youtube video, a woman, I believe also a past guest of Alex's, about this about a year or two ago, I bet you could find on youtube/google. She baisically says they can have RFID chips the size of a printed letter. (smaller then a peice of rice)

Offline infowarrior_039

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Re: Chips in official IDs raise privacy fears
« Reply #25 on: July 13, 2009, 03:18:33 AM »
here in canada we now have a standardized drivers license simialar to the ones in the US (the same essentially) that have a chip in them; and interestingly enough a distorted type of barcode that contains who knows what. also, they look ugly and your picture is in black and white, for some strange reason.

Offline infowarrior_039

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Re: IBM unwillingly provided punch card system for Nazi Germany
« Reply #26 on: July 13, 2009, 03:23:21 AM »
yes, IBM is 100% evil. creepy to know that the computers in my old elementry school were all IBMS.. I would refuse to buy an IBM, however buying a Windows PC isnt any better, Bills into eugenics too. Were all doomed! We need to make this known to people when ever possible. If you are shopping or something and you see some one using an IBM, be like "did you know that IBM gave the Nazi party the punch card machines for the concentration camps? its all on record!" and then tell them about that book. Or M$, you can give someone Gates qoute about having bees give sting people giving them malaria. (i think, cant remember the exact details. It goes on and on im sure....

Offline portuguese anarchist

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Re: Is Gillette putting RFID chips in its packaging?
« Reply #27 on: July 13, 2009, 10:47:25 AM »
I remember two radio interviews Alex made to Katherine Albrecht in 2003 where she said Gillette was already putting RFID chips in their products. That's probably the woman "infowarrior_039" is talking about.

http://www.prisonplanet.com/08_03_audio_archive.html
http://www.prisonplanet.com/jones_report_071403_albrecht.html
http://www.katherinealbrecht.com/


And I just found out that this boycott has been launched also already in 2003.

http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=34051


The youtube video "infowarrior_039" is talking about is probably this very good lecture she gave:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0Maj1I6kH0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1IXIoDFsgQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7A6uHNT2eUk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZwpkA3R3S0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQABh2FXKfQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJjbwMW_Vqs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjhJNNvCUIM


It's not just Gillette. A few months ago I saw on TV an employee showing how the embedded RFID chips worked in a clothing store here in Lisbon, for example.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eob532iEpqk

Offline ex_nihilo

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Mythbusters RFID
« Reply #28 on: July 13, 2009, 01:26:40 PM »
An open mind, like an open wound, is prone to infection. -ex_nihilo

Offline phasma

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Re: Mythbusters RFID
« Reply #29 on: July 14, 2009, 05:21:36 PM »
I watched this one on discovey...
Karry had one shoved in her arm and then climbed in an MRI scanner to prove they wouldnt rip ya arm open . . .

Bad move girl ! I thought she had more brains than that !

(I love grant in this series though - geek-chic ! LOL)

Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

Offline phasma

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Re: Is Gillette putting RFID chips in its packaging?
« Reply #30 on: July 14, 2009, 05:23:46 PM »
They were - they took them out after ppl here (here = UK) kicked off !

They are in trainers etc though - and condom packets (WTF?)

They want to put chip readers in mats that can register who you are as you enter a store . . .
Things are not what they appear to be: nor are they otherwise - Surangama Sutra

Offline TheWeavingSpider

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Re: Mythbusters RFID
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2009, 07:43:43 PM »
Here's that section of Mythbusters previously mentioned.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P4YUIcgG-6o

I am the Weaving Spider, I spin my web to catch the Owl of Bohemia.

Offline Letsbereal

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The Patented RFID Ink Tattoo
« Reply #32 on: July 26, 2009, 06:34:06 PM »
The Patented RFID Ink Tattoo http://tinyurl.com/l4a7ed
->>>|:-) THE CITY INDIANS (-:|<<<-

Offline feellikemore_dot_com

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Ubiquitous Computing: Big Brother's All-Seeing Eye
« Reply #33 on: July 28, 2009, 02:19:13 AM »
An "Everyware" world, as Adam Greenfield calls it, is a world in which computers are embedded and merged seamlessly everywhere in the environment. Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags communicate their position and other information constantly in a vast network. Everyday objects become "searchable" as if they were part of the interconnected world wide web. In this interconnected internet of things, scientific management and surveillance of people and the environment we inhabit becomes possible, and marketers' ultimate dreams come true.
Simulacra& Simulation in REAL LIFE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I3T_kLCBAw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKZm34jsNHY

~Mike
feellikemore.com || praise to the most high and none below.

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: Ubiquitous Computing: Big Brother's All-Seeing Eye
« Reply #34 on: July 28, 2009, 02:37:51 PM »
It's coming soon.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

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Offline mr anderson

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Feds at DefCon Alarmed After RFIDs Scanned
« Reply #35 on: August 05, 2009, 02:36:26 AM »
Feds at DefCon Alarmed After RFIDs Scanned

By Kim Zetter
August 4, 2009

http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2009/08/fed-rfid/


LAS VEGAS — It’s one of the most hostile hacker environments in the country –- the DefCon hacker conference held every summer in Las Vegas.

But despite the fact that attendees know they should take precautions to protect their data, federal agents at the conference got a scare on Friday when they were told they might have been caught in the sights of an RFID reader.

The reader, connected to a web camera, sniffed data from RFID-enabled ID cards and other documents carried by attendees in pockets and backpacks as they passed a table where the equipment was stationed in full view.

It was part of a security-awareness project set up by a group of security researchers and consultants to highlight privacy issues around RFID. When the reader caught an RFID chip in its sights — embedded in a company or government agency access card, for example — it grabbed data from the card, and the camera snapped the card holder’s picture.

But the device, which had a read range of 2 to 3 feet, caught only five people carrying RFID cards before Feds attending the conference got wind of the project and were concerned they might have been scanned.

Kevin Manson, a former senior instructor at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Florida, was sitting on the “Meet the Fed” panel when a DefCon staffer known as “Priest,” who prefers not to be identified by his real name, entered the room and told panelists about the reader.

“I saw a few jaws drop when he said that,” Manson told Threat Level.

“There was a lot of surprise,” Priest says. “It really was a ‘holy shit,’ we didn’t think about that [moment].”

Law enforcement and intelligence agents attend DefCon each year to garner intelligence about the latest cyber vulnerabilities and the hackers who exploit them. Some attend under their real name and affiliation, but many attend undercover.

Although corporate- and government-issued ID cards embedded with RFID chips don’t reveal a card holder’s name or company — the chip stores only a site number and unique ID number tied to a company or agency’s database where the card holder’s details are stored — it’s not impossible to deduce the company or agency from the site number. It’s possible the researchers might also have been able to identify a Fed through the photo snapped with the captured card data or through information stored on other RFID-embedded documents in his wallet. For example, badges issued to attendees at the Black Hat conference that preceded DefCon in Las Vegas were embedded with RFID chips that contained the attendee’s name and affiliation. Many of the same people attended both conferences, and some still had their Black Hat cards with them at DefCon.

But an attacker wouldn’t need the name of a card holder to cause harm. In the case of employee access cards, a chip that contained only the employee’s card number could still be cloned to allow someone to impersonate the employee and gain access to his company or government office without knowing the employee’s name.

Since employee access card numbers are generally sequential, Priest says an attacker could simply change a few digits on his cloned card to find the number of a random employee who might have higher access privileges in a facility.

“I can also make an educated guess as to what the administrator or ‘root’ cards are,” Priest says. “Usually the first card assigned out is the test card; the test card usually has access to all the doors. That’s a big threat, and that’s something [that government agencies] have actually got to address.”"

In some organizations, RFID cards aren’t just for entering doors; they’re also used to access computers. And in the case of RFID-enabled credit cards, RFID researcher Chris Paget, who gave a talk at DefCon, says the chips contain all the information someone needs to clone the card and make fraudulent charges on it — the account number, expiration date, CVV2 security code and, in the case of some older cards, the card holder’s name.

The Meet-the-Fed panel, an annual event at DefCon, presented a target-rich environment for anyone who might have wanted to scan government RFID documents for nefarious purposes. The 22 panelists included top cybercops and officials from the FBI, Secret Service, National Security Agency, Department of Homeland Security, Defense Department, Treasury Department and U. S. Postal Inspection. And these were just the Feds who weren’t undercover.

It’s not known if any Feds were caught by the reader. The group that set it up never looked closely at the captured data before it was destroyed. Priest told Threat Level that one person caught by the camera resembled a Fed he knew, but he couldn’t positively identify him.

“But it was enough for me to be concerned,” he said. “There were people here who were not supposed to be identified for what they were doing … I was [concerned] that people who didn’t want to be photographed were photographed.”

Priest asked Adam Laurie, one of the researchers behind the project, to “please do the right thing,” and Laurie removed the SD card that stored the data and smashed it. Laurie, who is known as “Major Malfunction” in the hacker community, then briefed some of the Feds on the capabilities of the RFID reader and what it collected.

The RFID project was a collaboration between Laurie and Zac Franken — co-directors of Aperture Labs in Great Britain and the ones who wrote the software for capturing the RFID data and supplied the hardware — and Aries Security, which conducts security-risk assessments and runs DefCon’s annual Wall of Sheep project with other volunteers.

Each year the Wall of Sheep volunteers sniff DefCon’s wireless network for unencrypted passwords and other data attendees send in the clear and project the IP addresses, login names and truncated versions of the passwords onto a conference wall to raise awareness about information security.

This year they planned to add data collected from the RFID reader and camera (below) — to raise awareness about a privacy threat that’s becoming increasingly prevalent as RFID chips are embedded into credit cards, employee access cards, state driver’s licenses, passports and other documents.

Brian Markus, CEO of Aries Security who is known in the hacker community as “Riverside,” said they planned to blur the camera images and superimpose a sheep’s head over faces to protect identities before putting them on the wall.



“We’re not here to gather the data and do bad things with it,” he said, noting that theirs likely wasn’t the only reader collecting data from chips.

“There are people walking around the entire conference, all over the place, with RFID readers [in backpacks],” he says. “For $30 to $50, the common, average person can put [a portable RFID-reading kit] together…. This is why we’re so adamant about making people aware this is very dangerous. If you don’t protect yourself, you’re potentially exposing your entire [company or agency] to all sorts of risk.”

In this sense, any place can become a hostile hacker environment like DefCon, since an attacker with a portable reader in a backpack can scan cards at hotels, malls, restaurants and subways, too. A more targeted attack could involve someone simply positioned outside a specific company or federal facility, scanning employees as they entered and left and cloning the cards. Or someone could even wire a coil around a door frame to collect data as people pass through the door, which Paget demonstrated at DefCon.

“It takes a few milliseconds to read [a chip] and, depending on what equipment I’ve got, doing the cloning can take a minute,” says Laurie. “I could literally do it on the fly.”

Paget announced during his DefCon talk that his security consulting company, H4rdw4re, will be releasing a $50 kit at the end of August that will make reading 125-kHz RFID chips — the kind embedded in employee access cards — trivial. It will include open source software for reading, storing and re-transmitting card data and will also include a software tool to decode the RFID encryption used in car keys for Toyota, BMW and Lexus models. This would allow an attacker to scan an unsuspecting car-owner’s key, decrypt the data and open the car. He told Threat Level they’re aiming to achieve a reading range of 12 to 18 inches with the kit.



“I often ask people if they have an RFID card and half the people emphatically say no I do not,” says Paget. “And then they pull out the cards to prove it and … there has been an RFID in their wallet. This stuff is being deployed without people knowing it.”

To help prevent surreptitious readers from siphoning RFID data, a company named DIFRWear was doing brisk business at DefCon selling leather Faraday-shielded wallets and passport holders (pictured above right) lined with material that prevents readers from sniffing RFID chips in proximity cards.

(Dave Bullock contributed some reporting to this piece.)

Photo at top: Former Fed Kevin Manson got RFID’d at DefCon and all he got was this spoof t-shirt — made by Brian Markus. All photos by Dave Bullock.
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Offline Unintelligable Name

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Re: Feds at DefCon Alarmed After RFIDs Scanned
« Reply #36 on: August 05, 2009, 02:53:49 AM »
Classic article ripe for deprograming of the minds in favor of RFID.

Offline Hurley Waldrip

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Microchip implants
« Reply #37 on: September 23, 2009, 01:31:57 PM »

http://www.healthlinkinfo.com/because.htm

short ad by Verichip promoting microchip implant
use in hospitals.  Click link, scroll down to
video box, called "Because"

Offline Apolitical Blues

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Re: Microchip implants
« Reply #38 on: September 24, 2009, 02:12:29 PM »
There's more to the story here. They've gotten their patten on a new and improved implant that is supposed to be 'good' for us. This is one of those stories that needs to go viral. Spread the word.

Semper Fi: http://www.reuters.com/article/hotStocksNews/idUSTRE58K4BZ20090921

(Reuters) - Shares of VeriChip Corp (CHIP.O) tripled after the company said it had been granted an exclusive license to two patents, which will help it to develop implantable virus detection systems in humans.

The patents, held by VeriChip partner Receptors LLC, relate to biosensors that can detect the H1N1 and other viruses, and biological threats such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, VeriChip said in a statement.

The technology will combine with VeriChip's implantable radio frequency identification devices to develop virus triage detection systems.
Labor is prior to, and independent of, capital. Capital is only the fruit of labor, and could never have existed if Labor had not first existed. Labor is superior to capital, and deserves much the higher consideration.  Abraham Lincoln

Offline SoP

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Re: Microchip implants
« Reply #39 on: October 11, 2009, 01:46:37 PM »
Makes me angry just to read it. I'm still waiting for someone to invent an RFID finder/killer device and sell it to consumers. As far as I know no one has so far.