The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)

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Offline TheCaliKid

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The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« on: April 17, 2009, 05:07:35 PM »
As most of you are aware, a new grassroots movement is taking place across the entire United States. It has been referred to as the "New Tea Party Movement".

We need a strong visual presence at our rallies. Seeing these flags is a great moral booster, and these flags are all representative of successful movements!



These are the flags, standards, and banners of our movement:



The rattlesnake was a symbol of resistance to the British in Colonial America. The rattlesnake was a native snake of the American Colonies, and therefore provided an excellent symbol for the American Revolutionary movement. Many American's at the time thought that the rattlesnake, not the Eagle, should have been the national symbol of the Country.

A snake minds it's own business, and does not go looking for trouble. But once provoked, it will back down from a fight!




Benjamin Franklin's Join, or Die cartoon published in his Pennsylvania Gazette on May 9, 1754:




Join, or Die flag:




An illustration from an old school textbook, showing two examples of Revolutionary-era flags: 

^ The Pine Tree flag (Left), and Gadsden flag (Right).



Gadsden Flag (1775):

^  Designed by Patriot and Colonel Christopher Gadsden of South Carolina. This has since become one of the primary flags of the modern U.S. Patriot and Militia movement. Also referred to as the "Rattlesnake Flag".





Culpepper Flag (1775):

^ Used by the Culpeper Minutemen of Colonial America who had the slogan "Liberty or Death".



Standard of General Sullivan's Guard of the Rhode Island Militia:




Flag of the South Carolina Navy (1777):




First Navy Jack (1777):

^  One of the first flags flown by our U.S. Navy may have been an adaptation of the "Rebellious Stripes" created at the time of the Stamp Act Congress. It featured thirteen red and white stripes. Stretched across them was the rippling form of a rattlesnake, and the words, "DON'T TREAD ON ME"- a striking indication of the colonists' courage and fierce desire for independence.





Sons of Liberty flag used by American merchant ships during the war (1776 - 1783):

^ Note: other color's were used as well - such as green and white or yellow and white.


Nine stripe Sons of Liberty or "Rebellious Stripes" flag (1767):

^ This flag had nine uneven vertical stripes (five red and four white). It is supposed that nine represented the number of colonies that were to attend the Stamp Act Congress. It also represented the blood of American Patriots going into the ground.


A modern rendering, known as the U.S. Civil Flag:





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Other flags of the New Tea Party Movement:


Bennington Flag (late 1700's):

^ Note: Alternating white-red (from either the top or bottom) instead of the more traditional red-white.


Betsy Ross Flag (1776):







Pine Tree Flag (1775):

^ The Pine Tree Flag was one of the flags used during the American Revolution. The flag, featuring a pine tree flag with the motto "An Appeal to God," or, more usually, "An Appeal to Heaven." was used originally by a squadron of six cruisers commissioned under George Washington's authority as commander in chief of the Continental Army in October 1775. It was also used by Massachusetts' state navy vessels in addition to privateers sailing from Massachusetts.










The Fort Moultrie or Moultrie Flag (1775):

^ The Moultrie Flag was designed in 1775, and flew over Fort Moultrie (then Ft. Sullivan) in Charleston Harbour. This flag was shot away by the British in a battle in 1776. This was the flag of the South Carolina "Minute men.










Bunker Hill Flag (1775):

^ This blue variation of the red New England flag has become a symbol of the Battle of Bunker Hill, and was featured on a 1968 US Postage Stamp.



Commodore Perry Flag (1814):

^During the War of 1812, this flag flew aboard Oliver Hazard Perry's flagship "Lawrence" while commanding an American squadron in the Battle of Lake Erie on September 10, 1813. Perry had named his ship after Captain James Lawrence, the hero of an earlier sea battle off New England whose dying words were "Don't Give Up The Ship".



The Come And Take It or Gonzales Banner flag (1835):

^ "Come and take it" was a slogan used in the Texas Revolution in 1835. In March 1831, Juan Gomez, a Lieutenant in the Mexican Army, worked alongside Tadeo Ortiz, a consul at Bordeaux, France, and granted a small cannon to the colony of San Antonio. The small bronze cannon was received by the colony and signed for by Randy Tumlinson. It was then transported to Gonzales, Texas and later was the object of Texas pride. At the minor skirmish known as the Battle of Gonzales, a small group of Texans successfully resisted the Mexican forces who had orders to seize their cannon. As a symbol of defiance, the Texans had fashioned a flag containing the phrase along with a black star and an image of the cannon which they had received six years earlier from mexican officials.






An updated, modern version:




The Goliad Flag or Bloody-Arm Flag (1835):

^ Dimmit's Goliad Flag. This militant and defiant banner, designed by Goliad garrison commander, Capt. Phillip Dimmitt, dramatically reflected the political shift of Texians and Capt. Dimmitt away from support of the independent statehood of Texas in the Mexican Federalist Republic and return to the Constitution of 1824 to support of complete separation from Mexico as an independent Republic. Before he returned from the Siege and Battle of Bexar to Goliad in the middle of Dec 1835, Capt. Dimmitt was an avid Mexican Federalist and opposed to separation which was symbolized in the 1824 Mexican tri-color which is also thought to be of his own design. Dimmitt's bloody arm flag was said to have been raised ceremonially on Dec 20 upon the signing of the Goliad Declaration of Independence as the official flag of the occasion although the banners of companies of Capt. William S. Brown  and Capt. William Scott were also present at Goliad at the time.


^ The Goliad flag symbolized the Texans' willingness to face any sacrifice to win their freedom - they would rather cut off their own right arm, than serve under Mexican tyranny.



Brown's Flag of Independence (1835):

^ This flag is said to have been designed by Capt. William S. Brown at Velasco in fall 1835 preceding Capt. Dimmitt's bloody-arm flag with which it has been commonly confused since it employs the same symbol (see Origin of the Bloody Arm Symbol). Which came first is uncertain, but it is likely that one influenced the other. This banner may have been flown by Capt. Brown and his men at the Battle of Bexar and with him when he went to Goliad after the battle where he was a signer of the Goliad Declaration of Independence.



Troutman Flag or "The Betsy Ross of Texas" flag (1835):




^This flag was designed in Nov 1835 by Johanna Troutman, sometimes called the Betsy Ross of Texas. When the Georgia Battalion of Volunteers under Captain William Ward marched from Macon to Columbus, GA on their way to Texas in response to an appeal for aid for Texas by Col. Fannin, Miss Troutman (daughter of Col. C.A. Troutman of Knoxville, GA and later Mrs. Pope), presented the troop with the flag to carry with them. According to Mrs. Looscan, the banner was of white silk with an azure star on both sides.




* If any of you Prison Planet Forum members see any flags that I missed, or you think they should be on the list, let me know. However, since I will not be able to edit this post after 10 mins, a Moderator will have to be asked to add it in.


I would strongly encourage all people reading this to buy any one of these flags and fly it proudly at your next Tea Party. Below are a few links to online retails who offer these flags:


 Gadsden and Culpeper - An excellent source for the Gadsden flag and it's variants. Also sells T-shirts, bumper stickers, etc.


 Liberty Flags - Historic US outdoor flags.


 3x5 Flag Store - Cheap prices on polyester flags.



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Restore the Constitution! Restore the Republic!



Hail all Brother's & Sister's in all States!


Death to the NWO!

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Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2009, 02:28:37 AM »
I forgot this one, I have seen many people at rallies flying the American flag upside-down.


Nation in Distress:
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Offline Monkeypox

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2009, 02:45:33 AM »
I think the US Civil Flag should be the official flag of our movement.


War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

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Offline Southern Patriot

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #3 on: April 18, 2009, 02:50:06 AM »
Nice...That was a lot of pics....I like that you explained each one for those that may not know...Good post.

Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #4 on: April 18, 2009, 02:50:18 AM »
Me too.

The other flags are important as well, they are exhilarating to see waving in the wind, the spirit of REAL change is in the air.  
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Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #5 on: April 18, 2009, 02:53:30 AM »
Nice...That was a lot of pics....I like that you explained each one for those that may not know...Good post.

Thank you, Patriot. I felt that some education was in order, and some motivation!
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Offline Monkeypox

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War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2009, 03:01:52 AM »
I vote for the US Civil Flag.  Same colors and parts of the current flag, but
re-ordered in an inverse way.


It just looks right.
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2009, 03:05:08 AM »

U.S. Civil Flag:




The U.S. Coast Guard flies a very similar flag.


U.S. Coast Guard Ensign:



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Offline Monkeypox

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2009, 03:05:53 AM »
Agreed.  My gut tells me that's the one.
Besides, the others have a history.  The US Civil without the eagle but with stars
is new and is ready earn its reputation.


I'd love it on a t-shirt.

This site sells it on a sticker:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Oren_neu_dag/my_sandbox1/United_States_Civil_Flag
War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

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Offline Alchematron

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2009, 03:06:31 AM »

Offline Monkeypox

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2009, 03:10:58 AM »
http://www.biblebelievers.org.au/hornswog.htm

Have You Been Hornswoggled?


Which Flag is Which?

by Richard McDonald

The people of the United States actually have two national flags: one for our military government and another for the civil. Each one has fifty stars in its canton and thirteen red and white stripes, but there are several important differences.

Although most Americans think of the Stars and Stripes (above left) as their only flag, it is actually for military affairs only. The other one, meant by its makers for wider use (peacetime), has vertical stripes with blue stars on a white field (above right). You can see this design, which bears civil jurisdiction, in the U.S. Coast Guard and Customs flags, but their service insignias replace the fifty stars.

I first learned of the separate, civil flag when I was reading Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, published in 1850. The introduction, titled "The Custom House," includes this description:

From the loftiest point of its roof, during precisely three and a half hours of each forenoon, floats or droops, in breeze or calm, the banner of the republic; but with the thirteen stripes turned vertically, instead of horizontally, and thus indicating that a civil, and not a military post of Uncle Sam's government, is here established.

It took me two years of digging before I found a picture that matched what he was describing: my second clue was an original Illuminated History of North America (1860). If this runs against your beliefs, look up those two references.

History book publishers contribute to the public's miseducation by always picturing the flag in military settings, creating the impression that the one with horizontal stripes is the only one there is. They don't actually lie; they just tell half the truth. For example, the "first American flag" they show Betsy Ross sewing at George Washington's request, was for the Revolution - of course it was military.

The U.S. government hasn't flown the civil flag since the Civil War, as that war is still going on. Peace has never been declared, nor have hostilities against the people ended. The government is still operating under quasi-military rule.

You movie buffs may recall this: In the old Westerns, "Old Glory" has her stripes running sideways and a military yellow fringe. Most of these films are historically accurate about that; their stories usually took place in the territories still under military law and not yet states. Before WWII, no U.S. flag, civil or military, flew within the forty-eight states (except in federal settings); only state flags did. Since then, the U.S. government seems to have decided the supposedly sovereign states are its territories too, so it asserts its military power over them under the "law of the flag."

Today the U.S. military flag appears alongside, or in place of, the state flags in nearly all locations within the states. All of the state courts and even the municipal ones now openly display it. This should have raised serious questions from many citizens long ago, but we've been educated to listen and believe what we are told, not to ask questions, or think or search for the truth.

War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2009, 03:13:17 AM »
Better to beg for forgiveness, than to ask for permission

Offline Monkeypox

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War Is Peace - Freedom Is Slavery - Ignorance Is Strength


"Educate and inform the whole mass of the people... They are the only sure reliance for the preservation of our liberty."

—Thomas Jefferson

Offline KoWBoY

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2009, 01:25:01 PM »
Thanks for the flags and the information DawnIsMyGoddess.
Placement is Key.
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Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2009, 02:07:15 AM »
You are welcome, KoWBoY. I am glad that you enjoyed it.

I will posting pictures of these flags flying at rallies as time goes by. We can all use some visual inspiration, IMHO.
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Offline a ReVoLuTIONarY ideA

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2009, 04:39:50 AM »
I'm pretty sure that the Betsy Ross flag was not introduced until the War of 1812.

Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2009, 06:00:12 PM »
I'm pretty sure that the Betsy Ross flag was not introduced until the War of 1812.

Well, according to what I could find online:

"According to the legend, the original Betsy Ross flag was made in 1776, when a small committee including George Washington and George Ross, a relative, visited Betsy and discussed the need for a new American flag."


"The flag was in use by 1777. Alfred B. Street described it at the surrender of General Burgoyne and understood the circle of stars to represent equality among the American states."


This 1779 portrait of George Washington by painter Charles Willson Peale features a flag with 13-stars arranged in a circle (upper right):



I think the evidence is pretty clear that it was in use before 1812.
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Offline a ReVoLuTIONarY ideA

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #18 on: April 21, 2009, 03:34:36 AM »
How about a flag with a picture of a huge penis.  Below the penis it would say, "We are gonna f**k you up!"



Hopefully, everyone here is down to earth and not offended by this...it's all in good fun.

Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2009, 09:52:29 PM »

This sweet variation of the classic Gadsden flag, was spotted at the John & Ken anti-tax rally in Corona, California last Saturday.


Gadsden flag variation:
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Offline TheCaliKid

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Re: The Flags of Our Movement (many pictures)
« Reply #20 on: May 19, 2009, 01:10:02 AM »
Here is yet another Gadsden variation. There is no grass under the snake, and it is colored a reddish-brown.



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